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Hispanic link weekly report, October 27, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 27, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
Stumping for U.S. Senate candidate for Maryland Linda Chdvez, President Ronald Reagan helps his former aide raise $402,000 at a fundraiser in Baltimore. The proceeds were the most raised at one event for any federal candidate of either party in the state... At the insistent prodding of U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy, Cuba releases the last imprisoned member of the U.S.-sponsored 2506 Brigade, the force that launched the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba in April 1961. Ram6n Conte Herndndez, 56, was originally sentenced to 30 years. . . California Gov. George Deukmejian criticizes Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, his opponent for the gubernatorial seat, for once nominating United Farm Workers founder and leader
'HR/0R
Cesar Chavez for the Nobel Peace Prize. Deukmejian charges that UFW strikes and boycotts often led tog^leoce. . f\ Thjeujieitest California Poll finds that 34% of that stat||j|6fei:$ favoriheWoon-firmation of state Supreme Court Justiceiiluz Reynoso. Twenty-one percent are against the reconfirmation, with 45% still undecided. .The San Francisco-based Center for Hemispheric Studies at the Institute for Contemporary Studies, described as President Reagan’s favorite think tank, selects Herberto Padilla as its executive director. . . Cesar Ch6vez,Archbishop Patricio Flores, classical guitarist Carlos Montoya, social worker Dr. Antonia Pantoja and labor leader Paul Sanchez are chosen as recipient^ of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor... The U.S. Embassy in El Salvador identifies Jos6 Mauricio Juarez and Yolanda Stets, dual U.S. - Salvadoran citizens, as vidtims of that Central American nation’s Oct. 10 earthquake...
HISPANICLINKWEEK^REPORT®^^
Editor Raps Prop. 63,
Immigration: Long Road Ahead
Editor Raps Prop. 63, Leaves U.S. English
Author and editor Norman Cousins resigned from the advisory board of U.S. English Oct. 15, charging that a referendum it is sponsoring on the California ballot is demeaning to Hispanica
The measure, Proposition, 63 declares English the state’s official language and permits private citizens to sue local or state government agencies for not stopping the \ “erosion” of English.
In a letter to Gerda Bikales, executive director of U.S. English, Cousins said that he initially favored the referendum but now recognizes its “negative symbolic significance.” He added, “I fear a momentum may have been created that is carrying us in an unwise and unhealthy direction.”
Another member of the group’s 21 -member board, author Gore Vidal, told The Los Angeles Times that had he been informed of the proposition, he would have advised against it. “Obviously, this amendment is out to get the Hispanics,” he said.
Salvadoran Asylum Denied
A federal appeals court ruled Oct. 15 that men of military age fleeing El Salvador did not qualify for political asylum in the United States on the basis of membership in a “social group.”
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld a 1982 decision by an Immigration Court judge which rejected the argument of the two Salvadoran plaintiffs, Luis Sanchez-Trujillo and Luis Escobar Nieto.
Sanchez-Trujillo and Escobar applied for asylum under 1980 revisions in immigration law which permitted asylum for people who could prove a “well-founded fear of persecution” based on membership in a religious, political, racial or social group.
The Salvadorans argued that young men not affiliated with that country’s military were suspected of being guerrilla sympathizers.
The appeals court held ihat a social group was a “group closely affiliated with each other”
An Immigration Appeals Board ruled earlier that the risk to the two men was no greater than that to other Salvadorans.
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, Hispanic civil rights and immigrant assistance groups, and other church and private agencies with long-standing concern for refugees and new immigrants moved this week to define and develop their roles in implementing the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The bill was passed finally in the Senate, 63 to 24, on Oct. 16, two days before Congress adjourned.
It will be several months before INS gears up fully to deal with the many new responsibilities it will shoulder relating to legalization policies and processes, policing employers, assisting agribusiness in maintaining a supply of field labor and checking the relatively free flow of undocumented workers between Mexico and the United States.
Although it has sporadically been preplanning programs to effect many of the changes in the ultimate bill (as Congress flashed hot and cold on various elements of the legislation in recent years), INS in Washington is cautious about announcing any specific plans and has yet to meet with organizations and agencies which are expected to be key players in the legalization process.
Talk Ban Tab: $184,000
Los Angeles County has had to pay $184,000' for the legal costs of defending a 1985 order issued by three municipal judges requiring^ that their staff speak only English on the jo\
After the County Counsel refused last March to defend the judges on grounds that their order was indefensible, the county was forced by a municipal court order to retain a private law firm at taxpayers'expense.
Auditor-Controller Mark Bloodgood said that as of Oct. 10 the county paid $183,735.30 in legal fees. An additional bill for $2,919 was filed that week.
Judges John Bunnett, Porter de Dubovay and Russell Schooling ordered county personnel in the Southeast Judicial District in Huntington Park to speak only English after a women complained a year and a half ago that fellow employees were gossiping about her in Spanish.
In March 1985, employee Alva Gutierrez and 12 other Hispanic employees filed for and received a preliminary injunction. The judges filed an appeal and are awaiting a decision from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.
Reflecting the church’s interest, the United States Catholic Conference in Washington has asked each bishop nationally to name a contact person with whotnit can work in legalization efforts Such groups are expected to play brokerage roles between INS and those seeking to legalize their status-individuals residing in this country since Jan. 1,1982.
Hispanic groups such as the Mexican American Legal Defense $nd Educational Fund and League of United Latin American Citizens-both of whom fought the legislation to the end - expressed more concern with what they perceive as dangers to all Hispanics inherent in such provisions of the bill as
\V ‘ continued on page 2
Raids Net 2,800 Aliens
Border Patrol agents arrested more than 2,800 undocumented aliens in San Diego County during a five-day roundup that ended Oct. 17.
Riding horses, motorcycles, all-terrain vehicles and assisted by a helicopter patrol, the operation netted more than 600 aliens on its final day. The roundup, prompted by complaints from public officials and residents in northern San Diego County cities, concentrated on popular gathering places for aliens working in agriculture.
P Attempts to strengthen federal regulations gpveming the safety and use of pesticides came to a halt as the 99th Congress failed to adopt a compromise bill before it adjourned Oct. 18.
On Oct. 6, the Senate passed by voice vote legislation that expanded and expedited the testing of active ingredients through assessed fees on manufacturers of insecticides, herbicides and pesticides.
The House passed a similar bill on Sept.
19. The primary difference between the House and Senate versions was an amendment to the Senate bill allowing states to impose stricter standards.
Both the Senate and House measures were the first major revisions- long sought by farm workers-si nee1972 in the Federal Insecticide. Fungicide and Rodenticide Act Farm workers have long cited their increased incidence of intestinal and skin disease and birth defects to working with untested pesticides.
isticide Legislation Dies


Events Raise $120,000
The .National Hispanic Scholarship Fund raisec^.§re^hq|T$120,000 at its fundraisers held si’rnuitanfedusly in seven cities across the nation earlier this month, said the organ izatton’s executive director Oct. 17.
The TO-year-old NH&F held its f und-rajsing dinners in Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Houston,
' Miami; New'Yoflcand San Francisco on Oct. 9. Ernest Robles, NHSFs executive director, told Weekly Report that proceeds from the dinners will help the organization distribute from $900,000 to$1 million in scholarships to .post-secondary Hispanic students for the 1987-88 academic year. This year $589,000 was awarded to 857 students.
In 1976 - the first year awards were given - NHSF awarded $30,000 to 115 students.
Scholarshipsrange from $800 to $1,000 for students iri graduate and professional schools, $600 to $800 for undergraduates and $300 motivational grants for community college students.
Besides the funds raised and the increased visibility, Robles said there were major corporate sponsors who pledged their support.
‘ Robles'Expressed pleasure over the nonpartisan, nature of the dinners. Barbara Bush, - Wife df U.S. Vice President George Bush, a Republican, keynoted in Dallas; Florida Gov. Robert Graham, a Democrat, headlined the event in Miami.___________
Prominent Latinos
Gearing-up for the race to determine who will represent a new predominantly Hispanic Los Angeies Council district, two prominent Latino public officials recently moved within that -district's boundaries.
California Assemblywoman Gloria Molina, 38, and Los Angeles school board member Larry Gonzalez, 30, although not formally announcing their,candidacies, have indicated
Prisoners’ Plea Rejected
The five-year legal battle to gain asylum or constitutional rights for the 1,813 Cuban refugees held in the Atlanta federal prison has exhausted all its avenues of legal recourse, said the attorney for the refugees on Oct. 17.
The U.S. Supreme Court decided on Oct. 14 not to hear the case. Any decision on the fate of the refugees will now be made by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.
The imprisoned Cubans were part of a group of 125,000 people who came to the United States in 1980 on a boatlift - the Freedom Flotilla - from Mariel Harbor in Cuba. Those in the Atlanta prison either broke U.S. law or were imprisoned immediately upon their arrival under the belief that they had broken Cuban law.
Those accused or convicted of breaking U.S. or Cuban law cannot remain in the United States, according to INS regulations.
Cuba President Fidel Castro had promised to take back the refugees but reneged when the United States' started its Radio Marti broadcasts to Cuba in May 1985. Radio Marti . is financed by the U.S. government.
2
Civil Rights Commission Reinecf In
The U.S. House of Representatives agreed to a Senate compromise Oct. 17 that would cut the budget of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from $ 12 million to$7.5 million, ^guaranteeing $2 million for regional office joperatiohs and limiting the number of paid working days for its chairman and commissioners.
Brock Refuses to Meet
Labor Secretary Bill Brock rejected a request by a former top-level Reagan appointee to' meet with him and leaders of major national Hispanic organizations to discuss, among other issues, the small number of Latinos in' the Labor Department's executive service and the lack of program money for Hispanic groups.
Former Assistant Labor Secretary Frank Casillas, who in September criticized the department’s “insensitivity” toward Hispanics, said his second letterto Brockelicitedareply from a Labor Department undersecretary, who wrote that Brock was too busy to meet with the group.
Casillas, chairman of the Illinois Hispanic Republicans, said he would “give, one more shot” at a meeting through two U.S. Senators, whom he declined to identify. Until then, he added, he will delay a decision on “going public nationwide” to air the complaints.
Eye Council Seat
they were seriously considering running for the district seat.
The 15-member City Council on Oct. 8 voted 8-2 to hold a special election in the redrawn 1 st District on Feb. 3. That same vote set Oct. 6 as the date that candidates had to become residents of the district Molina moved in the weekend of Oct 4. Gonzalez moved in several weeks ago after having lived for several years a mile and a half outside district borders.
Until his death Aug. 12, Howard Finn had represented the 1 st District in San Fernando Valley. After his death, the City Council moved the district to downtown Los Angeles. It is now 69% Hispanic, second in Hispanic predominance only to lone Latino Councilman Richard Alatorre’s 13th District
The district remaps were a result of a lawsuit by the U.S. Justice Department that charged the City with diluting the voting power of Latinos. The suit has since been dropped.
Ship Bomb Plot Alleged
An assistant U.S. attorney in Hartford, Conn., claimed Oct. 16 that the underground Puerto Rican independence group charged with being involved in the September 1983 $7 million robbery of a Wells Fargo depot had plans to blow up a ship in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
Assistant U.S. Attorney Albert Dabrowski said the plans were uncovered from documents seized in Puerto Fico.
The Justice Department contends the robbery, which occurred in West Hartford, was committed by an independence group called Los Mache-teros Sixteen people, have been charged.
The plan was part of the $576 billion omnibus spending bill forfiscal year 1987. The House had originally voted to shut down the commission by Dec. 31.
The commissioners approved a staffing plan to eliminate seven of the body’s 10 regional offices at their Sept. 26 meeting. In fiscal year 1986, the regional offices were staffed by 56 people, with $5 million in funding. Currently, they have less than 40 employees.
The bill trims Chairman Clarence Pendleton from 240 days of work last fiscal year to 125 days this year.The eight commissioners are limited to 75 working days.
Other stipulations include spending ceilings of $20,000 for consultants, $185,000 for temporary employees and $40,000 for contracts
The commission was to meet Oct. 24 to decide, among other things, what the staffing level will be under the new budget.
Moves to abolish the commission gathered momentum last spring when the General Accounting Office charged it with mismanagement and favoritism in its hirings.
Hispanic Groups, Others Begin Immigration Plans
continued from page 1
employer sanctions.
Mario Moreno, who directs MALDEFs Washington office, scoffed at headline reports in such newspapers as The New York Times and USA Today that the bill could provide amnesty to 4 million persons. He cited Congressional Budget Office and Census Bureau studies which place the number of eligibles at between 1 and 1.5 million.
“These persons must still hurdle some 15 to 20 INS exclusionary provisions,” he said. “Additionally, remember that these people have been living here invisibly for years, and now the United States government is telling them to prove it, to create a paper trail.”
For the most part, Moreno said, the legalization provision will “just identify people for deportation.”
The National Council of La Raza was among the first Hispanic groups to prepare a simple guide for individuals affected by the bill.
Available free (see Collecting), it defines critical provisions in the legislation and offers specific recommendations to employers, undocumented persons who have resided here since Jan. 1, 1982, and non-citizen farm workers who have worked at least 90 days in agriculture during the past year.
Foremost among its recommendations to the undocumented:
• Do not go to the INS toapply for legalization.
• Do not pay money to anyone who purports to be able to help you apply for legalization.
• If you want advice, contact one of the major voluntary agencies with a track record in the immigration field.
• Begin to collect documentation showing that you have been a continuous resident of the United States since before Jan. 1,1982.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Cecilio Morales, guest columnist
Immigration War Still On
After years of immigration reform debate, final passage of the bill this month evoked the end of the Vietnam War. Then, the Pentagon said: “They didn’t win, we didn’t lose.” On the day the immigration bill finally passed, Hispanic activists on whom I tried out my fancy found that the phrase’s ambiguity rang true.
They’d won an acceptable compromise between what they called the “pro-immigrant” House version and a Senate bill described as “the worst we’ve ever seen.” Result Congress enacted the first sweeping reform of immigration laws since the 1954 McCarran-Walter Act.
A more subtle outcome throughout debate was the achievement of remarkable unity within the Hispanic community, which suddenly demanded to know whether this nation would live up to its pluralist motto E Pluribus Unurn, unity from diversity.
“We all had different tactics, but on substance we were all in the same place, ” said Charles Kamasaki, director of policy analysis for the National Council of La Raza,last week.
Even Congressional Hispanic Caucus members, who split 6-5 against the final bill, weren’t that far apart in their overall evaluation of the legislation. They just gave differing weights to the bill's often conflicting elements.
BILL BROKE NEW GROUND
For the three national Hispanic organizations leading the work in Washington-the League of United Latin American Citizens(LULAC), the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund(MALDEF), and La Raza- the exercise was a period of maturation.
Working together they learned- as Arnold Torres, a former LULAC lobbyist, told me - that “nobody can lobby like LULAC, litigate like MALDEF, or research like La Raza.”
Together they won the first major labor protections for foreign farm workers, the first civil rights coverage for foreigners seeking a job and new hope of amnesty for the undocumented.
These victories must be weighed against real new fears of prejudice at the personnel office on the basis of the new law’s sanctions against employers newly hiring the undocumented.
To those most closely affected by the new law, attorney Rick Swartz had two words of advice: “Sit tight.”
OMINOUS FOR LEGAL RESIDENTS
“It would be a mistake for undocumented persons to walk into an office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service tomorrow and ask for amnesty,” said Swartz, president of the National Forum on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, who urged first a consultation at a community immigration agency.
Only about 1.6 million of the 3 to 5 million undocumented aliens in the country are likely to be amnestied since the law covers only those who have lived here since 1982, Census Bureau estimates suggest.
Attorney Wade Henderson of the American Civil Liberties Union, who opposed the measure’s final passage, added that the law is also ominous for legal residents and U.S. citizens.
“Subliminally, and not just in the workplace, this bill promotes discrimination against people who fit the public’s stereotype of the undocumented alien,” said Henderson of penalties against the future hire of the undocumented.
Under the new law, however, there are no penalties to employers who retain current employees who don’t have papers; also, businesses denying jobs simply because an applicant is foreign, or “looks undocumented” can be sued.
Clearly, the legislative battle for immigration reform is over, but the war for the nation’s soul, unlike the Vietnam intervention, goes on unambiguously.
(Cecilio Morales, managing editor of the Employment & Training Reporter, has written extensively on immigration since 1981.)
Sin peios an la lengua
CONGRESSIONAL CALAVERA: Passage of the Simpson/ Rodino immigration bandwagon bill has drawn a highfalutin response from our national lawmakers’ counterparts south of the border.
No talk of “Yankee oppressors” or the like.
Instead, Mexico’aChamber of Deputies chastized our Congress, in a unanimously approved declaration, for its failure to consider the bill’s “bilateral implications.”
Deputy Romeo Flores Caballero, who once picked cotton in the United States, called for “intelligence and reason” in implementing the bill; expounding that“solving such a delicate problem demands a multidisciplinary approach and bilateral participation..
As Mexico’s Dta de los muertos nears, it makes one yearn for less rhetorical political commentary, something to excite our body juices like the turn-of-the-century satirical penny broadsides of Jose Guadalupe Posada that blanketed Mexico when I was still a maiden.
Publisher Vanegas Arroyo teamed with Posada and other artists such as Manuel Manilla - to whom la calavera infernal (below) is attributed - to produce dozens of daily and weekly calaveras- chronicles which used skull and skeleton figures to comment bn the happenings of the day during the regime of Don Porfirio Diaz.
In humorous verse, politicians were teased as if already dead. The calavera - skull - as an art object predated Posada by centuries, of course. “Death was a unique persona in Mexico,” wrote Jas Reuter in “Posada’s Mexico,” the magnificent Library of Congress publication, now out of print. “In the pre-Hispanic cultures, death was just a further step in life itself...”
In ceremonies now mimicked in Nov. 1 All Souls’ Day celebrations, the deceased were buried with clothing, food and prized possessions - in the case of a rich man, wrote Reuter, “with jewels and weapons and sometimes even his servants.. to insure the departed certain comforts on his long journey to the Beyond.”
In the 16th century, the Spaniards spoiled all that. They brought with them to the New World the European concept of death - “a terrible, frightening Death, doubly inflicted by the conquistadores,” Reuter wrote. . . Once as a physical death in the form of slaughter, torture and alien illnesses that decimated the indigenous population; a second time as death in the abstract- hell, to which sinners would be consigned after the Final Judgment... European Death: worm-eaten corpses...”
The targets of artists like Posada ranged from politicos to drunks to careless train conductors to the yellow fever mosquito
to, of course, Uncle Sam.
If he were still with us today, Posada no doubt would have heralded the arrival of the99th Congresses immigration “reform” effort as we have done, using his famous figure, on our back page.
- Kay Barbaro
3
Oct. 27, 1986
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
ACTION ALERT: The National Council of La Raza issued an “Action Alert” on the implications of the new immigration legislation Oct. 20. For a free copy of the four-page advisory and a two-page assessment of the bill by NCLR President Raul Yzaguirre, contact: Charles Kamasaki, NCLR, 20 F St. NW, 2nd floor, Washington, D.C 20001 (202) 628-9600.
IMMIGRATION BILL SUMMARY: The American Immigration Lawyers Association has prepared a six-page summary of the immigration bill passed by Congress. For a copy of it and a five-page memorandum by the National Forum on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Director Rick Swartz describing probable implementation steps and monitoring proposals, send $3 to NFIR&C, 533 Eighth St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
MANAGEMENT TRAINING CAREERS: “Representation of Minorities in Graduate Training and Management Careers” is a 108-page report by the Graduate Management Admission Council detailing Hispanic, black and other minority representation in management education and jobs. For a free copy, write to: Susan Lankford, GMAC, 11601 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1060, Los Angeles, Calif. 90025.
NATIONAL POSTER CONTEST: To help promote Small Business Week May 10-16,1987, the Small Business Administration is sponsoring a nationwide poster design contest. The winner will be awarded $2,000 and honored in Washington, D.C. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 22. For more information, write to: Office of Public Communications, SBA, 1441 L St. NW, Rm. 926, Washington, D.C. 20416.
LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIPS: The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. is offering 12 nine-month paid internships to college graduates and graduate students. Those selected will be placed in governmental and non-governmental institutions For more information, write to: Hispanic Leadership Program Director, CHCI, 504 C St. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002.
COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT PROFILES: “Profiles, College-Bound Seniors, 1985” is the final installment in a series on trends during thp past five years. This report looks at the academic background and college admissions test performances according to racial and ethnic group. For a copy, send $5 to: The College Board, 45 Columbus Ave., New York N.Y. 10023-6917.
CONNECTING
(Late news on what’s occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
NAMED TO $430 MILLION TRUST BOARD Rita Granados, a former welfare mother of five who now works for the Community Action Marin social service agency, has been selected as one of seven members of a $430 million trust founded to help the needy who live in California’s Marin County.
The trust was established in the will of heiress Beryl Buck and will begin functioning Jan. 1. Members include Buck’s nephew, an investment consultant. Granados, of San Rafael, is one of two members designated to be selected by board supervisors.
LAMA RECEIVES $192,000 AWARD The Latin American Manufacturers Association is receiving a $192,388 award from the U.S. Commerce Department's Minority Business Development Agency to increase minority-owned business participation in the development and production of the multi-billion-dollar Air Force G-17 transport aircraft.
LAMA will develop a strategic marketing plan to involve minority firms in the project’s earliest negotiating stages.
Established in 1973, LAMA has been responsible for more than $350 million awarded to Hispanic-owned businesses in manufacturing and high-tech industries for the Defense Department and private sector.
SEATTLE PROJECT TEACHES JOURNALISM The Concilio for the Spanish Speaking of King County, Wash., based in Seattle, has developed a Latino journalism education project utilizing its magazine La Voz, plus funds from corporate sponsors and the educational facilities of Seattle Central Community College.
The program, inaugurated this fall, augments classroom instruction in journalism with practical experience in writing, editing and production of La Voz Its instructor is Bruce Johansen, a journalist for six years with The Seattle Times, now on leave as an associate professor of communication at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, to work with the Concilio.
The Seattle-First National Bank Foundation provided a grant of $5,000 to launch the program.
Calendar____________________________
THIS WEEK
SUCCESS IN THE CORPORATE WORLD New York Oct. 30
“Facing the Challenge of Change” is the theme of the 6th annual conference of Wall Street’s chapter of Image. Union City, N.J., Mayor Robert Mendez will be a keynote speaker, with five H ispanic business-persons being honored.
Iris Quiles (212) 484-2636
HISPANIC SOCIAL CONCERNS Cleveland Oct. 30, 31
Ohio’s Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will co-sponsor a conference for social service professionals working with Hispanics on problems ranging from drug and alcohol abuse to acculturation to incest and rape.
Julia Arbini-Haywood (614) 466-8333
LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRANTS Great Neck N.Y. Oct. 31
The chairman of Queens College (Flushing, N.Y.) Latin American Studies Program, George Priestley, will discuss the lives and acculturation of Latin Americans who have migrated to the United States. Barbara Richardson (718) 670-4172 4
SUCCESS AND WOMEN OF COLOR Chevy Chase, Md. Nov. 1
Cultural differences between Hispanas and other women and how they influence stereotypes, and balancing a career with your personal life will be discussed at the Organization of Pan Asian American Women’s conference.
Cindee Teves Jacobs (301) 530-7219
COMING SOON
CINEFESTIVAL Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center San Antonio Nov. 5-14 CineFestival (512) 271-9070
BUSINESS LUNCHEON Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce Washington, D.C. Nov. 6 Linda Rentz (202) 296-0335
FUNDRAISER
Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Services
New York Nov. 6
Stella Sanchez (212) 665-6369
EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS Association of Mexican American Educators Anaheim, Calif. Nov. 6-8 Gloria Franco (818) 919-2344
GLOBAL MULTICULTURALISM Chula Vista City Schools
Oct. 27r 1986
San Diego Nov. 7, 8
Barbara Takashima (619) 483-3925 ext 228
TELECOMMUNICATIONS OPPORTUNITIES
National Telecommunications and Information
Administration
Kingston, Jamaica Nov. 9-12
R.T. Gregg (202) 277-1551
LATINO FAMILY DYNAMICS Alcoholism Center for Women Los Angeles Nov. 15 Clarissa Chandler (213) 381-7805
SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT
Mexican American Alumni Association of Loyola
Marymount University
Marina del Rey, Calif. Nov. 15
Carol Gilger (213) 642-5136
SPOTLIGHT
ENGLISH PRIMACY FORUM: Former California U.S. Sen. S.I. Hayakawa, the founder of the U.S. English movement will, along with Sarah Melendez, associate director of the office of minority concerns of the American Council on Education, discuss the movement to declare English the nation’s official language. Sponsored by the LaAlianza student law organization of Georgetown University, the event will be held Nov. 15 in Washington, D.C. For information, contact Richard Olona at (202) 488-7757.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields:
Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant
Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degrees and full-time graduate students pursuing master's and doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered The program consists of 90- or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and J une-September. Individuals interested in the January-April session must submit their applications no later than Nov. 14, 1986. Upon completion of the 90-120-day experience, individuals with completed master’s degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment. For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620.
CONTROLLER
Camp Fire Inc., a national voluntary youth agency is seeking qualified candidates for the position of controller.
This position requires active participation as a member of a management team in forecasting, planning and daily management of the agency, as well as staff support and consultation to national board and committees as assigned. Candidate’s overall responsibilities include finance and asset management and directing support services, such as accounting, management information systems, word processing, printing operations, property management, purchasing, building services and maintenance.
We are seeking candidates with supervisory experience and the appropriate combination of education/experience/knowledge in: business administration, finance management and accounting. A knowledge of management information systems, including, but not limited to, automated data processing and word processing and various office machines is preferred. CPA degree helpful.
Camp Fire Inc. provides competitive salary and an attractive benefit package. Interested applicants must send salary history to:
Mr. Rick Williams, Assistant Director Human Resources Management Camp Fire Inc.
4601 Madison Ave.
Kansas City, Mo. 64112
Deadline for application is Oct. 31.
Anth ropology/America n Stud ies/Sociology: Assistant Professors, tenure track in Anthropology, American Studies or Sociology. Completed Ph.D. required plus demonstrated research in topics related to southwestern His-panics. Joint teaching and research appointments in southwestern Hispanic Studies and academic department to commence in Fall 1987, contingent upon available funds. Deadline: December 1, 1986. Send vitae to Director, Southwestern Hispanic Research Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131. AA/EOE.
TRANSLATOR/EDITOR
Major publisher of bilingual dictionaries requires translator (English to Spanish). Candidate should be bilingual with Spanish as native language, must relocate to London for two to three years. Applicants should submit resume to Jean Paradise, MacMillan Publishing Company, 866 3rd Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022 (212) 702-4265. _
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
ENGINEER CORPS JOBS
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks Persons wishing to get more information should contact Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office, U.S Army Corps of Engineers, Washington, D.C. 20314-1000(202)272-0098.
JOIN THE LARGEST (TEN THOUSAND CIRCULATION) AND FINEST HISPANIC MONTHLY NEWSPAPER IN CHICAGOLAND, CHICAGO CATOLICO, AS EDITOR. Your responsibilities will include writing and editing for this newspaper as well as completing writing assignments for the Chicago Catholic (our English weekly). You must be bilingual and possess an understanding of Catholic issues relative to Hispanics. Unusual opportunity for someone to shine in the rising Hispanic community of Chicago. Send resume and non-returnable sample to: Vince Saputo, General Manager, P.O. Box 11181, Chicago, III. 60611.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
Washington, D.C., national Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist in the planning/imple-mentation of Annual Conference. College degree/ equivalent experience in job-related area Strong writing, typing (70 wpm), telephone skills. Selfstarter, can work under pressure without need of close supervision. Position available immediately. Salary range: $14-16,000. Contact Ma-rialba Martinez/Lupe Aguirre with resume at (202) 628-9600.
National non-profit organization with for-profit centers, seeks a Finance Director/Comptroller. Must be able to direct in-house computerized accounting system and supervise two employees Report to President Capitol Hill location. Salary in high 20s - low 30s. CPA desirable but not necessary. Send resume to: Mr. May, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036.
HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES
You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholarships given annually to outstanding Hispanic students across the United States.
The combined federal campaign now gives you the opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your contribution.
The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax-exempt organization. Invest in your community today and support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101 (415) 892-9971.
The following two positions are with Arlington County, Arlington, Va. Please note deadline for applications.
CHIEF, SOLID WASTE DIVISION Ann. # 1671-7 A-DPW Senior level professional work as the Chief of the Solid Waste Division in the Department of Public Works. Chief is responsible for managing 78 employees and 49 pieces of equipment; projecting future demands and developing plans to meet those demands; developing the Division’s annual operating and capital budget and ensuring that those budgets are not overspent; and enforcing theRef useOrdinanceand the Litter Ordinance.
Requires a Bachelor's degree in Environmental Science, Engineering, Public Administration or related field, plus four years of current professional experience in an occupational area incorporating many of the major job duties of this position.
Arlington County offers a comprehensive benefits package. Salary range is $37,061-$52,070 per year. Applications must be received by thePersonnelDepartment no later than 5:00 p.m., Nov. 13.
BUREAU CHIEF FOR MANAGEMENT & BUDGET
Salary$29,991-$33,049 Ann. # 16097ADHS Professional position in the Administrative Services Division, Dept, of Human Services. Responsible for overall administration and supervision of the department* s centralized budget operation ($25 million 300 FTEs). Duties include coordinating all aspects of budget process including preparation, policy review, program evaluation and fiscal analysis.
Requires BA/BS in Public or Business administration or related field plus two years professional experience in management and budgetary and/or financial analysis. Prefer MBA/MPA and additional experience in program and financial management Official Arlington County Application Form required for each position. To request application material, please call (703) 558-2167 or TTY(703) 558-2028 (hearing impaired only) weekdays between 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department by 5 p.m., Nov. 20.
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N. 14th St., Arlington.Va. 22201 EOE
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Bilingual (English-Spanish); supervise programs and develop funding. Requirements: BA/BS and one year experience. Send resume to: Hispanic Institute, 368 Paramus Rd., Paramus, N.J. 07652.
PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for executives and professionals. Mail or phone your corporate classified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m. (EST) Tuesday will be carried in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates: $35percolumn inch.


Arts& Entertainment
ALL THAT ART: The works of hundreds of Latin American artists can be seen this fall in museums and galleries in New York - and across the nation.
In New York, the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art continues through Nov. 30 its Bienal Latinoamericana del Grabado with some 200 prints by artists from throughout the hemisphere. At the Sept. 25 opening of the exhibit, three artists were announced as the most outstanding of the showing.
Each of the three - Antonio Martorell from Puerto Rico, Liliana Porter from Argentina and Venezuela’s Ricardo Benaim- received a $750 award.
In a parallel exhibit, prints by several Puerto Rican artists can be seen through Dec. 12 at the Oller-Campeche Gallery of the commonwealth’s office in Manhattan.
New Yorkers may also enjoy solo exhibits by various Latinos:
At El Museo del Barrio, paintings by Honduran expressionist Francisco Alvarado Juarez (on view Oct. 24-Jan. 25) constitute what the artist describes as a “three-year journey into visual narrative.”
The Littlejohn-Smith Gallery shows 21 paper works by Venezuela painter Alirio Palacios through Oct. 28.
At the Jeffrey Neale Gallery, oil paintings by Ven!pzuela’^>Carlos| Sosa are on view through Nov. 1.
Around the country: Peruvian writer and painter Felipe Buendia will bring his Lima Tradicional showing to Austin, Texas, this fall as part of Austin-Lima sister city activities. Another Peruvian, Leoncio Villanueva, has an exhibition of paintings and drawings at the Organization of American States Building in Washington, D.C, through Nov. 3.
ONE LINERS: Los Angeles’ Plaza de la Raza will launch an Arts Consortium next month with three other city groups - the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, the California Afro-American Museum and the Craft and Folk Art Museum - to “introduce ethnic arts” to a larger audience... Argentina’s chamber string ensemble Camerata Bariloche continues the International Series at Washington, D.C.’s Kennedy Center with a performance Oct. 27... In Cuba, the Festival Internacional de Ballet de La Habana is staged Oct 28- Nov. 9 with companies from the United States and four other countries... La tercera palabra, by Spanish playwright Alejandro Casona, opens at New York’s Thalia Spanish Theatre Oct. 31... Spanish singer Rocio Durcal performs at Los Angeles’ Universal Amphitheater Nov. 2... Celebrating the 12th anniversary of its service to Hispanic artists, the Bronx (N.Y.) Museum of the Arts’ photographic exhibit, “A Decade of En Foco,” runs through Nov. 13. . . _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
THE TALE OF A TALE: New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez conducted a one-on-one interview with New York Gov. Mario Cuomo on Aug. 21. From it, he planned to develop a series of weekly columns for publication in the News this month, looking mainly at the governor's relationship with the Latirio community.
The first of those columns, published Oct. 9, ignited a public brawl which smoldered at first, but eventually drew the interest and/or participation of nearly every Hispanic organization and leader in the state, as well as the city’s media.
Two of Cuomo’s quoted comments stirred the embers:
First, he made reference to an old Ronald Reagan campaign stunt where Reagan held up a fat section of Help Wanted ads. “People don’t want those jobs,” Cuomo was quoted by Perez. “And if you go to the Latin Americans, the Hispanic Americans and the blacks, they don’t want those jobs. A lot of them would rather be on welfare. They don’t want to
starve, and I can understand them.”
Second, Perez quoted Cuomo as saying that some Puerto Ricans, when they immigrated to New York 10 or 15 years ago, “didn’t have a pair of shoes until they got to the airport.” While the English-language press- including Perez’s own paper - initially saw nothing newsworthy in the governor’s remarks, the Spanish-language press did. It jumped on the story. It elicited reaction from Hispanic leaders around town. The governor's office began receiving calls asking for explanations In his Oct. 16 column, Perez related what happened:
“Cuomo’s press secretary denied to the Spanish news media that the governor had ever said those things Now they were calling me a liar.
“As I read this in the Spanish-language daily, El Diario-La P re ns a, I was kissing a precious micro-cassette tape-recording of my entire interview. No other tape had ever looked so beautiful... ”
Perez shared his tape with El Diario and Cuomo press secretary Martin Steadman “changed his tune” - reported P6rez. Now Steadman said the governor's remarks “could be misunderstood if not placed in the proper context”
So Perez ran the full quote. Perez’s paper finally began playing the story in its news columns.
Herman Badillo, candidate for state comptroller on the same ticket as Cuomo, asked the governor to retract his statements, carefully adding that they were inconsistent with Cuomo’s “documented compassion for the poor.”
Now The New York Times was covering the feud, too. It an article by Jesus Rangel, it quoted State Senator Olga Mendez, a Bronx Democrat as accusing El Diario and New Yorks other Spanish-language daily, Noticias del Mundo, of being “Republican newspapers, politically motivated in their coverage.” Responded El Diario editor Manuel de Dios Unanue: “(Mendez) is justifying herself so she can receive favors from the governor. She doesn’t have any idea of what’s happening in the New York Hispanic community.”
By World Series time, Hispanic Democrats, including Badillo, had accepted an “apology^’ by Cuomo. Angelo Falcon, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, was accusing the “so-called established Puerto Rican leadership” of “turning its back on the community and selling its soul to the devil, if they have a soul.” And Miguel Perez was looking for his next interview. - Charlie Ericksen
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C.-20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
Phil Garcia
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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. t 1R/CR Cesar Chavez for the Nobel Peace Prize . Deukmejian charges that UFW strikes and boycotts often led f) California Poll that 34% of that Malting The News This Week Stumping for U .S. Senate candidate for Maryland Linda Chavez, President Ronald Reagan helps his former aide raise $402,000 at a fundraiser in Baltimore . The proceeds were the most raised at one event for any federal candidate of either party in the state ... At the insistent prodding of U.S. Sen. Edward Kennedy, Cuba releases the last imprisoned member of the U.S. -sponsored 2506 Brigade, the force that launched the Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba in April 1961 . Ram6n Conte Hernandez, 56, was originally sentenced to 30 years. . . California Gov . George Deukmejian criticizes Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, his opponent for the gubernatorial seat, for once nominating United Farm Workers founder and leader firmation of state Supreme Court J Reynoso. Twentyone percent are against the reconfirmatiOI\ with 40% still undecided .. The San Franc i sco-based Center for Hemispheric Studies at the . Institute for Conte . mporary Studies , described as President Reagan's favor i te think tank, selects Herberto Padilla as its executive director . . . Cesar Chavez , Archbishop Patricio Flores, classical guitarist Carlos Montoya, social worker Dr. Antonia Pantoja and labor leader Paul Sanchez are chosen as . recipientll of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor ... l:he U.S . Embassy in El Salvador identifies Jose Juarez and Yolanda Stets, dual U.S. Salvadoran citizens, as vicfiins of that Central American nation's Oct. 10 earthquake... Vol. 4 No. 43 HISPANIC LINK WEE EPORT Oct 27, 1986 Editor Raps Prop. 63, Leaves U.S. English Author and editor Norman Cousins re signed from the advisory board of U.S. English Oct. 15 , charging that a referendum it is sponsoring on the California ballot is demean ing to Hispanics. The measure , Proposit ion, 63 declares English the state ' s official language and permits private citizens to sue local or state government agencies for not stopping the " erosion " of Engl ish. In a letter to Gerda Bikales , e x ecutive director of U .S. English , Cousins said that he initially favored the referendum but now recognizes its " negative symbolic signi ficance. " He added, "I fear a momentum may have been created that is carrying us in an unwise and unhealthy direction." Another member of the group's 21member board , author Gore Vidal , told The Los Angeles Times that had he been informed of the proposition , he would have advised against it. " Obviously , this amendment is out to get the Hispanics, " he said . Salvadoran Asylum Denied A federal appeals court ruled Oct. 15 that men of military age fleeing El Salvador did not qualify for political asylum in the United States on the basis of membership in a " social group. " The 9th U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco upheld a 1982 decision by an Immigration Court judge which rejected the argument of the two Salvadoran pfaintiffs , Luis Sanchez Trujillo and Luis Escobar Nieto. Sanchez Trujillo and Escobar applied for asylum under 1980 revisions in immigration law which permitted asylum for people who could prove a fear of persecution" based on membership in a religious , political, racial or social group. The Salvadorans argued that young men not affiliated with that country's military were suspected of being guerrilla sympathizers . The appeals court held 1hat a sociu ! group was a "group . closely affiliated with each other. " An Immigration Appeals Board ruled earlier that the risk the two men was no greater than that to other Salvadorans. Immigration: Long Road . . J:\head The U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service, Hispanic civil rights and immigrant assistance groups , and other church and private agencies with long standing concern for refugees and new immigrants moved this week to define and develop their roles in implementing the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The bill was passed finally in the Senate , 63 to 24 , on Oct. 16 , two days before Congress adjourned . It will be several months before INS gears up fully to deal with the many new responsibilities it will shoulder relating to legalization policies and processes , policing employers , assisting agribusiness in maintaining a supply of field labor and checking the relatively free flow of undocumented workers between Mexico and the United States. Reflecting the church' S interest, the United States Catholic Conference in Washington has asked each bishop nationally to name a contact person with whom-, it can work in legalizatiqn efforts. Such groups are expected to play brokerage roles between INS and those seeking to legalize their s tatus-individuals residing in this country since Jan. 1, 1982. Hispanic groups such as the Mexican Amer ican Legal Defense Educational Fund and League of United Latin ' American Citizensboth of whom fought the legislati . on to the end expressed more concero with what' they perceive as dangers to all Hispanics inherent in such provisions of the b [ ll as \__ continued on page 2 Raids Net 2,800 Alien$ Border Patrol agents arrested more than Although it has sporadically been preplanning 2,800 undocum
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Events Raise $120,000 Civil Rights Commission Reinect In,. The National H ispanic Scholarship Fund $ } 20,090 at its fundrai?ers held simutfcfueously in seven cities across the nation eartier ' this month, said the or:ga nizatton's li)Xecutive director Oct. 17 . _ The NH!3-F h'eld its furid-rajsing , d1nners 1n.QI:11cago; Dalla&, .Denver, Houston, ; M iam i;-New'Y orkan.d Sah fra'hcisco on Oct. 9 . Ernest Robles, NHSPs executive director, . told VVe.ekly Report that proceeds from the dinnerswil. l heip the organization distribute to$1 million in scholarships to secondary Hispanic students tor the {987-88 -academic ye&r. Th(s year $589,000 was awarded to 85, 7 students. In 1976the f .fr:st year awards were given -NHSF awarded $30,000 to 115 students. Sc11olar;hips from $800 to $1 ,ooo for in graduate and professional schoois, $600 to $800 for'undergraduates and $300 motivational grants for community students. Besides ' the funds raised and the increased visibility, Robles said there were major cor porate sponsors , who pledged their support . pleasure over the nonpartisan natur!'F of, the dinners. Barbara Bush, 'Wifl;l of U.S. Vice President George Bush, a Repubiican, keynoted in Dallas; Florida Gov. Robert Graham, a Democrat, . beadlihed the event in Miami. The U.S. House of Representatives agreed to a Senate compromise Oct. 17 that would .•. cut,theof th _ e U.S. Commission on Civil Rights from $ 12 million to $7. 5 million, !guaranteeing $2 million for regional office !operations and limiting the number of paid working days for its chairman and commis sioners. Brock Refuses to Meet Labor Secretary Bill Brock rejected a request by a former top-level Reagan appointee to: meet with him and leaders of major national' Hispar1ic organizations to discuss, among other issues, the small number of Latinos in' the Labor Departmenfs executive service and the lack of program money for Hispanic groups. Former Assistant Labor Secretary Frank Casillas, who in September criticized the departmenfs "insensitivity" toward Hispanics, said his second letter to Brock elicited a reply from a Labor Department undersecretary, who wrote that Brock was too busy to meet with the group. Casillas, chairman of the Illinois Hispanic Republicans, said he would "give one more shot" at a meeting through two U.S. Senators, whom he declined to identify. Until then, he added, he will delay a decision on "going public nationwide" to air the complaints . Prominent Latinos Eye Council Seat Gearing. up for the race ' to determine who will represent a new predominantly Hispanic Los Angeles Council district, two prominent Latino public officials recently moved within that boundaries. . Califprnia Assemblywoman Gloria Molina, 38, an<;l Los Angeles school board member . Larry Gooz.alez , 30, although . not formally announcing theircandidacies, have indicated , . . . Prisoners' Plea Rejected they were seriously considering running for the district seat. The 15-member City Council on Oct. 8 voted 8-2 to hold a special election in the redrawn 1st District on Feb. 3. That same vote set Oct. 6 as the date that candidates had to become residents of the district. Molina moved in the weekend of Oct. 4. Gonzalez moved in several weeks ago after having lived for several years a mile and a half outside district borders. Until his deach Aug . 12, Howard Finn had The five-year legal battle to gain asylum represented the 1st District in San Fernando or rights for the 1 ,8 13 Cu_ban Valley . After his death, the City Council moved refugees held In the Atlanta federal pnson the district to downtown los Angeles. It is has exhausted all1ts avenues of legal recourse, . . , now 69o/o Hispanic, second in Hispanic pre said the attorney for the refugees on Oct. 17 'dominance only to lone Latino Councilman The U .S. Supreme Court on F<: chard Alatorre's 13th District. 14 not to hear the case. Any deCISIOn on t e The district remaps were a result of a fate of will now ?e de by lawsuit by the U.S. Justice Department that U :S. Immigration and Naturalization Service . charged the city with diluting the voting power The . 1mpnsoned Cubans were part of a of Latinos. The suit has since been dropped. group of 1 25,000 people who came to the United States in 1980 on a boatlift -the Freedom Flotilla from Marie! Harbor in Cuba. Those in the Atlanta prison either broke U.S . law or were -imprisoned immediately upon their arrival under the belief that they had broken Cuban law. Those accused or convicted of breaking U .S. or Cuban law cannot remain in the United States, accordi, ng to INS regulations. ./ Cuba PresidE(nt Fidel Castro had promised to take back the refugees but reneged when the United States started its Radio Marti broadcasts to Cuba in May 1985. Radio Marti _is financed by the U .S. government. 2 Ship Bomb Plot Alleged An assistant U.S. attorney in Hartford, Conn., claimed Oct. 16 that the underground Puerto Rican independence group charged with being involved in the September 1983 $7 million robbery of a Wells Fargo depot had plans to blow up a ship in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Assistant U.S. Attorney Albert Dabrowski said the plans were uncovered from documents seized in Puerto Rico. The Justice contends the robbery, which occurred in West Hartford, was committed byan independence group called Los Mache teros Sixteen people have been charged. The plan was part of the $576 billion omnibus spending bill for fiscal year 1987. The House had originally voted to shut down the com mission by Dec. 31 . The commissioners approved a staffing plan to eliminate seven of the body's 10 regional offices at their Sept. 26 meeting. In fiscal year 1986, the regional offices were staffed by 56 people, with $5 million in funding. Currently, they have less than 40 employees. The bill trims Chairman Clarence Pendleton from 240 days of work last fiscal year to 125 days this year. The eight commissioners are limited to 75 working days. Other stipulations include spending ceilings of $20,000 for consultants, $185,000 for temporary employees and $40,000 for con tracts. The commission was to meet Oct. 24 to decide, among other things, what the staffing level will be under the new budget. Moves to abolish the commission gathered momentum last spring when the General Accounting Office charged it with mismanage ment and favoritism in its hirings. Hispanic Groups, Others Begin Immigration Plans continued from page 1 employer sanctions . Mario Moreno, who directs MALDEPs Wash ington office, scoffed at headline reports in such newspapers as The New York Times and USA Today that the bill could provide amnesty to 4 million persons . He cited Con gressional Budget Office and Census Bureau studies which place the number of eligibles at between 1 and 1 . 5 million. "These persons must still hurdle some 15 to 20 INS exclusionary provisions, " he said. "Additionally, remember that these people have been living here invisibly for years, and now the United States government is telling them to prove it, to create a paper trail." For the most part, Moreno said, the legalization provision will "just identify people for depor tation." The National Council of La Raza was among the first Hispanic groups to prepare a simple guide for individuals affected by the bill. Available free (see Collecting), it defines critical provisions in the legislation and offers specific recommendations to employers, un documented persons who have resided here since Jan. 1, 1982, and non-citizen farm workers who have worked at least 90 days in agriculture during the past year. Foremost among its recommendations to the undocumented: • Do not go to the INS to apply for legalization . • Do not pay moneytoanyonewho purports to be able to help you apply for legalization . • If you want advice, contact one of the major voluntary agencies with -a track record in the immigration field. • Begin to collect documentation showing that you have been a continuous resident of the United States since before Jan . 1, 1982. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Morales; guest columnist Immigration War Still On After years of immigration reform debate, final passage of the bill this month evoked the end of the Vietnam War. said: "They didn't win, we didn't lose." On the day the immigration bill finally passed, Hispanic activists on whom I tried out my fancy found that the phrase's am biguity rang true. They'd won an acceptable compromise between what they called the "pro-immi grant" House version and a Senate bill described as "the worst we've ever seen . " Result: Congress enacted the first sweep ing reform of immigration laws since the 1954 McCarran-Walter Act. A more subtle outcome throughout debate was the achievement of remarkable unity within the Hispanic community, which suddenly demanded to know whether this nation would live up to its pluralist motto E Pluribus Unum, unity from diversity. " We all had different tactics, but on substance we were all in the same place," said Charles Kamasaki, director of policy analysis for the National Council of La Raza,last week. Even Congressional Hispanic Caucus members, who split 6-5 against the final bill, weren't that far apart in their overall evaluation of the legislation. They just gave differing weights to the bilrs often conflicting elements. BILL BROKE NEW GROUND For the three national Hispanic organi zations leading the work in Washington-the League of United Latin American Citizens(LULAC), the Mexican American L e gal Defense and Educational Fund (MALDEF) , and La Raza-the exercise was a period of maturation. Working together they learned-as Arnold Torres, a former LU LAC lobbyist , told me-that "nobody can lobby like LULAC, litigate like MALDEF, or research like La Raza." Together they won the first major labor protections for foreign farm workers, the first civil rights coverage for foreigners seeking a job and new hope of amnesty for the undocumented. These v ictories must be weighed against real new fears of prejudice at the personnel office on the basis of the new law's sanctions against employers newl y hiring the undocumented. T o those most closely affected by the new law, attorney Rick Swartz had two words of advice : "Sit tight." OMINOUS FOR LEGAL RESIDENTS "It would be a mistake for-undocumented persons to walk into an office o f the Immigration and Naturalization Service tomorrow and ask for am ne sty, " said Swartz, president of the National Forum on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, who urged first a consultation at a community immigration agency. Only about 1.6 million of the 3 to 5 million undocumented aliens in the country are likely to be amnestied since the law covers only those who have lived here since 1982, Census Bureau estimates suggest. Attorney Wade Henderson of the American Civil Liberties Union, who opposed the measure's final passage, added that the law is also ominous for legal residents and U.S. citizens. "Subliminally, and "not just in the workplace, this bill promotes discrimination against people who fit the public's stereotype of the undocumented alien ," said Henderson of penalties against the future hire of the undocumented. Under the new law, however, there are no penalties to employers who retain current employees who don't have papers; also, businesses denying jobs simply because an applicant is foreign, or "looks undocumented" can be sued. Clearly, the legislative battle for immigration reform is over, but the war for the nation's soul, unlike the Vietnam intervention, goes on unambiguously. (Cecilio Morales, managing editor of the Empioyment & training Reporter, has written extensively on immigration since 1981 . ) Sin pe/os en Ia lengua CONGR'ESSIONAL CALAVERA: Passage of the Simpson/ Rodino immigration bandwagon bill has drawn a highfalutin response from our national lawmakers' counterparts south of the border. No talk of "Yankee oppressors" or the li ke . Instead, Mexico's. Chamber of Deputies chastized our Congress, in a unanimously approved declaration , for its failure to consider the bill's "bilateral implications. " Deputy Ro m e;) Flore s Caballero, w ho once picked cotton in the United States, called for "intelligence an d reason" in imple menting the bill ; expounding that"solving s uch a delicate problem demands a multidisciplinary a ppr oach and bil ateral particip ati on ... " As Mexico's Ofa de los muertos nearS: it makes one yearn for less rhetorical political commentary, something to e xcite our body juices like the turn-of -the-century sa tirical penny broadsides of Jose Guadalupe Posada that blanketed Mexico wh e n I was still a maiden . Publisher Vanegas Ar ro yo teamed with P o sada and other artists such as Manuel Manillato whom Ia c a lavera infernal (below) is attributed -to produce dozens of daily and weekly calaveras-chronicles which used skull and skeleton figu r es to comment on the happenings of the day d uring the regime of Don Porfirio Diaz . In humorous verse, poli ti cians were teased as if already dead. The calavera skull as an art object predated Posada by centuries, of course. "Death w as a u nique persona in Mexico," wrote Jas Reuter in" Posada's Mex i c o , " the magnificent Library of Congress publication, now out of print. "In the pre-Hispanic cultures, death was just a further step in life itself ... " In ceremonies now mimicked in Nov. 1 All Souls ' Day celebrations, the deceased were buried with clothing, food and prized possessions -in the case of a rich man , wrote Reuter, "wi t h jewels and weapons and sometimes even his servants . .. to insure the departed certain comforts on his long journey to the Beyond. " In the 16th century, the Spaniards spoiled all that. They brought with them to the New World the European concept of death"a terrible, frightening Death, doubl y inflicted by the conquistadores, " Reuter wrote. ". . . Once as a physical death in the form of slaughter , torture and alien illnesses that decimated the indigenous population; a second time as death in the abstracthell, to which sinners would be consigned after the Final Judgment. . . European Death: worm-eaten corpses ... " The targets of artists like Posada ranged from politicos to drunks to careless train conductors to the yellow fever mosquito to, of course, Uncle Sam. If he were still with us today, Posada no doubt would have heralded the arrival of the 99th Congress's immigration "reform" effort as we have done, using his famous figure, on our back page. Kay Barbaro' 3 Oct. 27, 1986 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING ACTION ALERT: The National Council of La Raza issued an "Action Alert" on the implications of the new immigration legislation. Oct. 20. For a free copy of the four-page advisory and a two-page assessment of the bill by NCLR President Raul Yzaguirre, contact: Charles Kamasaki, NCLR, 20 F St. NW, 2nd floor. Washington, D . C 20001 (202) 628-9600. IMMIGRATION BILL SUMMARY: The American Immigration Lawyers Association has prepared a six-page summary of the im migration bill passed by Congress. For a copy of it and a five-page memorandum by the National Forum on Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Director Rick Swartz describing probable implementation steps and monitoring proposals, send $3 to NFIR&C, 533 Eightli St. SE, Washington, D .C. 20003. MANAGEMENT TRAINING CAREERS: "Representation of Minorities in Graduate Train in g and Management Careers" is a 1 08 page report by the Graduate Management Admission Council detailing Hispanic, black and other minority representation in management. education and jobs. For a free copy, write to: Susan Lankford, GMAC, 11601 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1060, Los Angeles, Calif. 90025. NATIONAL POSTER CONTEST: To help promote Small Business Week, May 1 0, 1987, the Small Business Administration is sponsoring a nationwide poster design contest. The winner will be awarded $2,000 and honored in Washington, D.C. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 22. For more information, write to: Office. of Public Com munications, SBA , 1441 L St. NW, Rm. 926, Washington, D . C . 20416. LEADERSHIP INTERNSHIPS: The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. is offering 12 nine-month paid internships to college graduates and graduate students. Those selected will be placed in governmental and non-governmental institutions For more information, write to: Hispanic Leadership Program Director, CHCI, 504 C St. NE , Washington, D . C . 20002. COLLEGE-BOUND STUDENT PROFILES: " Profiles, College-Bound Seniors, 1985" is the final installment in a series on trends during past five years . This report looks at the academic background and college admissions test performances according to racial and ethnic group. For a copy, send $5 to: The College Board ,45 Columbus Ave., New York, N . Y . 10023. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) NAMED TO $430 MILLION TRUST BOARD Rita Granados, a former welfare mother of five who now works for the Community Action Marin social service agency, has been selected as one of seven members of a $430 million trust founded to help the needy who live in California's Marin County. The trust was established in the will of heiress Beryl Buck and will begin functioning Jan . 1 . Members include Buck's nephew, an invest ment consultant. Granados, of San . Rafael, is one of two members designated to be selected by board supervisors. LAMA RECEIVES $192,000 AWARD The Latin American Manufacturers Association is receiving a $192,388 award from the U . S . Commerce Department's Minority Business DevelopmentAgencyto increase minority-owned business participation in the development and production of the multi-billion dollar Air Force G-17 transport aircraft. LAMA will develop a strategic marketing plan to involve minority firms in the project's earliest negotiating stages. Established in 1973, LAMA has been responsible for more than $350 million awarded to Hispanic-owned businesses in manufacturing and high-tech industries for the Defense Department and private sector. SEATTLE PROJECT TEACHES JOURNALISM The Concilio for the Spanish Speaking of King County, Wash., based in Seattle, has developed a Latino journalism education project utilizing its magazine La Voz, plus funds from corporate sponsors and the educational facilities of Seattle Central Community College. The program, inaugurated this fall , augments classroom instruction in journalism with practical experience in writing, editing and production of La Voz. Its instructor is Bruce Johansen, a journalist for six years with The Seattle Times , now on leave as an associate professor of communication at the University of Nebraska, Omaha, to work with the Concilio . The Seattle-First National Bank Foundation provided a grant of $5,000 to launch the program . Calendar SUCCESS AND WOMEN OF COLOR San Diego Nov. 7 , 8 THIS WEEK SUCCESS IN THE CORPORATE WORLD New York Oc;t. 30 " Fa c ing the Challenge of Change" i s the theme of the 6th annual conference of Wall Streefs chapter of Image. Union City, N .J., Mayor Robert Mendez will be a keyn ote speaker , with five Hispanic business persons being honored. Iris Quile s (212) 484-2636 HISPANIC SOCIAL CONCERNS Cleveland Oct 30, 31 Ohio' s Commission on Spanish Speaking Affairs will co-sponsor a con ference for social service professionals working with Hi spanics on problems ranging from drug a nd alcohol ab use to acculturation to incest a nd rape . Julia Ar bini-Haywood (614) 466-8333 LATIN AMERICAN IMMIGRANTS Great N eck, N.Y. Oct. 3 1 The c hairman of Queens College (Flushing, N.Y.) Latin American Studies Program, G!lorge Priestley, w ill di sc u ss the lives and acculturation of Latin Americans who have migrated to the United States. Barbara Ric hard so n (718) 670-4172 4 Chevy Chase , Md. Nov. 1 Cultural differences between Hispanas and other women and how they influence stereotypes, and balancing a career with your personal life will be discussed at the Organization of Pan Asian American Women's conference. Cindee Teves Jacobs (301) 5 30-7219 COMING SOON C/NEFEST/VAL Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center San Antonio Nov. 5 -14 CineFestival (512) 271-9070 BUSINESS LUNCHEON lbero-American Chamber of Commerce Washington, D .c'. Nov. 6 Linda Rentz (202) 296 FUNDRAISER Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Services New York Nov. 6 St"llla Sanchez (212) EDUCATIONAL PROGRESS Association of Mex ican American Educators Anaheim , Calif. Nov. 6-8 Gloria Franco (818) 919-2344. GLOBAL MULTICULTURALISM Chula Vista City Schools oci. 27,1986 Barbara Takashima (619) 483 ext. 228 TELECOMMUNICATIONS OPPORTUNITIES National Telecommunications and Information Administration Kingston , Jamaica Nov . 9-12 R.T. Gregg (202) 277-1551 LATINO FAMILY DYNAMICS Alcoholism Center for Women Los Angeles Nov. 15 Clarissa Chandler (213) 381-7 805 SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT Mexican American Alumni Association of Loyola Marymount University Marina del Rey , Calif . Nov. 1 5 Carol Gilger(213) 642-5136 SPOTLIGHT ENGLISH PRIMACY FORUM: Former California U.S. Sen . S .l. Hayakawa, the founder of the U .S. English movement, will, along with Sarah Melendez, associate director of the office of minority concerns of the American Council on Education, discuss the movement to declare English the nation' s official language . Sponsored by the La Alianza student law organization of Georgetown University, the event will be held Nov. 15 in Washington, D . C . For infor mation, contact Richard Olona at (202) 488. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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L CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be o ff ered in the following fields: Librarian /Library Te chnician Social Science AnalysVResearch Assistant EconomisVEconomics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs AnalysVResearch Assistant Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degrees and full-time graduate students pursuing master's and doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard F orm 171 , Pers o nal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they w i sh to be considered. The program consists of 90or 120-da y appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the January-April session must submit their applications no later than N ov . 14, 1986. Upon completion of the 90-120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year tempo rary appointment. F o r additional information , contact Carmen Mendez, Hi spa nic Empl oymen t Coordinator at (202) 287-5620. CONTROLLER Camp Fire Inc., a national voluntary youth agency, is seeking qualified candidates for the position of controller. This position requires active participation as a member of a management team in forecasting , planning and daily management of the agenc y , as well as staff support and con s ultati o n to national board and committees as assigned. Candidate's overall responsibilities include finance and asset management and directing support services , such as accounting, man age ment information systems, word pro cessing, printing operations, property management, purchasing , building services and maintenance . We are seeking candidates with supervisory experi e nce and the appropriate combination of education/experience/knowledge in: business administration, finance management and ac counting. A knowledge of management infor mation systems, including, but not limited to, automated data proc essi ng and word process ing and var ious office machines is preferred. CPA degree helpful. Camp Fire Inc. provides competitive salary and a n attractive benefit package. Interested applicants must send salary history to: Mr. Rick William s , Assistant Dire ctor Human Resourc es Management Camp Fir e Inc . 4601 Madison Ave. Kansas City, Mo. 64112 Deadline for application is Oct. 31. Anthropology/ American StudieS/Sociology: Assistant Professors , tenure track in Anthro pology, American Studies or Sociology. Com pleted Ph.D . required plus demonstrated re. search in topics related to southwestern His panics. Joint teaching and research appoint ments in southwestern Hispanic Studies and academic department to commence in Fall 1987, contingent upon available funds. Deadline : December 1, 1986. Send vitae to Director, Southwestern Hispanic Research Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico87131. ANEOE. TRANSLATOR/EDITOR Major publisher of bilingual dictionaries re quires translator(English to Spanish). Candidate should be bilingual with S;:-anish as 1.1tive l a nu Jage , must relocate to London for two to three years. Applicants should submit resume to Jean Paradise , MacMillan Publishing Com pany, 866 3rd Ave . , New York, N .Y. 10022 (212) 702-4265. Hispanic Link Weekly Report ENGINEER CORPS JOBS The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers seeks qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks. Persons wishing to get more informat ion s hould contact Department of the Army , Equal Employment Opportun ity Office , U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Washington , D.C. 20314-1000 (202) 272-0098. JOIN THE LARGEST (TEN THOUSAND CIRCULATION) AND FINEST HISPANIC MONTHLY NEWSPAPER IN CHICAGOLAND , CHIC AGO CATOLICO , AS EDITOR . Your res ponsibili ties will include writing an d editing for this newsp aper as well as c om pleting writing assignments for the Chicago Catholic (o ur English weekly). You must be bilingual a nd possessan understanding of Catholic is sues relative t o Hispa nics. Unusual opportunity for someone to s hine in the rising Hi spa ni c community of Chicago. Send resume and non-returnabl e sample to: Vince Saputo, Ge neral Manager, P . O . B ox 11181 , Chicago, Ill . 60611. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CONFERENCE COORDINATOR Was hington, D.C., national Hispan ic organization seeks individual to assi s t in the planning/implementation of Annual Conference . Co llege degree/ equivalent experience in joiJ-rel ated area Strong writing, typing (70 wpm) , telephone skills. Self starter, ca n work under pressure without need of close supervision. Position available immedi ately. Salary range: $14-16,000. Contact Ma rialba Martinez/Lupe Aguirre with resume at (202) 628-9600. National non-profit organization with for-profit centers, seeks a Financ. e Dire ctor/Comptroller. Must be able to direct in hous e computerized accounting system and supervise two emp l oyees. Report to President Capitol Hill location . Salary in high 20s low 30s. CPA d es irable but not necessary. Send resume to: Mr. May, 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036. HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Yo u can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholar ships given annually to outstanding Hispanic students across the United States. The combined federal campaign now gives you the opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your con tribution. The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax exempt organization. Invest in your com munity today and support the National His panic Scholarship Fund. For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund , P.O. Box748 , San Francisco, Calif. 94101 (415) The following two positions are with Arlington County, Arlington, Va. Please note deadline for applications. CHIEF, SOLID WASTE DIVISION Ann.# 1671 -7 A-DPW Senior level profes -sional work as the Chief of the Solid Waste Division in the Department of Public Works. Chief is responsible for managing 78 employees and 49 pieces of equipment; projecting future demands and developing plans to meet those demands; developing the Division ' s annual operating and capital budget and ensuring that those budgets are not overspent, and enforcing theRefuseOrdinanceand the Litter Ordinance. Requires a Bachelor's degree in Environ menta l Science, Engineering, Public Adminis tration or related field , plus four years of current professional experience in an oc cupati onal area incorporating many of the major job duties of this position. Arlington County offers a comprehensive benefits package. Salary range is $37,061-$52,070 per year. App lications must be received by thePerso,meiDepartment no later than 5:00 p .m., Nov. 13. BUREAU CHIEF FOR MANAGEMENT & BUDGET Salary$29,991-$33 ,049 Ann . # 16097 ADHS Profe ss ional position in the Administ ra tive Services Divi s ion , Dept. of Human Services. Responsibl e for overall administration and supervision ofthedepartmenfs centralized budget operation ($25 million 300 FTE 's). Duties include coordinating all aspects of budget process including preparation, policy review , program evaluation and fiscal analysis . Requires BNBS in Public or Business ad ministration or related t : .;ld plus two years professional experience in management and budgetary and/or financial analysis. Prefer MBNMPA and additional experience in program and financial management. Official Arlington County Application Form required for each position. To request ap plication material, please call (703) 558-2167 orTTY(703) 558-2028(hearing impaired only) weekdays between 8 a .m . 5 p.m. Ap plications must be received in the Personnel Department by 5 p.m., Nov. 20. ARLINGTOI':f COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 N . 14th St., Arlington. Va . 22201 EOE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR: Bilingual (English Spanish); supervise programs and develop funding. Requirements: BNBS and one year experience. Send resume to: Hispanic Institute , 368 Paramus Rd., Paramus , N.J . 07652. PERSONNEL MANAGERS Let Hispanic Link help you in your search for exec utive s a nd professionals. Mail or phone you r corporate c l ass ified ads to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW . W ashington , D .C. 20005. Phone (202) 234-0737. Ad copy received by 5 p.m . ( ES1) Tuesday will be carri ed in Weekly Reports mailed Frid a y of th e sa me week. Ad rates: 75 cents per word. Display rates : $35 per column inch. 5

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Arts & Entertainment At the Jeffrey Neale Gallery, oil paintings by Sosa are on view through Nov. 1. ALL THAT ART: The works of hundreds of Latin American artists can be seen this fall in museums and galleries in New York-and across the nation. Around the country: Peruvian writer and painter Felipe Buendia will bring his Lima Tradicional showing to Austin, Texas, this fall as part of Austin-Lima sister city activities. Another Peruvian, Leoncio Villanueva, has an exhibition of paintings and drawings at the Or ganization of American States Building in Washington, D . C , through Nov. 3. In New York, the Museum of Contemporary Hispanic Art continues through Nov. 30 its Bienal Latinoamericana del Grabado with some 200 prints by artists from throughout the hemisphere. At the Sept. 25 opening of the exhibit, three artists were announced as the most outstanding of the showing. Each of the three-Antonio Martorell from Puerto Rico, Liliana Porter from Argentina and Venezuela's Ricardo Benaim-received a $750 award. In a parallel exhibit, prints by several Puerto Rican artists can be seen through Dec. 12 at the Oller-Campeche Gallery of the common wealth's office in Manhattan. New Yorkers may also enjoy solo exhibits by various Latinos: At El Museo del Barrio, paintings by Honduran expressionist Francisco Alvarado Juarez (on view Oct. 24-Jan. 25) constitute what the artist describes as a "three-year journey into visual narrative." The Littlejohn-Smith Gallery shows 21 paper works by Venezuela painter Alirio Palacios through Oct. 28. ONE LINERS: Los Angeles' Plaza de Ia Raza will launch an Arts Consortium next month with three other city groups-the Japanese American Cultural and Community Center, the California Afro-American Museum and the Craft and Folk Art Museum-to "introduce ethnic arts" to a larger audience ... Argentina's chamber string ensemble Camerata Bariloche continues the International Series at Washington, D.C.'s Kennedy Center with a performance Oct. 27... In Cuba, the Festivallnternacional de Ballet de La Habana is staged Oct. 28-Nov. 9 with companies from the United States and four other countries . . . La tercera palabra, by Spanish playwright Alejandro Casona, opens at New York's Thalia Spanish Theatre Oct. 31 . .. Spanish singer Rocio Durcal performs at Los Angeles' Universal Amphitheater Nov. 2 .. Celebrating the 12th anniversary of its service to Hispanic artists, the Bronx (N.Y.) Museum of the Arts' photographic exhibit, "A Decade of En Foco," runs through Nov. 13. . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report THE TALE OF A TALE: New York Daily News columnist Miguel Perez conducted a ,one-on-one interview with New York Gov. Mario Cuomo on Aug. 21. From it, he planned to develop a series of weekly columns for publication in the News this month, looking mainly at the governor's relationship with the Latirio community. The first of those columns, published Oct. 9, ignited a public brawl which smoldered at first, but eventually drew the interest and/or participation of nearly every Hispanic organization and leader in the state, as well as the city's media. Two of Cuomo's quoted comments stirred the embers: First, he made reference to an old Ronald Reagan campaign stunt where Reagan held up a fat section of Help Wanted ads. "People don't want those jobs," Cuomo was quoted by Perez. "And if you go to the Latin Americans, the Hispanic Americans and the blacks, they don't want those jobs. A lot of them would rather be on welfare. They don't want to HISPANIC LINK 6 WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio MejiasRentas. Phil Garcia. t>Jo port1on of Htspanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weel