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Hispanic link weekly report, November 24, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 24, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
President Ronald Reagan signs legislation aimed at reducing fraudulent marriages between citizens and undocumented aliens. In order for the non-citizen spouse to be granted resident status, he must now show that the marriage remains intact two years later. ..U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) announces his support for Los Angeles City Council candidate Larry Gonz&lez... U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) busily lines up votes in his run for,House whip, the No. 3 House leadership post. Secret ballots by the 258 House Democrats will be cast Dec. 8. . . California Court of Appeals Judge John Arguelles and 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Arthur Alarcbn are pushed to Gov. George Deukmejian as
candidates for vacancies on that state’s Supreme Court... Albert Cappas, director of public affairs for the New York state Division of Youth, is honored by the student group Puerto Rican Organization for Dignity, Elevation and Responsibility at the University of Buffalo. Cappas founded the organization 20 years ago. . . Francisco Jimenez, a one-time migrant farm worker, receives the Phil Bobbie Sanfilippo Chair at Santa Clara (California) University. . . Barry L6pez, author of “Arctic Dreams: Imagination and Desire in a Northern Landscape,” wins one of the two 36th annual American Book Awards. Lopez will receive $10,000... U.S. marshals capture Samantha Dorinda L6pez and her fiance buying wedding rings at a shopping mall near Sacramento. Lopez escaped from prison earlier this month after a daring helicopter escape performed by her fiance who had also escaped from a California prison...

Latino Consumerism Measured
N.Y. Hispanic Dropout Rate Pegged at 62%
The dropout rate for Hispanic students in New York state public schools-62%-* can be traced in part to the cultural bias that exists in the educational system of that state, found a report released Nov. 17.
The report, titled “Dropping Out of School in New York State: The Invisible People of Color,” was commissioned by the State University system’s African American Institute. It followed members of the freshman class from 1977 until their scheduled graduation date of 1981. Blacks had the second highest dropout rate - 53%. Native Americans had a dropout rate of 46%. The overall dropout rate for the study period was 34%, showed the report.
Prepared by a 21-member task force, the study reported what neither the state nor New York City attempt to do. There are no state or city agencies that break down dropout rates according to ethnic or racial group.
The report criticized current state and city efforts to reduce the dropout rates and improve student academic performance.
“The programs seem to be based on blaming the victim while letting teachers and administrators go on with whatever they re doing... There is no focus on changing teachers’ or administrators’ attitudes or teaching styles,” it said.
Martinez Given Probation
San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez, the highest ranking Hispanic Republican official elected in California, was sentenced Nov. 13 to 400 hours of community work and restitution of $607.80 for the felony crime of misusing a city credit card. He will serve no jail time.
Martinez, 43, has until Nov. 13, 1987, to complete his community service. H is restitution payments, to begin no later than Jan. 13, must be $100 or more a month. The $607.80 represents 10 credit charges where Martinez was not conducting city business. He admitted guilt last month to two charges of treating non-city clients to restaurant dinners.
In office since December 1982, Martinez resigned from the City Council Nov. 12. Convicted felons are automatically expelled from the body.
Hispanics are brand conscious and firmly believe that American-made products are the most reliable, concluded a Hispanic consumer study being released this month in five major cities.
The survey report contains, among other things, information on the language usage, consumption patterns and buying power on the top 33 Hispanic markets in the United States. Conducted by Strategy Research
Texas Latino Vote Low
Only a small percentage of Texas’ Mexican Americans voted in the Nov. 4 election even though two Hispanics were on the statewide ballot the Southwest Voter Research Institute said Nov. 15.
In 1982, 38% of the more than 830,000 registered Hispanic voters turned out at the polls. This year, just 29% of the nearly 970,000 registered Latino voters cast ballots, said SVRI executive director Robert Brischetto.
That is the same percentage as in 1978 when 29% of the 590,000 registered Hispanics, voted, he added.
Texas Supreme Court Justice Raul Gonzalez received 92% of the Latino vote as he retained his Place No. 4 seat, and Mark White received 84% of that vote in his unsuccessful bid for re-election as governor.
However, Republican Roy Barrera Jr., a candidate for attorney general, received only 28% of the Hispanic vote.
“If Barrera had received only 55% of the Hispanic vote, he could have won,” Brischetto said, adding, “The results showed that party is still an important consideration for many Hispanics.”
Corporation of Miami, “The 1987 U.S. Hispanic Marker used a wide mix of available data along with 2,003 personal interviews in 21 Hispanic markets and 600 at-home interviews
The top 33 Hispanic markets account for 86% of the total U.S. Hispanic population, the report said. The concentration of Hispanics in a relatively few areas is highlighted by the fact that 62% of all Latinos reside in the top 10 Hispanic markets. The top 10 are Los Angeles, 3.6 million; New York, 2.5 million;^ Miami, 936,000; San Antonio, 889,000; San Francisco, 786,900; Chicago,753,700; Houston, 706,500; McAllen/Brownsville, Texas, 588,300; El Paso, 477,900; and Albuquerque, 451,300.
The Hispanic markets of Los Angeles and New York alone, including immediately outlying area counties, account for 32% of the U.S. Hispanic population.
Breaking down the country into six geographic regions, the study revealed that Hispanics in the Pacific region spent nearly 35%
continued on page 2
Hispanic Market Expenditures* by Geographic Regions
Non-
Du rable Durable
Goods Goods Srvcs. Total
Northeast $2.9 $ 7.3 $10.7 $20.9
Southeast 2.3 5.6 8.2 16.1
Central 1.6 4.0 5.8 11.4
Southwest 4.7 11.7 17.0 33.4
Northwest 0.8 2.0 2.9 5.6
Pacific 6.5 16.3 23.8 46.7
Total 18.8 46.9 68.4 134.1
* Expenditures are in billions
Source: "The 1987 U.S Hispanic Market" by Strategy Research Corporation. >
CONSUMER STATISTICS FOR HISPANICS IN 1986
Car Home Credit Card
Ownership Ownership Finances Ownership
% Who Cars Per Intend to Buy Swigs. Chckng. Don’t
Own Cars Household In Next 12 Months Accnt. Accnt. Yes No Know
P.R. 39.5% 1.3 18.8% 23.6% 18.4% 20.8% 79.2% 0%
Mex. 84.7 1.6 15.7 38.9 34.8 28.7 61.9 9.4
Cuban 77.4 1.7 23.3 42.5 45.2 45.7 53.1 1.2
Other 60.6 1.6 27.8 43.0 27.2 26.4 62.4 11.2
Source: "The 1987 U.S Hispanic Market" by Strategy Research Corporation.


Hispanics Lose Three State Legislative Seats
Latino state legislators saw their ranks decease in the Nov. 4 elections from 121 to 118, a tally by Weekly Report found. The number of voting H ispanics in the U.S. Congress remained at 11.
Florida experienced the largest gain in Hispanic state legislators, up from seven to nine. Other increases were recorded in Texas, Illinois and Oregon; each gained one.
The number of Hispanic legislators in Arizona fell from 12 in 1984 to nine in 1986. Five states - New Jersey, Colorado, Utah, Minnesota and Montana - each lost one.
Nationwide, Hispanics now have 34 state senators - three less than two years ago.
Other updates:
• Democrat Juan Trujillo won his bid to become a Colorado state representative against
Republican Mike Salaz in District 43. After a recount, Trujillo polled 7,385 votes to Salaz’s 7,322.
• Incumbent Democrat Rod Garcia from the 93 rd House District in Montana failed as a write-in candidate to regain his seat Garcia had lost in the primary.
Additions to Weekly Report’s Nov. 10 roundup on major party candidates:
• Rudy Apodaca brother of former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca, was unopposed in his bid for a seat on that state’s Court of Appeals.
• Democrat Jose Lugo retained his seat in the House of Representatives of Connecticut He defeated Republican challenger William Pow with 71% of the vote.
• John Hern&ndez kept his seat in Rhode Islands House of Representatives Hernandez,
Hispanic State Legislators, 1984-1986
State 1984 1986
Ariz. 12 9
Calif. 7 7
Colo. 8 7
Conn. 1 1
Fla 7 9
Hawaii 1 1
III. 2 3
Ind. 1 1
State 1984 1986
Kan. 3 3
La. 1 1
Minn. 1 0
Mont 2 1
N.J. 1 0
N.M. 39 39
N.Y. 7 7
Ore. 0 1
State 1984 1986
Pa 1 1
R.I. 1 1
Texas 24 25
Utah 1 0
Wash. 1 1
TOTAL 121 118
Hispanic Link Chart
a Democrat, defeated Joseph Scott, 58%-42%.
• Republican Darrell Castillo was defeated
by Democrat Eddie Johnson in Texas’ District 23 Senate race. Castillo received 23% of the vote. 1
• Republican Rick Serra lost in his effort to unseat U.S. Rep. Martin Sabo from the5thl District of Minnesota. Sabo, a Democrat, polled 74%.
• David Camisa a Republican/Conservative running in New York’s 27th State Assembly District, lost to Nettie Mayersohn. Camisa got 26% of the vote.
Also in New York, Republican Marie Ignarro was defeated by Democrat George Friedman, 72%-22%.
• Republican Willy Guzman failed in his bid for the 25th District of Utah’s House of Representatives, losing to Democrat Joanne Milnert, 70%-27%.
Corrections to the Nov. 10 roundup:
• Jaime Gutierrez was unopposed in his bid for the 11th District of the Texas State Senate, not the House of Representatives.
• In her successful attempt to become the first Hispana in the Texas Senate, Judith Zaffirini defeated Bennie Bock (not Bach). A graduate of the University of Texas, Austin, she has taught at the college level but not at UT-Austin.
N.Y. Caucus Responds to Prop. 63
In an effort to halt what it sees as a growing, negative campaign to make English the official language in New York and the United States, the Black and Puerto Rican Legislative Caucus of New York Nov. 9 announced that it will introduce two bills. One would declare New York a bilingual state; the other would create a $90 million English proficiency act
New York Assemblyman Jos6 Rivera (D-Bronx) said the caucus, a body composed of 25 legislators, will introduce the bills in January when the state legislature reconvenes. Galvanized by the Nov. 4 passage of an amendment in California that declares English as its official language, Rivera said the bills were a "counteroffensive" against “ racist, absolutist and reactionary sectors of the state and nation” who are pushing for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would declare English the official language.
The caucus? announcement came four days after California Assemblyman Frank Hill (R-Whittier) said he would ask that state’s Legislature to require that drivel's tests, welfare , applications, state university aid forms and other state services be offered 'only in English. Hill is the honorary vice chairman of the California English Campaign, the sponsors of the recently passed amendment.
Admitting that the chances for his initiative may be slim, Hill said he will use his purported network of 60,000 volunteers to put it on the ballot.
Hill added that t ie only services the state should provide in non-English languages are public health, safety and justice.
2
Rivera’s English proficiency bill would appropriate $30 million for 1987, 1988 and 1989 each. There are 1.6 million people in New York of Spanish origin. The bill calls for establishing and improving English literacy programs for limited-English-proficient adults and creating a clearinghouse for collecting and disseminating information on effective literacy education methods.
Consumer Habits Charted
continued from page 1
of all the personal expenditures($134.1 biflion) for U.S. Hispanics. California and Hawaii are the only two states in the Pacific region. Sixty percent of all U.S. Hispanic expenditures took place in the Pacific and Southwest regions Expenditures on services, as opposed to durable and non-durable goods, made up more than half ($68.4 billion) of all Hispanic expenditures, said the report.
The median household income in the six regions ranged from a low of $16,600 in the Northeast to a high of $27,700 in the Southeast The only other region whose median household income was below that of that the national median ($22,900) was the Southwest ($22,400), said the report.
When asked to compare their current economic status to that of five years ago, 45% felt it had improved. Hispanics in the Central market region were least likely to say so. Only four out of 10 Hispanics in that regiorrthought they were better off economically, showed the report.
White House Gets Mixed Affirmative Action Reviews
Fortune 500 companies are nearly equally divided on whetherthe Reagan administration has done an adequate job responding to the employment problems of Hispanics, other minorities and women, according to a survey whose results were released Nov. 10.
The Bureau of National Affairs, a private information services publisher, said 48% of the 197 firms that responded to its questionnaire on the administration’s affirmative action efforts felt that it had not done enough to meet the employment needs of minorities and women. The remaining 52% said the administration’s initiatives were responsive.
The report, titled “Affirmative Action Today: A Legal and Practical Analysis,” said that 87% of the respondents indicated they would make no changes in their affirmative action policies due to U.S. Supreme Court rulings this summer. In those two decisions, the Supreme Court upheld the use of racial preferences and recognized that classes, not just individuals, can be discriminated against
Most firms that have affirmative action programs said their policies would remain in place regardless of federal maneuverings.
In September 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed an executive order requiring all federal contractors to set minority hiring goals. The Reagan administration has been split on whether to scrap or keep the directive. The White House has said it will delay any decision on the matter until the Supreme Court rules on two affirmative action cases this term.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Antonia Hernandez, guest columnist
Let’s Define the Agenda
On Nov. 4, California’s voters overwhelmingly adopted Proposition 63, an amendment to the state constitution that makes English the official language of the state.
Two days later, President Reagan signed into law the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, the infamous Simpson-Rodino bill that most Hispanic organizations -including the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund - had strongly opposed.
For Hispanic Americans, whether Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans or others, the significance of these events is enormous. The 1960s’ laws that sought to protect the civil rights of minorities have been dealt a crippling blow. Language and race discrimination are now condoned and Hispanics are pushed to the bottom of the totem pole Ironically, the decade of the’80s, which at its inception promised Hispanics political, social and economic equality, has reneged on nearly every one of those promises.
' turnout, failure to organize and inadequate funding for candidates wiped out the strength of the Hispanic vote.
While Hispanics opposed the proposition by 2-1, the general electorate favored it 3-1. This, in spite of the fact that nearly every major media outlet, politicians from every side of the political spectrum, the private sector(including the characteristically conservative utility companies such as Pacific Bell and Pacific Gas and Electric) and the Catholic Church had taken positions against the English-only initiative.
We had everything going for us- the arguments, the endorsements, the strength of conviction. Everything but the money and the knowhow to get out the votes and reach our neighbors.
Our voice was drowned by a well-funded, skillfully organized, national campaign that continues to persuade voters that the English language is perilously close to extinction.
The majority of US. citizens fear that Hispanics are encroaching on their economic, cultural and linguistic turf. For that reason, the immigration law achieved its goal: to placate the public by exposing Hispanics to unwarranted employment discrimination. In the aftermath of Simpson-Rodino, we are left with a slew of ill-conceived provisions that fail to address the root cause of undocumented immigration.
Under ordinary circumstances the people of this country would shudder. But the politicians who supported the immigration bill and the voters who adopted Proposition 63 were groping for a return to the “natural order of things.”
LEGAL CHALLENGES NOT ENOUGH
The message from Proposition 63- SPEAK ENGLISH, INTRUDER! - will translate into English-only regulations at the workplace, English-only classrooms, English-only ballots, and, not coincidentally, English-only voters.
MALDEF and a number of other civil rights organizations intend to challenge the constitutionality of these new laws, practices and regulations. But expensive and protracted court battles hold out little hope for immediate remedies.
Perhaps this defeat will compel Hispanics from all backgrounds to accept the need fora nationwide effort to protect ourselves. Perhaps these affronts which slap us all equally will pull us out of our inertia into a wiser, more effective activism.
U.S. Hispanics cannot afford a second strike. U.S. English supporters have targeted Florida, New York, Texas and other states for the next round. The immigration law will play out one of the most tragic chapters in the history of this country’s civil rights. Toavertthe backlash, we must immediately define a cohesive, well-funded national Hispanic agenda.
(Antonia Hernandez is president and general counsel of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE CUCKOO NEST: Observing how California’s voters hugged Official English Proposition 63 this month, one must wonder whether the 63 also tallies their median IQ.
No sooner was the 73% - 27% landslide counted than the sickies, the dupes and their exploiters were plotting fresh ways to taunt newcomers to this land of equality.
State Assemblyman Frank Hill promised to push legislation requiring a multitude of state forms and services - including driver’s tests and applications essential to keep children from starving - be provided in English only.
Concerned that the legislature might be a tad too sane to pass his dream bill, he - as honorary vice chairman of the California English Campaign - is simultaneously threatening to go back to “our network of 60,000 volunteers” and put afresh package of raw meat on the ballot.
Bill Orozco, the group’s Southern California spokesman, wants non-English school notices to non-English-speaking parents eliminated immediately. (And, may I presume, he wants to change his last name.)
Were the voters as moon-struck as their ballots indicated?
Pollster Mervin Field tried to find out with an exit poll.
Giving voters three choices per issue, he asked: Why did you vote “yes” on Proposition 63? The top three responses were:
Everyone living here should speak English 61
Important for immigrants to learn English 54
Important to society to speak the same language 51
Are those the rantings of an electorate gone amok? Not really. In proper context, none of the three are outlandish statements.
Maybe that’s why Antonia Hern&ndez is smiling in the column next door. If we do a better job of educating our neighbors on the benefits to this nation of pluralism and of convincing them that we, too, accept the value of English- which we do- then maybe we can stay the avalanche of idiocy that's foaming over the Rockies and headed East.
It has already reached Colorado Springs, reports Richard Castro, Denver’s community relations director. There, a gent named Clovis Brakebill sees 63 as a national mandate and is stirring the fife and drum corps of his organization, the Sons of the American Revolution, to join the battle.
The man who started all the turmoil, former California Senator S. I. Hayakawa, is ready in the nation’s capital to carry his banner for a constitutional amendment forward.
Well, “ ready” may be too strong a word.
Hayakawa the founding father of U.S. English, showed up at the Georgetown University law center the other day, at the invitation of La Alianza student group there, to debate activist Sarah Melendez on the effect of Prop. 63. It wasn't much of a contest
Hayakawa even ended up agreeing with a young man wearing a Stanford U. sweatshirt who pleaded the case for his father to be allowed a bilingual ballot “If the situation’s the way you describe it, then your father should have a bilingual ballot," the venerable semanticist agreed.
Maybe we’re ready to edge back to sanity. As the old Spanish proverb goea..
No. I better not. Not just yet._______________- Kay BArbaro
Quoting...
Superior Judge BARBARA GAMER, in rejecting a prosecution recommendation that former San Diego City Councilman UVALDO MARTINEZ, 43, do jail time for misusing his city credit card:
“What I see is an intelligent, personable, hard-working individual who is a good administrator active in his church and community affairs. I also see a man who has embarrassed and humiliated himself and his family and betrayed the community, his constituents and friends. (His) punishment will go far beyond anything this court will do,”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Npv. 24,1986'
3.


COLLECTING
HISPANIC MARKET STUDY: Strategy Research Corporation recently released its third report on historical, demographic, cultural and consumer data on U.S. Hispanics. The 567-page study can be obtained by sending $40 to: SRC, 100 NW 37th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33125 (305) 649-5400.
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: “Affirmative Action Today: A Legal and Practical Analysis” is a 172-page study that examines affirmative action cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, surveys Fortune 500 officials on their opinions toward affirmative action, offers case studies in corporations and solicits the views of affirmative action experts. For a'copy, send $75 (less for bulk orders) to: Bureau of National Affairs, Circulation Department, P.O. Box4097, Washington, D.C. 20016-9990 (202) 452-4200.
LITERARY CONTEST: Queens College (New York) is sponsoring the Federico Garcia Lorca poetry contest. All works should be unpublished, in Spanish and between 50 and 150 lines. The deadline is Dec. 31. For more information, contact Guillermo Verdin, Department of Romance Languages, Queens College, Flushing, N.Y. 11367.
HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES: The National Council of Educational Opportunity Association serves as an information clearinghouse on federal and private programs that help disadvantaged students obtain college degrees NCEOA’s address is: Department P, 1126 16th St. NW, Suite 200, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 775-0863.
JOB SEARCHING: Learning howto prepare an effective resume, writing an application letter and sharpening your interviewing skills are covered in this booklet by the Consumer Information Center. For a copy, send $2.75 to: Department 106 P, CIC, Pueblo, Colo. 81009.
SECONDARY SCHOOL PREPARATION: “Must They Wait Another Generation? Hispanics and Secondary School Reform,” by Rafael iValdivieso, is a monograph that analyzes the failure of public schools to provide Hispanic students with a meaningful education and recommends steps to remediate that problem. For a copy, send $8 to: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027.
HOUSEHOLD STATISTICS: “Household and Family Characteristics: March 1985” looks at a myriad of characteristics for Hispanic, black and white families from 1970 to 1985. For a copy of the 127-page report (Series P-20, No. 411), write to: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (The price was not available at press time.)
CONNECTING
(Late news on what’s occurring within the U. S, Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
VOTER RESEARCH INSTITUTE LAUNCHED The new Southwest Voter Research Institute was activated this month in San Antonio, Texas, with the November elections. It’s a spinoff from the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and for the time being will be housed with SVREP.
Robert Brischetto, former director of research for SVREP, was* named by SVRI’s board as its first executive director. Jose Villareal is director of political education and Annette Avina data base manager.
FORUMS SCHEDULED AT HARVARD The Journal of Hispanic Policy has gained office space at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, 67 WinthropSt., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. It will publish a special edition on the Hispanic voter in mid-December, reports student-editor Adolph Falcon.
With school support, the Journal will sponsorfour monthly lectures, including ones on the English-only movement and the media, at the JFK School Forum, beginning in January.
$1.1 MILLION TO COMBAT DROPOUTS The Intercultural Development Research Association of San Antonio and the Bilingual Research and Teacher Training Center at Hunter College irf New York will receive $125,000 each to help schools, community organizations and others plan and develop collaborative dropout prevention programs.
The grants are part of a $1.1 million program announced by the Ford Foundation Nov. 18. Other technical assistance organizations in Atlanta and New York were also funded, and school districts in 21 cities were given $25,000 apiece to support their participation.
Among school districts involved will be ones in Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Hartford, New York, Philadelphia, San Antonio, San Diego and Tucson.
Only a small percentage of schools have preventive programs tied* to services provided by community agencies, business, government or higher education institutions, the Foundation noted in making the awards.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
STUDENT LEADERSHIP Rockville, Md. Nov. 24-26
The Department of Human Relations of the Montgomery County Public Schools will hold its 3rd annua! student leadership conference, including workshops on communication styles and conflict resolution. Jose Torrei (301) 279-3166
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION * Washington, D.C. Nov. 26
El Latino Newspaper will celebrate its 10th anniversary with its 3rd annual Gala Festival, with awards going to 10 Latinos for their service to the community, a $2,000 journalism scholarship and musical entertainment.
Concepcibn Sanz (202) 232-0447
COMING SOON
MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY CONFERENCE U.S. Commerce Department Acapulco, Mexico Dec. 3-5 Robert Johnson (602) 323-1467 4
SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT Multicultural Career Intern Program Washington, D.C. Dec. 4 Maria Tukeva (202) 673-3551
HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Institute for Puerto Rican Policy New York Dec. 5 Gerson Borrero(212) 564-1075
FUND-RAISER DANCE
Middlesex Community College Hispanic-American Club
Perth Amboy, N.J. Dec. 6 (201) 548-6000
PUBLIC RELATIONS SEMINAR
Hispanic Public Relations Society of Southern
California
Carson, Calif. Dec. 6 Carole Gerst(213) 516-3313
IMMIGRATION ISSUES FORUM Penn Valley Community College Kansas City, Mo. Dec. 12,13 Ascension Hernandez (816) 374-6411
CHRISTMAS DANCE
Houston Hispanic Fire Fighters Local 341
Houston Dec. 20
Nov. 24.1986
Juan Hernandez (713) 223-9166
ETHNIC AND MINORITY STUDIES CONFERENCE National Association for Ethnic Studies San Diego Feb. 25-28 Charles. Irby (714) 869-3593
FIRST NOTICE
CAREER CONFERENCE: The League of United Latin American Citizens’Pomona/East Los Angeles National Educational Service Centerwill hold its6th annual Hispanic Career Conference on March 4,
1987, in Ontario, Calif. The conference is geared to professionals and college students in high tech, business and government, with workshops on employment trends, job-searching strategies and corporate retention. For further information, contact Al Rios at (714) 623-0588.
As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1987 conferences* seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in December. Organizations wishing to have their event included should send the following information: date, place, brief description and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


OPPORTUNITIES IN EDUCATION
CHANCELLOR INDIANA UNIVERSITY EAST
Indiana University invites applications and nominations for the position of Chancellor at its Indiana University East Cam pus, located in Richmond, Indiana The chancel lor reports to the President of the Indiana University System and is responsible for the leadership, planning, management and evaluation of the campus programs. Candidates should have a strong academic background, an earned doctorate, a record of successful administrative experience and the ability to work with external constituencies. Familiarity with the operation of a multi-campus system is desirable.
The campus presently offers a range of two year programs and a limited number of baccalaureate programs and graduate courses serving 1,400 commuter students.
Nominations and letters of application with appropriate material (including resume) should be submitted to:
Chancellor Search Committee Indiana University East 2325 Chester Boulevard Richmond, Indiana 47374
The committee expects to submit its report to the President by mid-February, 1987.
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
TWO POSITIONS OPEN
Holland Public School Holland, Michigan
The School District of the City of Holland serves approximately4,500 students It is located on the Eastern shore of Lake Michigan, about 150 miles northeast of Chicago and 25 miles west of metropolitan Grand Rapids.
ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL, Holland High School. Qualifications: Masters in Educational Administration and minimum of two years successful teaching experience; demonstrated leadership qualities; experience in supervision of student activities and community relations; and Bilingual/Bicultural Hispanic preferred. Salary range: Approximately $39,000.
GUIDANCE COUNSELOR, Holland High School. Qualifications: Minimum of 18 credits toward a Masters in Guidance and Counseling with M.A. preferred; minimum of two years successful teaching experience; Bilingual/Bicultural Hispanic preferred. Salary range: $20,470 to $33,410-based on experience.
Interested persons should send a resume’ and references to:
Mr. Paul Jolly
Assistant Superintendent/Personnel
Holland Public Schools 633 Apple Ave.
Holland, Mich. 49423
Deadline for applications: December 1,1986 E.O.E.
HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES
You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholarships given annually tooutstanding Hispanic students across the United States.
The combined federal campaign now gives you'the opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your contribution.
The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax-exempt organization, invest in your community today and support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box748, San Francisco, Calif. 94101 (415) 892-9971. _____
The Unversity of Colorado’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication is seeking an Assistant Professor of Advertising.
Qualifications: Ph.D. required and some teaching and industry experience desired. AABD considered. Preference given to candidates who teach media planning and who can contribute to the graduate program.
Applicants are expected to maintain a continuing program of significant scholarship. rw,04 Send vitae, plus names, addresses, and Send vitae, plus names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references to Professor Sandra Moriarty, Journalism and Mass Communication, CB287, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 80309 by Jan. 20,1987.
The University of Colorado at Boulder has a strong institutional commitment to the principle of diversity. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people including women, members of ethnic minorities and disabled individuals.
GRAPHICS: El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C., provides: • Design • Illustration • Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW, Washington, D.Q. 20010(202) 483-1140.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
NIEMAN FELLOWSHIPS FOR JOURNALISTS
Every year approximately 12 journalists from the United States are awarded Nieman Fellowships to study at Harvard University. The Fellowships are granted for the academic year (September to June) and include a stipend for living expenses and tuition.
Application is made by the individual journalist Qualifications are: • must be United States citizens; • must ordinarily be full-time news or editorial employees or photographers with newspapers, press services, radio, television or magazines except for trade journals or house organ; • must have had at least three years of professional experience in the media; and • 1 must obtain their employer's consent for a leave of absence for the academic year.
The deadline for mailing completed applications is Jan. 31, 1987. Information and application forms may be obtained from: Program Officer, Nieman Foundation, Walter Lippmann House, One Francis Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02138.
REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for submission of applications fora 12-month $15,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Dec. 15.
The internship, sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by the! Gannett Foundation, is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism career.
Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
NAHJJOB EXCHANGE New employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, serving the East Coast South and Midwest Opportunities for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television, radio and other media, English of Spanish. Contact Lucienne Loman
National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228
Ordered oy__________
Title_______________
Area Code & Phone Advertiser Name_____
Bill To -
Address _____ City, State & Zip___
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weeikly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
IN OPERA-TION: Two of the world's best know Hispanic voices are featured in lead roles in the debut performances of Gian Carlo Menottfs new work for the Washington Opera.
The opera Goya, with tenor Placido Domingo singing the role of Spanish painter Francisco Jose de Goya y Lucientes, had its premiere Nov. 15 at the Kennedy Center in the nation’s capital. Two last performances are scheduled for Nov. 26 and 28.
Mezzo Victoria Vergara sings the role of Cayetana, the Duchess of Alba. The cast also includes bass-baritone Louis Otey and mezzo Suzanna Guzman. Goya is conducted by Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos.
The performance of the 26th will be videotaped by New York’s WNET and broadcast on PBS* Great Performances on Nov. 28 at 9 p.m. ET (check local listings). The evening is hosted by Jose Ferrer.
Menotti, twice a Pulitzer Prize-winning composer and lyricist, was asked by Domingo to create an opera based on the life of the 18th century painter. Goya is performed in English.
Back from a year of fund-raising concerts to benefit the victims of last year's earthquakes in Mexico, Domingo maintains a busy schedule as one of the world’s leading tenors. Hisfilm version of Verdi’s Otello, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, was released in September. He sang
the same role to inaugurate the Los Angeles Opera last month.
In other opera news: Puerto Rico’s Opera de Camara company continues its 1986-87 season with performances of the new work El mensajero de plata through December. Scheduled for February is another Gian Carlo Menotti opera: The Old Maid and the Thief. Puerto Rico’s baritone Pablo Elvira sang the title role in Verdi’s Rigoletto, performed by the Dallas Opera Nov. 15-23. And Francisco Araiza is in the San Francisco Opera production of Massenet’s Manon, with performances through Dec. 6.
The Washington Opera production of Goya is featured on the cover of the nation’s two opera magazines’ November issues: Opera News and Ovation.
Well-known Spanish painter Salvador Dali is interviewed for the November issue of Vanity Fair, which features a cover story about Nicaraguan model Bianca Jagger.
One more coven Raquel Welch is on the cover of the December issue of Shape. Welch, Olympian Tracy Ruiz and bodybuilder Gladys Portugues are listed among the “10 best bodies.”
ONE LINERS: Luis Avalos was featured in CBS’ five-part miniseries Fresno, which aired Nov. 15-20, and Richard Yniguez plays General Santa Ana in Houston: The Legend of Texas, Nov. 22, also on CBS... Argentina’s Oscar-nominated Camila has its last airings this month
on Galavision Nov. 24 and 29. . . „
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
BUREAUS PLANNED: While serving as news director for Spanish International Network for the past five years, Gustavo Godoy submitted annual budgets calling for the SIN television operations to open news bureaus in California and Texas.
But each year the items were blue-penciled, with SIN relying on local affiliates for coverage, he says.
Today, as president of Hispanic American Broadcasting Network, Godoy promises that HBN will have network bureaus in both states, along with Washington, D.C., New York, Miami, Mexico City and other major world centers.
Miami-based HBN plans to begin its half-hour, five-nights-weekly, Spanish-language newscasts early next year. It expects to reach all five major markets with its inaugural news programming.
Godoy left SIN last month following an
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Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
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internal dispute over the role Mexican television journalist Jacobo Zabludovsky would play in its news operation. More than 20 newsroom personnel, mostly in Miami, quit in protest to Godovs forced departure.
Among reporters who left SIN and are joining him at HBN, according to Godoy, are Jose Levy, Ricardo Brown, Pedro Sevsec, Marfa Elvira Salazar, Carlos Botifoll, Osvaldo Petrozzino and Jose Dfaz-Balart. Diaz-Balart was co-anchoring the SIN nightly news with Teresa Rodriguez at the time he left.
Contrary to a Nov. 17 story in Weekly Report, Rodriguez, who is under SIN contract, was not among those who quit.
Other former SIN news personnel who have agreed to join HBN include key producers and photographers, Godoy says.
Some Miami media have played upthe split as a Cuban/Mexican conflict. That’s “very unfortunate,” says Godoy, a native of Cuba “It’s just not true.”
Recent strong criticism of SIN’s commitment to coverage of the U.S. Hispanic community
has come from Mexican Americans, he points out. And Spanish media internationally have raised questions about Zabludovsky, who is regarded as too protective of Mexico’s political bosses.
How will HBN’s news coverage differ from that of SIN?
“With more bureaus and breadth of experience, we’ll be able to provide a more pluralistic vision,” Godoy projects.
PRODUCTION FELLOWS: The Corporation for Public Broadcasting announced a new project this month to place five minority, women or handicapped producers for up to two years with prominent radio and television programs. CPB will pay their full salaries.
Selections will be made in February, with chosen candidates beginning work in the spring.
For applications and information, write to CPB Production Fellows Project, Human Resources Development, 1111 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036._ c/lar//e Ericksen
c*Say, d/c/ you happen To see a Turkey pass by here t
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week candidates for vacancies on that s ' tate's Supreme Court' .. Albert Cappas, director of public affairs for the New York state Division of Youth, is honored by the student group Puerto Rican Organization for Dignity, Elevation and Responsibility at the University of Buffalo. Cappas founded the organization 20 years ago. . . Francisco Jimenez, a one-time migrant farm worker, receives the Phil Bobbie Sanfilippo Chair at Santa Clara (California) University. . . Barry L6pez, author of "Arctic Dreams: Imagination and Desire in a Northern Landscape," wins one of the two 36th annual American Book Awards . L6pez will receive $10,000 ... U .S. marshals capture Samantha Dorinda L6pez and her fiance buying wedding rings at a shopping mall near Sacral"(lento . L6pez escaped from prison earlier this month after a daring helicopter escape performed by her President Ronald Reagan signs legislation aimed at reducing fraudulent marriages between citizens and undocumented aliens. In order for the non-citizen spouse to be granted resident status , he must now show that the marriage remains intact two years later . .. U.S. Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) announces his support for Los Angeles City Council candidate Larry Gonzalez. . . U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho(D-Calif. ) busily lines up votes in his run for,House whip, the No . 3 House leadership post. Secret ballots by the 258 House Democrats will be cast Dec. 8 . . . California Court of Appeals Judge John Arguelles and 9th U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals Jud Arthur Alarc6n are hed to Gov . Deu as who had also escaped from a California iiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiii HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REP Nov. 24, 1986. 1 N.Y. Hispanic Dropout Rate Pegged at 620/o The dropout rate for Hispanic students in New York state public schools-62%-can be traced in part to the cultural bias that exists in the educational system of that state, found a report released Nov. 17. The report, titled " Dropping Out of School in New York State : The Invisible People of Color," was commissioned by the State Univer sity system ' s African American Institute. It followed members of the freshman class from 1977 until their scheduled graduation date of 1981. Blacks had the second highest dropout rate-53%. Native Americans had a dropout rate of 46% . The overall dropout rate for the study period was 34% , showed the report. Prepared by a 21-member task force , the study reported what neither the state nor New Yo r k City attempt to do. There are no state or city agencies that break down dropout rates according to ethnic or racial group. T he report criticized current state and city efforts to reduce the dropout rates and improve student academic performance. "The programs seem to be based on blaming the victim while letting teachers and adminis trators go on with whatever they're doing ... There is no focus on changing teachers' or administrators' attitudes or teaching styles," it said. Martinez Given Probation San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez, the highest ranking Hispanic Republican offi cial elected in California, was sentenced Nov . 13 to 400 hours of community work and restitution of $607.80 for the felony crime of misusing a city credit card. He will serve no jail time. Martinez, 43, has until Nov. 13, 1987, to complete his community service. His restitution payments, to begin no later than Jan. 13, must be $1 00 or more a month. The $607.80 represents 10 credit charges where Martinez was not conducting city business. He admitted guilt last month to two charges of treating non-city clients to restaurant dinners. In office since December 1982, Martinez resigned from the City Council Nov . 12. Con victed felons are automatically expelled from the body. Latino Consumerism Measured Hispanics are brand conscious and firmly believe that American-made products are the most reliable, concluded a Hispanic consumer study being released this month in five major cities. The survey report contains, among other things, information on the language usage, consumption patterns and buying power on the top 33 Hispanic markets in the United States . Conducted by Strategy Research Texas Latino Vote Low Only a small percentage of Texas' Mexican Americans voted in the Nov . 4 election even though two Hispanics were on the statewide ballot, the Southwest Voter Research Institute said Nov. 1 5. In 1982, 38% of the more than 830,000 registered Hispanic voters turned out at the polls. This year , just 29% of the nearly 970,000 registered Latino voters cast ballots , said SVRI executive director Robert Brischetto. That is the same percentage as in 1978 when 29% of the 590,000 registered Hispanics . voted, he added. Texas Supreme Court Justice Raul Gonzalez received 92% of the Latino vote as he retained his Place No.4 seat, and Mark White received 84% of that vote in his unsuccessful bid for re-election as governor. However, Republican Roy Barrera Jr., a candidate for attorney general, received only 28% of the Hispanic vote. "If Barrera had received only 55% of the Hispanic vote, he could have won," Brischetto said , adding , "The results showed that party is still an important consideration for many Hispanics." Corporation of Miami, "The 1987 U.S Hispanic .. Markef' used a wide mix of available data along with 2,003 personal intervi .ews in 2i Hispanic markets and 600 at-home interviews. The top 33 Hispanic markets account for 86% of the total U . S . Hispanic population, the report said. The concentration of Hispanics in a relatively few areas is highlighted by the fact that 62% of all Latinos reside in the top 10 Hispanic markets . The top 10 are Los Angeles, 3.6 million; New York, 2 . 5 million; , , Miami, 936,000; San Antonio, 889,000; San Francisco, 786,900; Chicago, 753,700; Houstol\ 706,500; McAllen/Brownsville, Texas, 588,300; El Paso, 477,900 ; and Albuquerque, 451,300. The Hispanic markets of Los Angeles and New York alone, including immediately outlying area counties, account for 32% of the U.S. Hispanic population. Breaking do. wn the country into six geo graphic regions, the study revealed that His panics in the Pacific region spent nearly35% continued on page 2 ----------------Hispanic Market Expenditures* by Geographic Regions Northeast Southeast Central Southwest Northwest Pacific Total Durable Goods $2.9 2 . 3 1.6 4 . 7 0 . 8 6.5 18.8 Norr Durable Goods $ 7.3 5.6 4 . 0 11. 7 2 . 0 16.3 46.9 •Expenditures are in billions. Srvcs. Total $10. 7 8.2 5 . 8 17. 0 2.9 23. 8 68.4 $20. 9 16.1 11.4 33.4 . 5.6 46.7" 134.1 Source : "The 1987 U.S Hispanic Market" by Strategy Research Corporation. , , . CONSUMER STATISTICS FOR HISPANICS IN 1986 . Car Ownership % Who Cars Per Own Cars Household Home Ownership Intend to Buy Finances Svngs. Chckng. . Credit Card Ownership oo'n"t In Next 12 Months Accnt. Accnt. Yes No Know P.R. 39. 5% 1 . 3 18.8% 23. 6% 18. 4% 20.8%79.2% 0% Mex. 84. 7 1 . 6 15.7 38. 9 34. 8 28. 7 61.9 9.4 Cuban 77.4 1 . 7 23. 3 42. 5 45.2 45. 7 53. 1 1 . 2 Other 60. 6 1 . 6 27.8 43. 0 Source: "The 1987 U . S Hispanic Market " by Strategy Research Corporation. 27.2 26.4 62. 4 11.2

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Hi: spanics Lose Three State Legislative Seats Latino state legislators saw their ranks decease in the Nov . 4 elections from 121 to 1 1 8, a tally by Weekly Report found. The number of voting Hispanics in the U .S. Congress remained at 11. Flori da experienced the largest gain in Hispan i c state legislators, up from seven to nine . Other increases were recorded in Texas, Illinois and Oregon ; each gained one. The number of Hispanic legislators in Arizona fell from 12 in 1984 to nine in 1986. Five states -New Jersey, Colorado, Utah, Min . nesota and Montana-each lost one. Nationwide, Hispanics now have 34 state senators-three less than two years ago. Other updates: • Democrat Juan Trujillo won his bid to a Colorado state representative against Republican Mike Salaz in District 43. After a recount , Trujillo polled 7,385 vo t es to Salaz ' s 7 , 322. • Incumbent Democrat Rod Garcia from the 93rd House District in Montana failed as a write-in candida t e to regain his seat. Garcia had lost in the primary. Additions to Weekly Reporfs Nov. 10 roundup on major party candidates: • Rudy Apodaca, brother of former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca , was unopposed in his bid for a seat on that state ' s Court of Appeals. • Democrat Jose Lugo retained h i s seat in the House of Representatives of Con necticut. He defeated Republican challenger . William Pow with 71% of the vote . • John Hernandez kept his seat in Rhode Islands House of Representatives. Hernandez, Hispanic State Legislators, 1984-1986 State 1984 1986 State 1984 1986 State 1984 1986 Ariz . 12 9 Kan . 3 3 Pa. 1 1 Calif . 7 7 La. 1 1 R.I. 1 1 Colo. 8 7 Minn. 1 0 Texas 24 25 Conn . 1 1 Mont. 2 1 Utah 1 0 Fla 7 9 N . J . 1 0 Wash. 1 1 Hawaii 1 1 N .M. 39 39 Ill. 2 3 N.Y . 7 7 TOTAL 121 118 I nd. 1 1 Ore . 0 1 Hispanic Link Chart N .Y. Caucus Responds to Prop. 63 In an effort to halt what it sees as a growing, negative campaign to make English the official language in New York and the United States, th e B l ack and Puerto Rican Legislat ive Caucus of New York Nov . 9 announced that it will introduce two bills. One would declare New York a bilingual state; the other would create a $90 million English proficiency act. New York Assemblyman Jose Rivera (D Bronx) sa i d the caucus, a body composed of 25 leg i slators, will introduce the bills in January w hen the state legislature reconvenes. Gal vanized b y t he Nov . 4 passage of an amend men t in C a li f orn i a that declares English as its off i cial language , Riv era said the bills were a "counter o ff en si ve" against " racist , absolutist and reactionary sectors of the state and nation " who are pushing for an amendment t o th e U . S . Constitution that would declare English t h e official language . Th e caucus' announcemen t came four days after California Assemblyman Frank Hill (RWhittien sa i d he would ask that state's Legi& to require that driver's tests, welfare , applications , state university aid forms and other state services be offered only in English. H ill is the honorary vice chairman of the Californ i a English Campaign, the sponsors of ihe recently passed amendment. Admitting that the chances for his initiative . may be slim , Hill said he will use his purported network of 60,000 volunteers to put it on the ballot. Hill added that t.1 e only services the state should provide in non-English languages are public health , safety and justice . 2 Rivera's English proficiency bill would appro priate $30 million for 1987, 1988 and 1989 each. There are 1 . 6 million people in New York of Spanish origin . The bill calls for es tabl i shing and improving English literacy pro grams for limited-English-proficient adults and creating a clearinghouse for collecting and disseminating informat ion on effective literacy education methods. Consumer Habits continued from page 1 of all the personal expenditures ($134 . 1 biifion) for U .S. Hispanics . California and Hawaii are the only two states in the Pacific region . Sixty percent of all U.S. Hispanic expenditures took place in the Pacific and Southwest regions. Expenditures on services, as opposed to durable and non-durable goods, made up more than half ($68.4 billion) of all Hispan i c expenditures, said the report. The median household income in the six regions ranged from a low of $16,600 in the Northeast to a high of $27,700 in the Southeast The only other region whose median house hold income was below that of that the national median ($22,900) was the Southwest ($22,400), said the report . When asked to compare their current eco nomic status to that of five years ago , 45% felt it had improved. Hispanics in the Central market region were least likely to say so. Only four out of 10 Hispanics in that regioll'thought they were better off economically, showed the report . a Democrat, defeated Joseph Scott, 58 % 42% . • Republican Darrell Castillo was defeated by Democrat Eddie Johnson in Texas' District 23 Senate race. Castillo received 23o/o of the vote . i • Republican Rick Serra lost i n his effort to unseat U .S. Rep . Martin Sabo from the 5thl District of Minnesota . Sabo , a Democrat , pol led 74%. • David Camisa, a Republican/Conservative running in New York's 27th State Assembly District , lost to Nettie Mayersohn. Camisa got 26o/o of the vote. Also in New York, Republican Marie lgnarro was defeated by Democrat George Friedman, 72o/o-22o/o. • Republican Willy Guzman fa i led in h i s bid for the 25th District of Utah's House of Representatives , losing to Democrat Joanne Milnert , ?Oo/o-27%. Corrections to the Nov . 10 roundup : • Jaime Gutierrez was unopposed in his bid for the 11th District of the Texas State Senate , not the House of Representatives . • In her successful attempt to become t he first Hispana in the Texas Senate , Jud i th Zaffirini defeated Bennie Bock (not Bach) . A graduate of the University of Texas , A u s t i n , she has taught at the college level but not at UT-Austin . White House Gets Mixed Affirmative Action Revie ws Fortune 500 companies are nearly equally divided on whether the Reagan administration has done an adequate job responding to the employment problems of Hispanics , other minorities and women , accord i ng to a survey whose results were released Nov. 10. The Bureau of National Affairs, a private information serv i ces publisher , said 48% of the 197 firms that responded to its questionnaire on the administrat ion' s affirmative action efforts felt that it had not done enough to mee t the employment needs of m i no r ities and women. The remain i ng 52% said 'the administration ' s initiatives were responsive . The report, titled " Affirmative Action Today: A Legal and Practical Analysis," said that 87% of the respondents indicated t hey would make no changes in their affirmative acti on policies due to U .S. Supreme Court rulings this summer . In those two decisions , the Supreme Court upheld the use of r acial pre ferences and recognized that classes, not just individuals, can be discriminated against. Most firms that have affirmative action pro grams said their policies would remain i n place regardless of federal maneuverings . In September 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed an execut i ve order requi r ing all federal contractors to set minority hiring goals. The Reagan administration has been split on whether to scrap or k eep the directive. The White House has said it will delay any decision on the matter until the Supreme Court rules on two affirmative action cases this term . Hispanic Lin k Weekly Report

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Anto nia Hern andez, guest columnist Let's Define the Agenda Sin pe/os en Ia Jengua On Nov. 4 , California's voters overwhelmingly adopted THE CUCKOO NEST: Observing how California ' s voters hugged Proposition 63, an amendment to the state constitution that Official English Proposition 63 this month, one must wonder whether the 63 also tallies their median IQ . makes English the official language of the state. No sooner was the 73% _ 27% landslide counted than the Two days later, P resident Reagan signed into law the sickies , the dupes and their exploiters were plotting fresn ways to Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, the infamous taunt newcomers to this land of equality. Simpson-Rodino bill that most Hispanic organizations State Assemblyman Frank Hill promised to push legislation including the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational requiring a multitude of state forms and services including Fund-had strongly opposed. driver's tests and applications essential to keep children from For H i spanic Americans, whetnerMexicans, starving-be provided in English only. Cubans , Puerto Ricans or others, the signi Concerned that the legislature might be a tad too sane to pass fican c e of these events is enormous. The his dream bill, he-as honorary vice chairman of the California 1960s' laws that sought to protect the civil English Campaign-is simultaneously threatening to go back t o rights of minorities have been dealt a crip"our network of 60,000 volunteers" and put a fresh package of raw piing b low . Language and race discrimination meat on the ballot. are now c o ndoned and Hispanics are pushed Bill Orozco, the group's Southern California spokesman, wants to th e bottom of the totem pole non-English school notices to non-English-spea k ing parents eliminated Ironically , the decade ofthe'80s, which at immediately. (And , may I presume, he wants to change his last its inception promised Hispanics political , name.) social and economic equali ty, has reneged Were the voters as moon-struck as their ballots indicate d? on n e arly every one o f those promises. Pollster Mervin Field tried to find out with an exit poll. I n C a lifornia , low voter turnout, failure to organize and inadequate Giving voters three choices per issue, he asked: Why did you funding for candidates wiped out th e st rength of t h e Hispanic vote. vote "yes" on Proposition 63? The top three responses were: Everyone living here should speak English 61 W h il e H ispa nics opposed the proposition by 2, the general Important for immigrants to learn English 54 el ec torate f a vore d it 31 . Thi s , in spi t e of the fact that nearly every Important to society to speak the same language 51 major m edia outlet , p o li t i ci ans from every side of the political spectrum , Are those the rantings of an electorate gone amok? Not really . In t he p r i vate s ec tor( i n cl u d ing th e characteristically conservative utility proper context, none of the three are outlandish statements. comp a ni e s s u c h a s Pa c ifi c Bell and Pacific Gas and Electric) and the Maybe thafs why Antonia Hernandez is smiling in the column C ath oli c Church h ad t a ke n positions against the English-only initiative . ne x t door. If we do a better job of educating o u r neighbors on the We h a d ev e rything going for us-the arguments, the endorsements, benefits to this nation of pluralism and of convincing them that we, the st r eng t h o f c on v i ction. Ev e ryth i ng but the money and the knowtoo, accept the value of Englishwhich we do-then maybe we can how to get out the votes and reach our neighbors. stay the avalanche of idiocy thafs foaming over the Rockies and Our voi c e was drowned by a well-funded , skillfully organized, headed East. nationa l campa ign that continues to persuade voters that the English It has already reached Colorado Springs, reports Richard lan g u a g e is p e rilously c l o se to e x tinction. Castro, Denver's community relations director. There, a gent T he m a j o r i t y of U .S. c i ti zens fear that Hispanics are encroachiny on named Clovis Brakebill sees 63 as a national mandate and is their econ o mic , cultural and linguistic turf. For that reason , the . stirring the fife and drum corps of his organization, the Sons of the immi g r ation la w ach ie ved its goal : to placate the public by e x posing . American Revolution, to join the battle. H ispa nics t o u nwarranted e mployment discrimination. In the aftermath of The man who started all the turmoil, former California Senator S imp sonRodino , we are left with a s l ew of ill-conceived provisions that S.l. Hayakawa, is ready in the nation' s capital to carry his banner fail to addres s the root c ause of undocumented immigration . for a constitutional amendment forward . Under o rdinary circ umstan c es the people of th i s country would Well, "ready" may be too strong a word. shudder. But the politicians w ho supported the immigration bill and Hayakawa, the founding father of u.s. English, showed up at the the v ot e r s who adopted Proposition 63 were groping for a return to Georgetown University law center the other day, at the invitation the "natu r a l o rder o f things." of La Alianza student group there, to debate activist Sarah LEGAL CHALLENGES NOT ENOUGH Melendez on the effect of Prop. 63. It wasn't much of a contest The message from Proposition 63SPEAK ENGLISH, INTRUDER! Hayakawa even ended up agreei ng with a young man wearing a will t ranslate i nt o English-only regulations at the workplace, Stanford U. sweatshirt who pleaded the case for his father to be English only c lassrooms, English-only ballots, and, not coincidentally, ' allowed a bilingual ballot. "If the situation's the way you describe English-only voters . it, then your father should have a bilingual ballot, " the venerable MALDEF and a number of other civ i l rights organizations intend to semanticist agreed. challe ng e the constitutionality of these new laws, practices and Maybe we're ready to edge back to sanity. As the old Spanish regulations. But e x pensive and protracted court battles hold out proverb goes. little hope for immediate remedies. No. I better not. Not just yet. -Kay Barbaro Quoting. .. P e rha p s this defeat w i ll compel Hispanics f r om all backgrounds to a ccept the ne e d for a nat ionwide effort to protect ourselves. Perhaps these affronts w h ich slap us all equally will pull us out of our inertia into a wiser, more effective activism . U . S . H ispanics cannot afford a second strike. U . S . English sup porters have targeted Florida, New York, Texas and other states for the ne x t round. The immigration law will play out one of the most tragic chapters in the history of this country's civi l rights. To avert the backlash , we must immediately define a cohesive, well-funded nat i onal Hispanic agenda. Superior Judge BARBARA GAMER, in rejecting a prosecution recommendation that former San Diego City Councilman UVALDO MARTINEZ, 43, do jail time for misusing his city credit card: (Antoni a Hern a ndez is president and general counsel of the Mexican Ameri c an Legal Defense and Educational Fund) I see is an intelligent personable, hard-working indi vidual who !s a good administratoJ, active in his church and community affairs . I also see a man who has embarrassed and humiliated himself and his family and betrayed the community, his constituents and friends. (His) punishment will go far beyond anything this court will do . " Hi sp a ni c Link Weekl y R e p o rt 1-lpv. 24, 1986 3 .

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COLLECTING HISPANIC MARKET STUDY: Strategy Research Corporation recently released its third report on historical , demographic, cultural and consumer data on U.S . Hispanics. The 567-page study can be obtained by sending $40 to: SRC , 100 NW 37th Ave., Miami, Fla . 331 25 (305) 649-5400. AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: "Affirmative Action Today: A Legal and Practical Analysis" is a 172-page study that examines affirmative action cases decided by the U .S. Supreme Court, surveys .Fortune 500 officials on their opinions toward affirmative action, offers case studies in corporations and solicits the views of affirmative action . . For a•copy, send $75 (less for bulk orders) to: Bureau of Nation' al Affairs, Circulation Department, P . O . Box4097, Washington, D . C . 2()016-9990 (202) 452-4200. LITERARY CONTEST: Queens College (New York) is sponsoring the Federico Garcia Lorca poetry contest. All works should be unpublished , in Spanish and between 50 and 150 lines. The deadline is Dec . 31 . For more information , contact Guillermo Verdin , Department o! Romance Languages, Queens College, Flushing , N.Y. 11367. HIGHER EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES: The National Council of Epucational Opportunity Association serves as an information clearinghouse on federal and private programs that help disadvantaged stude.nts obtain c;ollege degrees. NCEOA ' s address is: Department P, 1126 16th St. NW, Suite 200, Washington, D .C. 20036 (202) 775:>863. JOB SEARCHING: Learning how to prepare an effective resume, writing an application letter and sharpening your interviewing skills are covered in this booklet by the Consumer Information Center. For a copy, send $2. 75 to: Department 106 P, CIC , Pueblo , Colo. 81009. SECONDARY SCHOOL PREPARATION: "Must They Wait Another .Generation? H 'ispanics and Secondary School Reform, " by Rafael i Valdivieso, is a monograph that analyzes the failure of public schools to provide Hispanic students with a meaningful education and recommends steps to. rem .ediate that problem. For a copy, send $8 to: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N . Y . 10027. HOUSEHOLD STATISTICS: " Household and Family Characteristics: March 1985" looks at a myriad of characteristics for Hispanic , black and white families from 1970 to 1985. For a copy of the 127-page re'J)ort (Series P-20, No. 411 ), write to: Superintendent of Documents , U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402. (The price was not available at press time. ) CONNECTING (Late news on what's occumng with'in the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it.) VOTER RESEARCH INSTITUTE LAUNCHED The new Southwest Voter Research Institute was activated this month in San Antonio, Texas , with the November electiuns. It's a spinoff from the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and for the time being will be housed with SVREP . Robert Brischetto, former director of research for SVREP, was named by SVRI's board as its first executive director. Jose Villareal is director of political education and Annette Avina data base manager. FORUMS SCHEDULED AT HARVARD The Journal of Hispanic Policy has gained office space at Harvard ' s John F . Kennedy School of Government, 67 Winthrop St., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. It will publish a special edition on the Hispanic voter in mid-December, reports student-editor Adolph Falcon . With school support, the Journal will sponsor four monthly lectures, including ones on the English-only movement and the media, at the JFK School Forum, beginning in January. $1.1 MILLION TO COMBAT DROPOUTS The Intercultural Development Research Association of San Antonio and the Bilingual Research and Teacher Training Center at Hunter College ir'i New York will receive $125,000 each to help schools, community organizations and others plan and develop collaborative dropout prevention programs . The grants are part of a $1. 1 million program announced by the Ford Foundation Nov. 18. Other technical assistance organizations in Atlanta and New York were also funded , and school districts in 21 cities were given $25,000 apiece to support their participation. Among school districts involved will be ones in Albuquerque, Los Angeles, Hartford , New York , Philadelphia , San Antonio, San Diego and Tucson . Only a small percentage of schools have preventive programs tied' to services provided by community agencies, business, government or higher education institutions, the Foundation noted in making the awards . Calendar SCHOLARSHIP BENEFIT Multicultural Career Intern Pr og ram Washington, D .C. De c . 4 Juan Hernandez (713) 223-9166 ETHNIC AND MINORilY STUDIES CONFERENCE National Association for Ethnic Studies THIS WEEK STUDENT LEADERSHIP Rockville , Md. Nov. 24-26 Ttie Department of Human Relations of the Montgomery County Public Schools will hold its 3rd annua! student leadershipconfer ence, including workshops on communication styles and conflict resolution . Jose Torret (30 1) 279-3166 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Washington, D . C . Nov. 26 El Latino Newspaper will celebrate its 1Oth an niversary with its 3rd annual Gala Festival , with awards going to 10 Latinos for their service to the community, a $2,000 journalism scholarship and musical enteriainment. Concepcion Sanz (202) 232-044 7 COMING SOON MAQUILADORA INDUSTRY CONFERENCE U . S . Commerce Department Acapulco, Mexico Pee . 3-5 Robert Johnson (602) 323-1467 4 Maria Tukeva (202) 673-3551 HOLIDAY BENEFIT DANCE Institute for Puerto Rican Pol icy New York Dec . 5 Gerson Borrero (21 2) 564-1 07 5 FUND-RAISER DANCE Middlesex Community College Hispani o American Club Perth Amboy , N . J . Dec. 6 (201) 548-6000 PUBLIC RELATIONS SEMINAR Hispanic Public Relations Society of Southern California Carson , Calif. Dec . 6 Carole Gerst (213) 516-331 3 IMMIGRATION ISSUES FORUM Penn Valley Community College Kansas City, Mo. Dec. 12, 13 Ascension Hernandez (816) 37 4-6411 CHRISTMAS DANCE Houston Hispanic Fire Fighters Local 341 Houston Dec . 20 Nov . 24 . 198n San Diego Feb. 25-28 Charles.lrby (714) 869-3593 FIRST NOTICE CAREER CONFERENCE: The League of United Latin American Citizens' Pomona/East Los Angeles National Educational Service Center will hold its 6th annual Hispanic Career Conference on March 4 , 1987, in Ontario, Calif . The conference is geared to professionals and college students in high tech, business and government, with workshops on employment trends, job-searching strategies and corporate retention. For further information, contact AI Rios at (714) 623-0588. As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1987 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in December. Organizations wishing to have their event included should send the following information : date , place, brief description and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005. H i spanic Link Weekly Report

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OPPORTUNITIES IN EDUCATION II CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS NIEMAN FELLOWSHIPS FOR JOURNALISTS CHANCELLOR INDIANA UNIVERSITY EAST Indiana University invites applications and nominations for the position of Chancellor at its Indiana University East Cam pus, located in Richmond , Indiana. The chancellor reports to the President of the Indiana University System and is responsible for the leadership , planning , management and evaluation of the campus programs. Candidates should have a strong academic background, an earned doctorate, a record of successful administrative e xperience and the ability to work with e x ternal constituencies. Familiarity with the operation of a multi-campus system is desirable . The campus presently offers a range of two year programs and a limited number of baccalaureate programs and graduate courses serving 1,400 commuter students. Nominations and letters of application with appropriate material (including resume) should be submitted to: Chancellor Search Committee Indiana University East 2325 Chester Boulevard Richmo nd, Indiana 47374 The committee e xpects to submit its report to the President by mid-February , 1987. Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer TWO POSITIONS OPEN Holland Public School Holland , Michigan The School District of the City of Holland serves appro x imately4 ,500 students. It is located on the Eastern shore of Lake Michigan, about 150 miles northeast of Chicago and 25 miles west of metropolitan Grand Rapids . ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL, Holland High School . Qualifications: Masters in Educational Administration and minimum of two years suc cessful teaching e xperience; demonstrated leadership qualities; e xperience in supervision of student activities and community relations ; and Bilingual/Bicultural Hispanic preferred . Salary range : Approximately $39,000. GUIDANCE COUNSELOR, Holland High School. Qualifications: Minimum of 18 credits toward a Masters in Guidance and Counseling with M.A preferred ; minimum of two years suc cessful teaching experience; Bilingual/Bicultural H i spanic preferred. Salary range : $20,470 to $33,41 G-based on experience. Interested persons should send a resume ' and references to : Mr. Paul Jolly Assistant SuperintendenV Personnel Holland Public Schools 633 Apple Ave. The Unversity of Colorado ' s S c hool of Journalism and Mass Communication is see k ing an Assistant Professor of Advertising. Qualifications: Ph.D. requ i red a nd som e tea chIng and industry e x perience des i red . AABD considered. Preference given to candidates who teach media planning and who can con tribute to the graduate program . Applicants are expected to maintain a con tinuing program of significant s c holarship . rw ,04 Send vitae , plus names , addresses, and Send vitae , plus names, addresses, and phone numbers of three references to Prof e ssor Sandra Moriarty , Journal i sm and Mass Communication , CB287 , University of Colorado, Boulder, Colo . 80309 by Jan . 20, 1987. The University of Colo rado at Boulder has a strong institutional commitment t o the principle of diversity. In that spirit, we are p a rti c ularly inter ested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people including women , members of ethnic minorities and disabled individuals. GRAPHICS : El Barrio Graphics, Washington, D . C., provides : • Design • Illustration • Type setting e Layout • Silkscreen and • Slats. El Barrio Graphics, 3045 15th St NW , Washington, D .c. 2001 o (202).483-1140. Every year approximately 12 journalists from the United States are awarded Nieman Fellow ships to study at Harvard University. The Fellow ships are granted for the academic year (Sep tember to June) and include a stipend for living expenses and tuition. Application is made by the individual journalist Qualifications are : • must be United States citizens; • must ordinarily be full-time news or editorial employees or photographers with newspapers, press services, radio, television or magazines e xcept for trade journals or house organ; • must have had at least three years of professional e xperience in the media; and • must obtain their employer's consent for a leave of absence for the academic year. The deadline for mailing completed applications is Jan. 31, 1987. Information and application forms may be obtained from : Program Officer, Nieman Foundation, Walter Lippmann House, One Francis Ave., Cambridge, Mass. 02138. REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED The deadline fo r submission of applications for a 1 2month $ 1 5,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispa ni c Link News Serv ice in Washington , D . C., has been e xtended to Dec. 15. The internship, sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by the1 Gannett Foundation , is open to anyone of Puerto Ric an heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism . c areer. Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D .C. 20005 (202 ) 234-0737. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES NAHJ JOB EXCHANGE New employment referral service for Hispanic professionals and students in the media, serving the East South and Midwest Opportunities . for internships, entry-level and advanced positions in newspapers, magazines, television , radio and other media, English of Spanish . Contact Lucienne Loman National Association of Hispanic Journalists (202) 783-6228 Holland, Mich. 49423 Deadline for applications: December 1 , 1986 E.O.E. HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES You c an now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholar ships given annually to outstanding Hispanic studt>nts across the United States. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a " national pool of Latino e xecutives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, o.c: 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. The combined federal campaign now gives you fhe opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your con tribution. The scholarsh i p fund is a 501-C3 ta x e xempt organization. Invest i n your com munity today and support the National His panic S cholarship Fund . For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund, P . O . Box? 48, San Francisco , Calif. 94101 (415) 892-9971. Hispanic Link Weekly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words ; telephone numbe r . 1 word) .Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIEr> RATES ( Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Orderea oy ----------Title ________ _ Advertiser Name _________ _ Bill To------------Address -:-=----------City, State & Zip ---------

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1 \ .. : ' () r , w ... Arts & Entertainment the same role to inaugurate the Los Angeles Opera last month. In other opera news: Puerto Rico's Opera de Camara company continues its 1986-87 season with performances of the new work El mensajero de plata through December. Scheduled for February is another Gian Carlo Menotti opera : The Old Maid and the Thief. Puerto Rico's baritone Pablo Elvira sang the title role in Verdi's Rigoletto, performed by the Dallas Opera Nov. 1 5-23. And Francisco Araiza is in the San Francisco Opera production of Massenefs Manon, with performances through Dec. 6. IN OPERA-TION: Two of the world's best know Hispanic voices are featured in lead roles in the debut performances of Gian Carlo Menottrs new work for the Washington Opera. The opera Goya, with tenor Pl