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Hispanic link weekly report, December 30, 1985

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 30, 1985
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Making The News This Week
Jesse Hernandez of San Leandro, Calif., is nominated for the rank of Rear Admiral by the U.S. Navy. Senate confirmation is required... Irenemaree Castillo resigns, effective Jan. 15, as Region IX administrator for the Small Business Administration. Region IX covers California, Nevada, Arizona and Hawaii... Roland Alvarado resigns as White House special assistant to the president for intergovernmental affairs (and liaison between Puerto Rico and President Reagan) to return to California to run the state Senate campaign of Sandra Smoley, his former boss as Sacramento County Supervisor... Los Angeles attorney Armando Dur6n is elected ’86 president of the Mexican American Bar Association, with Gustavo
Bai
voSd president-elect for 1987. . . Mexico scientist Dr. Arturo G6mez-Pompa is named director of the University of California MEXUS program, a UC-Riverside-based consortium which coordinates research and exchange programs between the U.S. and Mexico... Linda Wong, with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund since 1981, becomes its associate counsel for the Los Angeles office... Former MALDEF staffer Maria Scuros joins the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Washington, D.C., as national citizenship project coordinator... San Antonio City Councilwoman Maria Berriozabal is added to the Board of Directors of the National League of Cities... Named as chair of the American Bar Association’s Committee on the Involvement of Women and Minorities of the Section of Corporation, Banking and Business Law is Fe Morales Marks of Washington, D.C______
vqI3mov52(Q) HISPANIC LINKWEEKLYREP5RT (UK*1’**
EEOC to Look at State Job Licensing Boards
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will hold hearings in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and Washington, D.C. in 1986 to determine if state and local requirements are barring Hispanics and other minorities from certain jobs and professions which generate about 10% of the gross national income.
The hearings, scheduled for two days in each city during August or September, will examine all job licensing requirements such as written tests, age, minimum education and
licensing fees.
These regulations are established by state, and, in some instances, local boards or agencies, usually composed of individuals within the field, to assure competency in professional or service-oriented jobs. However, a tendency to stricter or non-job-related requirements has barred entry of low income or minority persons in these jobs, critics claim.
State regulated jobs range widely from professional occupations such as lawyers, accountants and physicians, to more skilled
or semi-skilled jobs such as taxi drivers, plumbers and beauticians.
The Commission will be taking written and oral testimony from persons who may have had problems with state or local government requirements for professional or trade entry. At present, district offices in the four cities are conducting research that will serve as a base for the hearings.
It is the first time EEOC has looked at the regulations of these jobs and professions, which have increased from approximately
800 in 1970 to 988 in 1980.
A review of the 1980 Census shows that Hispanic representation in licensed professions and jobs is minimal. For example, in Los Angeles, 27.6% Hispanic, only 3.7% of the lawyers and 4.6% of the physicians were Hispanics. In New York, 17.6% Hispanic, only 5.6% of the elementary school teachers and 5.2% of the registered nurses were Hispanics. Chicago, 8.1 % Hispanic, had a better proportion of Hispanic doctors, 5.7%, but not many psychologists (1.9%), nurses (2.1%), elementary school teachers (2.4%) ortradespersons like electricians and plumbers (4.4% and 4.5%).
One cited roadblock confronting Hispanics is the lack of accreditation of their schools of origia Henrietta Villaescusa, president of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses, said foreign nurses must take additional nursing courses, aside from an examination, before they can work in the United States.
“I have worked in Panama where they have a very good university program and I simply
continued on page 2
HISPANIC PARTICIPATION IN LICENSED PROFESSIONS AND TRADES
Los Angeles 27.6% New York 17.6% Chicago 8.1%
Profession/Trade Total Hispanic % of Total Hispanic % of Total Hispanic % of
workers workers Hisps. workers workers Hisps. workers workers Hisps.
Lawyers 24,506 901 3.7% 41,668 805 1.9% 23,481 222 0.9%
Physicians 19,755 901 4.6% 31,321 1,664 5.3% 18,351 1,047 5.7%
Registered nurses 40,506 2,981 7.4% 61,952 3,191 5.2% 48,265 1,031 2.1%
Barbers 3,168 1,132 35.7% 3,918 531 13.6% 3,208 245 7.6%
Hairdressers/ 20,840 4,486 21.5% 19,268 3,508 18.2% 15,383 808 5.3%
Cosmetologists Electricians 15,015 2,904 19.3% 16,886 1,811 10.7% 19,615 854 4.4%
Plumbers 13,334 2,811 21.1% 12,617 1,395 11.1% 13,189 591 4.5%
Psychologists 4,404 223 5.1% 8,066 376 4.7% 3,426 66 1.9%
Teachers (elem.) 62,998 6,380 10.1% 82,308 4,576 5.6% 70,742 1,715 2,4%
Source; 1980 United States Census. - Hispanic Link Weekly Report chart
Alatorre to Direct L.A. Remap Effort
Newly-elected Los Angeles Councilman Richard Alatorre was appointed Dec. 17 by Council President Pat Russell as chairman of the body’s reappointment committee.
As such, he will be responsible, with two other new committee appointees, Mike Woo and Hal Bernson, for reviewing the city’s 1982 reapportionment plan and developing a new one acceptable to his new colleagues and the U.S. Department of Justice.
The Justice Department filed a lawsuit Nov. 26 against the city, charging that the Council gerrymandered its30% Latino population to minimize the impact of Hispanic voters.
Until Alatorre won a special election Dec. 10 for a seat held 18 years by Arthur Snyder, no Hispanics had served .on the 15-member Council for two decades. Snyder’s district was 75% Latino.
The‘82 plan split Hispanic population concentrations in such a way that six other districts
had between 32% and 41 % Latinos, with the balance ranging from 7% to 27%. The districts average 197,000 people.
Neither Alatorre nor Woo served on the Council when the ‘82 lines were established. Alatorre, in fact, was serving as chair of the California Assembles reapportionment committee, which was instrumental in creating congressional districts where two Chicanos, Matthew Martinez and Esteban Torres, were elected to Congress for the first time.
Alatorre has criticized the federal suit -which ignored the Republican-controlled, all-white-male County Board of Supervisors- as politically motivated to embarrass fellow Democrat Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley. In spite of community pleas at the time, Bradley failed to veto the city remap plan.
Alatorre has also been critical, as far back as 1972, of Los Angeles Council members’ actions to divide Latinos so they wouldn’t be a threat to incumbents.


Sin pelos en la lengua
OUT WITH THE OLD YEAR: And with it, our nominations for
THE YEAR’S MEANEST THIEF: After parishioners worked late into the night beating the masa, soaking the hojas, cooking, spreading, filling, folding and tying 840 tamales at San Antonio’s El Golgota church shortly before Christmas, with hopes to sell them to raise money for a new church building, some baddies broke in and hauled away every last tamale.
THE YEAR’S MOST PROSPEROUS UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS: Jos6 Caballero, 24, from Mexico and Julio Morales, 23, from Guatemala Julio, living in Hollywood, hit the $2 million jackpot in California’s lottery this month just a few weeks after Jose, living in San Jose, did it.
The notoriety brought both to the attention of la migra, but at least they aren’t going home empty-handed. Who says our streets aren’t paved with gold.
TH E YEAR’S N ASTI ESTINSU LT: New York City Mayor Ed Koch wins the prize, for the line in his book, “Politics,” about ex-Congressman and former Deputy Mayor Herman Badillo. Koch claimed that Badillo is regarded by NYC's puertorriquehos as an arrogant man who “left them when he moved from the barrio, that he married two
Jewish women, that he’s no more Puerto Rican than I am.”
THE YEAR’S LEAST ORIGINAL REJOINDER: Badillo’s response that Koch was“a petty racialist who fans the flames of racism.” Maybe so, but you have to come up with something flashier than that if you want to stay in a conversation with Mayor Ed.
THE YEAR’S MELLOWEST COPS: The San Juan, Puerto Rico, sting team that used asaltos navidehos to round up 52 robbery and petty crime suspects in pre-Christmas raids.
In early morning visits, they serenaded suspects all over town with guitars and tambourines, demanding - according to tradition-to be let in and fed. When the bad guys opened their doors, la poli showed them their badges and search warrants, too.
It may not be entrapment but isn’t it at least sacrilegious?
THE YEAR’S NICEST GUY: Raul Jimenez, the Texas businessman who brightened up the lives of 15,000 elderly and needy persons in San Antonio on Thanksgiving Day, providing every one of them not only with the traditional meal, but entertainment by Lucia Villa and half a dozen other international recording stars.
Jimenez has been doing it in San Antonio for six years.
For this year’s encore, Mayor Henry Cisneros slipped into a charro outfit to join Villa in a rendition of El hijo del pueblo.
- Kay Bueno
Licensing Board Hearings Planned
Velasquez Sets Record
Jockey Jorge Velasquez set the record for stakes winners ridden in one year Dec. 22 when his mount, Love That Mac, won the $68,100 Gravesend Handicap at New York’s Aqueduct race track.
With his 55th stakes-winning ride of the year, the 38-year-old Panamanian surpassed the mark set last year by Chris McCarron.
In 1983, Velasquez became tne fifth jockey in U.S. racing history to ride more than 5,000 winners. He joined Angel Cordero Jr., Willie Shoemaker, Laffit Pincay and Johnny Longden.
N.Y. Runoffs Ruled Valid
A federal appeals court in Manhattan, N.Y., upheld Dec. 13 the validity of a state law which provides for primary runoff elections in citywide elections, striking down an earlier federal court decision that said the law diluted minority voting strength in the city.
In ruling 2-1, the court said the primary-runoff law does not deny minority voters “an equal opportunity to participate in the political process”
Digna Sanchez, a Hispanic activist from Manhattan and founding member of Aspira, and the Rev. Calvin Butts III, pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem, claimed the law unconstitutionally discriminated against minority candidates Federal District Court Judge Charles Brieant struck down the law Aug. 13.
The law states that when a candidate does not receive at least 40% of the vote in a field of three or more in races for mayor, City Council president or city comptroller, a second election between the top two vote-getters is held. The earlier ruling by Brieant said candidates could be elected by gaining a plurality in the primary.
Chang-Diaz Date Reset
Space shuttle Columbia, carrying the first U.S. Hispanic astronaut, Costa Rica-born physicist Franklin Chang-Diaz, is now scheduled to be launched Jan. 6 from Cape Canaveral, Fla. The flight, originally set for Dec. 19, was postponed due to an engine malfunction.
THE GOOD NEWS will return next week.
continued from page 1
don’t think that nurses from there need additional schooling to work here,” said Villaescusa, who added that the problem is common to all Latin American nurses.
At first scheduled for March, the hearings were postponed at the request of the district offices which wanted more time to develop lists and background information on the most problematic job licensing requirements.
Clint Bolick, EEOC project assistant, said that if the Commission finds that some of the licensure requirements are consistently barring minorities from these jobs, they would be legally challenged under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. EEOC enforces Title VII, which prohibits employment discrimination on the account of race, color, religion, sex and national origin.
In the past, licensing requirements have resisted legal attack through federal antitrust laws. For the most part, these laws have succeeded in eliminating restrictions on advertising and competitive bidding for accountants, physicians and engineers, but have not dealt with requirements prior to licensure.
While the applicability of Title VII may be questioned because state boards cannot be considered as employers, EEOC attorneys contend that one section provides“a broader base in which to attack employment discrimination as long as there is evidence of a pattern of discrimination.”
Quinones Pact Renewed
In what he termed “an expression of confidence,” New York City Board of Education President James Regan Dec. 18 announced the renewal of Chancellor Nathan Quinones’ contract through June 1987.
Regan praised Quinones, whom the Board selected to head the nation’s largest school district in May 1984 following the resignation of Anthony Alvarado, as a “quiet man of substance and quality’’ who introduced effective programs for improving student achievement in the system.
Quinones, 55, is a former language teacher, high school principal and district administrator.
Commissioner Tony Gallegos, one of two Hispanics on the five-member commission, said he expects to find significant problems for Hispanics in present licensing policies or procedures, particularly with respect to language He said that he will conduct independent research in areas of high Hispanic population concentration not included as hearings sites and bring the results to the more nationally focused Washington, D.C. hearings.
Other identified concerns were:
• English language testing of beauticians in New England. According to EEQC New York district director Edward Mercado, the New York examination, now offered in Spanish, excluded almost all Puerto Rican and Latin American beauticians in years past.
• The $75,000 market price for taxi licenses in New York. No new licenses have been issued since the 1930s. Licenses are trans-fered among acquaintances and relatives preserving the white predominance among city cabbies, according to a recent study.
• The Florida State Department of Business and Professional Regulation, a licensing agency, required English written exams forall manicurists, shampooers and pedicurists, refusing to provide translations “unless advised of legislative intent” Some 1,500 manicurists were identified as unable to take the English-only examinations.
• Also in Florida, the Interamerican Physicians Association, a group of Latin American doctors organized around the issue, is protesting in the state legislature about a different exam and grading for physicians who come from abroad.
• The experience of minority beauticians in Chicago, who pass the practical examination at the same rate as non- minorities, but fail the written portion at a rate four times greater.
- Dora Delgado
Gallegos Seeks Information
EEOC Commissioner Tony Gallegos is collecting information on cases or statistics that reflect an unfavorable impact on Hispanics by job licensing agencies.
He may be contacted at EEOC, 2401, E St. NW, Suite 516, Washington, D.C. 20507 (202) 634-6720.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D C 20005. Phone (202) 234*0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m (ET) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: S35 per column inch.
ATTORNEY
National civil rights organization seeks Associate Counsel in Chicago to manage office and supervise litigation. Requirements: 5 years litigation experience including trial work and civil rights law, management experience knowledge of Midwest community, bilingual (English/Spanish) highly preferred. Send resume with references to: Ms. A. Hernandez, MALDEF. 634 S. Spring St.. 11 th floor. Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 1/4/86. Available 2/18/86.
PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MARYLAND, government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
GLOMB, HANTEN & BACA LAW FIRM: Immigration-civil litigation - commercial law-employment law - federal agency practice. 1815 H St. NW. Suite 1000, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 466-2250.
CORPORATIONS & NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS: Established Washington Hispanic firm is ready to assist you with your training, ADP Services, Research & Evaluation, Management Consulting, and reoresentation needs. For information or employment opportunities, contact Business Informations ServicesCorp.. 2025 I St. NW. Suite 1115, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-6100.
PUT A STAR fN YOUR FUTURE-BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL
STARTING SALARIES: GS-5, $14,390 or GS-7, $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications)
From Feb. 10 through Feb. 21, 1986, the U.S. Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U.S. Marshal positions in the Federal government.
The United States Marshals Service is the nation’s oldest Federal law enforcement agency. Since 1789, U.S. Marshals have served the Executive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vitalMaw enforcement activities: m „
• Protection of judges, officials and witnesses
• Apprehension of fugitives • Execution of court orders
• Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUP- The Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance. Membership is selective, part-time and voluntary. Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training. LOCATION OF POSITIONS - Deputy U.S. Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U.S. Marshals Service, which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations.
TO QUALIFY YOU MUST:
• Be a U.S. citizen
• Possess a valid driver's license
• Establish an eligible rating on the written examination
• Havea bachelor's degree or3 yearsof responsible experience, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Qualifying experience is administrative, professional, investigative, or other responsible work. There are additional education/experience requirements for the GS-7 grade level.)
• Be at least 21 years old
• Meet certain medical requirements and undergo a background and character investigation
AGE LIMITATION - Under Public Law 93-350, the maximum age for original entry into Deputy U.S. Marshal positions is the day immediately preceding one’$35th birthday; however, this limitation may be waived in some cases.
TRAINING - All new Deputies are required to complete a six-month basic training program consisting of approximately 3 months at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center(FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia, and 3 months of on-the-job training. At the end of the 6 months, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for GS-7.
HOWTO APPLY: Contact your local Federal Job Information/Testing Center, listed under U.S. Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb. 10, 1986, for more information and an application for the test.
The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is actively recruiting Women and Minority Applicants.

Calendar
Following is a listing of major conferences, con-! ventions, seminars and banquets by Hispanic It /organizations for 1986. The listing includes the
CHICANO FEDERATION DINNER
San Diego March 21
Jose Muftiz (619) 236-1228
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL
EDUCATION
Chicago April 1-5
Alfredo de los Santos (602) 244-8355 MEXICAN AMERICAN ENGINEERING SOCIETY
LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS Las Vegas, Nev. July 9-13 Robert Rivas (702) 322-1047
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA
Los Angeles July 13-16
Marialba Martinez (202) 628-9600 Ext 116
AMERICAN Gl FORUM San Jose, Calif. Aug. 5-10 Ed Bernaldez (915) 772-1442
NATIONAL COALITION OF HISPANIC MENTAL
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ORGANIZATIONS
New York Sept. 4-7
Linda Neal (202) 371-2100
CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE
DINNER
Washington, D.C. Sept. 16
Sarah Salvide (202) 543-1771
U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Denver Sept. 17-21
Sherri Hill (816) 842-2228
MIDWEST VOTER REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT
Chicago Oct. 10-12 i
Maria Elena Molina (614) 464-^16 NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF PUERTO RICAN WOMEN
Albany, N.Y. Oct. 17-19 Alicia Baro (305) 661-1550.
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION New York Nov. 10-12 Mara Patermaster (703) 684-0020 NATIONAL HISPANIC UNIVERSITY Los Angeles Nov. 30-Dec. 3 Elvia Mendoza (415) 451-0511
name and telephone of a contact person.

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Arts & Entertainment
THIS WEEK WE CONTINUE HIGHLIGHTS OF MAJOR contributions in 1985 by Hispanic actors and entertainers:
TELEVISION: Although the 1985-86 fall TV season began with fewer Hispanic actors in lead and regular roles than in 1984-85, Latinos began late in the year to have a strong impact in the nighttime soap opera genre. Apollonia and Cesar Romero were added to the cast of Falcon Crest (joining Lorenzo Lamas and Ana Alicia) and Ricardo Montalban joined the cast of the Dynasty spinoff, The Colbys of California.
One of the year's most popular TV actors was Martin Sheen, who played the father of a homosexual man in Consenting Adults and a retired policeman in The Atlanta Child Murders Sheen began working on his directorial debut this year - a TV movie about teenage pregnancy - introducing his daughter Renee Estevez as the lead.
Hispanic actors, Sheen among them, were nominated for a few TV acting awards. In September, Edward James Olmos was voted “Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series” by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his role as Lieutenant Castillo on the hit show Miami Vice. Sheen, Jose Perez and Trinidad Silva were nominated in December for cable television ACE awards for appearances
on The Guardian, Steambath and Maximum Security, respectively.
No other television presentation in 1985 gathered as much Hispanic talent as the historic, 16-hour telethon aired on Sept. 29 by the Spanish International Network to raise funds for the victims of two August earthquakes in Mexico. Live segments of the telethon originated in Argentina, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and SIN stations in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Antonio. The telethon, seen in 22 countries, raised over $5 million.
The Mexico estamos contigo efforts were repeated later in the year when tragedy struck in Puerto Rico and Colombia. Again, international artists gathered in television studios around the world to collect emergency monies.
THEATER: To help small Hispanic theater companies share resources and establish a touring circuit a group of Hispanic theater professionals gathered in San Antonio this year to begin plans for a 1986 National Conference of Hispanic Theaters.
Latinos did well on stage- even outside the Hispanic houses. Rita Moreno and Lucie Arnaz toured with hit shows- The Odd Couple and My One and Only, respectively- and director Jose Quintero returned to the stage in August with a revival of Eugene O’NeilPs classic The Iceman Cometh, which he opened on Broadway in 1956.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HURRICANE READINESS: The year's succession of hurricanes were covered with adequate warnings for Spanish speakers in most of the Southeast journalists there reported.
But a survey of Boston area media responses to the approach of Hurricane Gloria in late September revealed a serious lack of concern by establishment media for Greater Boston’s 150,000 Spanish speakers.
The weekly bilingual La Semana quoted Dalia Diaz St Marie, president of the Association of Latin Americans in Communications, which is based in Boston, that the city’s major radio and television stations were unwilling to broadcast more than cursory information and warnings in Spanish.
As the hurricane approached, a team of Hispanics spent 36 hours attempting to alert and prepare their communities, offering their services to the stations for translation.
Among the media’s best reported responses were a one-time bulletin in Spanish read by
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234*0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Carlos Morales
Reporting: Dora Delgado, F6lix Perez, Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CONFERENCE COORDINATORS: Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants’ packets at your next conference or convention. Fordetails, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza (202) 234-0737.
a secretary at one station and a Spanish-language“crawl” under spoken English information at another.
Diaz St. Marie, who hosts the De todo un poco public affairs program at Channel 56, reported that the news department at her own station hung up on her and the news director declined to return her calls.
Mayor's aide Carmen Pola called the lack of sensitivity “devastating.” If the hurricane had hit with its predicted force, she told La Semana reporter Lawrence Thomases, “it would have found our community completely unprepared.”
CUTTING BLADES: I n Washington, D.C., the year closed with another bilingual community weekly, Latino, addressing a strong open letter to singer Rub6n Blades for what it termed an indifferent attitude and performance as the well-paid star of its second annual Thanksgiving gala at the Capital Hilton Nov. 27.
Latino accused the crossover singer of demeaning those in attendance, including those being honored as the community’s outstanding contributors, as second-class citizens from the moment of his last-minute
arrival.
Questions it raised: Why does Blades, who dresses up so properly to appear on the Johnny Carson show, dress like a bum for a performance in the Hispanic community? Why does he grant an interview to the Washington Post but declines one - sought months in advance - by Latino, his host?
"A/o eres mas que otro Julio Iglesias,” -You’re no more than another Julio Iglesias- it provides the ultimate cut.
BURGER SURPRISE: A two-year campaign by Spanish International Network’s Channel 23 in Miami to get Burger King to advertise on Spanish-language television there has succeeded - but not quite like the station hoped, according to Miami Herald TV columnist Laurie Baum.
To gain attention from the nation’s No. 2 fast food chain, Channel 23 used a hard-sell, including a mobile billboard in front of the chairfs headquarters* with such unsubtle messages as “Burger King, 900,000 Latins have a beef with you.”
The result Burger King began running $100,000 in Spanish commercials, spread over six weeks, this month-on Channel51, the SIN station’s; competitor. - Charlie Ericksen \
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PAGE 1

Making The News This Week 1 Jesse Hernandez of San Leandro, Calif . , is nominated for the rank of Rear Admiral by the U .S. Navy : Senate confirmation is required . . . lrenemaree Castillo resigns , effective 15, as Region IX admin istrator for the Small Business Administration. Region IX covers California, Nevada , Arizona and Hawaii ... Roland Alvarado resigns as White House special assistant to the president for inter governmental affairs (and liaison between Puerto Rico and President Reagan) to return to California to run the state Senate campaign of Sandra Smoley, his former boss as Sacramento County Supervisor ... Los Angeles attorney Armando Dur6n is elected '86 president of the Mexican American Bar Association , with Gustavo for 1987. . . Mexico scientist Dr. Arturo G6mez-Pompa is named director of the University of California MEXUS program, a UC-Riverside-based consortium which coordi n ates research and exchange programs between the U .S. and M ex ico . . . Linda Wong, with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Edu c ational Fund since 1981 , becomes its associate counsel for the Los Ang e les office ... Former MALDEF staffer Maria Scuros joins the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Washingt on, D.C., as national citizenship project coordinator ... San Antonio City Councilwoman Maria Berriozabal is added t o the Board of Dire ctors of the National League of C i ties . . . Named as chair of the American Bar Association's Committee on the Involvement of Women and Minorities of the Section of Corporation, Banking and Business Law is Fe Morales Marks of Washington, D . C .... Voi.3Nov.s•l HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Dec. 30, 1985 EEOC to Look at State Job Licensing B oards The U .S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will hold hearings in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York and Washington, D . C . in 1986 to determine if state and local requirements are barring Hispanics and other minorities from certain jobs and professions which generate about 1 Oo/o of the gross national income. The hearings, scheduled for two days in each city during August or September, will examine all job licensing requirements such as written tests, age, minimum education and licensing fees. These regulations are established by state, and, in some instances, local boards or agencies, usually composed of individuals within the field, to assure competency in professional or service-oriented jobs. However, a tendency to stricter or non-job-related requirements has barred entry of low income or minority persons in these jobs, critics claim . State regulated jobs range widely from professional occupations such as lawyers, accountants and physicians , to more skilled or jobs suc h as t ax i drivers, p lumbers and beauticians. The Commission will b e taking writte n and oral testimony from p e rsons who may have had problems with state or local government requirements for professional or trade entry . At present, district offices i n the fou r c it ie s are conducting res earc h that will s e rve a s a base for the hearings. Alatorre to Direct L.A. Remap Effort It is the first time EEOC has looked at the regulations of these jobs and professions, which have increased from appr o ximately 800 in 1970 to 988 in 1980. A review of the 1980 Census shows that Hispanic representation in licensed professions and jobs is minimal. For example, i n Los Angeles, 27. 6% Hispanic, only 3 . 7 % of the lawyers and 4 . 6% of the physicians were Hispanics . In New York, 17 . 6% Hispanic, only 5 . 6% of the elementary school teachers and 5.2% of the registered nurses were Hispanics . Chicago , 8 . 1 o/o Hispanic , had a better proportion of Hispanic doctors, 5 . 7%, but not many psychologists (1.9%), nurses (2. 1 o/o), elemefitary school teachers (2.4%) or tradespersons like electricians and plumbers (4.4% and 4 . 5 % ) . Newly-elected Los Angeles Councilman Richard Alatorre was appointed Dec. 17 by Council President Pat Russell as chairman of the body's reappointment committee. As such, he will be responsible, with two other new committee appointees, Mike Woo and Hal Bernson, for reviewing the city's 1982 reapportionment plan and developing a new one acceptable to his new colleagues and the U .S. Department of Justice. The Justice Department filed a lawsuit Nov. 26 against the city, charging that the Council gerrymandered its30o/o Latino population to minimize the impact of Hispanic voters. Until Alatorre won a special election Dec. 10 for a seat held 18 years by Arthur Snyder, no Hispanics had served . on the 15-member Council for two decades. Snyder's district was 75o/o Latino. The '82 plan split Hispanic population con centrati ons in such a way that six other districts had between 32o/o and 41 o/o Latinos, with the balance ranging from 7o/o to 27% . The districts average 197,000 people. Neither Alatorre nor Woo served on the Council when the '82 lines were established. Alatorre, in fact, was serving as chair of the California Assembly's reapportionment com mittee, which was instrumental in creating congressional districts where two Chicanos, Matthew Martinez and Esteban Torres, were elected to Congress for the first time. Alatorre has criticized the federal suit -which ignored the Republican-controlled, all white-male County Board of Supervisors-as politically motivated to embarrass fellow Democrat Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley. In spite of community pleas at the time, Bradley failed to veto the city remap plan . Alatorre has also been critical, as far back as 1972, of Los Angeles Council members' actions to divide Latinos so they wouldn' t be a threat to incumbents. One cited roadblock confronting His panics is the lack of accreditation of their schools of origin . Henrietta Villaescusa, president of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses , said foreign nurses must take additional nursi ng courses, aside from an examination, before they can work in the United States. "I have worked in Panama where t he y have a very good university program and I simply con ti nu ed o n page 2 HISPANIC PARTICIPATION IN LICENSED PROFESSIONS AND TR ADES Los Angeles 27.6% New York 17.6% Chicag o 8.1 /o Profession/Trade Total Hispanic % of Total Hispanic % of Total Hisp anic % of workers workers Hisps . workers workers Hisps. workers workers /-lisps. Lawyers 24,506 901 3.7% 41,668 805 1.9% 23,481 222 0.9% Physicians 19,755 901 4.6% 31, 321 1,664 5.3% 18,351 1,047 5 .7% Registered nurses 40,506 2,981 7.4% 61,952 3,191 5.2% 48,265 1 , 031 2 .1% Barbers 3 ,168 1,132 35.7% 3,918 531 13.6% 3,208 245 7.6% Hairdressers/ 20,840 4,486 21.5% 19,268 3,508 18.2% 15,383 808 5.3 % Cosmetologists Electricians 15,015 2 ,904 19.3% 16,886 1,811 10.7% 19,615 854 4.4% Plumbers 13,334 2 , 811 21.1% 12,617 1,395 11.1% 13,189 591 4 . 5 % Psychologists 4,404 223 5.1% 8,066 376 4.7% 3,426 66 1.9% Teachers (elem.) 62,998 6 ,380 10.1% 82,308 4,576 5.6% 70,142 1 ,715 2.4% Source; 1980 United States Census. Hispanic Link Weekly Report c hart

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Sin pelos en Ia lengua Jewish women, that he's no more Puerto Rican than I am . " OUT WITH THE OLD YEAR: And with it , our nominations for: THE YEAR'S MEANEST THIEF: After parishioners worked late into the night beating the masa, soaking the hojas, cooking , spreading, f i lling , foldmg and tymg 840 tamales at San Antonio' s El Golgota church shortly before Christmas, with hopes to sell them to raise money for a new church builtling, some baddies broke in and hauled away every last tamale . THE YEAR'S LEAST ORIGINAL REJOINDER: Badillo ' s response that Koc;h was " a petty rac ialist who fans the flames of racism." Maybe so, but you have to come up with something flashier than that i f you want to stay in a conversation with Mayor Ed . THE YEAR ' S MELLOWEST COPS: The San Juan, Puerto Rico, sting team that used asaltos navideflos to round up 52 robbery and petty crime suspects in pre-Chr i stmas raids . THEYEAR'SMOSTPROSPEROUSUNDOCUMENTEDWORKERS: In early morning visits , they serenaded suspects all over town with guitars and tambourines, demanding-according to tradition-to be let in and fed . When the bad guys opened their doors, /a poli showed them their badges and search warrants, too. Jose Caballero, 24, from Mexico and Julio Morales, 23, from Guatemala. Julio, living in Hollywood. hit the $2 million jackpot in California' s lottery this month just a few weeks after Jose, living in San Jose, did it. It may not be entrapment but isn't it at least sacri legious? The notoriety brought both to the attention of Ia migra, but at least they aren ' t going home empty-handed. Who says our streets aren ' t pav&d with gold. THE YEAR'S NASTIEST INSULT: NewYorkCityMayor Ed Koch wms the prize, for the line in his book, " Politics, " about ex Congressman and former Deputy Mayor Herman Badillo . Koch claimed that Badillo is regarded by NYC ' s puertorriquenos as an arrogant man who "left them when he mo ved from the barrio , that he married two THE YEAR'S NICEST GUY: Raul Jimenez, the Texas businessman who brightened up the lives of 15,000 elderly and needy persons in San Antonio on Thanksgiv i ng Day , providing every one of them not only with the traditional meal , but entertainment by Lucia Villa and half a dozen other international recording stars. Jimenez has been doing it in San Antonio for six years . For this year's encore, Mayor Henry Cisneros slipped into a charro outfit to join Villa in a rendition of El hijo del pueblo. -Kay Bueno Velasquez sets Record Licensing Board Hearings Planned . Jockey Jorge Velasquez set the record for stakes winners ridden i n one year Dec . 22 when his mount, Love That Mac, won the $68,100 Gravesend Handicap at New York's Aqueduct race track. With his 55th stakes-winning ride of the year, the 38-year-old Panamanian surpassed the mark set last year by Chris McCarron . In 1983, Velasquez became tne fifth jockey i n U . S . racing history to ride more than 5,000 winners. He joined Angel Cordero Jr. , Willie Shoemaker, Laff i t P incay and Johnny Longden. N.Y. Runoffs Ruled Valid A federal appea l s court in Manhattan , N . Y . , upheld Dec . 13 the validity of a state law which provides for primary runoff elect i ons i n citywide elections, striking down an earlier federal court decision that said the law diluted minor i ty voting strength in the city . In ruling 2-1, the court said the primary-runoff law does not deny minority voters " an equal opportunity to participate in the political process " Digna Sanchez, a Hispan i c activist from Manhattan and founding merTlber of Aspira , and the Rev. Calvin Butts Ill , pastor of the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem , claimed the law constitutionally discrim i nated against minority candidates. Federal District Court Judge Charles Brieant struck down the law Aug . 13. The law states that when a candidate does not receive at least 40% of the vote in a field of three or more in races for mayor , City Council president or city comptroller , a second ele ct ion between the top two vote-getters is held. The earl i er ruling by Brieant said cand i dates could be elected by gaining a plurality in the primary . Chang-Diaz Date Reset Space shuttle Columbia, carrying the first U . S . Hispanic astronaut, Costa Rica born physicist Franklin Chang-Diaz, is now scheduled to be launched Jan. 6 from Cape Canaveral , Fla . The flight, originally set for Dec. 19, was postponed due to an engine malfunction. THE GOOD NEWS will return next week. 2 c o nl i nued f r o m page 1 don ' t think that nurses from there need additional schooling to work here," said Villaescusa, who added that the problem is common to all Latin American nu r ses. At first scheduled for March , the hear i ngs were postponed at the request of the district offices which wanted more time to develop lists and background information on the most problematic job licensing requirements. Clint Bolick, EEOC project assistant, said that if the Commission finds that some of the licensure requirements are cons i stently barring minorities from these jobs, they would be legally challenged under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. EEOC enforces Title VII , which prohibits employment discrimination on the account of race , color, religion , sex and national origin . In the past , licensing requirements have resisted legal attack through federal antitrust laws. For the most part , these laws have succeeded in eliminating rest rictions on advertising and competi tive bidding for accountants, physicians and engineers, but have not dealt with requirements p r ior to licensure. While the applicability of Title VII may be questioned because state boards cannot be considered as employers , EEOC attorneys contend that one section provides "a broader base in which to attack employment dis crimination as long as there is evidence of a pattern of discrimination. " Quinones Pact Renewed In what he termed " an of con fidence, " New York City Board of Education President James Regan Dec. 18 announced the renewal of Chancellor Nathan Quinones' contract through June 1987. Regan praised Quinones, whom the Board selected to head the nation's largest school d istrict in May 1984 following the resignation of Anthony Alvarado, as a "quiet man of substance and quality " who introduced effective programs for improving student achievement in the system . Quinones, 55, is a former language teacher , high school principal and district administrator . Comm issioner Tony Gallegos, one of two Hispanics on the five-member commission, said he expects to find significant problems for Hispan ics in present licensi ng policies or procedures, particularly with respect to language . He said that he will conduct independent research in areas of high Hispanic population concentration not included as hearings sites and bring the results to the more nationally focused Washington, D.C. hearings. Other identified concerns were: • English language testing of beauticians in New England . According to EEOC New York district director Edward Mercado, the New York examination, now offered in Spanish , excluded almost all Puerto Rican and Latin American beauticians in years past. • The $75,000 market price for taxi licenses in New York . No new licenses have been issued since the 1930s. Licenses are trans fered among acquaintances and relatives preserving the white predominance among city cabbies, according to a recent study. • The Florida State Department of Business and Professional Regulation, a licensing agency , required English written exams for all manicurists, shampooers and pedicurists, refusing to provide translations "unless advised of legislative intent" Some 1 ,500 manicurists were identified as unable to-take the English-only examinations. e Also in Florida, the lnteramerican Physicians Associat ion, a group of Latin American doctors organized around the issue , i s protesting in the state leg islature about a different exam and grading for physicians who corne from abroad. e The experience of minority beauticians in Chicago, who pass the practical examinat i on at the same rate as non-minorities, but fail the written portion at a rate four times greater. Dora Delgado Gallegos Seeks Information EEOC Commissioner Tony Gallegos is collecting information on cases or statistics that reflect an unfavorable impact on Hispanics by job licensing agencies. He may be contacted at EEOC, 2401 , ESt. NW, Su ite 516, Washington, D . C . 20507 (202) 634-6720. H i spanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PERSONNEL MANAGERS: Let Hispanic Lmk help you in your search for executives and pro.tessionals. Mail or phone your corporatE: classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW. Washington. D . C . 20005. Phone (202) 234. Ad copy received by 5 p . m !ED Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35 per column inch. AlTOR!'IEY National civil rights organization seeks Associate Counsel in Chicago to man age office and supervise litigation . Requ irements : 5 years litigation experience including t r ia l work and civil rights law. management experience, knowledge of Midwest community, bilingual (English/Spanish) highly prelerred. Send resume with references to: Ms. A Hern andez. MALDEF. 634 S. Spring St .. 11th floor. Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by 1 / 4/86. Available 2/18/86. PRINCE GEORGES COUNlY, MARYLAND , governmenl office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GLOMB, HANTEN & BAC A LAW F I RM: l m migration-civi l litigation-comrnerciallawemolovrnent lawfederal agency practice. 1815 H St. NW, Suite 1000, Washington . D.C. 20006 (202) 466. CORPORA TION S & NON-PROFIT ORGAN" ZATIONS: Established Was h ing t on Hispanic firm i s ready to assist you with your tra i ning. ADP Serv i ces. Resear ch& Evaluation, M anage ment Con su lt ing, a n d reoresentatlon needs. For lnf o rm u tion or employment opportunities, contact: Business In forma tion& Services Corp .. 2025 I St. NW. Suite 1 1 15. Washing ton. D.C. 20006 (202) 223100. PUT A STAR rN YOUR FUTURE-, -BE A DEPUTY U.S. MARSHAL STARTING SALARIES: G8-5 , $14,390 or G8-7 , $17,824 (Depending upon Qualifications) From Feb. 10 through Feb. 21, 1986, the U.S . Office of Personnel Management will accept applications to take the written Examination for Deputy U.S. Marshal positions in the Federal government. The United States Marshals Service is the nation' s oldest Federal law enforcement agency. Since 1789, U.S. Marshals have served the Executive and Judicial branches of government through a variety of vital law enforcement activities: • ''Protection "oi • Apprehension of fugitives • E xecution of court orders • Custody of prisoners • Custody of seized property SPECIAL OPERATIONS GROUPThe Special Operations Group is a highly trained reaction force which provides Federal assistance in emergency situations of national significance. Membership is selective, part time and voluntary . Deputies must be in superb physical condition and successfully complete the special operations training. LOCATION OF POSITIONS Deputy U.S. Marshal positions are located in the 94 Judicial Districts of the U.S. Marshals Service, which cover the 50 states, Puerto Rico , and the Virgin Islands. You must be available for initial assignment to any duty station; be prepared to travel frequently for extended periods of time; and be available for reassignment to other duty stations. TO QUALIFY YOU MUST: • Be a U.S . citizen • Possess a valid driver's lice nse e Establish a" eligible rating on the written exam ination e Have a bachelor's degree or3 years of respon s ible experience, or an equivalent combination of education a nd experience. Qualifying experience is administrative, professional, investigative, or other responsible work. There are additional education/experi ence requirements for the G8-7 grade level.) • Be at least 21 years old e Meet certain medical requirements and u ndergo a ba ckground and character investigation AGE LIMITATIONUnder Publi c Law 93, the ma ximum age fo r origjnal entry into Deputy U .S. Marshal positions is the day i mmediately preceding one'$ 85th birthday; however, this limitation may be waived in some cases. TRAINING-All new Deputies are requirec to complete a six-month basic training program consisting of approximatel y 3 months at the Federal i;nforcement T raining Center( FLETC) in Glynco, Georgia, and 3 months of onthe-job training. At the en d of the 6 months, those individuals hired at GS-5 will be eligible for GS-7. HOW TO APPLY : Contact your local Fed era l Job Information/Testing Center, listed under U . S . Government in metropolitan area telephone directories, beginning Feb. 10, 1986, for more information and a n application for the test. The United States Marshals Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer and is active(y recruiting Women and Minority Applicants. Calendar CHICANO FEDERATION DINNER San Diego March 21 LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS Las Vegas, Nev. July 9 Following is a listing of major conferences, con ventions, seminars and banquets by Hispanic I organizations for 1986. The listing includes the name and telephone of a contact person. Jose Muniz (619) 236-1228 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION Chicago April 1-5 Alfredo de los Santos (602) 244-8355 MEXICAN AMERICAN ENGINEERING SOCIETY Robert Rivas (702) 3221 047 NATIONAL COUNCIL O F LA RAZA Los Angeles July 131 6 Marialba Martinez (202) 628 Ext. 116 AMERICAN Gl FORUM San Jose, Calif. Aug . 5 0 Ed Bernaldez (915) 772 NATIONAL COALITION OF HISPANIC MENTAL HEALTHANDHUMANSERVICESORGANIZATIONS New York Sept. 4-7 Linda Neal (202) 3711 00 CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS INSTITUTE DINNER Section missing from original Washington, D.C. Sept. 16 Sarah Sal v ide (202) 543 U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Denver Sept. 17 1 Sherri Hill (816) 842-2228 MIDWEST VOTER REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT Chicago Oct. 1 0 , Maria Elena Molina (614) 16 NATIONAL CONFERENCE r;F PUERTO RICAN WOMEN Albany, N.Y . Oct. 17 Alicia Baro (305) 661. NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION New York Nov. 1 0 2 M ara Patermaster (?03) 684 NATIONAL HISPANIC UNIVERSITY Los Angeles Nov. 30-Dec. 3 Elvia Mendoza (41 5 ) 45111 3

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Arts & Entertainment THIS WEEK WE CONTINUE HIGHLIGHTS OF MAJOR contributions in 1985 by Hispanic actors and entertainers: TELEVISION: Although the 1985-86 fall TV season began with fewer Hispanic actors in lead and regular roles than in 1984-85, Latinos began late in the year to have a strong impact in the nighttime soap opera genre. Apollonia and Cesar Romero were added to the cast of Falcon Crest (joinind Lorenzo Lamas and Ana Alicia) and Ricardo Montalb<'m joined the cast of the Dynasty spinoff, The . Colbys of California. One of the year's most popular TV actors was Martin Sheen, who played the father of a homosexual man in Consenting Adults and a retired policeman in The Atlanta Child Murders Sheen began working on his directorial debut this year -a TV movie about teenage pregnancy-introducing his daughter Renee Estevez as the lead . Hispanic actors, Sheen among them, were nominated for a few TV acting awards. In September, Edward James Olmos was voted "Out standing Supporting Actor in a Drama Series" by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his role as Lieutenant Castillo on the hit show Miami Vice . Sheen, Jose Perez and Trinidad Silva were nominated in December for cable television ACE awards for appearances on The Guardian, Steambath and Maximum Security, respectively. No other television presentation in 1985 gathered as much Hispanic talent as the historic, 16-hour telethon aired on Sept. 29 by the Spanish International Network to raise funds for the victims of two August earthquakes in Mexico. Live segments of the telethon originated in Argentina, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Peru, Puerto Rico, Venezuela, and SIN stations in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New York and San Antonio. The telethon, seen in 22 countries, raised over $5 million. The Mexico estamos contigo efforts were repeated later in the year when tragedy struck in Puerto Rico and Colombia. Again, international artists gathered in television studios around the world to collect emergency monies. THEATER: To help small Hispanic theater companies share resources and establish a touring circuit a group of Hispanic theater professionals gathered in San Antonio this year to begin plans for a 1986 National Conference of Hispanic Theaters. Latinos did well on stage-even outside the Hispanic houses. Rita Moreno and Luci e Arnaz toured with hit shows-The Odd Couple and My One and Only, respectivelyand director Jose Quintero returned to the stage in August with a revival of Eugene O'Neill's classic The Iceman Cometh, which he opened on Broadway in 1956. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas a secretary at one station and a Spanisharrival. Media Report language"crawl" under spoken English infor-Questions it raised: Why does Blades, who mation at another. dresses up so property to appear on the Diaz St. Marie, who hosts the De todo un Johnnv Carson show. dress like a bum for a poco public affairs program at Channel 56, performance in the Hispanic community? HURRICANE READINESS: The year's reported that the news department at her Why does he grant an interview to the Washsuccession of hurricanes were covered with own station hung up on her and the news ington Post but declines one -sought adequate warnings for Spanish speakers in director declined to return her calls. months in advance-by Latino, his host? mostoftheSoutheastjournaliststherereported. Mayor's aide Carmen Pola called the lack "No eres mas que otro Julio Iglesias,"But a survey of Boston area media responses of sensitivity "devastating. " If the hurricane You're no more than another Julio Iglesiasit to the approach of Hurricane Gloria in late had hit with its predicted force, she told La provides the ultimate cut. September revealed a serious lack of concern Semana reporter Lawrence Thomases, "it BURGER SURPRISE: A two-year campaign by establishment media for Greater Boston's would have found our community completely by Spanish International Network's Channel 150,000 Spanish speakers. unprepared. " 23 in Miami to get Burger King to advertise on The weekly bilingual La Seman a quoted CUTTING BLADES: In Washington, D.C., the Spanish-language television there has succeeded Dalia DiazSt Marie, president of the Association year closed with another bilingual community -but not quite like the station hoped, according of Latin Americans in Communications, weekly, Latino, addressing a strong open to Miami Herald TV columnist Laurie Baum . which is based in Boston, that the city's major letter to singer Ruben Blades for what it radio and television stations were unwilling termed an indifferent attitude and performance To gain attention from the nation's No . 2 fast to broadcast more than cursory information as the well-paid star of its second annual food chain, Channel23 used a including a and warnings in Spanish. Thanksgiving gala at the Capital Hilton Nov. mobile billboard in front of the chain's headquarters, As the hurricane approached, a team of 27 . with such unsubtle messages as "Burger King, Hispanics spent 36 hours attempting to alert Latino accused the crossover singer of 900,000 Latins have a beef with you." and prepare their sommunities, offering their demeaning those in attendance, including The result Burger King began running$100,000 services to the stations for translation. those being honored as the community's in Spanish commercials, spread over six weeks, Among the media's best reported responses outstanding contributors, as second-class this month-on Channel 51, the Sl N station's \ were a one-time bulletin in Spanish read by citizens from the moment of his last-minute competitor. -Charlie Ericks!!!J..l jiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiif___ 4 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street N W Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Carlos Morales Reporting: Dora Delgado. Felix Perez. Charn<> Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CONFERENCE COORDINATORS : Include the latest edition of Hispanic Link Weekly Report in participants' packets at your next conference or convention. For details , contact Hector Erickse..,.Mendoza (202) 234-0737. I Section missing from original