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Hispanic link weekly report, November 17, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 17, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
The chairman of President Reagan’s Committee on Employment of the Handicapped names Consuelo Martinez of Sacramento, Calif., as one of 21 individuals on the 40-year-old body's goal-setting and policy-making executive committee. . . New Mexico Gov. Toney Anaya receives a written apology from psychologists who did an analysis of him for the magazine Albuquerque Living. The analysis, based on an 1 1/2 hour interview by the writer, said that Anaya was lonely and that his life was unbalanced... Anita Castelo goes back to working as the personal maid of first lady Nancy Reagan. Charges of illegal munitions export against Castelo were recently dropped... The mother of Washington, D.C., resident Rodrigo Rojas, the 19-year-pld Chilean exile who died from burns inflicted by the Chilean
Army, files a $10 million lawsuit against the Chilean government and its armed forces.. More than 1,000 police officers from 30 Florida departments turn out to pay their last respects to Emilio Miyares. Miyares, 27, married and the father of a 7-year-old son and a 4-year-old daughter, was the first officer to be killed in the line of duty in the 61-year history of the Hialeah police department. He was shot while struggling with a robbery suspect. . . The Houston Police Department confers public service awards on civilians Gilbert CH6vez and Chris Sweet for their help in saving six children who were thrown into a bayou by their mother... Samantha Dorllnda L6pez, 37, escapes from a Pleasanton, Calif., federal prison in a helicopter. Lopez, serving 60 years for bank robbery and kidnapping, was, plucked out of the prison courtyard by her boyfriend, also an escapee... Santa Cruz County deputy sheriff Joe Flores apprehends a malei suspect by barking like a vicious guard dog...
Vol. 4 No. 46
fa) HISPANI^UNKWEEK^REPORT
New Spanish Network Planned
Rafael Cortada Picked as New UDC Chief
Rafael Cortada was selected Nov. 5 to be the new president of the University of the District of Columbia on a 10-2 vote by that institution’s board of trustees.
Cortada, who said he would probably take office late next summer, currently is president of El Camino Community College in Torrance, Calif. He began a second four-year term as the $80,000-a-year head at El Camino just three months ago. El Camino Community College, a two-year public school with an enrollment of 27,000 students, has the nation’s largest community college campus.
In the late 1960s, Cortada taught history at Federal City College, which later merged with two other institutions to become UDC.
UDC, an open-admissions university whose enrollment dropped by about 1,000 this fall to 11,000 students, is 80% black. When asked why he accepted the position, Cortada, 52 and of Puerto Rican and Trinidadian extraction, said he looked forward to the challenge of improving the student academic performance. Under the stewardship of Cortada, El Camino Community College prospered despite decreasing enrollments at most other California community colleges.
Border Judge Jails 32
Thirty-six undocumented persons who attempted to cross a bridge joining Juarez, Mexico, with El Paso, Texas, Oct. 31 were given stiff jail sentences by U.S. Magistrate Janet Ruesch rather than being offered voluntary departure.
She sentenced 32 of them to 20 or 30 days in jail, giving the other four 180-day suspended sentences.
Judge Ruesch’s action was described by Al Giugni, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service district director in El Paso, as a signal to those who continue to violate U.S. immigration laws.
“Our inspectors were busy working so they couldn’t stop them,” Giugni said. “These people were taking advantage of a laxness in our procedure and we decided to put a stop to it”.
A new Spanish-language television network providing news and other programming to all major U.S. Hispanic markets will be in place and operating within 60-90 days, Charles M. Fernandez, executive vice president of Hispanic American Broadcasting Network, told Weekly Report Nov. 11.
HBN is based in Miami. Its board chair and main investor is Amancio Victor Suarez, principal owner of WAQI-Radio Mambi there. Suarez and associates purchased radio station WGBS a year ago and converted it to Spanish-language WAQI.
Gustavo Godoy, former vice president and news director for Spanish International Network, has been named president of the newly formed network.
The decision to form HBN was a very recent one, prompted by the departure of Godoy and some 20 other newsroom personnel at SIN.
Fernandez said that while the decision was a fast one, it was made only after a careful evaluation of the market and “discussions with Gustavo which convinced us that he could produce a product we could sell.”
Initially, HBN will produce a five-times-weekly half-hour newscast using bureaus in the United States, South and Central America and Europe.
By December, it expects to have negotiated contracts in five major U.S. markets plus eight or nine more in Latin America, Fernandez said.
Godoy left SIN in late October after he and others openly criticized that network for its announced decision two months earlier to bring Mexican broadcast journalist Jacobo Zabludovsky to the United States to direct SIN’s news effort.
Godoy charged that Zabludovsky was too closely tied to the Mexican government Zabludovsky, who anchors the “24 Horas” Mexico City nightly newscast was accused of downplaying stories which reflected badly on that country's political leadership.
Following Godoy to HBN will be SIN’s former assistant news director, Josie Goytisolo. She will direct its news operation.
Because of the mass resignation of SIN journalists and technicians in Miami, the new network will have a ready resource of trained personnel if it chooses to hire them. Among those who quit SIN were the co-anchors of its nightly “Noticiero SIN" Teresa Rodriguez and Jose Diaz-Balart.
Their resignations were followed by others in SIN bureaus, including three in El Salvador.
Miami employees who said that they would work through the Nov. 4 elections were immediately locked out of the newsroom there.
A SIN spokesperson then told reporters Nov. 3 that Zabludovski was not expected to move from Mexico City to New York after all. “Personal reasons” were cited.
"Noticiero SIN" reaches a U.S. audience of 6-10 million nightly.
-Charlie Ericksen
National Boycott Launched
United Farm Workers union President C&sar Chavez launched a nationwide boycott of A&P stores Oct. 28 after the supermarket chain refused to stop carrying California-grown grapes.
The union leader charged that the grapes are contaminated with pesticides that cause cancer and birth defects to the farm workers-' the vast majority of whom are Hispanic- who harvest them.
Arturo Rodriguez, a national executive board member of UFW, said 98-99% of all table grapes consumed in the United States are . grown in California
Jobless Rate Decreases
The Hispanic unemployment rate dipped from 11.1 % in September to 10.5% in October, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
The overall unemployment rate stayed at 7%. The jobless rate for Latinos at this.time last year was 11.1%. The number of Latinos unemployed decreased from 906,000 in September to 858,000 in October.
The black unemployment experienced a decrease also-14.8% to 14.4%. The rate for whites did not move from its September rate of 6%.


GAO Says Bennett Distorts Research
The U.S. Department of Education misinterpreted bilingual education research which supported teaching limited-English-speaking students in their native language, according to a General Accounting Office draft report
The analysis said that 10 bilingual education experts were asked to examine department reports which criticized bilingual education programs using the student’s native tongue as the primary language for instruction. The experts said that Education Secretary William Bennett was wrong when he concluded that the research showed that teaching students primarily or completely in English produced quicker and better results.
“On the contrary, most of these experts believe that the research evidence supports the use of native language,” said the draft obtained by the Los Angeles Times, reported on Nov. 8.
One of the experts said that the Education Department made “fraudulent and dishonest use of my work.”
Bennett has been an outspoken opponent of the 4% cap on federal bilingual education funds for alternate teaching methods which do not use the student’s native language as the primary language of instruction. Bilingual education proponents have charged that Bennett’s attempts at lifting the spending cap in order to give more flexibility to local school districts are nothing more than a ruse to allow English to become the sole instruction language.
Rep. Augustus Hawkins (D-Calif.), chairman of the Education and Labor Committee, told The Times: “Clearly, there is no evidence to support the current department position.
What remains is an ideological, rather than a factual, opposition to the use of native language in the classroom.”
A spokesman for Bennett said that the secretary did not favor one teaching method over another, but that he does not like the idea of being “locked into one method.”
Gonzalez, Molina Enter LA. Contest
Los Angeles School Board member Larry Gonzdlez formally announced Nov. 12 his candidacy for newly redrawn, predominantly Latino City Council District No. 1.
His announcement, widely expected since he moved within district boundaries shortly before the October residency-requirement deadline, pits him against California Assemblywoman Gloria Molina
Commission Cuts Latinos
Forty-seven staff members of the U.S. Commission on Civil'Rights, including Hispanics who have directed their regional operations in New York and Texas for years, have been formally advised by the agency that their employment will be terminated Nov. 18.
The RIF (reduction in force) notices were distributed to the staff members on Nov. 7 following a vote by the commission to adopt a staffing plan which would trim the agency to 62 staffers and reduce its regional offices from 10 to three.
The cutbacks were blamed by staff director J. Al Latham on mandated cuts in its budget and strictures placed by Congress on spending. After gaining commissionersTsupport for the personnel cuts on Oct. 24, Latham quit the agency a week later.
Among personnel let go are Richard A vena, director of its Southwest regional office in San Antonio; Ruth Cubero, director of the Eastern regional office in New York City; Idalia Morales, deputy director of the Southern regional office in Atlanta; and Isidro Lucas, deputy director of its Midwestern regional office in Chicago.
The three remaining regions will be coordinated from Los Angeles, Kansas City and Washington, D.C. The Los Angeles office is directed by Philip M6ntez. Each office will have a maximum staff of six persons while commission headquarters will be trimmed to 44 persons 2
Molina announced her candidacy Nov. 6 amid the support of influential political figures Among her backers present forthe announcement were U.S. Congressman Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Council President Pat Russell.
Gonzalez has received the support of his former boss state Sen. Art Torres and the only Hispanic on the Council, Richard Alatorre.
Molina, an assemblywoman since 1982, and Alatorre have been at odds since Alatorre endorsed Richard Polanco in the 1982 state assembly race against her. She narrowly won that race.
The special election will be Feb, 3. The district 69% Latino, is north of downtown Los Angeles Alatorre, chairman of the councifs reapportionment committee, drew the district The city of Los Angeles and the City Council had been sued by the U.S. Justice Department for diluting the voting power of Latinos by dispersing them over several districts Alatorre?s remap satisfied the suit.
Contras Not Welcome
The people of Puerto Rico do not want anti-Sandinista forces trained there, Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon told New York Times editors Oct. 31.
Responding to a Reagan administration statement that Puerto Rico was being considered as a Contra training site, Herndndez Colon warned that while the U.S. government had the authority to establish military facilities in the commonwealth “without our signing off on it,” such a decision could create severe political repercussions
Two U.S. military installations in Puerto Rico were bombed Oct. 28 and explosives were planted at six other sites that day.
The Associated Press in San Juan received a call from a person claiming to represent the Macheteros who said the actions were taken in response to reports that Contra forces might be trained on the island.
Administration Flops Cuban Prisoner Policy
On Nov. 17, 45 Cubans being held in the Atlanta Federal Penitentiary will be transferred to a minimum security prison as the first step i in a policy switch by the Reagan administration to release many of the Cubans currently! |I incarcerated.
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization) y Service, which confirmed the abrupt change Nov. 8, said that as many as 3,000 Cuban ) detainees could be affected There are 1,813 Cubans in the Atlanta prison and up to 700 of i these are eligible for transfer to the minimum security facility.
The Cubans are part of the boatlift that came from that island’s Mariel Bay in 1980. Some of the prisoners were arrested for being suspected of breaking Cuban law; the others broke U.S. law.
The administration policy reversal came on the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court decision Oct. 17 not to hear a 5-year-old case in which the detainees tried to gain asylum or constitutional rights.
Louis Richard, INS director for the Atlanta district, said that incarceration costs were part of the reason for the policy shift.
Refugee Centers Closed
Casa Oscar Romero in San Benito, Texas, and another Central American refugee center near the Texas-Mexico border were closed Oct. 31, causing 523 children, women and men to be bused to a U.S. Immigration and Naturalization center nearby.
Opened in 1982 and having served more than 16,000 refugees awaiting asylum or deportation, the shelter was ordered shut down by the San Benito CityCouncil when its t occupancy quadrupled. The closure was also precipated in part by a confrontation between neighborhood residents and refugees last summer.
Shelter officials said the increase in occupancy was caused by a Sept 8 INS policy requiring refugees to post $1,000 bonds in order to leave the area while awaiting depor- |
tation hearings.
The center, named after an assassinated San Salvador archbishop, was run by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brownsville. Refugees transferred to the INS center in Harlingen will either be deported, placed in a f detention center or released on their own recognizance.
Oldest Person, 127, Dies
Christina Martinez of East Hartford, Cona, reportedly the world’s oldest person at 127, died at St. Elizabeth Health Center in East Hartford, Conn., Oct. 23.
A farm worker for many years, she was born in Silas, Puerto Rico, on Feb.-3,1859, according to her family.
She was honored by Hartford officials in 1981 for casting her first vote on the U.S. mainland at age 121.
Hispanic LinkWeekly Report


Ana Veciana-Suarez
Joyous Miscommunication
Some people say fences make good neighbors. True. But not speaking the same language makes better ones.
Historians have gotten the Tower of Babel story all wrong. So have S.l. Hayakawa, the U.S. English movement and the five million Californians who went to the polls this month to vote “yes” on that state’s “Official English” Proposition 63.
As a matter of fact, confusion is often a result of understanding each other.
Neighbors have borrowed sugar and watched over each other's homes for years without speaking the same language. But no one has noticed
In my hometown of Miami, many ethnic problems can be traced to the mistaken notion that everybody should speak the same language - Spanish or English.
This would be a catastrophe. Not only would we understand each other’s words, we would also be inclined not to give our brethren the benefit of the doubt.
If the guy next door blocked your driveway and he was fluent In English, you would know for sure that he had ignored your hand-lettered sign. If his tree shed in your yard despite repeated warnings in a language you both spoke, you would be entitled to disperse the [ same leaves on his front lawn because you knew he understood.
NO READING BETWEEN LINES If neighbors don’t share a language, there is no reading between | the lines, no problem with not saying what you mean. When they \ cannot speak to each other, neighbors tend to look the other way. Not speaking to each other is a fence- a mental one perhaps- but a fence all the same. That is why so many apartment dwellers who speak the same language never exchange more than a greeting, j They’re industrious fence makers.
j Down in Miami’s Little Havana, my grandmother and her neighbor \ are a wonderful example of neighborliness. For years, the two old women have traded plants and flowers over the backyard fence.
My grandmother speaks little English. Her neighbor speaks no Spanish.
No matter. Language is not the only means of communication.
In my family, the Tower of Babel became the Tower of Love. My
i cousin reports that his Spanish-speaking parents get along wonderfully with his English-speaking in-laws because they cannot speak to each other. For the wedding, his wife’s parents flew in from Arizona to meet his family, most of whom understood only enough English to i watch the soap operas.
The meeting was memorable.
Her mother “Good morning.”
His mother "Buenos dias.”
Her father “Good morning.”
His father “Buenos dias.,f
They are still happily married. The couple’s daughter speaks both languages but refuses to listen to either set of grandparents. SCREAMING IN FLAWLESS SPANISH On the other hand, my grandfather and his neighbor used to have screaming matches over the most inconsequential matters- puppy droppings, property lines, parties. And always in flawless Spanish. There is a lesson to be learned from all this.
For years, teachers have used boy-girl-boy seating arrangements to promote harmony in our nation’s classrooms. Blocks of English household-Spanish household-English households could do the same in our nation’s neighborhoods.
I Many marriages reportedly resulted from the boy-girl-boy classroom
mix.
So why not try the household language checkerboard to see if it will at least help establish some neighborly bliss?
(Ana Veciana-Suarez is a reporter and weekly columnist with the "Living Today" section of The Miami Herald, Miami, Fla.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Stn pefos en la tengua
DRESSING UP FOR ’88: Unlike football, there are no timeouts in politics. Already they’re calling the next plays:
RICHARD FOR MAYOR: When Richard Alatorre was named to chair the Los Angeles City Council's reapportionment committee by Council President Pat Russell last December, many Latinos sighed, “Poor Richard.” He was certain to be crushed between veteran incumbents’ greed and the U.S. Justice Department’s intransigence.
When the smoke cleared 10 months later, The Los Angeles Times assessed the headline-grabbing drama’s winners and losers. The biggest loser, it concluded, was Russell. Her actions “cast doubt on her leadership ability.”
But“for newcomer Richard Alatorre, a tough veteran of the state Legislature who guided the redistricting plan through the council, it was a triumph of his political skills,” it added.
LA Mayor Tom Bradley, as is his style, bobbed and weaved and hid.
Now that the befuddled Bradley has been roundly shadow-boxed into submission for the second time by California’s colorless governor, George Deukmejian, there are those in Los Angeles who are asking if the time will be ripe in ’88 for Alatorre to challenge Bradley in that increasingly Latino city. And they are answering, “Yes.”
GLORY FOR GLORIA: On Nov. 4, Gloria Molina, the first Latina to serve in the California state Assembly, outpolled -percentagewise-all of California’s Hispanic candidates who were running for state or federal legislative office. Back in ’84, she showed ’em, too- taking 82% of her Assembly district vote Congressman Ed Roybal and then-Assemblyman Alatorre were next, with 72% and 71 % in their districts.
This time, Molina polled 85%, followed by Roybal’s 76%.
Almost immediately after her victory, she announced, with Roybal at her side, her intention to become the first Latina on the LA City Council. She’ll run Feb. 3 for the new 69%^-Latino seat Alatorre’s redistricting created.
If she wins, that’ll give the word “iron/ an added dimension Gloria and Richard are arch-rivals in the political game: She beat his ex-aide Richard Polanco in the 1982 Assembly race. This time Alatorre is siding with her major announced Council competitor, LA school board member Larry Gonzdlez.
TOUCHE FOR TEXAS: In Texas, politics are simpler. Democrats vs Republicana Latino voters helped Democrat RaCil Gonzalez write history by becoming the first Mexican American elected statewide. He kept the Place No. 4 Supreme Court seat which Gov. Mark White appointed him to in 1984.
Gonzalez, 46, won by 53%-47%, about 190,000 votea Fellow Latinos, voting 9-1 for him, clearly provided the margin of victory.
But it was state attorney general candidate Roy Barrera, Democrat-turned-Republican, who got the national press in his race against incumbent Jim Mattox. Badly underfinanced, Barrera, a baby at 34, lost by a much narrower than predicted 146,000 •votes, 51.6% - 47.2%. Latino voters opposed him 2-1..
“We’re still at a point where party affiliation is important to Hispanics,” Gonzalez assessed Barrera’s lose “A Spanish surname alone is not sufficient”
HELLO ROBERTO: in Florida, tomorrow’s dream arrived for ex-Tampa Mayor Bob Martinez, an ex-Democrat whose switch paid off.
Election night in Miami saw Hialeah Mayor Raul Martinez and The Miami Heralds Guillermo Martinez doing WLTV commentary and at one point Guillermo Martinez interviewed Gov.-elect Bob Martinez via satellite from Tampa
Martinez-Martinez- Martinez. It was more than enough to confuse Ted Turner. His Cable News Network used some of WLTVs clips the ne'Xt morning and cut regularly to a shot of Florida’s “new governor” - newsman Guillermo. - Kay B&rbaro
Nov. 17,1986
3


COLLECTING
CONNECTING
IMMIGRANT RIGHTS: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund is offering bilingual cards on which are listed the rights of people arrested by the Immigration and Naturalization Service and advice on what to do when one is arrested. For free copies (any donations would be appreciated), write to: Linda Wong, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014.
MULTICULTURAL VIDEO INSTRUCTION: Designed to address issues faced by Latinos and other minorities- such as prejudice- this series of 36 video programs has two aims: create a sense of pride and educate. Cassettes are catered to every educational level, from preschool to 12th grade. For a $26 rental fee, the tapes can be recorded for indefinite personal use. For a booklet on the programs available, write to: Great Plains National Instructional Television Library, Box 80669, Lincoln, Neb. 68501-0669 (402) 472-2007.
CHICANO LITERARY CONTEST: The 13th annual Chicano Literary Contest by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California will award cash prizes for short stories, poetry and theatrical works. Writers must submit unpublished work and identify with the Chicano community. The deadline is Feb. 23, 1987. Send entries to the abovementioned department at UC, Irvine, Calif. 92717.
IMMIGRATION PROJECTIONS: According to the51 -page study “Immigration to the U.S.: The Unfinished Story,” the influx of migrants to the United States will increase despite new immigration law. The study examines the future composition of the U.S. population in light of immigration reform. For a copy, send $6 to: Population Reference Bureau, 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20005.
POVERTY PROFILE: “Saving a Generation,” a 63-page book by the Twentieth Century Paper Fund, examines poverty according to ethnic/racial group and age. Among topics: what changes in social behavior are caused by poverty, can the welfare system help and can we afford the changes that need to be made? For a copy, send $7.50 to: Priority Press Publications, 41 E. 70th St., New York, N.Y. 10021.
PRESIDENTS REMARKS: Copies of President Reagarfs remarks at the Nov. 6 White House signing ceremony for the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, plus a two-page White House fact sheet on the bill, are available free. Request from Rudy Beserra, associate director, Office of Public Liaison, Room 193 OEOB, The White House, Washington, D.C. 20500.
SOUTH BRONX SUCCESS TOLD
A South Bronx literacy project is among 16 programs nationally which were given cash awards this month by the U.S. Department of Education to share information about their success.
The grants, totalling $770,000, are to be used to explain their programs - providing training, materials and follow-up assistance to schools and institutions willing to duplicate them.
In the South Bronx project, students attend classes for20 weeks in community centers and churches, learning to analyze words and sentences through oral and written drill. Conducted by Bronx Educational Services, it was awarded $45,000 through the department's National Diffusion Network project. In 10 years, NDN has funded more than 150 successful programs for adoption by schools and institutions
For information on the program, contact Pat Medina, BES, 965 Long wood Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 10459 (212) 991-7310.
FELLOWSHIPS OFFERED TO ARTS TEACHERS
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is offering fellowships to teachers of the arts- music, theater, dance, visual arts, film and creative writing-to travel to Australia June 27- July 17,1987, in an international cultural exchange.
As many as seven fellowships will be awarded under the Center’s Alliance for Arts Education program.
Application material and other information may be obtained by contacting Alliance for Arts Education, Kennedy Center, Washington, D.C. 20566 (202) 254-7190. Application deadline is Feb. 1.
ART SHOW ENTRIES WELCOMED
Entries are being accepted now through March 1987 for one of the country’s first national juried Hispanic art shows.
“Expressiones H/spana," offering$15,000 in awards, will showcase 40 to 50 works. Presented by the Adolph Coors Company, it will exhibit in major art centers in Denver, Los Angeles and San Antonio beginning this fall, remaining in each city for four to six weeks.
For entry packets and information, contact Artistic Images, attention: Maureen Leon Acosta, P.O. Box 11434, Denver, Colo. 80211 or call (303) 433-2661.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
LIBRARY SERVICES Washington, D.C. Nov. 19 .
REFORMA the National Association to Promote Library Services to the Spanish Speaking, will have Everette Larson of the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress be a speaker at its installation ceremonies.
Shelley Miller (202)~287-9481
TELEVISION AND HISPANICS Chicago Nov. 19
The Latino Committee on the Media will co-sponsor theconference“Televisionand Hispanics: L Ddnde Estamos?” to acquaint community-based organizations with the managers and workings of television stations. Mary Gonzalez Koenig (312) 247-0707
HISPANIC ELDERLY Chicago Nov. 19-21
“Promoting the Dignity/La Dignidadof the Hispanic Elderly” is the theme of the National Hispanic Council on Aging’s training conference, with information on long-term care and health promotion. Juan Paz (202) 265-1288 4
PARENTS AND EDUCATION ISSUES Wichita, Kan. Nov. 20
Involving Latino parents in educational issues facing their children, such as the dropout rate and bilingual education, will be the object of Hispanic Awareness Council’s program.
Martha Sanchez (316) 267-3263
BUSINESS NETWORKING Phoenix, Ariz. Nov. 21
James Richardson Gonzales, director of U.S. Department of Commerce’s Minority Business Development Agency, will keynote a forum on contract procurement and business development by the Southwest Business Network.
Ron Luis Valles (619) 323-2244 RECOGNITION BANQUET St. Paul,Minn. Nov. 22
Former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca will be the guest speaker at the Hispanic Ministry Committee’s 3rd annual banquet to recognize community volunteers.
Claudia Jaime (612) 291-4480
COMING SOON
GALA BALL El Latino newspaper Washington, D.C. Nov. 26
Nov. 17,1986
Concepcidn Sanz (202) 323-0447 MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY PROGRAM U.S. Commerce Department Acapulco, Mexico Dec. 3-5 Robert Johnson (602) 323-1467
FUNDRAISER RECEPTION Multicultural Career Intern Program Washington, D.C. Dec. 4 Marla Tukeva (202) 673-3551
HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Institute for Puerto Rican Policy New York Dec. 5 Gerson Borerro(212) 564-1075
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Hispanic Public Relations Society of Southern California
Carson, Calif. Dec. 6 Carole Gerst(213) 516-3313
IMMIGRATION FORUM Penn Valley Community College Kansas City, Mo. Dec. 12,13 Francisco Ruiz (816) 932-7600
ANNUAL CHRISTMAS DANCE Houston Hispanic Fire Fighters Local 341 Houston Dec. 20 Juan Hern&ndez (713) 223-9166
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


INTERNSHIPS
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Arizona
Starting salary $20,000. The City seeks qualified persons who have completed, or will complete, a Master's Degree in Public Administration or a closely related field by June 1987 for its one-year Intern Program. Positions start Julyl, 1987. All information and documents required for the application must be received by Jan. 30, 1987.
Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E. Hill, Management and Budget Director, 251 West Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003 (602) 262-4800.
An Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
KIPLINGER PROGRAM
The Kiplinger midcareer program for journalists is actively looking for minority candidates for its 1987-88 class. The ten fellows appointed to the program receive full tuition and fees plus a $13,000 stipend to spend one year in The Ohio State University School of Journalism, earning a master's degree. Three years experience in public affairs reporting and a bachelor's degree are required.
Fellows work on long-form enterprise stories that are published in two editions of the Kiplinger Program Report for pickup by papers around the country. In addition to the Kiplinger Seminar in journalism, they can specialize in subject areas- economics, urban affairs, political science, etc.
For more information, write: Prof. John Wicklein, Kiplinger Program, School of Journalism, The Ohio State University, 242 W. 18th Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (614) 422-2607, 422-6291.
REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for submission of applications for a 12-month $15,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Dec. 15.
The internship, sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by t.hei Gannett Foundation, is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism career.
Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE New employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, serving the East Coast South and Midwest Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish. Contact Luci-enne Loman, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301)952-3408.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
LIBRARY
Data & Information Services Librarian
Stanford University Libraries seeks an individual to perform a leading role in planning and development of support services for “electronic scholarship? in Stanford University Libraries. Coordinate program of automated services and online database searching. Participate as member of General Reference Department
MLS or equivalent knowledge of traditional and innovative reference services, including automated information sources, technology and use, experience in database searching required. Associate Librarian ($27,500 - $38,300) or Librarian ($31,300 - $46,300) rank depending upon experience/qualifications.
Send letter of application, resume and names of three professional references to Irene Yeh, Employment Coordinator, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif. 94305-6004 by 1/1/87. Cite #292-HL on all correspondence.
An equal opportunity employer through affirmative action.
PROFESSIONAL COUNSELOR- Primary responsibilities are to provide development/ counseling and informational/guidance services and programs to students.
Master’s in guidance and counseling required; demonstrated skills and knowledge in career decision making theories; high level of pom-munications and human relations skills; sensitivity to and ability to work with students from diverse background; previous experience working with adult learners is required: community college experience preferred.
Deadline for applications Jan.30,1987. Twelve-month appointment; compensation commensurate with education and experience as determined by counselor salary schedule.
Submit letter of application, current resume, copies of transcripts and three letters of recommendation to: Human Resources Office, Delta College, University Center, Mich. 48710.
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action MFH Employer.
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You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholarships given annually to outstanding Hispanic students across the United States.
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Opening available for experienced attorney to join a bilingual staff and take immediate responsibility for impact litigation in the area of civil rights for migrant farmworkers.
Applicant should have two years legal experience, must be conversant in English and Spanish, and should be willing to become a member of the Michigan bar (admission by motion with three years experience).
Duties include intake with a wide variety of farmworker problems which cover the following priority areas: Employment (wage, crewleader, eviction problems), civil rights, public benefits (including health care and pesticides), housing and immigration.
Salary range: $16,800 to $31,000 depending on experience. Excellent medical benefits to include vision, dental and prescription care, life and disability insurance.
Applicants should send resumes immediately to: Gary N. Gershon, Director, Michigan Migrant Legal Assistance Project Inc., 49 Monroe Centre NW, Suite 3 A, Grand Rapids, Mich. 49503..
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Arts & Entertainment
THE ENVELOPE PLEASE: Winners of San Antonio CineFestival’s first-ever Premio Mesquite were announced Nov. 7 at opening night ceremonies held at the city’s Guadalupe Theater.
Four of the newly instituted awards- film reels carved in mesquite, a wood abundant in South Texas - were presented.
The documentaries Harvest of Peace, produced by Lisa Bergerand directed by Robbie Leppzer, and Mountain Music of Peru, produced arid directed by John Cohen, won Premios in the non-fiction category.
In fiction, the film Gregorio, by Peru’s Grupo Chaski, won the Premio Mesquite. The film tells the story of street children in Lima, performed by real street kids.
A special Mesquite was juried for Mach it a, Carlos Ortiz’s documentary about the late Cuban bandleader.
Two special jury citations of merit were given- to M ichael Chanan’s New Cinema of Latin America, Parts 1 and 2 in the non-fiction group, and to Mexican director Jaime Humberto Hermosillo’s Maria de mi corazon in fiction.
Several honorable mentions were also announced: In non-fiction, they were Zydinia Nazario’s La batalla de Vieques, Ana Maria Garcia’s La operacion and Humberto Rio’s The Tango is Also History.
„ 1 viMHh
Honorable mentions in fiction went to Ejf^nna Costello's Gra/Wf/and Luis Antonio Rosario’s Cimarron.
In lieu of a Premio Mesquite for best new film or video, two honorable mentions were announced: to Graciela I. Sanchez’s Testimonies de Nicaragua and to When You Think of Mexico: Comer-cial Images of Mexico, co-produced by Carl Heyward and Yolanda Lopez and directed by Lopez.
Screenings at the 11 th edition of the CineFestival concluded Nov. 13. Following the festival and continuing through Nov. 23, the Guadalupe Theater presents the New Latin American Cinema series. Screening are entries from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Bolivia, Brazil and Argentina.
Other continuing events in San Antonio: Con cariho, an exhibit of Mexican folk art at the San Antonio Museum of Art . . Popular Arts/Artes popuiares, an exhibit of works by Michael F. Creese, Matilde Galvan, Jos6 Varela and Beatrix Ximenez, continues at the Guadalupe Theater Gallery through Jan. 4... And an exhibit by Six From Monterrey is presented by the Instituto Cultural Mexicano.
ONE LINERS: The SIN Network has launched America, a monthly magazine series produced by the Washington-D.C. based ZGS Productions. . . Johnny Rodriguez is a special guest at a Ricky Skaggs concert at Los Angeles’ Universal Amphitheatre Nov. 20...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
JOINT CAMPAIGN: Hispanic and black journalists will initiate a series of joint efforts commencing next year to monitor coverage and employment patterns in the media and media institutions.
This was a major objective settled on during a joint meeting of the boards of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and its black counterpart Nov. 1 in Philadelphia. It marked the first time the groups met together.
Manuel Galvin, Chicano Tribune reporter and NAHJ president, described the meeting as one that “sends a very clear message to the industry: ‘Don’t try to divide us. Don’t play us one off the other.’ ”
National Association of Black Journalists’ President Al Fitzpatrick, director of minority affairsforthe Knight-Riddernewspaper chain, described the industry’s progress to date as “moving at a snail’s pace.”
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“All minorities need to be fully and fairly represented in the communications business,” he said. “By uniting, we have made that goal our business.”
The boards unanimously supported a proposal to develop and write a special section fora“joumalism“ edition of Social Education, a national journal directed primarily to social studies teachers, trainers and administrators.
According to Charles Rivera, director of publications for the National Council for Social Studies and editor of the journal, its projected publication date is late ’88 or early ’89. The 16-page signature would focus on the role Hispanics, blacks, Asian Americans and American Indians play in deciding what constitutes news.
NAHJ and NABJ’s other joint plans related to identifying and developing potential journalists at the junior high and high school levels.
OTHER BOARD ACTIONS: The NAHJ board also voted to approve Dallas as the site for the 1988 National Hispanic Media Con-
ference, confirming April 27-30 as the dates. Next year’s conference is se.t for Los Angeles April 22-26.
Additionally, it discussed San Juan, Puerto Rico, as the conference site for 1989 and agreed to explore the possibility of an additional ’87 conference involving U.S. and Mexican journalists in Mexico.
Staff members recently added to its Washington, D.C, headquarters office were introduced to the board. Jocelyn Cordova, a native of Puerto Rico with experience in media arts training, serves as manager of educational and special programs. Lucienne Lopez Loman, a native of Mexico and former news assignment editor with KWEX-TV, San Antonio, joins as manager of career programs.
IN MOTION: Phil Garcia, who left The San Diego Union for a nine-month congressional fellowship, is staying on in Washington as a reporter for Pasha Publications, covering defense-related issues for its national publi-
cations. .. - Hector Ericksen-Mendoza
Wm., v'a
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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. Mak,ng Tlh,s Ull.eek Army, files a $10 million lawsuit against the Chilean government and I J 11 rr. I J rr• its armed forces. .. More than 1,000 police officers from 30 Florida departments turn out to pay their last respects to Emilio Mlyares. The chairman of President Reagan's Committee on Employment of Miyares, 27, married and the father of a ?year-old son and a 4-year the Handicapped names Consuelo Martinez of Sacramento, Calif . , old daughter, was the first officer to be killed in the line of duty in the as one of 21 individuals on the 40-year-old body's goal-setting and 61-year history of the Hialeah police department. He was shot policy-making executive committee. . . New Mexico Gov . Toney while struggling with a robbery suspect. . . The H0uston Police Anaya receives a written apology from psychologists who did an Department confers public service awards on civilians Gilbert Ch6vez analysis of him for the magazine Albuquerque Living. The analysis, and Chris Sweet for their help in saving six children who were thrown based on an 1 1/2 hour interview by the writer, said that Anaya was into a bayou by their mother. . . Samantha Dorlinda L6pez, 37, lonelyandthathislifewasunbalanced ... AnltaCastelogoesbackto escapes from a Pleasanton, Calif., federal prison in a helicopter. working as the personal maid of first lady Nancy Reagan. Charges of Lopez, serving 50 years for bank robbery and kidnapping, was! illegal munitions export against Castelo were recently dropped. . . plucked out of the prison courtyard by her boyfriend, also an escapee. The mother of Washington, D.C., resident Rodrigo Rojas, the 19 Santa Cruz County deputy sheriff Joe Flores apprehends a malei year-old Chilean exile who died from burns inflicted by the Chilean suspect by barking like a vicious guard dog . . . . Voi.4No.461 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 'No•.17 •1 -Rafael Cortada Picked as New UDC Chief Rafael Cortada was selected Nov. 5 to be the new president of the University of the District of Columbia on a 1 0 vote by that institution's board of trustees. Cortada, who said he would probably take office late next summer, currently is president of El Camino Community College in Torrance, Calif. He began a second four-year term as the $80,000-a-year head at El Camino just three months ago . El Camino Community College, a public school with an enrollment of 27,000 students, has the nation's largest community college campus. In the late 1960s, Cortada taught history at Federal City College, which later merged with two other institutions to become UDC . UDC, an open-admissions university whose enrollment dropped by about 1 ,000 this fall to 11 ,000 students, is 80% black. When asked why he accepted the position, Cortada, 52 and of Puerto Rican and Trinidadian extraction, said he looked forward to the challenge of improving the student academic performance. Under the stewardship of Cortada, El Camino Community College prospered despite decreasing enrollments at most other California community colleges. Border Judge Jails 32 Thirty-six undocumented persons who attempted to cross a bridge joining Juarez , Mexico, with El Paso, Texas, Oct. 31 were given stiff jail sentences by U.S. Magistrate Janet Ruesch rather than being offered voluntary departure. She sentenced 32 of them to20 or30 days in jail, giving the other four 180-day suspended sentences. Judge Ruesch's action was described by AI Giugni, U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service district director in El Paso, as a signal to those who continue to violate U.S. im migration laws. "Our inspectors were busy working so they couldn't stop them," Giugni said. "These people were taking advantage of a laxness in our procedure and we decided to put a stop to it." . New Spanish Network Planned A new Spanish-language television network providing news and other programming to all major U.S. Hispanic markets will be in place and operating within 60 days, Charles M. Fernandez, executive vice president"of His panic American Broadcasting Network, told Weekly Report Nov. 11 . HBN is based in Miami . Its board chair and main investor is Amancio Victor Suarez, prin cipal owner of WAQIRadio Mambi there . Suarez and associates purchased radio station WGBS a year ago and converted it to Spanish language WAQI. Gustavo Godoy, former vice president and news director for Spanish International Network, has been named president of the newly formed network. The decision to form HBN was a very recent one, prompted by the departure of Godoy and some 20 other newsroom personnel at SIN. Fernandez said that while the decision was a fast one, it was made only after a careful evaluation of the market and "discussions with Gustavo which convinced us that he could produce a product we could sell." Initially, HBN will produce a five-times-weekly half-hour newscast, using bureaus in the United States, South and Central America and Europe. By December, it expects to have negotiated contracts in five major U .S. markets plus eight or nine more in Latin America, Fer nandez said. Godoy left SIN in late October after he and others openly criticized that network for its announced decision two months eariier to bring Mexican broadcast journalist Jacobo Zabludovsky to the United States to direct SIN's news effort. Godoy charged that Zabludovsky was too closely tied to the Mexican government. Zabludovsky, who anchors the "24 Horas" Mexico City nightly newscast, was accused of down playing stories which reflected badly on that country's political leadership. Following Godoy to HBN will be SIN's former assistant news director, Josie Goytisolo. She will direct its news operation. Because of the mass resignation of SIN journalists and technicians in Miami, the new network will have a ready resource of trained personnel if it chooses to hire them. Among those who quit SIN were the of its nightly "Noticiero SIN" Teresa Rodriguez and Jose DiazBalart. Their resignations were followed by others in SIN bureaus, including three in El Salvador . Miami employees who said that they would work through the Nov. 4 elections were im mediately locked out of the newsroom there. A SIN spokesperson then told reporters Nov. 3 that Zabludovski was not expected to move from Mexico City to New York after all . "Personal reasons" were cited. "Noticiero SIN" reaches a U.S. audience of 6 0 million nightly. -Charlie Ericksen National Boycott Launched United Farm Workers union President Cesar Chavez launched a nationwide boycott of A&P stores Oct. 28 after the supermarket chain refused to stop carrying California grown grapes. The union leader charged that the grapes are contaminated with pesticides that cause cancer and birth defects to the farm workers-' the vast majority of whom are Hispanic:._ .,yho harvest them . Arturo Rodriguez, a national executive bOard member of UFW, s_aid 98% of all table grapes consumed in the United States are . grown in California. Jobless Rate Decreases The Hispanic unemployment rate dipped from 11.1% in September to 1 0.5% in October, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. The overall unemployment rate stayed at 7% . The jobless rate for Latinos at this. time last year was 11.1 % . The number of Latinos unemployed decreased from 906,000 in September to 858,000 in October. The black unemployment experienced a decrease also14.8% to 14.4%. The rate for whites did not move from its September rate of6%.

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GAO Says Bennett Distorts Research The U.S. Department of Education misin-Bennett has been an outspoken opponent terpreted bilingual education research which of the 4% cap on federal bilingual education supported teaching limited-English-speaking funds for alternate teaching methods which students in their native language, according do not use the studenfs native language as to a General Accounting Office draft report. the primary language of instruction . Bilingual The analysis said that 10 bilingual education education proponents have charged that experts were asked to examine department Bennetfs attempts at lifting the spending reports which criticized bilingual education cap in order to give more flexibility to local programs using the studenf s native tongue school districts are nothing more than a ruse as the primary language for instruction. The to allow English to become the sole instruction experts said that Education Secretary William language. Bennett was wrong when he concluded that Rep. Augustus Hawkins (D-Calif.), chairman the research showed that teaching students of the Education and Labor Committee, told primarily or completely in English produced The Times: "Clearly, there is no evidence to quicker and better results. support the current department position. "On the contrary, most of these experts believe that the research evidence supports What remains is an ideological, rather than a the use of native language," said the draft factual, opposition to the use of native ian obtained by the Los Angeles Times, reported guage in the classroom." on Nov. 8. A sp okesman for Bennett said that the One of the experts said that the Education secretary did not favor one teaching method Department made "fraudulent and dishonest over another, but that he does not like .the use of my work." . idea of being "locked into one method." Gonzalez, Molina Enter LA. Contest Los Angeles School Board member Larry Gonzalez formally announced Nov. 12 his candidacy for newly redrawn, predominantly Latino City Council District No. 1 . His announcement, widely expected since he moved within district boundaries shortly before the October residency-requirement deadline, pits him against California Assemblywoman Gloria Molina. Commission Cuts L.atinos Forty-seven staff members of the U.S. Com mission on CivWRights, including Hispanics who have directed their regional operations in New York and Texas for years, have been formally advised by the agency that their employment will be terminated Nov. 18. The RIF (reduction in force) notices were distributed to the staff members on Nov. 7 following a vote by the commission to adopt a staffing plan which would trim the agency to 62 staffers arid . reduce its region
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Ana Veciana-S uarez J o yous M iscommunication S o me peo p le s ay fences make good neighbors. True . But not s peaking th e sa me language makes better ones . H i sto ria ns have gotten the Tower of Babel story all wrong. So have S.l. Ha yakawa; the U.S. English movement and the five million Californians who went t o the polls this month to vote " yes " on that state's " Offici a l English" Proposit i on 63. As a matter of fact, confusion is often a result of understanding each other. Neighbors have borrowed sugar and over each other's homes for years speaking the same language . But no one has noticed. In my hometown of Miami, many ethnic pr o blems can be traced to the mistaken notion that everybody shou l d speak the same language-Spanish or English . This would be a catastrophe . Not only would we understand each other's words, we would also be inclined not to give our bre t hren t he benefit of the doubt. I f th e QUY n ex t d oor b l ocke d your driveway and he was fluent fn E nglis h , you wo uld k n o w for sure that he had ignored your hand lett e r e d sign. If h i s tree shed in your yard despite repeated warnings in a l a nguage y ou b oth spoke , you would be entitled to disperse the s am e l eaves o n h i s fron t lawn b e cause you knew ' he understood. NO READING BETWEEN LINES I f ne ig hbors don ' t sha r e a language , there is no reading between t he li nes, no proble m w ith no t saying what you mean . When they ca n no t sp e a k t o ea c h o t her , neighbors tend to look the other way . No t sp e a k i n g to e ach other is a fence-a mental one perhaps-but a fen ce all t h e sam e . Tha t is why so many apartment dwellers who s peak t he sa m e l a nguage never exchange more than a greeting . They're ind us t r i ous fence makers . Dow n i n Miami ' s Lit t l e Havana , my grandmother and her neighbor are a w o nderfu l ex ample of n e ighborliness . For years, the two old w om e n h ave t r a d e d plants and flowers over the backyard fence . My g r andmo t h e r s p eaks little English . Her neighbor speaks no S pa n ish. N o matter . L anguage is not the only means of communication . In my fa m i l y , t he Tow e r of Babel became the Tower of Love . My cou s in reports th a t his Spanish-speaking parents get along wonder fully w i t h h is E nglish-speaking in-laws because they cannot speak to each o t h e r . For t he wedding, his wife ' s parents flew in from Arizona to meet h i s f amil y , most of whom understood only enough English to < w a tc h the soap operas . 'I The me eting was memorable . He r mother. " Good morning . " I Hi s mother. " Buenos dias. " Her fa t her. "Good morning . " His f ather. "Buenos dias. " ii. They are still hap p ily married. The couple ' s daughter speaks both ! lan g uages b u t refuses to listen to either set of grandparents . SCREAMING IN FLAWLESS SPANISH On the other hand , my grandfather and his neighbor used to have screaming matches over the most inconsequential matters-puppy I droppings , pro perty lines, parties. And always in flawless Spanish . There is a lesson to be learned from all this . l For years , teache r s have used boy-girl-boy seating arrangements 1 to promote harmony in our nation's classrooms. Blocks of English ! household-Spanish household-English households could do the ! I 1 . same in our n ati on ' s neighborhoods. Many m ar riages reportedly resulted from the boy-girl-boy classroom mix. So why not try the household language checkerboard to see if it will a t lea s t help es t abli s h some neighborly bliss? (Ana Veciana-Sua re z is a reporter and weekly columnist with the " Living Today" sec tion of The Miami Herald, Miami, Fla) Sin pe/os en Ia , ,tengua DRESSING UP FOR '88: Unlike football, there are no time outs in politics. Already they're calling the next plays: RICHARD FOR MAYOR: When Richard Alatorre was named to chair the Los Angeles City Councirs reapportionment committee by Council President Pat Russell last December, many Latinos sighed, "Poor Richard." He was certain to be crushed between veteran incumbents' greed and the U . S . Justice Departmenfs intransigence. When the smoke cleared 10 months later, The Los Angeles Times assessed the headline-grabbing drama ' s winners and losers. The biggest loser , it concluded, was Russell. Her actions "cast doubt on her leadership ability . " But"for newcomer Richard Alatorre, a tough veteran oft he state Legislature who guided the redistricting plan through the council, it was a triumph of his political skills," it added. L.A. Mayor TomBradley, as is his style, bobbed and weaved and hid . Now that the befuddled Bradley has been roundly shadow boxed into submission for the second time by California's color less governor, George Deukmejian, there are those in Los Angeles who are asking if the time w i ll be ripe in '88 for Alatorre to challenge Bradley in that increasingly Latino city. And they are answering , " Yes . " GLORY FOR GLORIA: On Nov . 4, Gloria Molina, the first Latina to serve in the California state Assembly, outpolled -percentagewiseall of California's Hispanic candidates who were running for state or federal legislative office. Back in '84, she showed 'em, too-taking 82% of her Assembly district vote. Congress man Ed Roybal and then-Assemblyman Alatorre were next, with 72% and 71% in their districts . This time , Molina polled 85%, followed by Roybal's 76% . Almost immed i ately after her victory, she announced, with Roybal at her side, her intention to become the first Latina on the L.A. City Council . She ' ll run Feb. 3 for the new 69%--Latino seat Alatorre ' s redistricting created . If she wins, thafll give the word "irony'' an added d i mension Gloria and Richard are arch-rivals in the pol i t i cal game; She beat his ex aide Polanco in the 1982 Assembly race. This time Alatorre is siding with her major announced Council competit or, L.A. school board member Larry Gonzalez. TOUCHE FOR TEXAS: In Texas, politics are simpler . Democratsvs. Republicans. Latino voters helped Democrat Raul Gonzalez write history by becoming the first Mexican American elected statewide. He kept the Place No . 4 Supreme Court seat which Gov . Mark White appointed him to in 1984. Gonzalez, 46, won by 53%-4 7%, about 190,000 votes. Fellow voting 9-1 for him, clearly provided the margin of victory. But 1t was state attorney general candidate Roy Barrera Democrat-turned-Republican , who got the national press in race against incumbent Jim Mattox. Badly underfinanced, Barrera, a baby at 34, lost by a much narrower than predicted 146,000 ' votes , 51.6%-47. 2%. Latino voters opposed him 2-1 . . "We' re still at a point where party affiliation is important to Hispanics," Gonzalez assessed Barrera's loss. "A Spanish surname alone is not sufficient" HELLO ROBERTO: in Flor i da, tomorrow's dream arrived for exTampa Mayor Bob Martinez, an ex-Democrat whose switch paid off. Election night in Miami saw Hialeah Mayor Raul. Martinez and The Miami doing WL TV commentary and at one pomt, Guillermo Martmez interviewed Gov .-electBob Martinez via satellite from Tampa Martinez-Martinez-Martinez. It was more than enough to confuse Ted H . is Cable News Network used some of WL TV s clips the ne'Xt mornmg and cut regularly to a shot of Florida's "new governor' ' newsman Guillermo. -K B"' ba ay "'" ro Hi s pani c Link Weekl y Report Nov . 17, 1986 3

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COLLECTING IMMIGRANT RIGHTS: The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund is offering bilingual cards on which are listed the rights of people arrested by the Immigration and Naturalization Service and advice on what to do when one is arrested. For free copies (any donations would be appreciated), write to: Linda Wong, MALDEF, 634 S . Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014. MULTICULTURAL VIDEO INSTRUCTION: Designed to address issues faced by Latinos and other minorities-such as prejudice-this series of 36 video programs has two aims: create a sense of pride and educate. Cassettes are catered to every educational level, from preschool to 12th grade. For a $25 rental fee, the tapes can be recorded for indefinite personal use. For a booklet on the programs available, write to: Great Plains National Instructional Television Library, Box 80669, Lincoln, Neb. 68501-0669 (402) 4 72-2007. CHICANO LITERARY CONTEST: The 13th annual Chicano Literary Contest by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California will award cash prizes for short stories, poetry and theatrical works. Writers must submit unpublished work and identify with the Chicano community. The deadline is Feb. 23, 1987. Send entries to the abovementioned department at UC, Irvine, Calif. 92717. IMMIGRATION PROJECTIONS: Accordingtothe51-pagestudy "Immigration to the U.S.: The Unfinished Story," the influx of migrants to the United States will increase despite new immigration law. The study examines the future composition of the U.S. population in light of immigration reform . For a copy, send $5 to: Population Reference Bureau, 777 14th St. NW, Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20005. POVERTY PROFILE: "Saving a Generation," a 63-page book by the Twentieth Century Paper Fund, examines poverty according to ethnic/racial group and age. Among topics: what changes in social behavior are caused by poverty, can the welfare system help and can we afford the ch9-nges that need to be made? For a copy, send $7.50 to: Priority Press Publications, 41 E. 70th St., New York, N . Y . 10021. PRESIDENT'S REMARKS: Copies of President Reagan's remarks at the Nov. 6 White House signing ceremony for the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, plus a two-page White House fact sheet on the bill, are available free . Request from Rudy Beserra, associate director, Office of Public Liaison, Room 193 OEOB, The White House, Washington, D.C. 20500. CONNECTING SOUTH BRONX SUCCESS TOLD A South Bronx literacy project is among 16 programs nationally which were given cash awards this month by the U.S. Department of Education to share information about their success. The grants, totalling $770,000, are to be used to explain their programs-providing training, materials and follow-up assistance to schools and institutions willing to duplicate them. In the South Bronx project, students attend classes for20 weeks in . community centers and churches, learning to analyze words and sentences through oral and written drill . Conducted by Bronx Educational Services, it was awarded $45,000 through the departmenfs National Diffusion Network project. In 10 years, NON has funded more than 150 successful programs for adoption by schools and institutions. For information on the program, contact Pat Medina, BES, 965 Longwood Ave., Bronx, N.Y. 10459 (212) 991-7310. FELLOWSHIPS OFFERED TO ARTS TEACHERS The John F . Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is offering fellowships to teachers of the arts-music, theater, dance, visual arts: film and creative writing-to travel to Australia June 27July 17,1987, in an international cultural exchange. As many as seven fellowships will be awarded under the Center's Alliance for Arts Education program. Application material and other information may be obtained by contacting Alliance for Arts Education, Kennedy Center, Washington, D.C. 20566 (202) 254-7190. Application deadline is Feb. 1 . ART SHOW ENTRIES WELCOMED Entries are being accepted now through March 1987 for one of the country's first national juried Hispanic art shows. "Expressiones Hispana, " offering $15,000 in awards, will showcase 40 to 50 works. Presented by the Adolph Coors Company, it will exhibit in major art centers in Denver, Los Angeles and San Antonio beginning this fall, remaining in each city for four to six weeks. For entry packets and information, contact Artistic Images, attention : Maureen Leon Acosta, P . O . Box 11434, Denver, Colo. 80211 or call (303) 433-2661. Calendar PARENTS AND EDUCATION ISSUES Wichita , Kan. Nov . 20 Concepcion Sanz (202) 323-0447 MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY PROGRAM U.S. Commerce Department THIS WEEK LIBRARY SERVICES Washington, D . C . Nov. 19 . REFORMA, the National Association to Promote Library Services to the Spanish Speaking, will have Everette Larson of the Hispanic Division of the Library of Congress be a speaker at its installation ceremonies. Shelley Miller(202).287-9481 TELEVISION AND HISPANICS Chicago Nov. 19 The LatinoCommittee on the Media will co-sponsor the conference"Television and Hispanics:
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.I..._ __ IN_TE_R_Ns_H_IP_s _ __,1] .'----_C_O_R_P_O_R_A_T_E_C_LA_S_S_I_F_I_E_D_S _ ___. MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Arizona Starting salary $20,000. The City seeks tied persons who have completed, or will com plete, a Degree in Public Administration or a closely related field by June 1987 for its one-year Intern Program. Positions startJuly1, 1987. All information and documents required for the application must be received by Jan. 30, 1987. Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E. Hill, Management and Budget Director, 251 West Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003 (602) 262-4800. An Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. KIPLINGER PROGRAM The Kiplinger midcareer program for journalists is actively looking for minority candidates for its 1987-88 class. The ten fellows appointed to the program receive full tuition and fees plus a $13,000 stipend to spend one year in The Ohio State University School of Journalism, earning a degree. Three years experience in public affairs reporting and a degree are required. Fellows work on long-form enterprise stories that are published in two editions of the Kiplinger Program Report for pickup by papers around the country. In addition to the Kiplinger Seminar in journalism, they can specialize in subject areas-economics, urban affairs, political science, etc. For more inforrmition, write: Prof. John Wicklein, Kiplinger Program, School of Journalism, The Ohio State University,242 W.18thAve.,Columbus, Ohio 43210 (614) 422-2607, 422-6291. REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED The deadline for submission of applications for a 12-month $1 5,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Dec. 15. The internship, sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by thel Gannett Foundation, is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism career. Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE New employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, serving the East South and Midwest Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English or Spanish. Contact Luci 'enne Loman, National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. Hispanic Link Weekly Report LIBRARY Data & Information Services Librarian Stanford University Libraries seeks an in dividual to perform a leading role in planning and development of support services for"elec tronic scholarship' in Stanford University Libraries. Coordinate program of automated services and online database searching. Participate as member of General Reference Department. MLS or equivalent, knowledge of traditional and innovative reference services, including automated information sources, technology and use, experience in database searching required. Associate Librarian ($27 ,500 $38,300) or Librarian ($31 ,300$46, 300) rank depending upon experience/qualifications. Send letter of application, resume and names of three professional references to Irene Yeh, Employment Coordinator, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif. 94305-6004 by 1/1/87. Cite #292-HL on all correspondence. An equal opportunity employer through affirm ative action. PROFESSIONAL COUNSELORPrimary responsibilities are to provide developmenV counseling and informational/guidance services and programs to students. in guidance and counseling required; demonstrated skills and knowledge in career decision making theories; high level of pom munications and human relations skills ; sen sitivity to and ability to work with students from diverse background ; previous experience working with adult learners is required: community college experience preferred. DeadlineforapplicationsJan.30, 1987. Twelve month appointment; compensation commen surate with education and experience as de termined by counselor salary schedule. Submit letter of application, current resume , copies of transcripts and three letters of re commendation to: Human Resources Office, Delta College, University Center, Mich. 48710. An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action MFH Employer. INTERNATIONAL PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGER seeks position with growing or ganization in Southern California area. Background in international public relations and l tourism. Energetic, self-motivated and fluent in Spanish. Please contact: Hispanic Link News Service , Corporate Classifieds, Attn: JR, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholar ships given annually to outstanding Hispanic students across the United States. Tfieicombined federal campaign now gives you fhe opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your con tribution. The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax exempt organization. Invest in your com munity today and support the National His panic Scholarship Fund. For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box? 48, San Francisco, Calif. 94101_ (415) 892-9_971. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT CONFERENCE COORDINATOR Washington, D .C., national Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist in the planning/ implementation of Annual Conference. College degree/equivalent experience in job-related area Strong writing, typing (70 wpm), telephone skills. Self-starter, can work under pressure without need for close supervision. Position available immediately. Salary range: $14 $16,000. Contact Marialba Martinez/Lupe Aguirre with resume at (202) 628-9600. STAFF ATTORNEY Opening available for experienced attorney to join a bilingual staff and take immediate re sponsibility for impact litigation in the area of civil rights for migrant farmworkers. Applicant should have two years legal experi ence , must be conversant in English and Sp;mish, and should be willing to become a member of the Michigan bar (admission by motion with three years experience). Duties include intake with a wide variety of farrnworker problems which covert he following priority areas: Employment (wage, crewleader, eviction problems), civil rights, public benefits (including health care and pesticides), housing and immigration. Salary range: $16,800 to$31 ,000 depending on experience. Excellent medical benefits to include vision, dental and prescription care, life and disability insurance. Applicants should send resumes immediately to: Gary N. Gershon , Director, Michigan Migrant Legal Assistance Project Inc., 49 Monroe Centre NW, Suite 3 A, Grand Rapids, Mich. 49503 .. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTORi No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, o .c: 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by _________ _;.._ Title -::--:--:--:---------Area Code & Phone _______ _ Advertiser Name _________ _ Bill To ----------_,. Address -----------City, State & Zip ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment r 1 1 0 0 R Honorable mentions in fiction went to and Luis Antonio Rosario's Cimarron. THE ENVELOPE PLEASE: Winners of San Antonio CineFestival's first-ever Premio Mesquite were announced Nov. 7 at opening night ceremonies held at the city's Guadalupe Theater. In lieu of a Premia Mesquite for best new film or video, two honorable mentions were announced: to Graciela I . Sanchez's Testimonies de Nicaragua and to When You Think of Mexico : Comer cia/ Images of Mexico, co-produced by Carl Heyward and Yolanda Lopez and directed by Lopez. Four of the newly instituted awards-film reels carved in mesquite, a wood abundant in South Texas-were presented. The documentaries Harvest of Peace , produced by Lisa Berger and directed by Robbie Leppzer, and Mountain Music of Peru, produced ahd directed by John Cohen, won Premios in the non-fiction category. In fiction, the film Gregorio , by Peru's Grupo Chaski, won the Premio Mesquite . The film tells the story of street children in Lima, performed by real street kids. Screenings at the 11th edition of the Cine Festival concluded Nov. 13. Following the festival and continuing through Nov. 23, the Guadalupe Theater presents the New Latin American Cinema series. Screening are . entries from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Bolivia , Brazil and Argentina . A special Mesquite was juried for Mach ito, Carlos Ortiz's documentary about the late Cuban bandleader. Other continuing events in San Antonio: Con cariflo, an exhibit of Mexican folk art at the San Antonio Museum of Art . . . Popular Arts/Artes populares, an exhibit of works by Michael F . Creese, Matilde Galvan, Jose Varela and Beatrix Ximenez, continues at the Guadalupe Theater Gallery through Jan. 4... And an exhibit by Six From Monterrey is presented by the lnstituto Cultural Mexicano. Two special jury citations of merit were given-to Michael Chanan ' s New Cinema of Latin America, Parts 1 and 2 in the non-fiction group, and to Mexican director Jaime Humberto Hermosillo's Maria de mi coriiz6n in fiction. Several honorable mentions were also announced: In non-fiction, they were Zydinia Nazario's La batalla de Vieques, Ana Maria Garcia's La operaci6n and Humberto Rio ' s The Tango History. ONE LINERS: The SIN Network has launched America, a monthly ' magazine series produced by the Washington-D.C . based ZGS Productions .•. Johnny Rodriguez is a special guest at a Ricky Skaggs concert at Los Angeles' Universal Amphitheatre Nov. 20.:. Antonio Mejias-Rentas . . Media Report JOINT CAMPAIGN: Hispanic and black journalists will initiate a series of joint efforts commencing next year to monitor coverage and employment patterns in the media and media institutions. This was a major objective settled on during a joint meeting of the boards of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and its black counterpart Nov. 1 in Philadelphia . It marked the first time the groups met together. Manuel Galvan , Chicano Tribune reporter and NAHJ president, described the meeting as one that "sends a very clear message to the industry: ' Don't try to divide us . Don't play us one off the other.' " National Association of Black Journalists' President AI Fitzpatrick, director of minority affairs for the Knight-Ridder newspaper chain, described the industry's progress to date as "moving at a snail' s pace.'' 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a nationa l publi ca ti on of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hect o r Ericksen Mendoza Editor. Fel ix Perez Reporting : Charli e Eri ckse n . A nt on io MejiasRentas No portion o f Hi s p anic Lin k Weekly Rewrt may be r eprod u ce d o r broadcast in any form without a d vance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates are 75 ce nts per word. Displayadsare$35 per column inch . Ads placed by . Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Frida y of same week. Multiple use rates on request. "All minorities need to be fully and fairly represented in the communications business," he sa id. " By uniting, we have made that goal our business." The boards unanimously supported a pro posal to develop and write a special section for a "journalism" edition of Social Education, a national journal d irected primarily to social studies teachers , trainers and administrators. According to Charles Rivera, director of publications for the National Council for Social Studies and editor of the journal, its pro jected publication date is late '88 or early '89. The 16-page signature would focus on the role Hispanics , blacks, Asian Americans and American Indians play in deciding what constitutes news. NAHJ and NABJ ' s other joint plans related to identifying and developing potential jour nalists at the junior high and high school levels. OTHER BOARD ACTIONS: The NAHJ board also voted to approve Dallas as the site for the 1988 National Hispanic Media Con terence, confirming April27 as the dates. Next year's conference is se. t for Los Angeles April 22. Additionally, it discussed San Juan, Puerto Rico , as the conference site for 1989 and agreed to explore the possibility of an additional '87 conference involving U.S . and Mexican journalists in Mexico. Staff members recently added to its Wash ington , D .C., headquarters office were intro duced to the board . Jocelyn Cordova, a native of Puerto Rico with experience in media arts training , serves as manager of educational and special programs. Lucienne Lopez Loman, a native of Mexico and former news assignment editor with KWEX-TV, San Antonio, joins as managerof career programs. IN MOTION: Phil Garcia, who left The San Diego Union for a nine-month congress ional fellowship, is staying on in Washington as a reporter for Pasha Publications, covering defense-related issues for its national publi cations. . . Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Hispanic Link Weekly Report