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Hispanic link weekly report, October 20, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 20, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
The National Women’s Political Caucus notifies New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya that he will be honored at a Washington, D.C., luncheon as one of 10 of the nation’s governors who have appointed women to important state-level positions. . . Cuba-born Roberto Goizueta, chairman and chief executive officer of The Coca-Cola Co., is among 80 recipients nationally of the Ellis Island Award for his “outstanding representation” of an ethnic group . . . United Nations Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar, 66, is reappointed to a second five-year term as that international body’s head... The Ohio Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs elects its new executive committee members. Elected were Jesus Rodriguez, chairman; Angel Guzman, vice chairman; and Juan Rentas, secretary/treasurer. All three men
are of Puerto Rican descent. .. Manuel Ramirez of Yorba Linda, Calif., is appointed by California Gov. George Deukmejian to the Orange County Superior Court... The Latin Business and Professional Women’s Club of Miami, Fla., chooses Miami City Commissioner Rosario Kennedy as its Woman of the Year... Charles Serrano, a detective with the New York City Police Department, is inducted into the Hall of Fame of the U.S. Labor Department’s Job Corps at a special ceremony in Washington, D.C... Gabe Rivera, former Texas Tech University All-American defensive lineman whose 1983 rookie season with the National Football League’s Pittsburgh Steelers was cut short by a near-fatal traffic accident, returns from Canton, China, after nine months of acupuncture treatment for his paralysis. Rivera, 25, paralyzed from the chest down, reported some benefit from the treatment... Ernie Gonzalez becomes the first left-handed player to win a Professional Golfers’ Association tournament in 12 years, capturing the rain-shortened Pensacola (Fla.) Open.______________
Vol. 4 No. 42
Oct. 20, 1986
(0) HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT (il — .....—... ■ ■" .............— ■■ 1 "■ ^ 1 —
u.s. Salvadorans Help latinos Plan Japanese Agenda
Victims of Earthquake
Salvadoran communities in major U.S. cities, including Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Houston, have galvanized to aid victims of the major earthquake that shook that country’s capital, San Salvador, Oct 10.
Between 600 to 900 people were estimated to have died from the quake, which measured 5.4 on the Richter scale. The earthquake and 900 aftershocks injured 10,000 people and left 200,000 homeless.
In Los Angeles, where between 250,000 to
350,000 Salvadorans live, making it the largest U.S. Salvadoran community, the Salvadoran Consulate collected $35,000 in donations from concerned relatives and friends of the victims. The Archdiocese of Los Angeles contributed $ 100,000 to the Catholic archbishop in San Salvador.
A concert was held Oct. 19 in Washington, D.C., to raise funds for earthquake victims. Sylvia Rosales, director of the nonprofit Central American Refugee Center, which has offices in Los Angeles, Houston, New York and San Francisco, said her organization had collected $10,000 prior to the concert and had set up a hotline for individuals trying to get messages
continued on page 2'
Directors of three major national Hispanic organizations gained approval from their boards last week to pursue both punitive and positive actions against the government of Japan.
The authorizations came as part of a widening wake of response to statements derogatory to U.S. Hispanics made by Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone in mid-September.
Nakasone said that his country was superior to the United States educationally because of the “considerable number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans” here.
The organizations - the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of La Raza and the American Gl Forum -called for activities ranging from nationwide boycotts to Japanese investments in U.S. Hispanic community enterprises.
A trio of LULAC officers, President Oscar Moran and treasurer Sam Doria of San Antonio and legal advisor Armando C. de Baca of Denver, met with Japanese Ambassador Nobuo Matsunaga Oct. 9 to present him with their guidelines on actions LULAC wants Japan to consider in improving relations with U.S. Hispanics.
Surrogate Mother Fights for Baby
In the growing legal thicket of the rights of surrogate mothers, a San Diego Superior Court judge on Oct. 9 granted Alejandra Arellano Munoz visitation rights to see the infant she bore while he decides who should have custody.
Arellano signed a contract with hercousin, Nattie Haro, and her husband, Mario, from Chula Vista, Calif., to be paid $1,500 for being artificially inseminated with the sperm of Mr. Haro. The 20-year-old Arellano, from El Habal, Mexico, and living in the United States illegally for the past year, charges that the Haros duped her into the deal. She also alleges she notified the couple before the birth she had decided to keep the baby.
According to Arellano, she was to carry the baby for two to three weeks and have it
transplanted to the womb of Haro. Arellano, said the couple told her after she had been impregnated for a short while that the embryo transfer could not be performed. In her seventh month of pregnancy, Arellano said she told the Haros she had decided to keep the baby.
The Haros denied any mention of a embryo transfer and maintained that they were never told of Arellano’s change of heart. The couple has not paid the $1,500 fee.
Arellano is seeking joint custody of the baby, Lydia Michelle, and $500 monthly child support payments from Mario Haro.
Judge William Pate ordered Arellano be allowed five-hour visitations at her home twice a week Attorneys for both parties agreed to a hearing next month.
These included investment in educational institutions with high Hispanic enrollment, cultural exchanges and a high-level series of meetings with Latino organizational leadershipi Moran requested that the Japanese respond to five general suggested actions by next week.
On Oct. 12, the LULAC board, meeting in Washington, D.C., gave Moran its unanimous; consent to take whatever he deems appropriate action in his ongoing negotiations with the Japanese. This includes calling a national boycott on Japanese goods.
Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, met with his board the same weekend and gained backing to pursue alternatives he proposed. He told Weekly Report that he plans to look at fair trade legislation and to ascertain whether the Japanese are involved in any trade practices which unfairly affect U.S. Hispanics.
“We will be prepared by the next Congress to offer or support any appropriate initiatives,” he said.
Ed Bernaldez, president of the American Gl Forum, also got the green light from his. board. The Forum reacted most promptly and sharply against Nakasone’s remarks. Its members have launched boycotts in some areas and participated in demonstrations against Japanese consulates.
Congressional Hispanic Caucus chairman Esteban Torres said that he is prepared to lead a trade mission to Japan to explore trade opportunities between U.S. Hispanic entrepreneurs and Japanese companies.
“Now is the time for Hispanic and Japanese business leaders to begin discussion on ways to increase Hispanic participation in the distribution of Japanese products in the United States and increasing exports to Japan of products manufactured by Hispanic-owned firms, ” he commented.
Leaders from all Hispanic groups contacted by Weekly Report stressed that while they are employing separate strategies, they plan to work together to insure maximum benefit to the entire U.S. Hispanic community.


House Finally Passes Immigration
The nation’s first significant immigration reform legislation in two decades was molded by House and Senate conferees Oct. 14 after months of acrimonious debate. Just days before, it had been written off as dead in the House.
The complexities of the bill were reflected by the vote of Hispanic Caucus members on it Firmly in opposition to immigration proposals
How Latinos in Congress Voted
IMMIGRATION BILL The bill included penalties for employers who hire undocumented workers* legalization for undocumented persons here since 1982, a 50% increase in Border Patrol personnel, and many other provisions to satisfy diverse interest groups.
HOUSE VOTE
Passed Oct. 9 by a 230-166 vote.
CAUCUS VOTE Five in favor; six opposed.
YES: Esteban Torres, Tony Coelho (both Calif.), Albert Bustamante, Solomon Ortiz (both Texas), Bill Richardson (N.M.)
NO: Henry B. Gonzalez, E. “Kika” de la Garza (both Texas), Matthew Martinez, Edward Roybal (both Calif.), Robert Garcia (N.Y.), and Manuel Lujdn(N.M).
Higher Ed
Despite a 12% increase in the number of Hispanics enrolled in two- and four-year postsecondary institutions from 1980 to 1984, a report released Oct 7 by the American Council on Education says that the gain is “modest” compared to Latinos’ population growth.
“Minorities in Higher Education,” the fifth in a series of reports by ACE, shows that at two-year schools Hispanic enrollment went up 13%; at four-year schools, 11.1%. California and New York, the number one and three states in terms of Hispanic population, experienced drops in their Hispanic enrollment from 1980 to 1984 in both two- and four-year schools California’s four-year enrollment
HISPANIC POST-HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT BY SEX, 1980-84
1980 1984 Change
Undergrad. 390,463 436,614 +11.8
Female 200,239 230,227
Male 190,224 200,337
Graduate 24,263 24,402 + 0.5
Female 12,090 12,726
Male 12,173 11,676
Prof. 6,534 7,913 +21.9
Female 1,901 2,761
Male , 4,633 5,152
Source: American Council on Education's “Minorities in mHigher Education."
2
in the recent past, the caucus members split, five in favor, six opposed to the bill when it was brought back up Oct. 9.
The conference committee revision was passed Oct. 15 by a 238-173 vote. Hispanic legislators voted as they had voted six days before.
Then it went back to the Senate for final approval before being forwarded to the White House for President Reagan’s consideration.
The legislation imposes civil and criminal sanctions against employers of undocumented workers but also permits legalization for those here since Jan. 1,1982.
The compromise includes most of the key provisions of the version finally approved by the House Oct. 9 by a 230-166 vote. *|he Senate version passed handily last year. \
One House provision that was stricken would have effectively protected Salvadoran and Nicaraguan refugees from deportation for the next three years.
The legislation includes these key provisions:
• Undocumented persons here since Jan. 1,1982 (with brief absences permitted), can apply for legal status six months after the bill is signed. After one more year, they can apply for permanent residence; after another five, for citizenship.
• Illegal aliens employed as farm workers for at least 90 days between May 1, 1985, and May 1, 1986, are entitled to temporary resident status. After two years they can file for permanent residency; after five more, citizenship.
decreased by 0.9%; the number of Hispanics at its two-year colleges went down 7.3%. In New York, there was a 37.7% reduction at the two-year schools, while enrollment in four-year programs dropped 62.8%.
Hispanics accounted for 529,000, or 4.3%, of the 12.1 million students in two- and four-year institutions in 1984. In 1980, there were
472,000 Latinos at these institutions- 3.9% of total enrollment.
Enrollments in two- and four-year schools in five key states with large Hispanic populations were:
1980 1984
California 167,789 158,423
Florida 29,990 43,582
New Mexico 14,238 16,507
New York 53,922 28,867
Texas 85,559 104,017
Hispanics continued to have the highest proportional representation of all racial/ethnic groups at two-year colleges, says the report. Fifty-four percent of all Latinos enrolled in post-secondary institutions in 1980 and 1984 were at two-year schools.
The largest increase for Hispanics- 22.1 % - occurred in law schools, shows the report. In 1980, there were 3,013 Latinos in American Bar Association-approved law schools; in 1985; the number had grown to 3,679.
States Cite English Instruction Dearth
New York and Los Angeles education officials ' - in what appears to refute a contention by j English-language primacy proponents that j immigrants do not wish to learn English- are turning away thousands of adults trying to enroll in English classes.
In New York, where nearly half of the 27,000 students in adult education classes hail from Spanish-speaking countries, officials say they j could easily double enrollment given adequate funds and space. Despite an increase from $5 million to $20:6 million in 1984 for adult literacy programs and a doubling in these classes since 1984, administrators say demand has increasingly exceeded supply.
New York is said to receive 86,000 legal immigrants annually, with an estimated additional 35,000 to 40,000 who are undocumented.
In the Los Angeles Unified School District, officials estimate there will be 40,000 hopeful students turned down this year, twice the number rejected last year. Although there are private schools and community colleges that offer English classes, immigrants complain that they cannot afford them. According to a recent survey by that state’s Department of Education, 131 out of 228 school districts have an overload of such students.
Not foreseeing the increase in the number of non-English-speaking immigrants, a state law in effect since 1979 limits the growth of English-as-a-Second-Language programs for adults to 2% a year.
Quake Victims Get Aid
continued from page 1
through to the Central American country. It is estimated that there are 100,000 Salvadorans in Washington.
In Houston, Spanish-language radio station KXYZ-AM concluded a 72-hour marathon Oct 13, raising funds* medicine and clothing. Carlos Martinez, a disc jockey for the station, said it had raised more than $93,000. According to the Salvadoran Consulate in Houston, there are more than 100,000 Salvadorans in that city.
Other efforts included $50,000 from the Catholic Relief Services, with $100,000 to be transferred from existing funds later. On Oct. 17, an airlift coordinated by AmeriCares, a Connecticut-based international relief agency, flew more than 100,000 pounds of privately donated medicines to El Salvador.
Shark Victim to Regain Use of Mangled Limb
Seven-year-old Helena Florez, a shark attack victim, will have to undergo roughly 20 operations to regain the use of her right leg, said doctors Oct 6.
Helena was attacked Oct. 4 by a six-foot-long shark while wading in three-feet-deep water in the Gulf of Mexico near Sanibel, Fla With the youngster in the water at the time were her mother, Ruth Florez, and her mother’s fiance, David Ybiles.
Gains Fail to Keep Pace
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
REGION DIRECTOR
Camp Fire Inc., a national voluntary youth agency, is seeking qualified candidates for the position of region director.
This position is part of Camp Fire’s field service system which provides technical assistance and management support to local units (Camp Fire councils) throughout the country. Incumbent will develop and implement region plans to promote membership growth and excellence of management deploy and supervise paid and volunteer staff, and provide management consulting service to councils within the mid-America region of the United States.
We are seeking candidates with the appropriate combination of education, hands-on-management and not-for-profit executive director experience with an emphasis on financial asset management. Candidates must possess effective interpersonal communication, consulting and negotiation skills, and analytical abilities. This position requires extensive travel.
Camp Fire Inc. provides competitive salary and an outstanding benefit package. Interested
DIRECTOR OF LEADERSHIP Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate Students The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc.
The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. serves as a clearinghouse for non-legislative programs designed to heighten awareness among the Hispanic community of the American political process. The Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate Students was recently funded by the Ford Foundation to help the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute meet its mandate.
Position Title: Director of Leadership Qualifications: Master's degree or equivalent Salary Range: $25,000 - $30,000
applicants must send resume and salary history to:
Mr. Rick Williams, Assistant Director Human Resources Management Camp Fire Inc.
4601 Madison Ave.
Kansas City,
Deadline for application is Nov. 15.
FUND-RAISER
Lehman College of the City University of New York seeks a Director of Development The Director will have responsibility for fund raising and corporate relations at a four-year liberal arts college with a Performing Arts Center and an Art Gallery. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree, a minimum of 3 years experience in all facets of development and demonstrated success in annual giving programs and corporate solicitation. Strong writing and interpersonal skills required Experience in raising funds for the arts preferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits program. Letters of application with resumes should be sent by Oct. 24,1986, to: Ginger Waters, Executive Assistant to the President, Lehman College, Bronx, N.Y. 10468.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER m/f
GAO EVALUATOR
The U.S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelor's(2.9 GPA or higher) or graduate degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities. We
Mo. 64112
FACULTY/FULL TIME
SUNY/Empire State College seeks tenure track faculty member in Syracuse. Assistant professor. Twelve month position beginning
1 /87, or as soon thereafter as possible. Duties involve instructing and advising adult students. Interdisciplinary background and experience with adults in non-traditional college programs preferred. Ph.D. or other terminal degree required. Women and minorities strongly urged to apply. Letter and resume by 11/15/86 to: Ms. Janet Zimmer, Director SUNY/ESC, Room 256,
2 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N.Y. 12866. An AA/EOE.
THE CALIFORNIACHICANO NEWS Media Association has the following openings:
• Administrative assistant $15,000- $18,000. Applicant must type45 words per minute, possess strong organizational, verbal and interpersonal skills; have his/her own transportation and be fluent in English/Spanish.
• Manager of JOBank& professional programs. BA or equivalent in journalism, English or comm unication-related field; strong organizational, systems management skills.
Send resume, three references and, if available, candidate’s published samples of writing and/or promotional material to: Suzanne Manriquez, Executive Director, CCNMArSchool of Journalism, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695.
Additional Skills Required: j
Evidence'of successful management of programs, personnel and fiscal matters. Experience in teaching and/or management. Evidence of ! successful experience in working with legislative bodies or other agencies/organizations. Training and/or successful background in curriculum development, research activities as well as ability in computer applications and setting up data bases Demonstrated proficiency in speaking and writing skills. An equivalent combination of education, training and experience will be given consideration.
Job Summary:
The Director of Leadership reports to the Executive Director of the Caucus Institute. Typical duties include: development of internship sites; intern recruitment and supervision; preparing and administering program budget; preparing and disseminating existing program materials, research and resource materials on leadership; networking, organizing and directing communication and publication materials to provide information to members; and developing a public relations program to promote public and legislative support for leadership endeavors.
Travel will also be required for this position. Additional duties may be assigned by the Executive Director.
For additional information, please contact Ms. Beverly Ellerman, Executive Director, Congressional Hispanic Caucus, 5b4~C St NE, Washington, D.C. 20002.
TRANSLATOR/EDITOR
Major publisher of bilingual dictionaries requires translator (English to Spanish). Candidate should b^ bilingual with Spanish as native language, must relocate to London for two to three years. Applicants should submit resume to Jean Paradise, MacMillan Publishing Company, 866 3 rd Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022 (212) 702-4265.
are interested in business, economics, computer science, government or political affairs majors to work in Washington, D.C., or one of our 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good analytical and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you. To obtain an application (deadline to apply is. Nov. 14) contact U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington Regional Office, 441 G St. NW, Room 5077, Washington, D.C. 20548, Attn: Laura Talbott (202) 275-8904.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR; No other publication or system lets you target a' national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. >0005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
Ordered by__________
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Artsji Entertainment
MILAGRO SHOOTING: Casting for the Milagro Bean field War has been completed, with five Hispanic actors getting lead roles.
Hispanic actor Chick Vennera will star as John Mondragon, a role that earlier this year was rumored to be for comedian Cheech Marin. The other Latinos in the film are Ruben Blades, Sonia Braga, Julie Carmen and Carlos Riquelme (in his first English-speaking role). The film also stars Richard Bradford, James Gammon, Melanie Griffith and Christopher Walken.
The Milagro Beanfield War, based on a novel by John Nichols, tells the story of New Mexico farmers who rebelled against land developers. The movie is being directed and produced by Robert Redford; Moctezuma Esparza is the co-producer.
Shooting of Milagro was supposed to begin Aug. 4 in Chimayo, New Mexico, at the town’s historic Plaza de Cerro, but local businesses objected to the Hollywood invasion. Cast and crew have relocated near Santa Fe, and production is now expected to continue through mid-November.
The film is by Universal Pictures, with a release date now slated for the winter of 1987.
Other Hispanics are seen in films now currently in release. Daniel
Jordano stars in Playing for Keeps, released by Universal, and Gina Gallegos is featured in The Men’s Club, from Atlantic Releasing Corp.
NIELSEN PROBING: Officials of the Federal Trade Commission may investigate the Hispanic audience survey practices of the A.C. Nielson Co., responding to a complaint filed in December by a Spanish-language television station in Miami.
The FTC’s Bureau of Competition could request a formal probe of circumstances surrounding the complaint filed by WLTV-Miami. The station charges that Nielsen, one of two widely used rating services, underrepresents Hispanics in its audience sample.
According to a WLTV official, “an independent statistical analysis” shows that Nielsen undercounts the older Hispanic populations, more likely to watch Spanish-language television, while overcounting younger, bilingual Hispanics.
ONE LINERS: Argentine dancer Julio Bocca recently became the first Hispanic lead dancer hired by the American Ballet Theater without having been brought up in its dance corps; he makes his debut with the company in Los Angeles this December, in the Nutcrackers. . . Actress Theresa Saldana headlined an Oct. 18 leadership conference given by the Hispanic Women’sCouncil in Los
Angeles... ., ,
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
AMERICA’S TIME BOMB: Southwestern Bell Telephone, which encompasses Texas,* Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri, will air its new half-hour documentary, “Hispanic Dropouts: America’s Time Bomb,” on commercial and public television stations in the Southwest this fall - and make the program available for showings by Hispanic and educational organizations nationally.
Narrated by actor Edward James Olmos, it includes interviews with several Hispanic leaders.
The videotape is available in English and Spanish. Also available are such support materials as a 25-page parents’ guide, posters, textbook covers and a leader's guide for presenting the materials.
For more information, contact Gary Volluz at (314) 247-5538.
HISPANIC LINK "WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
.Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, â– Phil Garda.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13* issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
COMPLAINT DEPARTMENT: The American Lung Association protested in Washington this month that the tobacco industry is aiming too much of its advertising at minority com-* munities. “They put far more emphasis into selling cigarettes to blacks and Hispanics than to other population groups,” complained James Swomley, director of the association’s Christmas Seal People.
When The Washington Post launched its new Sunday “Magazine” this fall, its cover story featured a black rap singer accused of murder and a white columnist’s defense of local store owners who bar black youths on the contention that they're crime-prone.
Led by radio personality Cathy Hughes, the capital’s black community has staged weekly protests at the Post, dumping more than
50,000 of the “Magazine” at its front door.
A subsequent issue of the publication featured the predominantly Hispanic Adams-Morgan section of town, where successful Latino businesses abound. The article pictured half a dozen prosperous non-Hispanics, but the
lone Hispanic family portrayed was shown in a cramped living room with a clothesline of laundry as its centerpiece.
Now local Hispanics, led by publisher Jose Sueiro of the weekly Latino, are talking protest, too. ,
Reporter Morley Safer’s profile of Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez on CBS-TV’s60 Minutes Sept. 28 pleased the mayor and most of the city's cubano inhabitants enormously. In a show that alternately savages and saints its subjects, Suarez and Miami’s Cubans got the sainthood treatment.
The Miami Herald has found one authority, however, who takes exception to such black-and-white reporting: Lisandro Perez, chairman of Florida State University's sociology department.
The segment, which ignored any problems encountered by Mariel refugees or friction among the city's Latinos and still-in-place white establishment misled viewers to believe “that all of the power is in the hands of the Cubans,” Perez objected. - Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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1 ' ! i t ' I. M . k• T'h AI T'h • IAI. k are of Puerto Rican descent. . . Manuel Ramirez of Yorba Linda, a Jng I j e lvews I j IS vrree Calif., is appointed by California Gov . George Deukmejian to the Orange County Superior Court ... The Latin Business and Professional Women's Club of Miami, Fla., chooses Miami City Commissioner The National Women' s Political Caucus notifies New Mexico Gov. Rosario Kennedy as its Woman of the Year. . Charles Serrano, a Toney Anaya that he will be honored at a Washington, D.C., luncheon detective with the New York City Police Department, is inducted into the as one of 10 of the nation's governors who have appointed women to Hall of Fame of the U.S. Labor Departmenfs Job Corps at a special important state-level positions. . . Cuba-born Roberto Goizueta, ceremony in Washington, D.C ... Gabe Rivera, former Texas Tech chairman and chief executive officer of The Coca-Cola Co., is among 80 University American defensive lineman whose 1983 rookie season recipients nationally of the ellis Island Award for his "outstanding with the National Football League's Pittsburgh Steelers was cut representation" of an ethnic group . . . United Nations Secretary short by a near-fatal traffic accident, returns from . Canton, China, after General Javier Perez de Cuellar, 66, is reappointed to a second fivenine months of acupuncture treatment for his paralysis. Rivera , 25, year term as that international body's head ... The Ohio Commission paralyzed from the chest down, reported some benefit from the on Spanish Speaking Affairs elects its new executive committee treatment. .. Ernie Gonzalez becomes the first left-handed player to members. Elected were Jesus Rodriguez, chairman; Angel Guzman, w in a Professional Golfers' Association tourna m e nt in 12 years. vice chairman; and Juan Rentas, secretary/treasurer. All three men capturing the rain-shortened Pensacol a (Fla.) Opeiin.ii.iiiiiiiiiii Voi4N4 2Il HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I U.S. Salvadorans Help Victims of Earthquake tinos Plan Japanese Agenda Salvadoran communities in major U.S. cities , including Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., and Houston, have galvanized to aid victims of the major earthq uake that shook that country' s capital, San Salvador, Oct 10. Between 600 to 900 people were estimated to have died from the quake, which measured 5.4 on the Richter scale. The earthquake and 900 aftershocks injured 10,000 people and left 200,000 homeless. In Los Angeles, where between 250,000 to 350,000 Salvadorans live , making it the largest U .S. Salvadoran community, the Salvadoran Consulate collected $35,000 in donations from concerned relative s and friends of the victims. The Archdiocese of Los Angeles con tributed$1 00,000 to the Catholic archbishop in San Salvador. A concert was held Oct. 19 in Washington, D .C., to raise funds for earthquake victims. Sylvia Rosales, director of the nonprofit Central American Refugee Center, which has offices in Los Angeles, Houston, New York and San Francisco , said her organization had collected $10,000 prior to the concert and had set up a hotline for individuals trying to get messages continued on page 2 -Dire ctors of three major national Hispani c orga niz at ion s gained approval from their boards last week to pursue both puniti ve and positi ve actions against the government of J a pan. The authorizations came as part of a widening wake of response to statements derogatory to U.S . Hispanics made by Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone in mid-Sept embe r . Nakasone said that his country was superio r to the United States educationally because o f the "considerable number of blacks , Pue rto Ricans and Mexicans" here. The organizations-the League of United Latin American Citizens , the National Council of La Raza and the American Gl Forum called for activities ranging from nationwide boycotts to Japanese investments in U .S. Hispanic community enterprises. A trio of LULAC officers, President Oscar Moran and treasurer Sam Doria of San Antonio and legal advisor Armando C. de Baca of Denver , met with Japanese Ambassador Nobuo Matsunaga Oct. 9 to present him with their guidelines on actions LULAC wants Japan to consider in improving relations with U.S. H i spanics. Surrogate Mother Fights for Baby In the growing legal thicket of the rights of surrogate mothers, a San Diego Superior Court judge on Oct. 9 granted Alejandra Arellano Munoz vis itation rights to see the infant she bore while he decides who should have custody. Arellano signed a contract with her cousin, Nattie Haro, and her husband, Mario, from Chula Vista , Calif. , to be paid $1,500 for being artificially inseminated with the sperm of Mr. Haro. The 20-year-old Arellano, from El Habal, Mexico, and living in the United States illegally for the past year, charges that the Hares duped her into the deal. She also alleges she notified the couple before the birth she had decided to keep the baby. According to Arellano, she was to carry the baby for two to three weeks and have it transplanted to the womb of Haro. Arellano, said the couple told her after she had been impregnated for a short while that the embryo transfer could not be performed. In her seventh month of pregnancy, Arellano said she told the Hares she had decided to keep the baby. The Hares denied any mention of a embryo transfer and maintained that they were never told of Arellands change of heart. The couple has not paid the $1,500 fee . Arellano is seeking joint custody of the baby, Lydia Michelle, and $500 monthly child support payments from Mario Haro. Judge William Pate ordered Arellano be allowed five-hour visitations at her home twice a week Attorneys for both parties agreed to a hearing next month. These included investment in educational institutions w ith high Hispanic enrollment, cultural exchanges a nd a high level series of meetings with L a tin o organizational leadership . Moran requested that the J apanese respond to fiv e general suggested actions by next week. On Oct. 12, the LULAC board, meeting in Washington, D.C., g a ve Moran it s unanimous co ns e nt to t ake wh ate ver he de e ms appropriate' action in his ongoing negotiations with the Japanese. This in cludes calling a national boycott on Japanese goods. Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza , met with his board thesame weekend and gained backing to pursue alternatives he proposed. He told Weekly Report that he plans to look at fair trade legislation and to ascertain whether the Japanese are involved in any trade practices which unfairly affect U . S . Hispanics. "We will be prepared by the next Congress ' to offer or support any appropriate initiatives," he said . Ed Bernaldez, president of the American Gl Forum , also got the green light from his. board. The Forum reacted most promptly and sharply against Nakasone's remarks. Its members have launched boycotts in some :areas and participated in demonstrations against Japanese consulates. Congressional Hispanic Caucus chairman Est e ban Torres said that he is prepared to lead a trade mission to Japan to explore trade opportunities between U . S . Hispanic entre preneurs and Japanese companies. "Now is the iime for Hispanic and Japanese business leaders to begin discussion on ways to increase Hispanic participation in the dis tribution of Japanese products in the United States and increasing exports to Japan of products manufactured by Hispanic-owned firms," he commented. Leaders from all Hispanic groups contacted by Weekly Report stressed that while they are employing separate strategies, they plan to work together to insure maximum benefit to the entire U .S. Hispanic community.

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House Finally Passes Immigration The nation's first significant immigration reform legislation in two decades was molded by House and Senate conferees Oct. 14 after months of acrimonious debate. Just days before, it had been written off as dead in the House. The complexities of the bill were reflected by the vote of Hispanic Caucus members on it Firmly in opposition to immigration proposals How Latinos in Congress Voted IMMIGRATION BILL The bill included penalties for employers who hire undocumented workers, legalization for undocumented persons here since 1982, a'50% increase in Border Patrolpersonnel, and many other provisions to satisfy diverse interest groups. HOUSE VOTE Passed Oct. 9 by a 230-166 vote. CAUCUS VOTE Five in favor; six opposed. YES: Esteban Torres, TonyCoelho(both Calif.), Albert Bustamante, Solomon Ortiz (both Texas), Bill Richardson (N.M.) NO: Henry B . Gonzalez, E. "Kika" de Ia. Garza(both Texas), Matthew Martinez, Edward Roybal (both Calif.), Robert Garcia (N.Y .), arid Manuel Lujan (N.M.) . in th. e recent past, the caucus members split, five in favor, six opposed to the bill when it was brought back up Oct. 9 . The conference committee revision was passed Oct. 15 by a 238-173 vote. Hispanic legislators voted as they had voted six days before. Then it went back to the Senate for final approval before being forwarded to the White House for President Reagan's consideration. The legislation imposes civil and criminal sanctions against employers of undocumented workers but also permits legalization for those here since Jan. 1, 1982. The compromise includes most of the key provisions of the version finally approved by the House Oct. 9 by a 230-166 vote. -l.he Senate version passed handily last year. . One House provision that was stricken would have effectively protected Salvadoran and Nicaraguan refugees from deportation for the next three years. The legislation includes these key provisions: • Undocumented persons here since Jan. 1, 1982 (with brief absences permitted), can apply for legal status six months after the bill is signed. After one more year, they can apply for permanent residence; after another five, for citizenship. • Illegal aliens employed as farm workers for at least 90 days between May 1, 1 985, and May 1, 1986, are entitled to temporary resident status. After two years they can file for permanent residency; after five more, citizenship. Higher Ed Gains Fail to Keep Pace Despite a 12% increase in the number of Hispanics enrolled in twoand four-year post secondary institutions from 1980 to 1984, a report released Oct 7 by the American Council on Education says that the gain is "modesf' compared to Latinos' population growth. "Minorities in Higher Education, " the fifth in a series of reports by ACE, shows that at two year schools Hispanic enrollment went up 13%; at four-year schools, 11.1 %. California and New York, the number one and three states in terms of Hispanic population, ex perienced drops in their Hispanic enrollment, from 1980 to 1984 in both two-and four. year schools. California's four-year enrollment HISPANIC POST-HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT BY SEX, 1980 Undergrad. Female Male Graduate Female Male Prof. Female Male . 1980 390,463 200,239 190,224 24,263 12,090 12,173 6 ,534 1,901 4 ,633 1984 436,614 230,227 200,337 24,402 12,726 11,676 7 ,913 2 , 761 5,152 Change +11.8 + 0.5 +21.9 S ource: Americ an Coun c il on Educati o n' s " Mino.rities in • H igher Edu c ation. " 2 decreased by0. 9%; the number of Hispanics at its two-yec:r colleges went down 7 . 3% . In New York, there wasa37. 7% reduction at the two-year scliools, while enrollment in four year programs dropped 62.8% . Hispanics accounted for 529,000, or 4.3%, of the 12.1 million students in two-and four year institutions in 1984. In 1980, there were 472,000 Latinos at these institutions-3 . 9% of total enrollment. Enrollments in twoand four-year schools in five key states with large Hispanic populations were: 1980 1984 California 167,789 158,423 Florida 29,990 43,582 New Mexico 14,238 16,507 New York 53,922 28,867 Texas 85,559 104,017 Hispanics continued to have the highest proportional representation of all racial/ethnic groups at two-year colleges, says the report. Fifty-four percent of all Latinos enrolled in post-secondary institutions in 1980 and 1984 were at two-year schools. The largest increase for Hispanics-22. 1% -occurred in law schools, shows the report. In 1980, there were 3,013 Latinos in American Bar Association-approved law schools; in 1985; the number had grown to 3,679 . States Cite English Instruction Dearth New York and Los Angeles education officials in what appears to refute a contention by English-language primacy proponents that immigrants do not wish to learn Englishare turning away thousands of adults trying to enroll in English classes. In New York, where nearly half of the 27,000 students in adult education classes hail from Spanish-speaking countries , officials say they could easily double enrollment given adequate funds and space. Despite an increase from $5 million to $20 . . 6 million in 1984 for adult literacy programs and a doubling in these classes since 1984, administrators say demand has increasingly exceeded supply. New York is said to receive 86,000 legal immigrants annually, with an estimated additional35,000 to40,000 who are undocumented. In the Los Angeles Unified School District, officials estimate there will be 40,000 hopeful students turned down this year, twice the number rejected last year. Although there are private schools and community colleges that offer English classes, immigrants com plain that they cannot afford them. Accord ing to a recent survey by that state' s Depart ment of Education, 131 out of 228 school districts have an overload of such students. Not foreseeing the increase in the number of non-English-speaking immigrants, a state law in effect since 1979 limits the growth of English-as-a-SecondLanguage programs for adults to 2% a year. Quake Victims Get Aid continued from page 1 through to the Central American country. It is estimated that there are 1 00,000 Salvadorans in Washington. In Houston, Spanish-language radio station KXYZ-AM concluded a 72-hour marathon Oct. 13, raising funds, medicine and clothing. Carlos Martinez, a disc jockey for the station, said it had raised more than $93,000. According to the Salvadoran Consulate in Houston, there are more than 1 00,000 Salvadorans in that city. Other efforts included $50,000 from the Catholic Relief Services, with $1 00,000 to be transferred from existing funds later. On Oct. 17 , an airlift coordinated by AmeriCares, a Connecticut-based international relief agency, flew more than 100,000 pounds of privately donated medicines to El Salvador. Shark Victim to Regain Use of Mangled Limb Seven-year-old Helena Florez, a shark attack victim, will have to undergo roughly 20 operations to regain the use of her right: leg, said docto :s Oct. 6. 1 Helena was attdcked Oct. 4 by a six-foot long shark while wading in three-feet-deep water in the Gulf of Mexico near Sanibel, Fla. With the youngster in the water at the time were her mother, Ruth Florez, and her mother's fiance, David Ybiles. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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L CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS REGION DIRECTOR Camp Fire Inc. , a national voluntary youth agency, is seeking qualified candidates for the position of region d i rector. This position is part of Camp Fire's field service system which provides technical assistance and management support to local units (Camp Fire councils) throughout the country. Incumbent will develop and implement region plans to promote membership growth and excellence of management , deploy and supervise paid and volunteer staff, and provide management consulting service to councils within the mid-America region of the United States. We are seeking candidates with th.e appropriate combination of education, hands-on-management and not-for-profit executive director experience with an emphasis on financial asset management. Candidates must possess effective interpersonal communication, consulting and negotiation skills, and analytical abilities. This position requires e xtensive travel. Camp Fire Inc. provides competitive salary and an outstanding benefit package. Interested applicants must send resume and salary history to: Mr. Rick Williams, Assistant Director Human Resources Management Camp Fire Inc. 4601 Madison Ave. Kansas City, Mo. 64112 Deadline for application is Nov. 15. FUND-RAISER Lehman College of the City University of New York seeks a Director of Development The Director will have responsibility for fund raising and corporate relations at a four-year liberal arts college with a Per forming Arts Center and an Art Gallery. Applicants must have a bachelor's degree, a minimum of 3 years experience in all facets of development and demonstrated success in annual giving programs and corporate solicitation. Strong writing and interpersonal skills required. Experience in raising funds for the arts preferred. Salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits program. Letters of application with resumes should be sent by Oct. 24, 1986, to: Ginger Waters, Exe cutive Assistant to the President, Lehman College, Bronx, N .Y . 10468. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY AFFIRMATIVE ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER m/f GAO EVALUATOR FACULTY/FULL TIME SUNY/Empire State College seeks tenure track faculty member in Syracuse. Assistant professor. Twelve month position beginning 1/87, or as soon thereafter as possible: Duties involve instructi ng and advising adult students. Interdisciplinary background and experience with adults in non-traditional college programs preferred. Ph . D . or other terminal degree re quired. Women and minorities strongly urged to apply. Letter and resume by 11/15/86 to: Ms. Janet Zimmer, Director SUNY/ESC, Room 256, 2 Union Ave., Saratoga Springs, N .Y. 12866. An AA!EOE. THE CALIFORNIA CHICANO NEWS Media Association has the following openings: • Administrative assistant $15,000$18,000. Applicant must type 45 words per minute , possess strong organizational, verbal and interpersonal skills; have his/her own transportation and be fluent in English/Spanish. • Manager of JOBank& professional pro grams. B.A or equivalent in journalism , English or communication-related field; strong organi zational, systems management skills. Send resume, three references and, if available, candidate's published samples of writing and/or promotional material to: Suzanne Manriquez, Executive Director, CCNMA-School of Journalism, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089. DIRECTOR OF LEADERSHIP Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate Students The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. serves as a clearinghouse for norl' legislative programs designed to heighten awareness among the Hispanic community of the American political process. The Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program for College Graduates and Graduate Students was recently funded by the Ford Foundation to help the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute meet its mandate. Position Title : Director of Leadership Qualifications: Master's degree or equivalent Salary Range : $25,000-$30,000 Additional Skills Required: Evidence' of successful management of pro grams, personnel and fiscal matters. Experience in teaching and/or management. Evidence of successful experience in working with legislative bodies or other agencies/organizations. Training and/or successful background in curriculum development, research activities as well as ability in computer applications and setting up data bases. Demonstrated proficiency in speaking and writing skills. An equivalent combination of education , training and experience will be given consideration. Job Summary: The Director of Leadership reports to the Executive Director of the Caucus Institute. Typical duties include: development of internship sites ; intern recruitment and supervision; preparing and administering program budget; preparing and disseminating existing program materials, research and resource materials on leadership; networking, organizing and directing com rnunication and publication materials to provide i nformation to members; and developing a public relations program to promote public and legis lative support for leadership endeavors. Travel will also be required for this position. Additional duties may be assigned by the Executive Director. For additional information, please contact Ms. Beverly Ellerman, Executive Director, Con gressional Hispan'fc Caucus, 504-C St. NE:, Washington, D.C . 20002. TRANSLATOR/EDITOR Major publisher of bilingual dictionaries re translator(English to Spanish) . Candidate should b!i. bilingual with Spanish as native language, must reiocate to London for two to three years. Applicants should submit resume to Jean Paradise, MacMillan Publishing Com pany, 866 3rdAve., New York, N .Y. 10022 (212) 702. The U .S. General Accounting Office is looking for individuals with a bachelor's(2.9 GPA or or g r aduate degree to examine the effectiveness, efficiency and economy with which federal agencies carry out their responsibilities. We are interested in business, economics, computer science, government or political affairs majors to work in Washington, D.C., or one of our 15 regional offices. If you are interested in an entry level Evaluator position and have good and oral communication skills, we would like to hear from you. To obtain an appli cation (deadline to apply is. Nov. 14) contact: DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR; No other publication or system lets you target a ' I pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, pleasecomplete 3.nd attach your ad copy and mail to: Hisr,ianic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.c: !0005 or phone(202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) I:Jy 5 p . m . (En Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. U.S. General Accounting Office, Washington Regional Office, 441 G St. NW, Room 5077, Washington, D.C . 20548, Attn: Lau r a Talbott (202) 2758904. An Equal Opportunity Employer PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md. , govern meht office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301 ) 952-3408. Hi spanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephol'le number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by----------Title--------------Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name _ _._ _______ _ Bill To------------Address -------------City, State & Zip --------.,,. \ 5

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Arts & Entertainment Jordano stars in Playing for Keeps , released by Universal, and Gina. Gallegos is featured in The Men' s Club, from Atlantic Releasing Corp. MILAGRO SHOOTING: Casting for th e Milagro Bean field War has bee11 completed, with five Hi s p a n ic actors getting lead roles. Hispanic a ctor Chick Vennera will star as John Mondragon, a role tha t earlier this year was rumored to be for comedian Cheech Marin. Th e other L a t i nos in t h e fil m are Rub e n Blades, Sonia Braga , Julie Carm e n and Carlos Riqu elme (in hi s first En glish-speaking role). The film also stars Richard Bradford, James G a mmon , Melanie Griffith and Christopher Walken. NIELSEN PROBING: Officials of the Federal Trade Commission may investigate the Hispanic audience survey practices of the A.C. Nielson Co., responding to a complaint filed in December by a Spanish-language television station in Miami. The Milagro Bean field War, based on a novel by John Nichols, tells th e story o f N e w Mex i c o far mer s w ho reb elle d again s t l a nd dev e lopers . The movie is being directed and produced by Robert Redford ; Moctezuma Esparza is the co-producer. The FTC ' s Bureau of Competition could request a formal probe of circumstances surrounding the complaint filed by WL TV-Miami . The station charges that Nielsen, one of two widely used rating services, underrepresents Hispanics in its audience sample. According to aWL TV official, " an independent statistical analysis" shows that Nielsen undercoun t s the older Hispanic populations, more likely to watch Spanish language tel e vision , while overcounting younger, bilingual Hispani cs. Shooting of Milagro was supposed to begin Aug . 4 in Chima yo , New Mex i c o , at the town ' s histori c Plaza d e Cerro , but lo c al busin e sses o bj ected to the Hollywood inva s ion . Cast and crew have relo cated near San ta Fe , an d production is now e xpected to continue through mid-Novembe r . The film is by Universal Pictures, with a release date now sl ated for the winter of 1987. ONE LINERS: Arg entine d a ncer Jul i o Bocca recentl y becam e th e first Hi spa n ic l ea d danc e r h i re d by t h e Ame rican B a ll e t Th ea t e r without h a vin g be e n brought up in its d a nce corps ; h e m a kes his d e but with th e company in Angeles th i s December, i n th e Nutc racke r s . A c tre ss T heresa S a l dana headli n e d a n O ct. 1 8 leade rship confe ren c e given by the Hispanic Women's C o un cil in Los Other Hispanics are seen in films now currently in releas e . Daniel Angeles . . Media Report AMERICA' S TIME BOMB: Southwestern Bell Telephone, which encompasses Texas,• Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri, will air its new half-hour documentary, "His panic Dropouts: America' s Time Bomb," on commercial and public television stations in the Southwest this fall-and make the program available for showings by Hispanic and educational organizations nationally. Narrated by actor Edward James Olmos, it includes interviews with several Hispanic leaders. The videotape is available in English and Spanish. Also available are such support materials as a 25page parents ' guide, posters , textbook covers and a leader's guide for presenting the materials. For more information, contact Gary Volluz at (314) 247-5538. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of . Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publ isher Hector Eric ks en-M endoza Edito r F e lix P e r e z R e p o rting : C h a rli e Eri c k sen, Antoni? MejiasRentas, Phil Garcia. ' No port1on of H1;panic Link Wee k ly Report may be reproduced or broadcast i n an y form without advance permission . Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13. issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 percolumn i nch . Ads placed by Tuesday will run i n Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. M.ultiple use rates on reQuest. 6 COMPLAINT DEPARTMENT : The Ame rican Lung Association protested in Wa shington this month that the toba cco industry i s a i ming too much of its advertising at minority com.l munities. "They put far more emphasis into selling cigarettes to blacks and Hispanics than to other population groups , " complained James Swomley, director of the association' s Christmas Seal People. When The Washington Post l a un c hed its new Sunday "Magazine" this fall , i ts cover story featured a black rap singer accused of murder and a white columnist's defense of local store owners who bar black youths on the contention that they're crime-prone. Led by radio personality Cathy Hughes, the capital's black community has staged weekly protests at the Post , dumping more than 50,000 of thP. "Magazine" at its front door. A subsequent issue of the publication featured the predominantly Hispanic Adams -Morgan section of town, where successful Latino businesses abound. The article pictured half a dozen perous non-Hispanics, but the -Antonio Mejias-Rentas lone Hispanic family portrayed was shown in a cramped living room with a clothesli ne of laundry as its centerpiece. Now local Hispanics, led by publisher Jose Sueiro of the w ee kl y Latino, a re t alking protest, too. 1 Reporter Morley Safer's profile of Miami Mayor X avier Suare z on CB5TV's60 Minutes Sept. 28 pleased the mayor and most of th e city's cuba no inhabitants enormously. In a show that alternately savages a nd saints its subjects, Suarez and Miami' s Cubans got the sainthood treatment. The Miami Herald has found one authority, however, who takes exception to such black and-white reporting : Lisandro Perez, chairman of Florida State University's sociology depart ment. The s e gment, whic h ignored a ny problems encountered by Mariel refugees or friction among the city's Latinos and still-in-place white establishment, misled viewers to believe "that all of the power is in the hands of the Cubans, " Perez objected. Charlie Ericksen SPECIAl.. INSTRUCTIONS FoR oUR BLACK AND H J$f'ANIC CUSTOMERS: TR.YING-0-PEAAT ASK FOR HELP FROM A SUPERIOR 't./HITE