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Hispanic link weekly report, November 3, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 3, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
The United States National Archives receives an all-metal sculpture from Tomas Ferndndez destined for the presidential library of President Ronald Reagan. The 11 x2x7-foot work is titled “Freedom’s Gallop.”... An opinion survey by the Albuquerque Journal reportsthat the approval rating of Gov. Toney Anaya by New Mexico residents is down to 12%... U.S. Sens. Ted Kennedy and Bill Bradley, and Rep. Richard Gephardt congratulate Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez-Colon for his efforts in saving Section 936 of the U.S. Tax Code. The congressmen see the tax incentive, which allows U.S. businesses to operate tax free in the island, as an essential economic, development tool for the Caribbean Basin... A presidential search committee for the University of the District of Columbia recommends Rafael
Cortada, 52, as its first choice to be the new president of UDC. Presently he is president of the nation’s largest community college, El Camino College just outside of Los Angeles... The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement unanimously elects Joaquin (Jack) Otero as president to replace Henry (Hank) Lacayo, who retired for health reasons... The remains of Air Force Lt. Col. Richard Castillo, of Corpus Christi, Texas, along with those of three other servicemen killed years ago in air crashes in Laos and Vietnam, are returned to their families... The Sporting News names Oakland A’s outfielder Jose Canseco as American League rookie of the year. The weekly also names John Candelaria, a pitcher with the California Angels, as the comeback player of the year in the National League... The YWCA honors Mary Gonzales Koenig, executive director of the Spanish' Coalition for Jobs in Chicago, as one of six outstanding women leaders in that city...
Vo I. 4 No. 44
?Q) HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORTS
Nov. 3, 1986
Half of Latino-Owned Firms in Calif, and Texas
More than half of the 250,000 U.S. Hispanic-owned businesses in 1982 were in California and Texas, found a report by the U.S. Census Bureau released Oct. 23.
Firms Sales, Receipts
(numbers) (millions)
Mexican 143,177 $7,177
Cuban 36,631 2,149
Cent./S. Amer. 26,986 1,113
European Span. 20,838 1,186
Puerto Rican 14,690 663
Other Hispanic 5,819 2,686
Total 248,141 14,976
Nearly 50% of the undocumented aliens estimated to be eligible for permanent resident status as a result of the immigration law passed by Congress last month reside in California, reported a national population-research organization Oct. 21.
Present best-estimates are that between one and two million people will be eligible. Most Hispanic groups foresee between one and one and a half million applying. Two years ago, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service projected two million, using a 1980 cutoff date. INS is presently reworking its figures.
In an advance report, Population-Environment Balance - using 1984 densus bureau data-concluded that if one million aliens were eligible for legalization, 497,810, or 49.7%, would be residents of California. The state of New York would be a distant second, with 113,760, or 11.4% of the nation’s total. If two million people apply for legalization, the numbers would double.
PEB’s report found that 77% of all aliens who came here before Jan. 1, 1982 - the cutoff date for eligibility status contained in
The report, “Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises: Hispanic-Owned Businesses, 1982,” found that the 248,141 businesses owned by Latinos generated $14.9
FIRMS WITH PAID EMPLOYEES
Sales,
Firms Employees Receipts
(numbers) (numbers) (millions)
24,100 106,712 $4,847
5,215 22,639 1,395
3,646 11,919 662
3,203 13,174 828
1,700 5,528 331
2,043 29,664 2,586
39,917 189,636 10,652
the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 passed Oct. 16 - are residents of California, New York Texas and Illinois The vast majority of the recent surge of Salvadoran immigrants, fleeing their country's civil strife, arrived here after the bill’s eligibility deadline. ___________
TOP ELEVEN STATES’
ALIEN LEGALIZATION ESTIMATES*
1,000,000 2,000,000
Calif. 497,810 995,620
N.Y. 113,760 227,520
Texas 90,420 180,840
III. 65,630 131,260
Fla. 38,890 77,780
N.J. 17,990 35,980
Va. 16,520 33,040
Md. 15,560 31,120
Ariz. 12,150 24,300
Wash. 10,700 21,400
Colo. 9,240 18,480
* U.S Census Bureau estimates based on 1,000,000 and 2,000,000 aliens eligible for legalization.
Source: Population-Environment Balance Inc
ibillion dollars in sales and receipts. This represents 1.5% of total U.S. business revenues [and 2.1% of all U.S. firms.
! Despite having 5,000 fewer Hispanic-owned |firms, the Miami metropolitan area’s 24,900 (firms generated $500 million more in sales land receipts than the Los Angeles-Long Beach (area. The Los Angeles- Long Beach area had (more Latinos concerns - 29,982 - than any jother metropolitan area in the United States.; iCalifornia and Texas accounted for eight of jthe top ten metropolitan areas in terms £f the inumber of firms and the amount of sales and ireceipts, showed the report. The Miami area, however, commanded the largest portion -81% - of gross income generated by any 'state’s Hispanic businesses It generated $2.2 billion in sales.
| The top five states in the number of Hispanic-owned firms were: California, 74,998; Texas,
continued on page 2
Latino Groups Denounce Sen. Hawkins’ Remarks
The League of United Latin American Citizens and the American Gl Forum denounced U.S. Sen. Paula Hawkins (R-Fla) Oct. 24 for her remarks questioning the patriotism of Mexican Americans.
At a press conference in Miami, LULAC President Oscar Moran, Gl Forum President Edward Bernaldez and Miami Vice actor James Edward Olmos criticized Hawkins for her comments made during a live radio interview on a Miami radio station Oct. 21.
In attempting to lure the Cuban vote, the senator said, “They (Mexican Americans) walk over at night. You can’t see them, thousands, thousands. And they’re not patriots by and large. They’re not partriots like the Latins and the Cuban Americans.”
Moran said he did not accept an apology issued by Hawkins the day after her remarks. The LULAC head instead called for a public statement from the senator on the contributions made by Mexican Americans. He said such a statement should also be made on the Senate floor when Congress reconvenes.
HISPANIC GROUPS’ INDUSTRY STATISTICS: 1982 ALL FIRMS
Source: “Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises: Hispanic-Owned Businesses, 1982” by the U.S Bureau of the. Census.
Legalization Prospects: Calif. Leads


Martinez Leads, Other State Candidates Trail
On election eve, Florida Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob Martinez held a slight polling edge in his race against Democrat Steve Pajcic, but for Latino candidates in six other state races, victory seemed less certain.
A Miami Herald poll published Oct. 25 gave former Tampa Mayor Martinez a 43%-40% lead over Pajcic, a state representative.;
Maryland polls showed ex-White House aide Linda Chavez still trailing her Democratic foe for a U.S Senate seat, U.S. Rep. Barbara Mikulski, by about 20 percentage points.
In New York, former Congressman Herman Badillo hasgained some ground on incumbent Edward Regan in the state comptroller race, but a low Democratic turnout is expected to« hurt him. A Badillo campaign spokesperson told Weekly Report that Republican-Conservative Regan raised $2 million in his
campaign compared with $275,000 for Badillo Democrat-Liberal Badillo must count on a powerful turnout for Gov. Mario Cuomo to win, he added.
In New Mexico, Democrat Casey Luna has been trailing Republican Jack Stahl by about 20 points in the race for lieutenant governor. The secretary of state competition between Democrat Rebecca Vigil and Republican Jannie McDaniel remains close. Democrat Rudy Apodaca, brother of former Gov. Jerry Apodaca, has no Republican opposition in his bid for a seat on the Court of Appeals.
In Texas, Republican Roy Barrera still trails incumbent Attorney General Jim Mattox badly. Bidding for his first full six-year term on the Texas Supreme Court, Democrat Ratil Gonzalez, appointed as a justice in 1984, is locked in a close race with Republican John
Bates.
The margin of support for reconfirmation of California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso narrowed last month, according to a Los Angeles Times Poll released Oct. 21.
It showed:
Poll dates Yes No Undecided
Oct. 11-16 33% 26% 41%
Sept. 5-9 32% 21% 47%
The poll showed Proposition 63, that state’s “Official English” initiative, favored 71 %-24%, with 5% undecided - about the same as in September.
It found Hispanics favoring the measure by a surprising 8-5 ratio, blacks by 2-1 and non-Hispanic whites.by 3 1/2-1.
All Latino incumbents in the U.S. Congress appear assured of re-election.
Hispanic Firms Generate $15 Billion
continued from page 1
61,540; Florida, 33,516; New York, 14,477; and New Mexico, 9/354. In the same order, the five states were also the top generators of revenue.
The report found that the vast majority of the Hispanic-owned businesses operated as individual proprietorships; 94.1 % of the firms were so organized.
Eighty-four percent of the Hispanic businesses were mom-and-pop establishments. Those firms with paid employees, however, accounted for 71 % of the gross revenue generated, said the report. The 111 concerns - 0.3% of the total*- that had 100 or more employees rung up 17% of the revenue of firms with employees.
Mexican Americans owned 58% of all the Hispanic-owned firms. Cubans owned the second largest number-36,631, or 14.8%. Puerto Ricans owned 6% of the nation’s Hispanic-owned businesses, but these only
FootbalJ Player Honored Fifteen Years After Death
Fifteen years to the day that Marcos Cervantes suffered a fatal head injury in a high school football game, the city of Chicago honored him with a proclamation marking Oct. 23 as a Day of Unity.
Cervantes sustained the injury on Oct 23, 1971. After catching a pass for his Senn Metropolitan Academy team, Cervantes turned, lowered his head and collided with an opposing linebacker. He walked off the field, collapsed and died 12 days later, never, regaining consciousness. Cervantes was 17 years old and a senior.
Mayor Harold Washington signed the/ proclamation as a result of the tireless prodding of a brother of Cervantes, Ramon.
“The days he was in a coma, there was interest in his condition all over the country, j Perhaps this recognizes Marcos as a force to unite us,” said Ram6n, now a community activist.
2
included firms on the mainland.
The economic census, conducted every five years, contained these other findings:
• Service and retail-trade firms accounted for 63.1% of all Hispanic firms and 53.8% of all sales and receipts.
• Of the 20 metropolitan areas nationally with the largest numbers of Hispanic-owned businesses, Texas had the most - seven.
• Louisiana had the tenth largest number of Hispanic-owned businesses (2,127), preceded by Illinois (5,218), Colorado (5,977), New Jersey (6,466) and Arizona (6,607).
• Thirty-four percent of the firms had gross income of less than $5,000.
® Firms generating gross revenue of $1 million or more accounted for35% of the total gross receipts but comprised only 0.6% of all businesses.
TOP TEN HISPANIC INDUSTRIES ACCORDING TO RECEIPTS: 1982
Receipt's (millions) Firms (number)
Auto Dealers, Service Stations $1,309 3,746
Wholesale Trade: Nondurable Goods 1,286 2,279
Food Stores 1,095 7,692
Eating/Drinking Establishments 1,076 10,791
Special Trade Contractors 1,042 22,017
Health Srvcs. 579 8,401
Wholesale Trade: Durable Goods 531 1,343
Warehousing, Trucking 419 9,201
Personal Srvca 410 22,382
Auto Repair, Srvcs., Garages $363 . 6,873
Source: “Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises: Hispanic-Owned Businesses, 1982” by the U.S. Bureau of the Census
Latinos May Decide Close State Elections
As part of its preliminary findings, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released figures on what percentage of the Hispanic voters in four key states would be required to make a one-point difference in overall election results.
To be used as a backdrop for its analyses of the Nov. 4 elections across the nation, the findings show that Hispanics can be the swing vote in close statewide elections, said Harry Pachon, executive director of NALEO.
The four states, the percentage Hispanics represent of all voters in those states and the percentage of the Hispanic vote needed for each one-point variance in the overall vote are:
Texas 12% 8.5%
California 7 13
New York 5 20
Florida 4 23
AIDS Hits More Latinos
Hispanics accounted for 14% of the 24,576 AIDS cases reported in the United States from June 1, 1981, to Sept. 8, 1986, while comprising 6% of the population, according to a report released Oct 24 by the Centers for Disease Control.
Of the AIDS cases reported during the period, 3,488 were Hispanic and 6,192, or 25%, were black. The number of adult Hispanic AIDS cases was 3.4 times higher per every million H ispanics than the like incidence for whites.
Sixty-five percent of the Hispanic patients resided in three states: New York, New Jersey and Florida The rate of incidence for H ispanics in these states was nine times higher than that of whites.
Hispanic men made up 14% of all the male AIDS cases, while Hispanas accounted for 21% of 1,634 female patients.
Among the 350 patients who were 15 years of age or younger, 22% were Hispanic.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


George Childs, guest columnist
Integration Accomplished
A problem of frequent debate in Florida’s Dade County is the lack of communication between the Hispanic and American communities. And while I hope that this column will be a step toward the solution, I recognize that other means of communication have already been established without my or other debaters’ help.
The actions were neither planned nor organized. They were more spontaneous-and permanent.
If you don’t believe me, then tell me where all those blonde-freckled-green-eyed Garcias came from. And where did all those deep-black- eyed-salsa-waisted brunettes named Cathy, Linda or Carol come from?
Today it is common to hear a young “American” boy call his girlfriend “mi puchunguita” or a young Hispanic boy pour the words “darling” or “honey” into an all-American girl’s ears.
t
We Cubans complain at times about the lunch system in this country, contrasting it to the full course meals we used to enjoy in ours. But we have learned to swallow those hamburgers like crazy while we watch our northern-born neighbors eat their rice and beans and yuca con mole with gusto.
ANYTHING BUT AMERICAN COFFEE
Many of us who originally hated American coffee now drink it by the gallon. But since we can’t give in graciously, we have come up with justifications like, “Cuban coffee is so strong that it keeps me awake all night.” Or, “When I drink American coffee, I fix it with at least three Cremoras and four spoons of sugar filled to the rim.”
It is also true that there are scores of non-Hispanics longing for the taste of strong Cuban coffee. Those are the same ones who eat roast pork on Christmas Eve while their Cuban neighbors roast a turkey.
We already enjoy Thanksgiving and Halloween. It’s even common to see an habanero wearing green from head to toe on St. Patrick’s Day. And that’s something to wonder about.
One of the main conquests of the young Hispanics in this country has been the abolition of chaperones- a legitimate aspiration of the youngsters of my generation. We used to dance to the rhythm of a salsa melody with the following words:
“S/‘ las viejas se murieran todas.. .los muchachos cumbancharan mas, cumbancharan mas, cumbancharan mas.”
“ If the old women would just drop dead... young people would have a ball, would have a ball, would have a ball.”
The experts on these so-called “cultural traits” don’t understand how in the world a norteamericano can refuse to eat a fried ripe plantain with his food because it is too sweet, but think nothing of gulping down roast turkey with a shower of cranberry’ sauce.
CUBAN BURRITOS AND PAELLA It is also difficult to comprehend how a Cuban can refuse to recognize tortillas and burritos as Cuban dishes (they are truly Mexican), anctthen purport to show an American friend the goodness of a real Cuban meal by inviting him or her to a delicious dish of paella with total disregard tor the natives of Valencia These differences and contradictions could become annoying or amusing (depending on one’s mood). But we manage to survive, in this maremagnum of irrelevance, sometimes in complete harmony; in other instances, uncomfortable with each other.
But those blonde-freckled-green-eyed Garcias and those deep-black-eyed-sa/sa-waisted brunettes named Cathy, Linda or Carol are incontrovertible proof that the customs, traditions and cultural aberrations die down when confronted with that sweeping and irresistible force called love.
(George Childs, a radio and television comedy writer in his native Cuba, now writes a three-times-weekly humor column for El Miami Herald in Miami, Florida.)
Sin peios en la lengua
FREE AT LAST: Now that Ray Knight, once-obscure New York Mets’ third baseman and husband of a champion golfer, has been chosen as the Most Valuable Player of the 1986 World Series, he may no longer be known as Mr. Nancy Lopez.
ONE MEXICAN, OVER-EASY: When they were schoolgirls, the syndicated lovelorn sisters Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren must have skipped the same social science classes together.
Two years ago (Oct. 22, 1984),. Sin Peios censured Abby for spreading the stereotype that, unique among Hispanics, “Wife beating is sometimes accepted by both wife and husband. The macho man feels that it is okay to beat his wife and children.”
Now (Oct. 24,1986), sister Ann responds to a reader who lost a barroom “most suntanned legs” contest to a “Mexican.”
“The only way such a contest could be fair would be to limit the contestants to Caucasians,” Ann rules.
Who wants to be the one to tell Ann that Mexicans may be Caucasian just like her and their legs may be naturally white, yellow, red, brown, black or shades in between.
So can we tan? Just back from Cancun, my comadre Linda Prieta wants to know where that bar is. “I could be a sun BURN contest all by myself,” she vouches.
TRUE OR FALSE: Working class Mexican Americans blame undocumented workers for lower salaries, loss of jobs, the overcrowding of schools and deterioration of neighborhoods.
In a page 1 article Oct. 21, The Wall Street Journal states flatly that they do. Not “some working-class Mexican-Americans.” ALL working-class Mexican Americans.
In its annual foray into the barrio, the Journal marvels, in stacked headlines, at:
“Latino Schism - Hispanic Communities In U.S. Are Divided By Influx of Mexicans - Chicanos, Newer Immigrants Trade Charges Over Jobs, Pay Cuts, Neighborhoods - Language Is Often a Barrier.”
To suggest that there are no rivalries among some newcomers and some oldtimers would be to ignore a reality. But the Journal’s simple-minded, inflamatory distortion goes far beyond that.
Did I say annual foray?
It was about a year ago when the Journal carried its editorial with the neat heading, “Wetbacks as People.”
And it was two years ago when it counted 200 Spanish-language and bilingual newspapers in this country and did a hatchet job on them all, describing their collective content as“apt to turn heads, if not stomachs.”
What could it possibly be working on for next year?
CURTAIN CALL: So how do you get the attention of the national media if you’re just another humble Hispanic?
Actor Eric Estrada gained all sorts-of media attention last month when he attended an opening night Tango Argentino party at Washington’s Willard Hotel.
How so? Prominently displayed on a gold chain around his neck was his 7-month-old son’s umbilical cord. - Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
ROSE BIRD, California’s Chief Supreme Court Justice who, with Justice Cruz Reynoso, is the target of a campaign by conservatives to deny her reconfirmation Nov. 4, commenting to syndicated columnist .Anthony Lewis:
"It would be a great tragedy if (Reynoso) were defeated. He is the only person from the Hispanic community in statewide office. He is a role model. Defeating him would be a clear statement, an ugly statement.
“Women are going to find their place in law and society whatever happens to me. But I don't know about the Hispanics. Even with their growing numbers, they are so poor, so unorganized... ”
Nov. 3,1986
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
U.S. HISPANIC BUSINESSES: “Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises: Hispanic-Owned Businesses, 1982” lists sales and receipts and geographic distribution of firms. For a copy of the 202-page report, send an $11 prepaid order to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, GPO Stock No. (003-024-06214-3), Washington, D.C. 20402.
MATH SKILLS: “Using Calculators to Improve Your Child’s Math Skills” is a brochure by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope before Dec. 31 to: Parents Brochure No. 4,1906 Association Drive, Reston, Va. 22091.
LATINOS IN CHICAGO: The Latino Institute has made available the study “At the Cutting Edge,” which focuses on the empowerment of Hispanics in that city. For a copy, send $8 to: LI, 228 S. Wabash, 6th Floor, Chicago, III. 60604.
FORD FOUNDATION REPORTS:* The three following reports are free from the Ford Foundation:
1) Created Equal: A Report on Ford Foundation Women’s Programs;
2) Ford Foundation Support for the Arts inihe United States; and
3) President’s Review, 1985 on the topic of affirmative action.
To obtain, write: Office of Reports, Department L, Ford Foundation,
320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10017.
, POVERTY, STATISTICS: U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) has released a study questioning the accuracy of a recent report by the Census Bureau revising the definition of poverty using non-cash benefits. Fora copy, contact: House Subcommittee on Census and Population, 219 Cannon Office Building, Washington, D.C. 20515.
FEMALE AND MINORITY ACADEMIC SUCCESS: “Sex and Ethnic Differences in Middle School Mathematics, Science and Computer Science: What Do We Know?,” a report by the Educational Testing Service, discusses factors that improve the performance of females and minorities in the subjects. For a copy of the 300-page report, send $6.50 to: Elaine Guennel, 10-R, ETS, Princeton, N;J. 08541.
CONNECTING
’87 MARKETING STUDY DUE Strategy Research Corporation of Miami will release the findings of its 1987 Hispanic Market Study at five seminars starting this week. The study has a publication price of $40. The seminars are set for Los AngeleefNbv. 7),'Chicago (Nov. 11), Miami (Nov. 13), New YorkfNov. 18) and Houston (Nov. 20). Registration cost for New York is $165; for the others, -$125.
For more information, contact Elizabeth Grudzinski, Vice President, SRC, 100 N.W. 37th Ave., Miami, Fla 33125 (305) 649-5400.
HIGH SCHOOL ESSAY CONTESTS The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is assisting organizations and newspapers in more than 20 cities nationally to conduct high school essay writi ng contests, with local cash awards and a national prize of a trip for two to the NationabHispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles April 22-25, 1987.
The competition is open to students grades9-12. This year's essay assignment profile an involved member of your Hispanic community.
If you want information on how a student in your community may participate ,or wish to start a contest yourself, contact Joselyn Cordova, NAHJ, Room 634, National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
FORTY FLIGHT ATTENDANTS GRADUATE Forty Puerto Rican flight attendants were graduated in ceremonies at American Airlines’ Learning Center in Dallas/Ft. Worth Oct. 23. All were recruited in Puerto Rico. It was the first class ©fall Puerto Rican students. Having completed their 5 1 /2-week training, they are returning to the island to support American’s Caribbean expansion program.
OTHER PLACES^ OTHER FACES5
The Hispanic Bankers Association honored Ignacio Urravazo Jr., president, Commerce Bank, Laredo, Texas, and AntonioMarti, senior vice president First Interstate Bank, Los Angeles, at Its6th annual recognition reception held in Los Angeles last month.
Calendar_____________________________
THIS WEEK
CINEFESTIVAL San Antonio Nov. 5-14
Entering its second decade, CineFestival’86, sponsored by the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, will for the first time award prizes for the best feature film, best documentary and best first film or video. CineFestival(512) 271-9070
BUSINESS LUNCHEON SERIES Washington, D.C. Nov. 6
U.S. Rep. Jack Kemp, a New York Republican frequently mentioned as a presidential candidate for 1988, will be a guest speaker at the Ibero-American Chamber of Commerce’s luncheon series.
Linda Rentz (202) 296-0335
FUNDRAISER New York Nov. 6
The Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Services will hold its 3rd annual fundraiser, presenting Life Achievement Awards to four Latinos, including poet and philosopher Clemente Soto-Velez.
Stella Sanchez (212) 665-6369
EDUCATION OF LATINOS Anaheim, Calif. Nov. 6-8
“Ensuring Progress in Education” is the theme of the Association of Mexican American Educators’ 21 st annual conference, with presentations on parent-4
community relations, bilingual education and adult training. -
Gloria Franco (818) 919-2344
GLOBAL MUTILCULTURALISM San Diego Nov. 7, 8
Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez and Paul Espinosa, award-winning; producer and writer at KPB&7V, San Diego, will be among the participants at this conference looking at multiculturalism in business and education.
Barbara Takashima (619) 483-3925 ext. 228
TELECOMMUNICATION OPPORTUNITIES
Kingston, Jamaica Nov. 9-12
Taoping into telecommunication opportunities for
The minority entrepreneur in the Caribbean Basin will
be the focus of U.S. Department of Commerce’s
National Telecommunications and Information
Administration.
R.T. Gregg (202) 377-1551.
COMING SOON
AWARDS DINNER
Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund
San Antonio Nov. 10 Barbara Aguirre (512) 224-5476
ENGLISH PRIMACY FORUM La Alianza
Washington, D.C. Nov. 12 Richard Olona (202) 488-7757
EMPLOYMENT STRATEGIES Nov. 3,1986
Oficina de la Comunidad Hispana de Maryland Gaithersburg, Md. Nov. 13 Alvaro DeMoya (301) 330-0446
CAREER DEVELOPMENT
Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement
Chicago Nov. 14
Katherine Ortiz (312) 341-9150
FAMILY DYNAMICS Alcoholism Center for Women Los Angeles Nov. 15 Clarissa Chandler (213) 381-7805
LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICIENCY
Immaculata, College
Immaculata, Pa. Nov. 15
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT
Mexican American Alumni Association of Loyola
Marymount University
Marina del Rey, Calif. Nov. 15
Carol Gilger (213) 642-5136
FIRST NOTfCE
ILLITERACY: SER-Jobs for Progress will have illiteracy as the central theme for its 21 st annual conference in San Antonio on April 15-17, 1987. Noting that Hispanics representroughly33% of the nation’s estimated 23 million illiteratesrthe conference will look at work-related solutions.-For more information, contact Allison Parkerat(214) 631 -3999.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields:
Librarian/Library Technician
Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant
Economist/Economics Research Assistant
Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant
Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degrees and full-time graduate students pursuing master’s and doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered.
The program consists of 90- or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the January-April session must submit their applications no later than Nov. 14, 1986. Upon completion of the 90-120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment. For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620.
TRANSLATOR/EDITOR
Major publisher of bilingual dictionaries requires translator (English to Spanish). Candidate should be bilingual with Spanish as native language, must relocate to London for two to three years. Applicants should submit resume to Jean Paradise, MacMillan Publishing Com-, pany, 866 3 rd Ave., New York, N. Y. 10022 (212) 702-4265.
CHAPTER DIRECTOR: California Chicano News Media Association, San Diego. Chapter. DUTIES: Administrates all San Diego Chapter activities including fundraising development, office management, design and implementation of workshops and conferences, representation of CCNMA-SD in community and institutional settings, coordination with CCNMA-Los Angeles and other duties as required. REQUIREMENTS: Familiarity with underrepresentation of Latinos in media, fundraising experience, excellent writing and communication skills, fouryear degree or equivalent thereof; media background and bilingual (Spanish) abilities desirable. SALARY: $25,000/year to begin Jan. 1, 1987. Submit resume and inquiries to Paul Espinosa, CCNMA-SD, KPBS-TV, San Diego, Calif. 92182 (619) 265-6415. Filing DEADLINE: Nov. 15.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for human rights/ foreign policy NGO. Requires leadership, administration/fund-raising experience, solid understanding of Latin America, demonstrated commitment to human rights. $26,000-$29,000, depending on experience. EOE. Request application materials from: Search Committee, Board of Directors, Washington Office on Latin America, 110 Maryland Ave. NE, Washington, D.C. 20002.
JOIN THE LARGEST (TEN THOUSAND CIRCULATION) AND FINEST HISPANIC MONTHLY NEWSPAPER IN CHICAGOLAND, CHICAGO CATOUCO, AS EDITOR. Your responsibilities will include writing and editing for this newspaper as well as completing writing assignments for the Chicago Catholic (our English weekly). You must be bilinguaiand possess an understanding of Catholic issues relative to Hispanics. Unusual opportunity for someone to shine in the rising Hispanic community of Chicago. Send resume and non-returnable sample to: Vince Saputo, General Manager, P.O. Box 11181, Chicago, III. 60611.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish. Type 60 words per minute*, ability to work effectively under pressure. Word processing experience desir: able. Good writing skills essential. Contact Lupe Aguirre, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600
HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholar-shipsgiven annually tooutstanding Hispanic students across the United States.
. Thecombined federal campaign now gives you the opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your contribution.
• The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax-exempt organization. Invest in your community today and support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101 (415) 892-9971.
CHICANO STUDIES The Department of Chicano Studies anticipates a tenure track appointment in one of the following disciplines:
• Anthropology • Economics • Political Science • Psychology Appointment will either be a joint appointment or a full appointment in Chicano Studies. Position effective July 1,1987. Ph.D. by time of appointment and evidence of excellence in teaching and research are required. Assistant Professor level preferred, although exceptionally well-qualified persons whose background and experience warrant a tenure-level appointment are also encouraged to apply.
Salary and rank dependent on qualifications. Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents, including copies of main publications (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed chapters), and arrange to have at least three professional evaluations sent by Jan. 31,1987 to:
Dr. Mario T. Garcia
Chair, Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara, Calif. 93106 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Actior Employer
STATION MANAGER, KSJV-FM, Fresno, Calif. KSJV is a CPB qualified station that serves the over 600,000 Latino population in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif.
RESPONSIBILITIES: To provide overall adrrvinistration and coordination of KSJV. Will be chiefly responsible for managing six-person full-time staff.
QUALIFICATIONS: Administrative and organizational skills are required and some familiarity with personnel management. Must nave proven ability to work with community-based, grassroots organizations. Fund-raising and Financial Management skills are necessary. Must be bilingual in English and Spanish with the ability to read/write in both languages.
SALARY: $1,200 per month plus fringe benefits
TO APPLY: Send resume to: Hugo Morales, P.O. Box 12682, Fresno, Calif. 93778 or call (209) 486-5174.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis Call (301) 251-2252.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-1140.
INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER seeks position with growing organization in Southern California area. Background in international public relations and tourism. Energetic, self-motivated and fluent in Spanish. Please contact: Hispanic Link News Service, Corporate Classifieds, 1420 N St., NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Attn: JR.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a* national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of H ispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word). Multi pie use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
Ordered by__________
Title_______________
Area Code & Phone Advertiser Name_____
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YOGA (202) 362-2656 or (301) 933-6196
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts& Entertainment
FUN AT THE FESTIVALS: Latino films make an impact at two distinct U.S. film festivals this month.
The Chicago International Film Festival, one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious film exhibits, continues through Nov. 7 with a 14-film retrospective of Argentinean cinema.
Two films from that South American coutry competed in the festival - Mari Luisa Bemberg’s Miss Mary, which inaugurated the festival Oct. 24, and Eliseo Subiela’s Hombre mirando al Sudeste.
In total, 19 Hispanic films will be screened during the 22nd annual event.
Out West, the San Antonio Cine-Festival enters its second decade this week, with film and video projects by and about Latinos and Latin Americans.
This year CineFestival becomes a competitive event, with the awarding of Premios Mezquite tothe“Best New Film or Video,” “Best Feature Film” and “Best Documentary.” A Special Jurors Award will go to the entry that best reflects “the spirit of the CineFestival
The event begins with a public forum Nov. 5 titled “The Evolution of Latino Consciousness Through Cinema” Speakers include filmmaker Jesus Trevino and Raquel Ortiz, executive producer for Community Affairs at WGBG-TV, Boston.
Shorts, features and documentaries from the United States, Puerto
Rico, Peru, Nicaragua, Chile, Spain, Paraguay, Argentina, Cuba, Mexico and Canada will screen at the city’s historic Guadalupe Theater through Nov. 14.
CineFestival, directed by Eduardo Diaz, is sponsored by the city’s Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center with city, state and corporate grants.
Following the CineFestival, the Guadalupe will host a selection of Latin American films screened this summer in New York as part of that city’s Festival Latino. A total of seven films will be shown through Nov. 23.
Another of the Wesfs historic movie houses, Denver's Mayan Theatre, reopens Nov. 6 with a gala benefit event to be attended by the city’s mayor, Federico Pena
Opened in 1930, the Mayan is one of six U.S. theaters built in the art deco Mayan Revival Style - and one of three still remaining.
Further West, a Hispanic film producer has filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles to try to stop production of The Milagro Beanfield War -which Robert Redford is directing in New Mexico with Moctesuma Esparza as co-producer.
The lawsuit claims that Redford’s film is based on the life of New Mexican activist Reies Tijerina - and that Larry Cano, executive producer of Silkwood, owns the film rights to Tijerina’s story.
According to the suit, production of Milagro halted the progress and success of a movie called King Tiger - which Cano hoped to produce for Columbia Pictures.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
DEBUT NO. 1: Estrella Hispana, a32-to-40-page Spanish-language magazine based in Indianapolis, Ind., made its debut this month with a 10,000 press run.
Editor/publisher David Hernandez sees the new monthly “taking a Midwest approach to national issues” Early editions will also provide coverage of plans for the Pan American Games, scheduled for Indianapolis next August.
Subscription price: $15 for 12 issues annually. For a copy of the premiere issue, send $1 to co\/er postage and handling to Hernandez at Estrella magazine, 342 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 46204.
DEBUT NO. 2: The36-page monthly English-language magazine Uno begins publication in November with a 10,000 press run.
Produced by the Carlos Freymann family of
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
.Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza i Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas,
[ Phil Garcia
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission:
Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
San Antonio, which also publishes guidebooks, Uno will be edited by Carlos Freymann Jr. and directed to the Hispanic professional nationally.
Price: $14 a yean $1.50 on newsstands where available. For a copy of the premiere issue, send $2 to Freymann & Associates, 702 E. Euclid St., San Antonio, Texas 78212.
TENTH ANNIVERSARY: El Directorio Hispano and its publishers, Aaron and Sara Lopez, were saluted at a 10th anniversary celebration in Reading, Pa., Oct. 26. Patrisia Gonzales, reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer, led off a day of activities with a
journalism seminar. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, publisher of Hispanic Link Weekly Report, keynoted an afternoon banquet.
El Directorio Hispano Pennsylvania’s largest bilingual weekly, serves nine cities with sizeable Hispanic populations in the southeastern section of the state, including Reading, Lancaster, Harrisburg, York, Bethlehem and Allentown.
IN MOTION: Elaine Rivera, reporter with The Washington Times, joins Newsday’s metropolitan New York reporting staff Dec 1...
- Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week The United States National Archives receives an all metal sculpture from Tomas Fernandez destined for the presidential library of President Ronald Reagan. The 11 x2x7foot work is titled"Freedom's Gallop." . . . An opinion survey by the Albuquerque Journal reports that the approval rating of Gov. Toney Anaya by New Mexico residents is down to 1 2% ... U.S. Sens. Ted Kennedy and Bill Bradley, and Rep. Richard Gephardtcongratulate Puerto Rico Gov . Rafael Hernandez Col6n for his efforts in saving Section 936 of the U.S . Tax Code. The congressmen see the tax incentive, which allows U.S . businesses to operate tax free in the island, as an essential economic development tool for the Caribbean Basin ... A presidential search committee for the University of the District of Columbia recommends Rafael Cortada, 52, as its first choice to be the new president of UDC . Presently he is president of the nation's largest community college, El Camino just outside of Los Angeles . .. The Labor Council for Latin American Advancement unanimously elects Joaquin (Jack) Otero as president to replace Henry(Hank) Lacayo, who retired for health reasons ... The remains of Air Force Lt. Col. Richard Castillo, of Corpus Christi, Texas, along with those of three other servicemen killed years ago in air crashes in Laos and Vietnam, are returned to their families. . . The Sporting News names Oakland A's outfielder Jose Canseco as American League rookie of the year. The weekly . also names John Candelaria, a pitcher with the California Angels, a s the comeback player of the year in the National League ... The YWCA honors Mary Gonzales Koenig, executive director of the Spanish' Coalition for Jobs in Chicago, as one of six outstanding women leaders in that city ... •• , •••.•• , HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Half of Latino-Owned Firms in Calif. and Texas More than half of the 250,000 U . S . Hispanic owned businesses in 1982 were in California and Texas, found a report by the U.S. Census Bureau released Oct. 23. The report , "Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises : Hispanic-Owned Busi nesses , 1982, " found that the 248,141 busi nesses owned by Latinos generated $14. 9 HISPANIC GROUPS' INDUSTRY STATISTICS: 1982 ALL FIRMS FIRMS WITH PAID EMPLOYEES Sales, Sales, Firms Receipts Firms Employees Receipts (numbers) (millions) (numbers) (numbers) (millions) Mexican 143,177 $7,177 24,100 106,712 $4,847 Cuban 36,631 2 ,149 5 ,215 22,639 1 ,395 Cent./S . Amer. 26,986 1,113 3 ,646 11,919 662 European Span. 20,838 1,186 3 ,203 13,174 828 Puerto Rican 14,690 663 1,700 5,528 331 Other Hispanic 5 ,819 2 ,686 2,043 29,664 2,586 Total 248,141 14,976 39,917 189,636 10,652 Sourc e : "Survey o f Owned Business Enterprises: Hispanic-Owne d Businesses. 1982" by th e U.S Bureau o f the . Census . Legalization Prospects: Calif. Leads Nearly 50% of the undocumented aliens estimated to be eligible for permanent resident status as a result of the immigration law passed by Congress last month reside in California, reported a national population research organization Oct. 21. Present best-estimates are that between one and two million people will be eligible. Most H ispanic groups foresee between one and one and a half million applying. Two years ago, the U . S . Immigration and Natural ization Service projected two million , using a 1980 cutoff date. INS is presently reworking its figures. In an advance report, Population-Environment Balanceusing 1984 den sus bureau data concluded that if one million aliens were eligible for legalization, 497,810, or 49. 7%, would be residents of California. The state of New York would be a distant second, with 113,760, or 11.4% of the nation's total. If two million people apply for legalization, the numbers would double. PEB's report fourid that 77% of all aliens who came here before Jan. 1, 1982 -the cutoff date for eligibility status contained in the Immigration Reform and Control Act of _1986 passed Oct. 16-are residents of Cali fornia, New York, Texas and Illino is. The vast majority of the recent surge of Salvadoran immigrants, fleeing their country's civil strife , arrived here after the b i ll's eligibility deadline. TOP ELEVEN STATES' ALIEN LEGALIZATION ESTIMATES* Calif. N.Y. Texas Ill. Fla. N.J. Va. Md. Ariz. Wash. Colo. 1,000,000 497,810 113,760 90,420 65,630 38,890 17,990 16,520 15,560 12,150 10,700 9,240 2,000,000 995,620 227,520 180,840 131,260 77,780 35,980 33,040 31,120 24,300 21,400 18,480 • U . S Census Bureau f! Siimates based on 1 ,000,000 and 2 ,000,000 aliens eligible for legalization . Source: PopufalionEnvironment Balance Inc. I billion dollars in sales and receipts. This r e !presents 1 . 5% of total U.S. business revenues and 2.1% of all U .S. firms . Despite having 5,000 fewer Hispanic-owned !firms , the Miami metropolitan area's 24,900 . firms generated $500 million more in sales l and receipts than the Los Angeles-Long Beach i area. The Los Angeles Long Beach area had ! more Latinos concerns 2 9 ,982 -than a n y iother metropolitan area in the United States.i iCalifornia and Te x as accounted for eight of !the top ten metropolitan areas in terms 9f the 'number of firms and the amount of sales and 1receipts, showed the report. The Miami area, . 1however, commanded the largest portion-81% -of gross income generatdd by any state's Hispani c businesses. It generated $2. 2 jbillion in sales. 1 The top five states in the number of Hispanic 'owned firms were: California, 74,998; Texas , continued on p age 2 Latino Groups Denounce Sen. Hawkins' Remarks The League of United Latin American Citizens and the American Gl Forum de nounced U . S . Sen . Paula Hawkins (R Fia . ) Oct. 24 for her remarks questioning the patriotism of Mexican Americans. At a press conference in Miami, LULAC President Oscar Moran, Gl Forum President Edward Bernaldez and Miami Vice actor James Edward Olmos criticized Hawkins for her comments made during a live radio interview on a Miami radio station Oct. 21. In attempting to lure the Cuban vote, the senator said , "They (Mexican Americans) walk over at night. You can' t see them. Thousands, thousands. And they're not patriots by and large. They're not partriots like the Latins and the Cuban Americans." Moran said he did not accept an apology issued by Hawkins the day afte r her remarks . The LULAC head instead called for a public statement from the senator on the contributions made by Mexican Americans. H e said such a statement should also be m a d e on the Senate floor when Congress re convenes.

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Martinez Leads, Other State Candidates Trail On election eve, Florida Republican guber nato r ial candidate Bob Martinez held a slight polling edge in his race against Democrat Steve Pajcic, but for Latino candidates in six other state races, victory seemed less certain. A Miami Herald poll published Oct. 25 gave former Tampa Mayor Martinez. a 43%40% lead over Pajcic, a state representative. Maryland polls showed ex-White House aide Linda Chavez stili trailing her Democratic foe for a U.S Senate seat, U.S. Rep. Barbara Mikulski, QY about 20 percentage points. lri NewYork, former . Congressman Herman Badillo has gainea some ground on incumbent Edward Regan in the state comp,troller race,. but a lov/Democratic turnout is expected to hurt him. ABadillo campaign spokesperson told-Weekly Report .that Republican-Con servative Regan raised $2 million in his campaign compared with $275,000 for Badillo. Democrat-Liberal Badillo must count on a powerful turnout for Gov. Mario Cuomo to win, he added. In New Mexico, Democrat Casey Luna has been trailing Republican Jack Stahl by about 20 points in the race for lieutenant governor. The secretary of state competition between Democrat Rebecca Vigil and Republican Jannie McDaniel remains close. Democrat Rudy Apodaca, brother of former Gov. Jerry Apodaca, has no Republican opposition in his bid fora seat on the Court of Appeals. In Texas, Republican Roy Barrera still trails incumbent Attorney General Jim Mattox badly. Bidding for his first full six-year term on the Texas Supreme Court, Democrat RaUl Gonzalez, appointed as a justice in 1984, is locked in a close race with Republican John Hispanic Firms Generate $15 Billion continued from page 1 61 ,540; Florida, 33,516; New Yo.rk, 14,477; and New Mexico, 9,354. In the same order, the five states were also the top generators of revenue. The report found that the vast majority of the Hispanic-owned businesses operated as individual proprietorships; 94. 1% of the firms were so organized. Eighty-four percent of the Hispanic businesses were mom-and-pop establishments. Those firms with paid employees, however, accounted for 71% of the gross revenue generated, said the report. The 111 concerns0.3% of the total'that had 100 or more employees rung up 17% of the revenue affirms with employees. _ Mexican Americans owned 58% of all the Hispanic-owned firms. Cubans owned the second largest number-36,631, or 14.8%. Puerto Ric a ns owned 6%: of the nation's! • businesses, these only_ Football Player Honored Fifteen Years After Death I Fifteen y ea r s to the day that Marcos Cerva ntes suffered a fatal head injury in a high school football game, the city of Chicago ! ho norea him with a proclamation marking i Oct. 23 as a Day of Unity. C e rvant e s s us t ained the injury on Oct. 23, 1971 . After catching a pass for his Senn Metropo l itan Academy team, Cervantes turned, lowered his head and collided with a n opposing linebacker. He walked off the field, collapsed and died 12 days later, never : regaining consciousness. Cervantes was 17 ye a rs old a n d a senior. Mayor Harold Washington (>igned th81 proclamation as a result of the tireless prodding of a brother of Cervantes, Ramon. "The days he was in a coma, there was interest iri his condition all overthecountry. J Perhaps t , h i s recognizes Marcos as a force to unite us," said Ramon, now a community activist. 2 included firms on the mainland . The economic census, conducted every five years, contained these other findings: e Service an.d retail-trade firms accounted for 63.1% of all Hispanic firms and 53.8% of all sales and receipts . e Of the 20 metropolitan areas nationally with the largest numbers of Hispanic-owned businesses, Texas had the most-seven . e Louisiana had the tenth largest number of Hispanic-owned businesses (2,127), pre ceded by Illinois (5,218), Colorado (5,977), New Jersey (6,466) and Arizona (6,607). e Thirty-four percent of the firms had gross income of less than $5,000. e Firms generating gross revenue of $1 million or more accounted for35% of the total gross receipts but co.mprised only 0.6% of all businesses. TOP TEN HISPANIC INDUSTRIES ACCORDING TO RECEIPTS: 1982 Receipts Firms (millions) (number) Auto Dealers, Service Stations $1,309 3,746 Wholesale Trade: Nondurable Goods 1,286 2,279 Food Stores 1,095 7,692 Eating/Drinking Establishments 1,076 10,791 Special Trade Contractors 1,042 22,017 Health Srvcs. 579 8,401 Wholesale Trade: Durable Goods 531 1,343 Warehousing, Trucking 419 9,201 Personal Srvcs. 410 22,382 Auto Repair, Srvcs., Garages $363 . 6,873 Source: "Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises: Hispanic-Owned Businesses, 1982" by the US. Bureau of the Census. Bates. The margin of support for reconfirmation of California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso narrowed last month, according to a Los Angeles Times Poll released Oct. 21. It showed: Poll dates Yes No Undecided Oct.11-16 33% 26% 41% Sept. 5-9 32% 21% 47% The poll showed Proposition 63, that state's . "Official English" initiative, favored 71%-24%, with 5% undecided-about the same as in September. It found Hispanics favoring the measure by a surprising 8-5 ratio, blacks by 2-1 and non-Hispanic whites :by3 1/2-1. All Latino incumbents in the U.S. Congress appear assured of re-e lection. Latinos May Decide Close State Elections As part of its preliminary findings, the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials has released figures on what percentage of the Hispanic voters in four key states would be required to make a one-point difference in overall election results. To be used as a backdrop for its analyses of the Nov. 4 elections across the nation, the findings show that Hispanics can be the swing vote in close statewide elections, said Harry Pach6n, executive director of NALEO . The four states, the percentage Hispanics represent of all voters in those states and the percentage of the Hispanic vote needed for each one-point variance in the overall vote are: Texas California New York Florida 12% 7 5 4 8.5% 13 20 23 AIDS Hits More Latinos Hispanics accounted for 14% of the 24,576 AIDS cases reported in the United States from June 1, 1981, to Sept. 8, 1986, while comprising 6% of the population, according to a report released Oct. 24 by the Centers for Disease Control. Of the AIDS cases reported during the period, 3,488 were Hispanic and 6,192, or 25%, were black. The number of adult His panic AIDS cases was 3.4 times higher per every million His panics than the like incidence for whites. Sixty-five percent of the Hispanic patients resided in three states: New York, New Jersey and Florida The rate of incidence for Hispanics in these states was nine times higher than that of whites. Hispanic men made up 14% of all the male AIDS cases, while Hispanas accounted for 21 o/o of 1 ,634 female patients. Among the 350 patients who were 15 years of age or younger, 22% were Hispanic. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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George Childs, guest columnist Integration Accomplished A problem of frequent debate in Florida's Dade County is the lack of communication between the Hispanic and American communities. And while I hope that this column will be a step toward the solution, I recognize that other means of com munication have already been established without my or other debaters' help. The actions were neither planned nor organized. They were more spontaneous and permanent. If you don' t believe me, then tell me where all those blonde-freckle&green-eyed Garcias came from. And where did all those deep black-eye&sa/sa-waisted brunettes named Cathy, linda or Carol come from? Today it is common to hear a young "American" boy call his girlfriend "mi puchunguita" or a young Hispanic boy pour the words "darling" or "honey" into an all ll.merican girl's ears. We Cubans complain at times about the lunch system in this country, contrasting it to the full course meals we used to enjoy in ours. But we have learned to swallow those hamburgers like crazy while we watch our northern-born neighbors eat their rice and beans and yuca con mole with gusto. ANYTHING BUT AMERICAN COFFEE Many of us who originally hated American coffee now drink it by the gallon. But since we can't give in graciously, we have come up with justifications like , "Cuban coffee is so strong that it keeps me awake all night. " Or , "When I drink American coffee, I fix it with at least three Cremoras and four spoons of sugar filled to the rim." It is also true that there are scores of non-Hispanics longing for the taste of strong Cuban coffee. Those are the same ones who eat roast pork on Christmas Eve while their Cuban neighbors roast a turkey. We already enjoy Thanksgiving and Halloween. It's even common to see an habanera wearing green from head to toe on St. Patrick's Day . And that's something to wonder about. One of the main conquests of the young Hispanics in this country has been the abolition of chaperones-a legitimate aspiration of the youngsters of my generation. We used to dance to the rhythm of a sa/sa melody with the following words: " Si /as viejas se murieran todas ... los muchachos cumbancharan mas, cumbancharan mas , cumbancharan mas" "If the old women would just drop dead .. . young people would have a ball, would have a ball, would have a ball. " The experts on these so-called "cultural traits" don't understand how in the world a norteamericano can refuse to eat a fried ripe plantain with his food because it is too sweet, but think nothing of gulping down roast turkey with a shower of cranberry sauce. CUBAN BURRITOS AND PAELLA It ts also difficult to comprehend how a Cuban can refuse to recognize, . tortillas and burritos as Cuban dishes (they are truly Mexican), and--then purport to show an American friend the goodness of a real Cuban meal by inviting him or her to a delicious dish of paella with total disregard tor the natives of Valencia. These differences and contradictions could become annoying or amusing (depending on one's mood). But we manage to survive, in this maremagnum of irrelevance, sometimes in complete harmony; in other instances, uncomfortable with each other. But those blonde-freckle&green-eyed Garcias and those deep black-eyed-sa/sa-waisted brunettes named Cathy, linda or Carol are incontrovertible proof that the customs, traditions and cultural aberra tions die down when confronted with that sweeping and irresistible force called love. (George Childs, a radio and television comedy writer in his native Cuba, now writes a three-times-weekly humor column for El Miami Herald in Miami, Florida) Sin pe/os en Ia lengua FREE AT LAST: Now that Ray Knight, once-obscure New York Mets' third baseman and husband of a champion golfer, has been chosen as the Most Valuable Player of the 1986 World Series, he may no longer be known as Mr. Nancy Lopez. ONE MEXICAN, OVER-EASY: When they were schoolgirls, the syndicated lovelorn sisters Ann Landers and Abigail Van Buren must have skipped the same social science classes together. Two years ago (Oct. 22, 1984), . Sin Pelos censured Abby for spreading the stereotype that, unique among Hispanics, "Wife beating is sometimes accepted by both wife and husband. The macho man feels that it is okay to beat his wife and children. " Now (Oct. 24, 1986), sister Ann responds to a reader who lost a barroom "most suntanned legs" cont es t to a "Mexican." "The only way suc h a contest could b e fair would be to limit the contestants to Caucasians," Ann rules. Who wants to be the one to tell Ann that Mexicans may be Caucasian just like her and their legs may be naturally white, yellow, red , brown, black or shades in between. So can we tan? Just back from Cancun, my comadre Linda Prieta wants to know where that bar is . " I could be a sunBURN contest all by myself," she v ouches. TRUE OR FALSE: Working Mex ican Americans blame undocumented workers for lower salaries, loss of jobs, the over crowding of s chools and deterioration of neighborhoods. In a page 1 article Oct. 21, The Wall Street Journal states flatly that they do. Not" some working-class Mexican-Americans." ALL workingc la ss Mexican Americans. In its annual foray into the barrio, the Journal marvels, in stacked headlines, at: "Latino Schism-Hispanic Communities In U.S. Are Dividecf By Influx of MexicansChicanos, Newer Immigrants Trade Charges Over Jobs, Pay Cuts, Neighborhoods-Language Is Often a Barrier." . . To suggest that there are no rivalries among some newcomers and some oldtimers would be to ignore c. reality. But the Journal's simple-minded, inflamatory distortion goes far beyond that. Did I say annual foray? It was about a yea r ago when the Journal carried its editorial with the neat heading, "Wetbacks as People." And it was two years ago when it counted 200 Spanish language and bilingual newspapers in this country and did a hatchet job on them all , describing their collective content as "apt to turn heads, if not stomachs." What could it possibly be working on for next year? CURTAIN CALL: So how do you get the attention of the national media if you're just another humble Hispanic? Actor Eric Estrada gained all sortsof media attention last month when he attended an opening night Tango Argentino party at Washington' s Willard Hotel. How so? Prominently displayed on a gold chain around his neck was his 7-month-old son's umbilical cord. -Kay Barbaro Quoting. .. ROSE BIRD, California's Chief Supreme Court Justice who, with Justice Cruz Reynoso, is the target of a campaign by conservatives to deny her reconfirmation Nov. 4 , commenting to syndicated columnist .Anthony Lewis: "It would be a great tragedy if (Reynoso) were defeated H e is the only person from the Hispanic community in statewide office. He is a role model. Defeating him would be a clear statement, an ugly statement. " Women are going to find their place in law and society whatever happens to me. But I don ' t know about the Hispanics. Even with their growing numbers, they are so poor, so unorganized . . 3 Nov . 3, 1986 Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1

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U.S. HISPANIC BUSINESSES: "Survey of Minority-Owned Business Enterprises : Hispanic-Owned Businesses, 1982" lists sales and receipts and geographic distribution of firms. For a copy of the 202-page report, send an $11 prepaid order to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, GPO Stock No. (003 024), Washington, D.C. 20402. MATH SKILLS: ''Using Calculators to Improve Your Child's Math Skills " is a brochure by the National Council ofTeachersof Mathematics. For a free copy, send a self-addressed, st-amped envelope before . Dec. 31 to: Parents Brochure No.4, 1906 Association Drive, Reston, Va. 22091. LATINOS IN CHICAGO: The Latino Institute has made avail-able the study" At the Cutting Edge," which focuses on the empowerment of Hispanics in that city. For a copy, send $8 to: . Ll , 228 S.Wabash, 6th Floor, Chicago, Ill . 60604, FORD FOUNDATION REPORTS: The three following reports are free from the Ford Foundation: 1) Created Equal: A Report . on Ford Foundation Women's. Programs; 2) Ford Foundation Support for the Arts in the United States; and 3) President's Review, 1985 on the topic of affirmative action . To obtain, write: Office of Reports, Department L, Ford Foundation, 320 E. 43rd St., New York, N.Y. 10017. POVERTY . STATISTICS: U.S . Rep. Robert Garcia (DN . Y . ) has released a study questioning the accuracy of a recent report by the Census Bureau revising the definition of poverty using non-cash benefits. For a copy, contact: House Subcommittee on Census and Population, 219 Cannon Office Building, Washington, D . C . 20515. FEMALE AND MINORITY ACADEMIC SUCCESS: "Sex and Ethnic Differences in Middle School Mathematics, Science and Computer Science: What Do We KnoW?," a report by the Educational Testing Service , discusses factors that improve the performance of females and minorities in the subjects. For a copy of the -300-page report, send $6.50 to: Elaine Guennel, 1 OR, ETS , Princeton; N.'J. 08541. '87 MARKETING STUDY DUE Strategy Research Corporation of Miami will release the findings of its 1987 Hispanic Market Study at five seminars starting week. The study has a publication price of $40. The seminars are set-for Los Angeles-( Nov. 7) ; Chicago (Nov. 11 ), Miami (Nov. 13), New York (Nov. 18) and Houston (Nov. 20). Registration cost for.New York is $165; for the other-s, .$125. For more information, contact Elizabeth Grudzinski, Vice President, SRC, 100 N.W . 37th Ave., Miami , Fla 33125 (305) 649. HI'GH:SCHOOL ESSAY CONTESTS. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is assisting organizations and newspapers in more than 20 cities nationally to conduct higl;l school essay writing conte. sts, . with localcash awards and a national--prize of a trip for two to the NationatHispanic Media Conference in Los Angeles April 22, 1987. The competition is open to students grades9 . . This year's essay assignment profile an involved member of your Hispanic community . If you want information on how a student in your community may participate -or wish to start a contest yourself , contact. Josel.yn Cordova, NAHJ, Room 634, National Press Btlilding, . Washingt_on, D.-c. 20045 (202) 783.FORTI FLIGHT ATTENDANTS. GRADUATE Forty Pue[-to Rican flight attendants were graduated in ceremonies at American Airlines' Learning CenteF.in Dallas/'Ft: Worth Oct. 23. All were recruited in Puerto Rico. It was the first class of all Puerto Rican students. Having completed their 5 1 /2-week training, they are returning to the island to support American's Caribbean expansion program . OTHER PLACES,. OTHER-FACEs:; The Hispanic Bankers Association honored Ignacio Urravazo Jr. , preside nt, Commerce Bank, Laredo, Texas, and Antonio Marti, senior vice pr. esident, ' FirstInterstate -Bank, Los Angeles, .at its 6th annual _recognition reception held in Los Angeles last month. calendar community relations , bilingual education and adult training . Oficina de Ia Comunidad Hispana Cle Mct(vlana Gaithersburg, Md. Nov. 13 THIS WEEK CINEFEST/VAL San Antonio Nov. 5 Entering its second decade, CineFestiva/'86, spon so red by the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, will for the first time award prizes for the best feature film, best documentary and best first film or video . CineFestival (51 2) 271 BUSINESS LUNCHEON SERIES Washington, D . C . Nov. 6 U . S . Rep . Jack Kemp , a New York Republican frequently me l!tioned as a presidential candidate for 1988, will be a guest speaker at the lbero-American Chamber of Commerce' s luncheon series . Linda Rentz ( 202) 296 FUNDRAISER New York Nov. 6 The Institute of Puerto Rican Urban Services will hold its 3 rd annual fund raiser , presenting Life Achievement Awards to four Latinos, including poet and philosopher Clemente Soto-Velez . Stella Sanchez (21 2) 6656369 EDUCATION OF LATINOS Anaheim, Calif. Nov. 6 "Ensuring Progress in Education" is the theme of the Association of Mexican American Educators' 21st annual conference, with presentations on parent 4 Gloria Franco (818) 919 GLOBAL MUTILCULTURALISM San Diego Nov . 7, 8 Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez and Paul Espinosa, award-Winning producerandwriter at KPB&TV , San Diego, will be among the participants at thiS con ference looking at multiculturalism in business and education. Barbara Takashima (619) 483 ext. 228 TELECOMMUNICATION OPPORTUNITIES Kingston, Jamaica Nov. 9 Tanping into telecommunication opportunities for The minority entrepreneur in the Caribbean Basin will be the focus of U.S . Department of Commerce' s National Telecommunications and Information Administration. R.T. Gregg(202) 377. COMING SOON AWARDS DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund San Antonio Nov. 1 0 Barbara Aguirre (512) 224 ENGLISH PRIMACY FORUM La Alianza Washington, D.C. Nov. 12 Richard Olona (202) 488 EMPLOYMENT STRATEGIES Nov . 3, 1986 Alvaro DeMoya (301) 330 CAREER DEVELOPMENT. Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement Chicago Nov. 14 Katherine Ortiz (312) 341 FAMILY DYNAMICS Alcoholism Center for Women Los Angeles Nov. 15 Clarissa Cfiandler (213) 381 LIMITED ENGLISH PROFICI.ENCY Immaculata, College Immaculata, Pa. Nov. 15 Sister Mary Consuela (215) 6474400 SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT Mexican American Alumni Association of Loyola Marymount University Marina del Rey, Calif. Nov . 15 Carol Gilger(213) 642 Fl RST 'NOTI'CE' ILLITERACY: SERJobs for Progress will have . illiteracy as the central theme for its 21st annual conference in San Antonio on April 15, 1987. Noting that-Hispanics representroughly33% cit the nation's estimated 23 million illiterates, the conference will look at work-related solutions. >more in formation, contact Allison Parker at(-2 1"4) 631. H ispanic Link Weekly Report

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L CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS G r ad u ate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields : ' Librarian/Library Technician Social Science AnalysVResearch Assistant EconomisVEconomics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs AnalysVResearch Assistant Eligibility includes persons with maste(s and /or doctorate degrees and full-time graduate students pursuing maste(s and doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 1 7 1 , Perso na l Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered. Th e program consists of 90or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations . Sessions for 1987 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individu a ls interested in the January-April session must submit their applications no later than Nov. 14, 1986. Upon completion of the 90-120-day experience, individuals with completed maste(s degrees wil l be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment. For additional information, con tact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620. TRANSLATOR/EDITOR Major publisher of bilingual dictionaries re quires translator(Engli sh to Spanish). Candidate should be bilingual with Spanish as native langua\Je . must relocate t o London for two to three years. Appl ican t s should submit resume to Jean Paradise , MacMillan Publishing Com ' pany , 866 3rdAve., New York, N.Y. 10022 (212) 702-4265. CHAPTER DIRECTOR: California Chicano News Media Assoctatton, San Otego _ Chapter. DUTIES: Administrates all San Diego Chapter activities including fundraising development, office management design and implementation of workshops and conferences, representation of CCNMA-SD in community and institutional settings, coordination with CCNMA-Los Angeles andotherdutiesasrequired. REQUIREMENTS : Familiarity with underrepresentation of Latinos i n media, fundraising experience, excellent wri ting and communication skills, four year degree or equivalent thereof; media background and bilingual (Spanish) abilities desirable. SALARY: $25,000/year to begin Jan. 1 , 1987. Submit resume and inquiries to Paul Esp ino sa , CCNMA SD , KPB&TV, San Diego, Calif . 92182 (619) 265. Filing DEADLINE: Nov. 15. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR for human rig htS/ foreign policy NGO. Requires leadership, administration/fund-raising experience, solid understanding of Latin America , demonstrated commitment to human rights $26,000-$29, 000, depen d ing on experience. EO E. Request cation materials from: Search Committee , Board of D i rectors, Washington Office on Latin America, 11 o Maryland Ave . NE, Washington, D.C. 20002. JOIN THE LARGEST (TE N THOUSAND CIRCULATION) AND FINEST HISPANIC MONTHLY NEWSPAPER IN CHICAGOLAND, CHICAGO CATOLICO, AS EDITOR. Your res ponsibilities w ill in clude writing and editing for this newspaper as well as completing writing assignments for the Chicago Catholi c (our Engli s h . weekly). You must be bilingual and po ssess an understanding of Catholic issues rel ative to Hispanics. Unusual opportunity for someone to shine in the rising Hi spanic community of Chicago. resume and nonreturnable sa mple to: Vtnce Saputo, General Ma nager, P .O. B ox 11181, Chicago, Ill . 60611. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bilingual with good Spanish . Type 60 words per minute; ability to work effective ly under pressure . Word processing experience desir: able. Good wri t ing skills essential. Contact Lupe Aguirre , National Council of La Raza , 20 F St. NW , 2nd Floor, Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 628-9600 HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES You can now support th e National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards c ollege scholar . ships given annually to outstanding Hispani c students across the United States. . The !combined federal campaign now gives you the opportunity to write in your choice of .organizations you want to receive your con tribution. The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax exempt organization. Invest in your com mun ity today and support the National His panic Scholarship Fund. For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund , P.O. Box? 48, San Franc isco ; Calif . 94101 (415) 892-9_ 971 . CHICANO STUDIES The Dep artment of Chicano Studies cipates a tenure track appointment in one of the following disciplines: • Anthropology • Economics • Political Science • Psychology Appointment will either be a joint appoint ment or a full appointment in Chicano Studies. Position effective July1, 1987. Ph . D . by time of appointment and evidence oi excellence in teaching and r esea rch are required . Assis tant Professor level preferred, although ex ceptionally well-qualified persons whose back ground and experience warrant a tenure le ve l appointment are also encouraged to apply. Salary and rank dependent on qualifications Applicants should send vitae and pertinent documents, in cluding copies of main publi cations (for those completing dissertations, copies of completed c hapters) , and arrange to have at le ast three professional evaluations sen t by Jan. 31, 1987 to: Dr. Mario T. Garcia Chair, Department of Chicano Studies University of California Santa Barbara , Calif. 931 06 An Equal Opportunity/Affirmati ve Actior Employer STATION MANAGER, KSJV-FM, Fresno , Calif . KSJV is a CPB qualified station that serves the over 600,000 L atino population in the San Joaquin Valley, Calif. RESPONSIBILITIES: To provide overall administration and coordination of KSJV. Will be chiefly responsible for managing six-person fu ll-time staff . QUALIFICATIONS: Administrative and or ganizational skills are required and some fa miliarity wit h personnel management. Must nave proven ability to work with community based, grassroots organizations. Fund-raising and Financial Management skills are necessary . Must be bilingual in English and Spanish with the ability to read/write in both languages. SALARY: $ 1 ,200 per month plus fringe benefits TO APPLY : Send resume to: Hugo Morales, P .O. Box 1 2682, Fresno, Calif. 93778 or call (209) 486-517 4. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md. , are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES r GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington." D . C., provides: e Design • Illustration • Type setting • Layout e Silkscreen and • Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.C . 20010 (202) 483. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a " national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, o . c : 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesd ay will be in Wee k ly Reports mailed Fr ida y of the same week. INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER seeks position with growing or ganization in Southern California area . Back ground in international public relations and tourism. Energetic, self-motivated and fluent in Spanish. Please contact: Hispanic Link News Service, Corporate Classifieds, 1420 N St., NW, Washington, D .C. 20005. Attn: JR. YOGA (202) 3622656 or (301) 933-6196 Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words ; telephone number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) .$35 per column inch. Ordered by _________ _..._ Title-:------------Area Code & Phone _______ _ ll.dvertiser Name _________ _ Bill To------------Address -----------City, State & Zip ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment FUN AT THE FESTIVALS: Latino films make an impact at two distinct U . S . film festivals this month. The Chicago International Film Festival, one of the nation' s oldest and most prestigious film exhibits, continues through Nov. 7 with a 14-film retrospective of Argentinean cinema. Two films from that South American coutry competed in the festival Mari Luisa Bemberg' s Miss Mary, which inaugurated the festival Oct. 24, and Eliseo Subiela' s Hombre mirando at Sudeste. In total, 19 Hispanic films will be screened during the 22nd annual event. Out West, the San Antonio Cine-Festival enters its second decade this week, with film and video projects by and about Latinos and Latin Americans. This year CineFestival becomes a competitive event, with the awarding of Premios Mezquite to the" Best New Film or Video," "Best Feature Film " and "Best Documentary." A Special Jurors Award will go to the entry that best reflects "the spirit of the CineFestival." The event begins with a public forum Nov. 5 titled " The Evolution of Latino Consciousness ThroughCinema." Speakers include filmmaker Jesus Trevino and Raquel Ortiz, executive producer for Community Affairs at WGBG-TV, Boston. Shorts, features and documentaries from the United States, Puerto Rico , Peru , Nicaragua, Chile, Spain, Paraguay, Argentina, Cuba, Mexico and Canada will screen at the city's historic Guadalupe Theater through Nov. 14. CineFestival , directed by Eduardo Diaz , is sponsored by the city's Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center with city, state and corporate grants. Following the CineFestival , the Guadalupe will host a selection of Latin American films screened this summer in New York as part of that city's Festival Latino. A total of seven films will be shown through Nov. 23. Another of the West's historic movie houses, Denver's Mayan Theatre, reopens Nov. 6 with a gala benefit event to be attended by the city's mayor, Federico Pena. Opened in 1930, the Mayan is one of six U . S . theaters built in the art deco Mayan Revival Styleand one of three still remaining. Further West, a Hispanic film producer has filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles to try to stop production of The Milagro Beanfield Warwhich Robert Redford is directing in New Mexico with Moctesuma Esparza as co-producer. The lawsu i t claims that Redford ' s film is based on the life of New Mexican activist Reies Tijerina -and that Larry Cano, executive producer of Silkwood, owns the film rights to Tijerina' s story. According to the suit, production of Milagro halted the progress and success of a movie called King Tiger-which Cano hoped to produce for Columbia Pictures. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report San Antonio , which publishes guidebooks, Uno will be edited by Carlos Freymann Jr. and directed to the H i spanic professional nationally. journalism seminar . Hector EricksenMendoza, publisher of Hispanic Link Weekly Report, keynoted an afternoon banquet. DE BUT NO. 1 : Estrella Hispana, a 32-to-40-page Spanish-language magazine based in Indianapolis, Ind., made its debut this month with a 10,000 press run . Editor/publisher David Hernandez sees the new monthly "taking a Midwest approach to national issues. " Early editions will also provide coverage of plans for the Pan American Games, scheduled for Indianapolis next August. Subscription price : $15 for 12 issues annually. For a copy of the premiere issue, send $1 to cover postage and handling to Hernandez at Estrella magazine, 342 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis, Ind. 46204. DEBUT NO.2: The36-page monthly Englishlanguage magazine Uno begins publication in November with a 10,000 press run . Produced by the Carlos Freymann family of HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nation_al publ)cation of . Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW 6 Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Pii bli s h er. Hector Eri c k s enMendoza Edit or. F e li x Perez R e porting : C h arlie E r icksen . Anio ni c M e j ias-Rentas. P h il Ga r cia . No port•on of H•svan i c Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcas t i n any form without advance permission Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (1 3 . issues) S26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 7 5 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch . Ads placed b y Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use on reQuest. Price : $14 a year, $1.50 on newsstands where available . For a copy of the premiere issue , send $2 to Freymann & Associates, 702 E. Euclid St., San Antonio, Te x as 78212. TENTH ANNIVERSARY: El Directorio Hispano and its publishers, Aaron and Sara Lopez, were saluted at a 1Oth anniversary celebration in Reading, Pa., Oct. 26. Patrisia Gonzales, reporter with The Philadelphia Inquirer, led off a day of activities with a El Directorio Hispano, Pennsylvania ' s largest bilingual weekly, serves nine cities with size able His panic populations in the southeastern section of the state, including Reading, Lancaster, Harrisburg, York, Bethlehem and Allentown. IN MOTION: Elaine Rivera, reporter with The Washington Times, joins Newsday's metropolitan New York reporting staff Dec. 1 . .. Charlie Ericksen MYTHOLOGICALC REATURES, 1985 (acrylic on canvas), by FranciscoAivarado-Jwhez. His most recent paintings are featured at El Museo del Barrio in New York City through Jan. 25. Hispanic :..ink Weekly Report