Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, December 8, 1986

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, December 8, 1986
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
In his first public speech since being voted out of office, California Supreme Court J ustice Cruz Reynoso says, “Judges, consciously or subconsciously, will have to worry about whether their opinions are making powerful political or economic interests in this state happy or unhappy.”.. .Republicans approach Chicago Board of Education President George Munoz, 35, to switch parties and run for mayor against Harold Washington. . .Phil Saenz, director of California Gov. George Deukmejian’s Office of California- Mexico Affairs, resigns. He will return to private law practice. . .The Federal Bar Council awards a Certificate of Distinguished Judicial Service to Judge Harold Medina of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York..
Moses Anguiano, also known as Baby Moses, celebrates his first anniversary as the youngest heart transplant recipient ever. Moses was less than a year old at the time of the operation.. . Jos6 Canseco, an outfielder for professional basebairs Oakland A’s> wins the American League Rookie of the Year Award. Canseco, 22, is Cuban.. .Barbaro Garbey, the first Mariel refugee to play professional baseball, is arrested in Miami for cocaine possession. . .Marsha Padilla and Allen Pilgeram become the first-couple target married aboard the Mayflower II, a fascimile of the ship that,brought the Pilgrims to Plymouth Rock in 162Cji The-couple wqs feacried on Thanksgiving Day.. .U.S. Representative Kika de la Garza purchases what he calls one of the finest abstract paintings he has ever seen. Causing a spate of inquiries on Capitol Hill, the painting was created by a 5-year-old orangutan named Guero...
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
N. Y. Job Growth Helps Latinos ^ayaExecution-Stays
Draw Praise, Criticism|
New York City will experience a net increase of 231,000 new jobs between 1984 and 1995, and Latinos and blacks aged 16 to 24 will land a disproportionate share, according to a study released Nov. 24.
Prompted by the decreasing numberof youngsters applying to the city’s Department of Employment Summer Youth Employment Program, “Labor Market Outlook for Young People in New York City: Prospects to the Year2000” charted the city’s BUSTELO changing demographics and its implications for young job seekers and employers.
Manuel Bustelo, commissioner of the city’s Department of Employment, said the report shows Hispanics and blacks “will constitute an ever increasing portion of the population and so will be in the best position to benefit from the healthy economy.”
Adding on the numberof vacancies expected because of attrition, the report concluded that there will be a minimum of 1.4 million job openings between 1984 and 1995. This, plus an expected 59% decrease in the number of 16 to 24-year-old white non-Hispanics between
1970 and 1990, will create a “window of opportunity’ for Latinos and blacks.
As a percentage of that overall age bracket, Hispanics will grow from 17% in 1970 to 28% in 1990; blacks will increase from 20% to 31%; and white non-Hispanics will shrink from 60% to 33%, showed the report.
In 1970 there were 194,00016-to 24-year-old Latinos; by 1990 the report estimated there will be 243,000.
The industries that will decrease and increase
their jobs from 1984 to 1 995 are:
Industry Net Change
Service 228,000
Finance, Real Estate, Ins. 57,000
Government 24,000
Construction 23,000
Trade 11,000
Transportation, Public Utilities,
Communication -24,000
Manufacturing -88,000
Total 231,000
The New York City job market is the countrys largest, employing more than 3.5 million people.
Bustelo, a former director of the National Puerto Rican Forum, a job-training and counseling center, said, “It is in the interest of government <*nd of all employers in the city to ensure that every segment of the population has the skills and work habits the job market will require.”
The five New Mexico death row inmates who had their death sentences commuted by Gov. Toney Anaya Nov. 26 praised the governor for his courage and conviction, but the victims’ families assailed Anaya’s decision.
The commutations, said Anaya, were based on his belief that death sentences are “inhumane, immoral, anti-God and incompatible to an enlightened society.” Barred by law from seeking a second consecutive four-year term, Anaya had twice commuted the sentences of inmates sentenced to die. He has roughly three weeks left in his term.
Michael Guzman, 23 and the youngest of the five who had their sentences commuted, thanked Anaya for his “compassion and understanding.” The other four inmates were Richard Garcia, 31, Edward Lee Adams, 24, Joel Lee Compton, 33, and William Wayne Gilbert, 37.
Garrey Carruthers, Anaya’s Republican successor, said one of the first official acts he will perform when he takes office will be to try to re impose the penalties. “We should, and I will, uphold New Mexico’s capital punishment law.”
Carruthers said he may take legal action to overturn Anaya’s reprieves, but according to lawyers familiar with the facts, the chances for that are slim.
Eviction Hearings Planned
A spokesman for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development told Weekly Report Dec. 1 that the agency will take public comment this fiscal year on proposed regulations which would evict undocumented aliens from public housing.
On Nov. 14a U.S. District Court issued a nationwide injunction that barred HUD from evicting such tenants. When Congress passed its omnibus spending bill in October, it stipulated that HUD could not use any of its funds to enforce an eviction policy.
HUD announced its eviction policy concerning undocumenteds April 1. The policy was to have taken effect at the end of this month.
The Immigration Reform and Control Act, signed into law last month, contains a provision which allows HUD to use its records to verify the residency status of public housing tenants.
TV Pioneer Desi Arnaz Dead at 69
Desi Arnaz, the Cuba-born entertainer who teamed with wife Lucille Ball to star in and produce one of television’s most enduring situation comedies, died Dec. 2 of lung cancer. He was 69.
The “I Love Lucy” show cast Arnaz as Ricky Ricardo, the rumba bandleader, who coped with the antics of his redheaded wife. Arnaz helped pioneer the three-camera technique of shooting situation comedies before a live audience, a method still used today. The show premiered in 1951 and ran fora decade. Its 1952-53 season averaged a 67.3 Nielsen rating, the highest ever.
His studio, Desilu, created at least 19
series, including “Make Room for Daddy” and “The Untouchables.” In 1963, he sold his studio interest to Ball, three years after their 20-year marriage ended in divorce.
Born Desiderio Alberto Arnaz y de Acha III in Santiago, Cuba, on March 2, 1917, Arnaz emigrated to the United States following the 1933 Cuban Revolution.
“He died of lung cancer. It was from smoking those Cuban cigars, that’s the truth,” said Arnaz’s doctor, Charles Campbell.
Arnaz passed away at his Del Mar, Calif., home in San Diego County with his daughter, Lucie Arnaz Luckim^ill, at his side. He is also survived by his son, Desi Jr.


Calif. Literacy Bill Introduced £!£■1La“"fs.Labf11^
‘Political Underclass’
A bill expanding English literacy classes in California was introduced Dec. 1 in the State Legislature by Sen. Art Torres The English Language Opportunity Act or Senate Bill 9, would allocate $5.5 million annually for volunteers to teach the state’s estimated 4 million illiterate adults
“We are hopeful that proficiency in English will transcend into economic well-being for Hispanics and other minorities” Sen. Torres said, adding, “Once they know the language of contracts then they will be able to compete in the marketplace.”
“This is not a response to Proposition 63,” said Beth Bonbright, aide to Sen. Torres, referring to the English Only initiative which passed with 73% of the vote this November.
Under the bill, school districts with high concentrations of illiterate adults wouId receive grants to expand or establish English as a Second Language and basic literacy classes
The strained relationship between local and federal government was underscored when San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, the outgoing president of the National League of Cities criticized his federal colleagues at the league’s national meeting Nov. 29-Dec. 3 for enacting laws that increase costs to city governments while reducing federal aid.
Cisneros completing his one-year term as NLCs chief, also assailed a recent welfare reform plan drawn up by a private commission that he charged would end the relationship between “the federal government and city problems” and “put cities at the mercy of states”
Under the plan, the federal government would be charged with 90% of the costs for Medicaid and Aid to Families With Dependent Children, an expense up to now shared by states and the federal government The states would then be responsible for financing hereto-
$6 Million Verdict Pared
A U.S. Court of Appeals Nov. 28 halved a $6.3 million settlement against the federal government in a malpractice lawsuit involving the birth of a disabled Latina at an army hospital.
The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco held that a lower court placed too high a value on the emotional losses suffered by Sophia Trevino and her parents, Rachel and Ruben. The court also ruled that the $1.7 million for lifelong care was improperly awarded.
The hospital was held liable for damages because it failed to take into account problems that arose from the detachment of the placenta from the mother’s uterine wall during labor.
Sophia now has permanent brain damage, cerebral palsy and suffers periodic seizures
The appeals court ordered the case remanded to another federal court in Tacoma, Wash., for possible further reductions.
Community-based organizations could apply for grants to the Department of Education, which would administer the program.
Adult educators would recruit, train, place and supervise volunteers to teach non- and limited-English-speaking adults, according to the proposed legislation. An estimated 2 million of California’s illiterate adults are either limited-or non- English-speaking With more than40,000 Los Angeles residents alone waiting to get into English classes, Torres expects his bill to alleviate the long waiting lists and eventually help these adults become economically competitive.
“We have to get people on the track because they’re going to have to learn how to speak English in many areas,” Torres said.
No action is expected on the bill until January when the California Legislature reconvenes Torres introduced his bill during an introductory two-day session of the legislature.
fore federally funded programs.
Cisneros commanded center stage at the meeting and established his viability as vice presidential timber for 1988.
Terry Michaels, a spokesman for the Democratic National Committee, said Cisneros would have to be “on anybody’s list of potential Democratic candidates.”
Cisneros, according to political strategists, possesses management skills and attributes that make him stand out he is young (39), highly educated (a master’s degree from Harvard, a doctorate from George Washington University), a Hispanic and has brought San Antonio fiscal stability in a state which is suffering from a drop in oil prices
There were 6,600 mayors and other city officials present at the meeting in San Antonio.
‘International Illiteracy’ Hit
Foreign language education should start as early as the first grade and foreign language requirements should be reinstated as college admission standards, the Southern Governors Association urged in a report issued in Atlanta Nov. 21.
It charged the nation’s schools with producing students who can't compete in a world environment and are victims of “international illiteracy.”
In 1984, the South exported $53 billion in manufactured products, approximately 30% of this country’s manufacturing exports
NCTE Raps English-Only
The National Council of Teachers of English has adopted a resolution that opposes making English the nation’s official language, saying such a law could lead to discrimination against limited- and.non-English speakers.
The resolution, adopted at NOTE’S annual meeting in San Antonio Nov. 21, said that the English language was capable of accommodating many languages Any attempt to preserve it would stagnate its evolution, the resolution held.
Hispanics who now make up 17% of California’s adults were only 7% of its voters Nov. 4, a recent Mervin Field Poll found.
Lack of citizenship, youth, economic status and “disengagement from the political process?’ were some reasons cited by Field for Hispanics being part of a growing non-white “political underclass” in the state.
The poll revealed:
Group % of Calif. Adults % of Nov. Voters
White 69% 85%
Hispanic 17 7
Black 7 4
Asian 5 2
All voters 18-39 52% 31%
All voters 50-over 33 51
Earn under$20,000 30% 22%
Earn over $50,000 20 28
Candidates supported by whites prevailed in all statewide races except the one between incumbent U.S. Sen. Alan Cranston and Ed Zschau. White support for Zschau was overcome by overwhelming Hispanic and black support for Cranston.
Ad Expenditures Up 19%
Advertisers are spending $398 million this year to reach the 16.9 million mainland U.S. Hispanics, a 19% increase over the $335 million spent in 1985, projects Hispanic Business magazine in its December issue. This represents only 0.5% of the total advertising market, it says
Spanish-language television received the largest share of advertising dollars with $184.3 million in sales Independent television stations (those not affiliated with Spanish International Network) expanded their share of the market from 6.1% in 1985 to 10.6%, or$42.3 million, in 1986.
Procters Gamble passed Philip Morris as the biggest spender in the Hispanic market with outlays of $8 millioa Philip Morris dropped into second place with $7.5 million. Anheuser-Busch was third with $6.5 million in advertising, and McDonald’s, with$6.3 million in expenditures, fourth.
Los Angeles Miami and New York remained the top three Hispanic advertising markets, with Chicago surpassing San Antonio for the number four slot.
Murder Confession Nixed
Police officials in Fontana, Calif., said Nov. 20 that a Latino suffered needlessly for 26 years after he confessed recently to fatally shooting a gang member in a shootout Albert Hernandez, 44, said he gunned down the gang member in a 1960 melee in Los Angeles Officials retrieved the records and found that another man had confessed to the shooting and was convicted of manslaughter. The police added that even if Hernandez had shot someone, the statute of limitations since expired. Hernandez was freed. ________________________
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Cisneros Impresses at Cities Parley
2


Alicia Sandoval, guest columnist
The New Workplace
A quarter of a century ago, the path leading most Latino immigrants to the promise of prosperity in this nation wound first through its tomato fields, orchards and vineyards.
In the mid-‘60s, playwright Luis Valdez helped bring those newcomers and their struggles to the attention of the nation when he launched his United Farm Workers Union theater, El Teatro Campesino.
Today, the path guiding a new generation of Latino immigrants more often than not bypasses the increasingly mechanized agribus* iness fields. Instead, it leads to our cities and their service fields As the United States shifts from a post-industrial age to an information society, nine out of 10 new jobs will be generated by the service economy.
The story of the new arrivals was dramatized by the UFWs parent union, the AFL-CIO, at Los Angeles’ prestigious Mark Taper Forum on Dec. 8 in “The Greatest Stories Never Told: Voices from the New American Workplace.”
The 90-minute presentation involved 13 union members, including Jess Barajas, a Los Angeles County social worker, and Hope Fierro, a registered nurse and former organizer for Cesar Chavez. Both are members of the Service Employees International Union and portray themselves in the unique theater project.
SUICIDE TESTS BARAJAS
To prepare for their roles, they, along with 11 other workers-turned-actors, studied in a 10-week workshop under acclaimed director Victoria Ann Lewis.
In his engaging Forum monologue, Barajas relates the day-to-day frustrations he faces as he tries to serve a client list of deprived barrio kids from troubled homes. The young social worker complains of case overloads, government red tape and constant crises He struggles to remain caring, hoping not to end up a cynic. When one of his wards commits suicide, he is tested.
A modern “ Man of La Mancha,” he fights the crowded Los Angeles freeways on his field calls, jousts with a faceless “system” and shows the audience that he is commited to right the wrongs he finds.
Hope Fierro, the registered nurse with salt-and-pepper hair, a merry laugh and a sweet face, takes what could have been a tragedy and turns it into light comedy.
In her monologue, she tells us about an old man whose doctor had given him up for dead. Assigned to care for him for the night, Fierro becomes angry when she finds that no one had bothered to bathe the old man or even to change his soiled bedding.
She tackles her“death watch” assignment with zeal and indignation that her patient and his family have accepted the doctor’s verdict She sets about to clean him up, all the while chattering, urging him to live. From time to time she lapses into Spanish as she cajoles, teases and pleads with her patient. She prays to the Virgin Mary, to Jesus, to the saints and angels on behalf of the “doomed man.”
PATIENT VERY MUCH ALIVE
In the morning, the old man’s doctor comes in to check for vital signs. He is amazed that the patient is very much alive.
The unique program is a joint venture of the AFL-CIO’s Labor Institute of Public Affairs, which wants to get its message across that service workers typically earn $ 100 a week less than manufacturing workers, and the Mark Taper Forum.
What fate awaits Barajas and Fierro and the rest of the troupe of workers-turned-actors after their night under the stage lights of the famous Forum?
For the immediate future, they will be back doing what they are trained and paid to do - serving the people who need them.
(Alicia Sandoval, a popular Los Angeles news personality for years, now serves as director of communications, AFL-CIO, Los Angeles County Federation of Labor.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Dec.
Sin pelos en la lengua
FOOLS’ RULES: Why do some Latinos keep insisting that there’s a double standard at work in their communities?
ASK UVALDO: San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez tabbed $607.80 worth of meals with friends to his city credit card. He got caught, was found guilty of a felony, forced to resign from office, ordered to do 400 hours of community work and to reimburse the city.
Meanwhile, San Diego Police Chief Bill Kolender was busy fixing traffic tickets, lying about it, using his staff to pick up his laundry and take his children to the dentist, accepting gifts like season ticketstoSanDiegoChargers’footballgamesand illegally helping a friend buy a gun.
A two-week investigation by City Manager John Lockwood concluded Nov. 26 that the chiefs actions were only “technical” violations of the law. He let Kolender off with a reprimand, no fine, no reimbursement, no loss of job. Lockwood brushed away the fact that the chief and his top aides dismissed parking tickets and citations for moving violations for friends, relatives and influential citizens by saying “there is historical precedence for this conduct”
ASK THE GOVERNORS: The Southern Governors Association has just formally urged that foreign language education start as early as the first grade.
Yet states like Georgia, Kentucky and Virginia point proudly to the “Official English” statutes they now have on their books.
ASK THE CONGRESS: Congress passed the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of 1972. Its liberal members continually badger private sector institutions about their hiring and promotional practices.
Yet it has carefully exempted itself from all of its own equal employment laws. The last time we conducted a tally, Iq$s than 3% of Congressional staff members were Hispanic.
ASK ALAN: The nation’s biggest, purportedly most responsible, newspapers are still telling their readers that “millions” (as many as 20 million, in one report) of undocumented workers will be eligible in May to apply for legalization. All reliable studies we have seen place the number between one and two million.
If the press were distorting the number of aliens who are maltreated by agents of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, Commissioner Alan Nelson would be the first to set the record straight.
But, with solid estimates at his disposal (he needs them to staff properly for his legalization processing responsibilities) and with frequent goads by Hispanic Link and other media, he steadfastly refuses to provide the public with an honest estimate.
It makes one wonder whether INS wants the public and the Congress to keep believing all those tales about “alien hordes.”
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
GERALD BALILES, governor of Virginia and chairman of the Southern Governors Association Advisory Council on International Education, in its November report, Cornerstone of Competition:
“America is a living paradox: a nation of nations that is afraid to learn different languages
CARL HIAASEN, Miami Herald columnist, on the Voice of America decision to transfer reporter Annette Lopez-Munoz from her White House beat for violating policy by asking questions during a televised presidential press conference:
“Lopez-Munoz said she will fight her case within Radio Marti, and I hope she prevails The alternative is to leave Uncle Sam’s airwaves to the party hacks and pretenders"
1,1986 3.


COLLECTING
ENGLISH LANGUAGE OPPORTUNITY ACT: Copies of California Senate Bill 9, introduced by Sen. Art Torres and providing for a volunteer program to expand English literacy classes for limited- and non-English-speaking adults, may be obtained by writing to: Sen. Art Torres, State Capitol, Room 2080, Sacramento, Calif. 95814 (916) 445-3456.
MEDIA CALENDAR: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists will put out its 1987 calendar around Christmas. The calendar contains 23 photographs by 12 Latino photojournalists, as well as a listing of different events sponsored by media associations throughout the country. To order, send $8 to: NAHJ, 529 14th St NW, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
NEW YORK CITY FUTURE EMPLOYMENT: The New York City Department of Employment has issued “Labor Market Outlook for Young People in New York City: Prospects to the Year 2000.” The report projects an increasing availability of jobs for Latinos and other minorities. For a free copy, write to: DOE, Office of Public Affairs, 220 Church St., Room 507, New York, N.Y. 10013.
MINORITY VENDORS: Philip Morris Companies Inc. has put together a booklet on how Hispanic and other minority entrepreneurs can sell their services and goods to the corporation. The booklet, “They Sell Jo Philip Morris, So Can You,” lists the four steps to become a su pplier and the goods and services normally purchased. Fora free copy, write to: Angela Gagliardo, Philip Morris, 120 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017.
GUM DISEASE: Three out of four people will suffer from gum disease in their lifetime. A Spanish-language pamphlet by the American Academy of Periodontology addresses the causes of the disease, its signs, and its prevention and treatment For a free copy of “ Enfermedades de la Encias: La Epidemia Invisible," send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: AAP, 211 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago. III. 60611.
LATINOS IN CALIFORNIA: “California 2000: A Business and Economic Appraisal,” a 32-page report, predicts that Hispanics and Asians will have a significant impact on business and politics in that state by the year 2000. For a copy, send $5 to: Wells Fargo Bank, #0102-102, 475 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif. 94163.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: “Mejor Sola Que Mai Acompahada,” by Myrna Zambrano, is a bilingual book approaching emotional and physical abuse from a Latina’s perspective. To obtain a copy, send $7.95 to: The Seale Press, 500 E. Pike, Seattle, Wash. 98122.
CONNECTING
(Late news on whafs occurring within the U.S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
$5,000 ‘PARTNERSHIP AWARDS OFFERED
A national competition offering a dozen awards of up to $5,000 each to groups involving Hispanic parents in creative education-related projects with schools was announced Nov. 20.
Sponsor of the program is the Reader's Digest Foundation. With a Jan. 30 deadline for brief proposals, the project will be administered bythe Hispanic Policy Development Project. Winners will be notified in March.
The program is designed to encourage greater cooperation among parents of children in grades K-9, teachers and administrators at schools with at least 25% Hispanic enrollment.
For information and entry forms, contact Carmen Lydia Ramos, project coordinator, Parent/School Partnership Campaign, Hispanic Policy Development Project, 250 Park Ave. South, Suite 5000A, New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 529-9323.
. . ENHANCING AMERICA’S FUTURE’
The Hispanic Heritage Week Coordinating Committee of the Washington, D.C., Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers already is soliciting artisfs conceptions for next September’s national poster.
Their selected theme is“Hispanics: A Proud History... Enhancing America’s Future.”
A prize of $100 and national exposure are offered to winning artists. Entry deadline is Feb. 1. For more information, contact Orlando Gutierrez, NASA Headquarters Code UI.400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20546 (202) 756-6365.
UNIVERSITY ESTABLISHES SCHOLARSHIPS
The new Xerox/Clarkson University Scholarship Program for minority high school students interested in pursuing an engineering career will help 10 students from the Rochester, Syracuse and Buffalo areas with tuition.
The program is being supported by a $250,000 grant from Xerox with an equal commitment by Clarkson from its institutional resources. The first grant will be awarded to the Potsdam, N.Y, university in July 1987.
For more information contact: Steve K. Schoenholtz(315) 268-6481.
Calendar
“ As it has in the past, Weekly Report will publish a list of major 1987 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in December. Organizations thatwish to have their event included should phone in or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St, NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
THIS WEEK
THEATER PRODUCTION Los Angeles Dec. 8
Two Latino service workers-turned-actors will star in “The Greatest Stories NeverTold- Voices from the New American Workplace,” a play sponsored by the AFL-CIO at the Mark Taper Forum.
Dennis Shanahan (213) 658-6274
ISSUES FORUM: IMMIGRATION
Kansas City, Mo. Dec. 12,13
This forum, at Penn Valley Community College, will
4
include an overview of U.S. immigration history, immigration policy and input from Kansas City Latinos. Francisco Ruiz (816) 932-7600
LEGISLATIVE PROCESS WORKSHOP Washington, D.C. Dec. 13
Congressional Hispanic Caucus Executive Director Elvira Castillo and National Education Association Media Specialist Elvira Crocker will be guest speakers at the Mexican American Women’s National Association legislative process workshop designed to help individuals work more effectively on legislative issues affecting the Hispanic community.
Avalyn Castillo (202) 223-3440
CHRISTMAS DANCE Santa Clara, Calif. Dec. 13
Chicanos In Action, a Hispanic IBM employee service organization, is sponsoring a benefit Christmas dance, including a performance by mariachis, to aid community organizations.
Eastside Youth Center (408) 258-2587
COMING SOON
CHRISTMAS BENEFIT DANCE Houston Hispanic Fire Fighters Local 341 Houston Dec. 20
Juan HernSndez (713) 223-9166
JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA
Latin American Jewish Studies Association, University
of Florida at Gainesville.
Gainesville, Fla. Feb. 13-17 Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880
ETHNIC STUDIES
National Association for Ethnic Studies San Diego Feb. 25-28 Charles Irby (714) 869-3593
SPOTLIGHT
CAREER WORKSHOP: Hispanic Business magazine will select200 Southern California Hispanic seniors and juniors majoring in finance, computer science, engineering, management and physical sciences to participate in a professional career workshop in Los Angeles. Applications are available at business/engineering student organizations for the Feb. 21 event. Application deadline is Feb. 6. For further information, contact HB at 360 S. Hope Ave., Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843.
Dec. 8, 1986
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CLINICAL COORDINATOR $29,273 - $41,021 Ann. #6656-7A-DHS Arlington County has an opening fora Coordinator in our Mental Health Services. Employee supervises emergency therapists and directs client service in emergency crisis intervention; provides direct clinical functions, including crisis intervention, precommitment screenings, emergency mental health assessments, treatment recommendations and provision of brief therapy to certain clients.
Requires Bachelor's degree in related field, plus4 years professional experience in a mental health or substance abuse services field. Preference may be given to applicants with experience beyond the minimum and/or a Master's degree in a related field
Official Arlington County application form required. To request application materials, please call (703) 558-2167 and refer to announcement #6656-7A-DHS. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than Dec. 18,1986.
Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North Arlington, Virginia 22201 Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for submission of applications foral 2-month$15,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Dec. 15.
The internship, sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by thei Gannett Foundation, is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism career.
Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
CREATIVE WRITERS CHRISTMAS ARTICLES
Hispanic Link News Service looks each year for memorable Christmas-season stories -anecdotal pieces which reflect cultural influences - for its syndicated feature service. 650-700 words. Payment on acceptance. Submissions by non-professional as well as professional writers encouraged. We work with authors.
For writer's guidelines and samples of past seasonal columns, send a stamped, self addressed envelope to: Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
DENTAL ASSISTANT
Community Healthcare Clinic is seeking bilingual Dental Assistant; 30 hours per week; previous experience preferred, but will train.
Nan Sullivan National Health Plan Inc.
3020 14th St. NW Washington, D.C. 20009 EOE
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Radio Producer/Writer University of Arizona
Individual will work in the Spanish-language programming service of KUAT radio and will be responsible for producing news, public affairs and occasional documentaries.
Bachelor's degree in communications, radiotv or related field plus two years news and public affairs experience with proven work in radio. Additional experience may be considered in lieu of a degree. The individual must be equally capable in the writing, reading and delivery of English and Spanish, and be able to relate to and work with Hispanic communities.
Salary range is $18,836 - $20,720. Usual University benefit package. Please submit resume and letter of interest to: Employment Office, University of Arizona, 1717 E. Speedway, Tucson, Ariz. 85721.
Recruitment/Placement Director
Non-profit, California-based corporation specializing in journalism-training programs for minorities seeks an aggressive individual with at least five years’ experience as a newspaper reporter and/or a recruiter for a daily newspaper or journalism organization.
Successful applicant must be willing to relocate, travel extensively throughoutthe United States recruiting applicants for our programs and meeting with editors. This job is demanding and requires that the person whofills it maintain a professional attitude at all times and be able to communicate well verbally.
We are looking for a self-starter who can initiate projects, work independently and produce results. Relocation expenses will be paid. We offer a complete benefits package. Salary range: $29,000 to $35,000. Send resumes by Jan. 9 to: Vice President/Administration, The Institute for Journalism Education, B28 North Gate Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Calif. 94720.
DIRECTOR OF THE BECHTEL INTERNATIONAL CENTER at Stanford University sought Salary range is $50-55,000 per year (depending on qualifications and experience). Applications must be postmarked by Feb. 10, 1987. For further information contact
Kathy DeMoulin Stanford University Personnel Department Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-0918
Equal Opportunity Employer through Affirmative Action.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR - for KUNM, Albuquerque, New Mexico Responsible for radio development activities, including the planning, implementation and maintenance of all radio fundraising efforts. Specific emphasis will be placed on on-air fundraising, program underwriting and program-guide advertising Bachelor’s degree in appropriate discipline with at least two years experience in fundraising required. Equivalent combination of education and experience will be accepted in lieu of degree on one year for one year basis. Send letter of application, resume and three references to: Personnel, University of New Mexico, 1717, Roma NE, Albuquerque, N.M. 87) 31. Mention requisition #1029A. EOE/AA.
HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES
You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholarships given annually to outstanding Hispanic1 students across the United States.
The combined federal campaign nowgives you the opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your contribution.
The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax-exempt organization. Invest in your community today and support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund.
For scholarship information: The National Scholarship Fund, P.O. Box748, San Francisco; Calif. 94101 (415) 892-9971.
The Radio Marti Program of the Voice of America has openings in Washington, D.C., fora secretary for the Personnel Office and a clerk in the Music Department. Applicants for either position need to be skilled in both English and Spanish and must be able to type. The secretary position will be filled at the GS-4 ($ 13,248), GS-5 ($14,822) orGS-6 ($16,521) based on qualifications and experience. The Music Department clerk will be hired at either the GS-4 ($13,248) or GS-5 ($14,822), also tied to the applicant's experience. U.S. citizenship is required. Questions may be directed to Ms. Crosser on (202 485-6314. Interested applicants should submit an Application for Federal Employment (Standard Form 171) to:
USINRadio Marti Program, VOA/MP Attention: Joy Crosser 400 Sixth Street SW Washington, D.C. 20547 The Radio Marti program of the Voice of America is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Ordered by__________
Title_______________
Area Code & Phone, Advertiser Name_____
Bill To_____________
Address_____________
City, State & Zip___
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a: national pool of Latino executives arid professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to; Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.


Arts & Entertainment
A RECORDED COLLECTION OF SAMPLES of American English dialects recently installed at the Library of Congress includes the speech styles of three U.S. Hispanic groups.
The 118 hours of spoken word material, drawn from the archives of 50 linguists, dialectologists, folklorists and other speech collectors, was compiled by the non-profit Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C. In 1983 the Center launched its Survey and Collection of American English Dialect Recordings, and its completion was marked with a ceremony at the Library of Congress last month.
Among the many ethnic dialects included in the collection, there are recordings of speech samples by Puerto Rican teenagers in New York City, Puerto Rican English speakers in the island-commonwealth, and Mexican American senior citizens from Ysleta, Texas.
The samples are expected to be of use to linguists, folklorists and theatrical performers, and many of them include verbatim transcripts. The CAL project was funded in part by the Division of Research Programs of the National Endowment for the Humanities.
WRITERS FROM THROUGHOUT THE SPANISH-speaking world
are up for various national awards to be announced in Spain beginning this week.
The first of the awards, in literature, will be announced Dec. 11. A $17,000 grant goes to the author of a book published during the previous years in any of the Spanish tongues (Castilian, Catalan, Galician or Basque). Other national awards given this month will be for history (announced Dec. 15) and for translation of foreign works into Spanish tongues (Dec. 17).
On Dec. 18, the country’s Real Academia de la Lengua Espahola will announce the winner of the Cervantes Award - Spain’s counterpart to the Nobel in literature. High among the list of possible winners are Paraguay’s Augusto Roa Bastos and Peru’s Mario Vargas Llosa.
ONE LINERS: The National Endowment for the Arts has awarded the Museo de Arte de Ponce, in Puerto Rico, $75,000 in matching funds to stimulate the institution’s financial and administrative development. . .Unpublished manuscripts in Spanish, English or a combination of both will be accepted through Feb. 23 for the 13th Chicano Literary Contest at the University of California at Irvine; nine cash prizes total $1,800.. .Actor Richard Yniguez has been cast in a starring role in Ohara, Warner Bros. Television’s new hour-long series for mid-season debut on ABC... - Antonio Mejlas-Rentas
Media Report
‘CROSSROADS’ COMING: Elizabeth Perez Luna’s non-profit Earmark Inc. will receive a $300,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to fully fund a half-hour weekly news and feature radio program next year.
The award to the Philadelphia-based nonprofit production company marks the first time such support has been given to an independent producer. Perez Luna will produce 52 editions of “Crossroads,” a multicultural “magazine” that will look at minority culture and mainstream issues from a Third World perspective. It will include news, analysis, commentaries and features.
The program will begin production early next year. It will be distributed by National Public Radio satellite for use starting next summer.
The award was one of 11 made by CPB to fund “new, innovative programs to advance the art of radio and expand the public radio audience.” More than 170 applicants com-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 percolumninch. Adsplacedby Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
peted for a $3.2 million pot.
HALLMARK SUPPORT: With the Federal Communications Commission expected to take final action soon on the $301.5 million bid by Hallmark Cards Inc. for 10 Spanish International Communications Corporation television stations, Hallmark has picked up some impressive Hispanic organizational support to counter petitions by unsuccessful Hispanic bidders.
Among those submitting letters of support to the FCC in recent weeks were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund(MALDEF), based in San Francisco, and the Camara de Comercio Latino de Los Estados Unidos (CAMACOL) in Miami. Also adding his voice was the Most Reverend Patricio Flores, Archbishop of San Antonio.
Following introduction last summer by U.S. Rep. Matthew Martinez(D-Calif.) of HR 5253, a bill which would have precluded the sale, four other Congressional Hispanic Caucus members - Henry B. Gonzalez, Albert Bustamante and E. (Kika) de la Garza of Texas and Bill Richardson of New Mexico - sent out a
“DearColleague” lettercalling Martinez’s biIi inappropriate and counterproductive.
Gonzalez also sent a letter to Timothy Wirth (D-Colo.), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Consumer Protection and Finance, to let him know the bill didn’t have caucus support.
The bill died.
Major stations involved in the sale include Los Angeles’ KM EX-TV, San Antonio’s KWEX-TV, Miami’s WLTV, WXTV in Paterson, N.J., and KFTV in Fresno, Calif.
MACHADO CHOSEN: Melinda Machado, a University of Texas journalism graduate who has worked in Texas with the Kerrville Daily Times, state Rep. Irma Rangel and the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, joined Hispanic Link News Service as a reporter this week.
Machado was selected over more than 20 competitors for the first National Association of Hispanic Journalists/Adolph Coors Company journalism internship award. She will report for Hispanic Link in Washington, D.C., for 12 months. - Charlie Ericksen
rfjhai Rock group l are Yoa kith ?

6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week Moses Anguiano, also known as Baby Moses, celebrates his first anniversary as the youngest heart transplant recipient ever. Moses was less than a year old at the time of the operation .. . Jose Canseco, an outfielder for professional basebalrs Oakland Ns, wins the American League Rookie of the Year Award . Canseco, 22, is Cuban ... Barbaro Garbey, the first Mariel refugee to play professional is arrested in Miami for cocaine possession . . . Marsha Padilla and Allen Pilgeram become the firstlcouple t0'get married aboard the Mayflower II, a of the to Plymouth Rock in 1620t wa_ ThanksgiVIng Day . .. U.S. Representati r e de Ia Garza purchases what he calls one of the finest abstract paintings he has ever seen. Causing a spate of inquiries on Capitol Hill, the painting was created by a 5 In his first public speech since being voted out of office, California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso says, " Judges, consciously or subconsciously, will have to worry about whether their opinions are making powerful political or economic interests in this state happy or unhappy." ... Republicans approach Chicago Board of Edu<.ation President George Munoz, 35, to switch parties and run for mayor against Harold Washington ... Phil Saenz, director of California Gov . George Deukmejian' s Office of California-Mexico Affairs, resigns. He will return to private law practice ... The Federal Bar Council awards a Certificate of Distinguished Judicial Service to Judge Harold Medina of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York .. yearold named Guero •.. Vol. 4 No. 49 HISPANIC LINK WE Dec. 8, 1986 N.Y. Job Growth Helps Latinos Anaya NewYorkCitywillexperienceanetincrease, 1970 and 1990, will create a "window of PraiSe, of 231 ,000 new jobs between 1984 and opportunity' ' for Latinos and blacks . The five New MexiCO death row mmates ' 1995, and Latinos and blacks aged 16 to 24 As a percentage of that overall age bracket, who had their death sentences commuted by , will land a disproportionate share , according Hispanics will grow from 17o/o in 1970 to 28o/o Gov . Toney Anaya Nov . 26 praised the governor to a study released Nov . 24. in 1990; blacks will increase from 20o/o to for his courage and conviction , but th e victims' Prompted by the 31 o/o; and white non Hispanics will shrink families assailed Anaya ' s decision. decreasing number of from 60o/o to 33o/o, showed the report . The commutations, said Anaya , were based youngsters applying In 1970 there were 194,000 16to24year on his belief that death sentences are "in to the city's Depart old Latinos; by 1990 the report estimated humane, immoral, anti God and incompatible ment of Employment there will be 243,000. to an enlightened society." Barred by law Summer Youth Em The industries that will decrease and increase from seeking a second consecutive four-year ployment Program , their jobs from 1984 to 1995 are: term, Anaya had twice commuted the sentences " Labor Market Outlook Industry Net Change of inmates sentenced to die . He has roughly for Young People in Service 228,000 three weeks left in his term . New York City: Pros Finance , Real Estate , I 57,000 Michael Guzman, 23 and the youngest of pectstothe Year2000 " Government ns 24•000 the five who had their sentences commuted, charted the city's Construction 23,000 thanked Anaya for his " compassion and under BUSTELO changing demogra Trade 11 ,OOO standing." The other four inmates were Richard phics and its implications for young job seekers Transportation , Public Utilities, Garcia, 31, Edward Lee Adams, 24, Joel Lee and employers. C 0 Compton, 33, and William Wayne Gilbert, 37. ommunication 4 ,0 Garrey Carruthers, Anaya's Republican Manuel Bustelo, commissioner of the city's Department of Employment, said the report shows Hispanics and blacks " will constitute an ever increasing portion of the population and so will be in the best position to benefit from the healthy economy." Adding on the number of vacancies expected because of attrition, the report concluded that there will be a minimum of 1.4 million job openings between 1984 and 1995. This, plus an expected 59% decrease in the number of 16 to 24-yearold white nonHispanics between Manufacturing 88•000 successor, said one of the first official acts he Total 231,000 will perform when he takes office will be to try The New York City job market is the country's to reimpose the penalties. "We should, and 1 largest , employing more than 3 . 5 million will, uphold New Mexico's capital punishment people. law." Bustelo , a former director of the National Carruthers said he may take legal action to Puerto Rican Forum, a fob-training and overturn Anaya's reprieves, but according to ing center, said, "It is in the interest of govern lawyers familiar with the facts, the chances men! .. nd of all employers in the city to for that are siim. ensure that every segment of the population has the skills and work habits the job market will require . " Eviction Hearings Planned TV Pioneer Desi Arnaz Dead at 69 A spokesman for the U.S . Department of Housing and Urban Development told Weekly Report Dec. 1 that the agency will take public comment this fiscal year on proposed regulations which would evict undocumented aliens from public housing. Desi Arnaz, the Cubaborn entertainer who teamed with wife Lucille Ball to star in and produce one of television's most en during situation comedies, died Dec. 2 of lung cancer. He was 69. The "I Love Lucy'' show cast Arnaz as Ricky Ricardo , the rumba bandleader, who coped with the antics of his redheaded wife . Arnaz helped pioneer the three-camera technique of shooting situation comedies before a live audience, a method still used today. The show premiered in 1951 and ran for a decade. Its 1952 season averaged a 67. 3 Nielsen r ating, the highest ever . His studio, Desilu , created at least 19 series, including "Make Room for Daddy'' and "The Untouchables. " In 1963, he sold his studio interest to Ball , three years after their 20-year marriage ended in divorce. Born Desiderio Alberto Arnaz y de Acha Ill in Santiago, C •Jba, on March 2, 1917, Arnaz emigrated to the U nitP.d States following the 1933 Cuban Revolution . "He died of lung cancer. It was from smoki ng those Cuban cigars, thafs the truth," said Arnais doctor, Charles Campbell. Arnaz passed at his Del Mar, Calif., home in San Diego ourity with his daughter , Lucie Arnaz Luckin ill, at his side . He is also survived by his son, Desi Jr. On Nov . 14 a U.S. District Court issued a nationwide injunction that barred HUD from evicting such tenants. When Congress passed its omnibus spending bill in October, it stipulated that HUD could not use any of its funds to enforce an eviction policy. HUD announced its eviction policy concerning undocumenteds April 1 . The policy was to have taken effect at the end of this month. The Immigrati on Reform and Control Act, signed into law last month, contains a provision which allows HUD to use its records to verify the residency status of public housing tenants.

PAGE 2

Calif. Literacy Bill Introduced A bill expanding English literacy classes in Community-based organizations could apply California was introduced Dec. 1 in the State for grants to the Department of Education, LegislaturebySen.ArtTorres. The English Lanwhich would administer the program. guage Opportunity Act, or Senate Bill9, would Adult educators would recruit, train, place allocate $5. 5 million annually for volunteers and supervise volunteers to teach non-and to teach the state's estimated 4 million illiterate limitedEnglish-speaking adults, according to adults. the proposed legislation. An estimated2 million "We are hopeful that proficiency in English of California's illiterate adults are either limited will transcend into economic well-being for ornon-English-speaking. Withmorethan40,000 Hispanics and other minorities," Sen. Torres Los Angeles residents alone waiting to get said, adding, "Once they know the language into English classes, Torres expects his bill to of then they will be able to compete alleviate the long waiting lists and eventually in the marketplace." help these adults become economically "This is not a response to Proposition 63," competitive. said Beth Bonbright, aide to Sen. Torres, "Wehavetogetpeopleonthetrackbecause referring to the English Only initiative which they're going to have to learn how to speak passed with 73% of the vote this November. English in many areas , " Torres said. Under the bill , school districts with high No action is expected on the bill until concentrations of illiterate adults would receive January when the California Legislature re grants to expand or establish English as a convenes. Torres introduced his bill during Second Language and basic literacy classes. an introductory two-day session of the legislature. Cisn!!ros Impresses at Cities Parley The strained re lationship between local and federal government was underscored when San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, the outgoing president of the National League of Cities, criticized his federal colleagues at the league's national meeting Nov. 29-Dec. 3 for enacting laws that increase costs to city governments while reducing federal aid Cisneros, completing his one-year term as NLC's chief, also assailed a recent welfare reform plan drawn up by a private commission that he charged would end the relationship between "the federal government and city problems" and "put cities at the mercy of states." Under the plan , the federal government would be charged with 90% of the costs for Medicaid and Aid to Families With Dependent Children, a n expense up to now shared by states and the federal government. The states would th en be responsible for financing hereto2 $6 M i llion Verdict Pared A U.S . Court of Appeals Nov. 28 halved a $6. 3 million settlement against the federal governm e nt in a malpractice lawsuit involving the birth of a disabled Latina at an army hospital. T he 9th U.S . Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisc o held that a lower court placed too high a value on the emotional losses suffered by Sophia Trevino and her parents, Rachel and Ruben. The court also ruled tha t the $1.7 million for lifelong care was improperly awarded. The hospital was held liable for damages because it failed to take into account problems that arose from the detachment of the placenta from the mother's uterine wall during labor. Sophia now has permanent brain damage , cerebral palsy and suffers periodic seizures . The appeals court ordered the case re manded to another federal court in Tacoma, Wash . , for possible further reductions. fore federally funded programs . Cisneros commanded center stage at the meeting and established his viability as vice presidential timber for 1988. Terry Michaels, a spokesman for the De mocratic National Committee, said Cisneros would have to be " on anybody's list of potential Democratic candidates." Cisneros, according to political strategists, possesses management skills and attributes that make him stand out he is young (39) , highly educated (a master's degree from Harvard, a doctorate from George Washington University) , a Hispanic and has brought San Antonio fiscal stability in a state which is suffering from a drop in oil prices . There were 6,600 mayors and other city officials present at the meeting in San Antonio . 'International Illiteracy' Hit Foreign language education should start as early as the first grade and foreign language requirements should be reinstated as college admission standards, the Southern Governors Association urged in a report issued in Atlanta Nov. 21. It charged the nation ' s schools with producing students who can ' t compete in a world environ ment and are victims of " international illiteracy . " In 1984, the South exported $53 billion in manufactured products, approximately 30% of this country's manufacturing exports. NCTE Raps English-Only The National Council of Teachers of English has adopted a resolution that opposes making English the nation's official language , saying such a law could lead to discrimination against limited and. non-English speakers. The resolution, adopted at NCTE ' s annual meeting in San Antonio Nov. 21, said that the English language was capable of acco"m modating many languages. Any attempt to preserve it would stagnate its evolution, the resolution held . Hispanics, who now make up 17% of Cali fornia ' s adults, were only 7 % of its voters Nov. 4, a recent Mervin Field Poll found. Lack of citizenship, youth, economic status and " disengagement from the political process" were some reasons cited by Field for Hispanics being part of a growing non-white "political underclass" in the state. The poll revealed : %of Calif. Group White Hispanic Black Asian All voters 18-39 All voters 50-over Adults 69% 17 7 5 52% 33 %of Nov. Voters 85% 7 4 2 31% 51 Earn under$20,000 30% 22% Earn over $50,000 20 28 Candidates supported by whites prevailed in all statewide races except the one between incumbent U . S . Sen . Alan Cranston arid Ed Zschau . White support for Zschau was over come by overwhelming Hispanic and black support for Cranston . Ad Expenditures Up 19/o Advertisers are spending $398 million this year to reach the 16. 9 million mainland U . S . Hispanics, a 19% increase over the $335 million spent in 1985, projects Hispanic Business magazine in its December issue. This represents only 0 . 5 % of the total adver tising market, it says . Spanish-language television received the largest share of advertising dollars, with $184. 3 million in sales. Independent television stations (those not affiliated with Spanish International Network) expanded their share of the market from 6 . 1 % in 1985 to 1 0 . 6%, or $42.3 million , in 1986. Procter & Gamble passed Philip Morris as the biggest spender in the Hispanic market with outlays of $8 million . Philip Morris dropped into second place with $7.5 million . Anheuser Busch was third with $6. 5 million in advertising, and McDonald's, with $6.3 million in expendi tures, fourth . Los Angeles , Miami and New York remained the top three Hispanic advertising markets, with Chicago surpassing San Antonio for the number four slot. Murder Confession Nixed Police officials in Fontana, Calif., said Nov. 20 that a Latino suffered needlessly for 26 years after he confessed recently to fatally shooting a gang member in a shootout Albert Hernandez, 44, said he gunned down the gang member in a 1960 melee in Los Angeles. Officials retrieved the records and found that another man had confessed to the shooting and was convicted of man slaughter. The police added that even if Hernandez had shot someone, the statute of limitations since expired. Hernandez was freed. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Alicia Sandoval, guest columnist The New Workplace A quarter of a century ago, the path leading most Latino immigrants to the promise of prosperity in this nation wound first through its tomato fields, orchards and vineyards . In the micl-'60s, playwright Luis Valdez helped bring those newcomers and their struggles to the attention of the nation when he launched his United Farm Workers Union theater, El Teatro Campesino. Today, the path guiding a new generation of Latino immigrants more often than not bypasses the increasingly mechanized agribus iness fields. Instead, it leads to our cities and their service fields. As the United States shifts from a post-industrial age to an infor mation society, nine out of 10 new jobs will be generated by the service economy. The story of the new arrivals was dramatized by the UFWs parent union, the AFLCIO, at Los Angeles' prestigious Mark Taper Forum on Dec. 8 in "The Greatest Stories Never Told: Voices from the "New American Workplace." The90minute presentation involved 13 union members, including Jess Barajas , a Los Angeles County social worker, and Hope Fierro, a registered nurse and former organizer for Cesar Chavez. Both are members of the Service Employees International Union and portray themselves in the unique theater project. SUICIDE TESTS BARAJAS Sin pe/os en Ia lengua FOOLS' RULES: Why do some Latinos keep insisting that there's a double standard at work in their communities? ASK UVALDO: San Diego City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez tabbed $607.80 worth of meals with friends to his city credit card. He got caught, was found guilty of a felony, forced to resign from office, ordered to do 400 hours of community work and to reimburse the city. Meanwhile, San Diego Police Chief Bill Kolender was busy fixing traffic tickets, lying about it, using his staff to pick up his laundry and take his children to the dentist, accepting gifts like season tickets to San Diego Chargers' football games and illegally helping a friend buy a gun. A two-week investigation by City Manager John Lockwood concluded Nov . 26 that the chiefs actions were only "technical" violations of the law . He let Kolender off with a reprimand, no fine, no reimbursement, no loss of job. Lockwood brushed away the fact that the chief and his top aides dismissed parking tickets and citations for moving violations for friends, relatives and influential citizens by saying "there is historical precedence for this conduct." ASK THE GOVERNORS: The Southern Governors Association has just formally urged that foreign language education start as early as the first grade. Yet states like Georgia , Kentucky and Virginia point proudly to the " Official English" statutes they now have on their books. ASK THE CONGRESS: Congress passed the landmark Civil To prepare for their roles, they, along with 11 other workers Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Act of turned-actors, studied in a 1 Oweek workshop under acclaimed . 1972. Its liberal members continually badger private sector instidirector Victoria Ann Lewis. tutions about their hiring and promotional practices. In his engaging Forum monologue, Barajas relates the day-to-day Yet it has carefully exempted itself from all of its own equal frustrations he faces as he tries to serve a client list of deprived barrio employment laws. The last time we conducted a tally, le,ss than kids from troubled homes. The young social worker complains of 3% of Congressional staff members were Hispanic. case overloads, government red tape and constant crises. He struggles to remain caring, hoping not to end up a cynic. When one of his wards ASK ALAN: The nation's biggest, purportedly most responsible, commits suicide, he is tested. newspapers are still telling their readers that "millions" (as many A modern" Man of La Mancha," he fights the crowded Los Angeles as 20 million, in one report) of undocumented workers will be freeways on his field calls, jousts with a faceless " system" and shows eligible in May to apply for legalization. All reliable studies we the audience that he is commited to right the wrongs he finds. have seen place the number between one and two million. Hope Fierro, the registered nurse with salt-and-pepper hair, a If the press were distorting the number of aliens who are merry laugh and a sweet face, takes what could have been a tragedy maltreated by agents of the U .S. Immigration and Naturalization and turns it into light comedy. Service, Commissioner Alan Nelson would be the first to set the In her monologue, she tells us about an old man whose doctor had record straight. given him u;:J for dead. Assigned to care for him for the night, Fierro But, with solid estimates at his disposal (he needs them to staff becomes angry when she finds that no one had bothered to bathe the properly for his legalization processing responsibilities) and with old man or even to change his soiled bedding. frequent goads by Hispanic Link and other media, he steadfastly She tackles her"death watch" assignment with zeal and indignation refuses to provide the public with an honest estimate. . that her patient and his family have accepted the doctor's verdict She It makes one wonder whether INS wants the public and the sets about to clean him up, all the while chattering, urging him to Congress to keep believing all those tales about "alien hordes." live . From time to time she lapses into Spanish as she cajoles, teases "-••••••••••••••••••••-•K•a•y•B•a•rb•a•r•o..l and pleads with her patient. She prays to the Virgin Mary, to Jesus, to the saints and angels on behalf of the "doomed man . " PATIENT VERY MUCH />LIVE In the morning, the old man's doctor comes in to check for vital signs. He is amazed that the patient is very much alive . The unique program is a joint venture of the AFLCIO' s Labor Institute of Public Affairs, which wants to get its message across that service workers typically earn $1 00 a week less than manufacturing workers, and the Mark Taper Forur; •. What fate awaits Barajas and Fierro and the rest of the troupe of workers-turned-actors after their night under the stage lights of the famous Forum? For the immediate future, they will be back doing what they are trained and paid to do-serving the people who need them. (Alicia Sandoval, a popular Los Angeles news personality for years, now serves as director of communications, AFLCIO, Los Angeles County Federation of Labor.) Quoting. • • GERALD BALILES, governor of Virginia and chairman of the Southern Governors Association Advisory Council on International Education, in its November report, Cornerstone of Competition: "America is a living paradox: a nation of nations that is afraid to learn different languages." CARL HIAASEN, Miami Herald columnist, on the Voice of America decision to transfer reporter Annette L6pezMuiioz from her White House beat for violating policy by asking questions during a televised presidential press conference: "L6pezMunoz said she will fight her case within Radio Marti, and I hope she prevails. The alternative is to leave Uncle Sam's airwaves to the party hacks and pretenders." Hispanic Link Weekly Report Dec. 8,1986 3 ,

PAGE 4

COLLECTING ENGLISH LANGUAGE OPPORTUNITY ACT: Copies of California Senate Bill 9, introduced by Sen. Art Torres and providing for a volunteer program to expand English literacy classes for limited-and non-English-speaking adults, may be obtained by writing to: Sen. Art Torres, State Capitol, Room 2080, Sacramento, Calif. 95814 (916) 445-3456. MEDIA CALENDAR: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists will put out its 1987 calendar around Christmas. The calendar contains 23 photographs by 1 2 Latino photojournalists, as well as a listing of different events sponsored by media associations throughout the country. To order, send $8 to: NAHJ, 529 14th St NW, Washington, D .C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. NEW YORK CITY FUTURE EMPLOYMENT: The New York City Department of Employment has issued "Labor Market Outlook for Young People in New York City: Prospects to the Year 2000." The report projects an increasing availability of jobs for Latinos and other minorities. For a free copy, write to: DOE, Office of Public Affairs, 220 Church St., Room507, New York, N . Y . 1 001 3 . MINORITY VENDORS: Philip Morris Companies Inc. has put together a booklet on how Hispanic and other minority entrepreneurs can sell their services and goods to the corporation. The booklet, "They Sell to Philip Morris, So Can You , " lists the four steps to become a supplier and the goods and services normally purchased. For a free copy, write to: Angela Gagliardo, Philip Morris, 120 Park Ave., New York, N.Y. 10017. GUM DISEASE: Three out of four people will suffer from gum disease in their lifetime . A Spanish-language pamphlet by the American Academy of Periodontology addresses the causes of the disease, its signs, and its prevention and treatment. For a free copy of" Enfermedades de Ia Encias : La Epidemia Invisible, " send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: AAP , 211 E. Chicago Ave., Chicago. Ill. 60611. IN CALIFORNIA: "California 2000: A Business and Economic Appraisal," a 32-page report, predicts that Hispanics and Asians will have a significant impact on business and politics in that state by the year 2000. For a copy, send $5 to: Wells Fargo Bank, #01 02,475 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif. 94163. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE: "Mejor Sola Que Mal Acompanada," by Myrna Zambrano, is a bilingual book approaching emotional and physical abuse from a Latina' s perspective. To obtain a copy, send $7,95 to: The Seale Press, 500 E. Pike , Seattle, Wash. 98122. CONNECTING (Late news on what's occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) $5,000 'PARTNERSHIP' AWARDS OFFERED A national competition offering a dozen awards of up to $5,000 each to groups involving Hispanic parents in creative education related projects with schools was announced Nov. 20. Sponsor of the program is the Reader's Digest Foundation. With a Jan. 30 deadline for brief proposals, the project will be administered by the Hispanic Policy Development Project. Winners will be notified in March. The program is designed to encourage greater cooperation among parents of children in grades K-9, teachers and administrators at schools with at least 25% Hispanic enrollment. For information and entry forms, contact Carmen Lydia Ramos, project coordinator, Parent/School Partnership Campaign, Hispanic Policy Development Project, 250 Park Ave . South, Suite 5000A, New York, N.Y . 10003 (212) 529-9323. ' ... ENHANCING AMERICA'S FUTURE' The Hispanic Heritage Week Coordinating Committee of the Washington , D . C., Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers already is soliciting artisfs conceptions for next September's national poster. Their selected theme is"Hispanics: A Proud History . .. Enhancing America ' s Future." A prize of $100 and national exposure are offered to winning artists. Entry deadline is Feb. 1 . For more information, contact Orlando Gutierrez, NASA Headquarters, Code Ul, 400 Maryland Ave. SW , Washington, D . C . 20546 (202) 756-6365. UNIVERSITY ESTABLISHES SCHOLARSHIPS The new XeroX/Clarkson University Scholarship Program for minority high school students interested in pursuing an engineering career will help 10 students from the Rochester, Syracuse and Buffalo areas with tuition. The program is being supported by a $250,000 grant from Xerox with an equal commitment by Clarkson from its institutional resources . The first grant will be awarded to the Potsdam, N.Y., university in July 1987. For more information contact: Steve K Schoenholtz (315) 268-6481 . Calendar include an overview of U.S. immigration hi::;,ory , immigration policy and input from Kansas City Latinos. Francisco Ruiz (816) 932-7600 Juan Hernandez (713) 223-9166 JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA .• :.As It has in the past, Weekly Report will publish a list of major 1987 conferences, seminars and banquets stheduled by Hi s panic organizations. The list wil l be published in December. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone in or send the following information: date, place, brief descrip tion of event a nd name and telephone number of contact person . Address all correspondence to Cale-ndar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. . NW , Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. THIS WEEK THEATER PRODUCTION Los Angeles Dec. 8 Two Latino service workers-turned-actors will star in "The Greatest Stories Never ToldVoices from the New American Workplace," a play sponsored by the AFL-CIO at the Mark Taper Forum. Dennis Shanahan (213) 658-6274 ISSUES FORUM: IMMIGRATION Kansas City, Mo. Dec . 12, 1 3 This forum, at Penn Valley Community College, will 4 LEGISLATIVE PROCESS WORKSHOP Washington, D.C. Dec. 13 Congressional Hispanic Caucus E xec utive Director Elvira Castillo and National Education Association Media Specialist Elvira Crocker will be guest speakers at the Mexican American Women's National As sociation legislative process workshop designed to help individuals work more effectively on legislative issues affecting the Hispanic community. Avalyn castillo (202) 223-3440 CHRISTMAS DANCE Santa Clara, Ca.lif. Dec. 13 Chicanos In Action , a Hispanic IBM employee service organization, is sponsoring a benefit Christmas dance, including a performance by mariachis, to aid community organizations. Eastside Youth Center (408) 258-2587 COMING SOON CHRISTMAS BENEFIT DANCE Houston Hispanic Fire Fighters Local 341 Houston Dec . 20 Dec. 8 , 1986 Latin American Jewish Studies Association, University of Florida at Gainesville . Gainesville , Fla . Feb . 13-17 Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880 ETHNIC STUDIES National Association for Ethnic Studies San Diego Feb . 25-28 Charles I rby (714) 869-3593 SPOTLIGHT CAREER WORKSHOP: Hispanic Business magazine will select 200 Southern California Hispanic seniors and juniors majoring in finance, computer science, engineering, management and physical sciences to participate in a professional career workshop in Los Angeles . Applications are available at business/engineering student organizations for the Feb . 21 event. Application deadline is Feb. 6. For further information, contact HB at 360 S . Hope Ave., Santa Barbara, Calif. 931 05 (805) 682-5843. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS CLINICAL COORDINATOR $29,273-$41 , 021 Ann. #6656-7 A-DHS Arlington County has an opening for a nator in our Mental Health Services. Employee supervises emergency therapists and directs client service in emergency crisis intervention; provides direct clinical functions, including crisis intervention, precommitment screenings, emer gency mental health assessments, treatment recommendations and provision of brief therapy to certain clients. Requires Bachelo(s degree in related field, plus 4 years professional experience in a mental health or substance abuse services field. Pre ference may be given to applicants with experience beyond the minimum and/or a Maste(s degree in a related field. Official Arlington County application form re quired. To request application materials, please call (703) 558-2167 and refer to announcement #6656-7 A-DHS. Applications must be received in the Personnel Department no later than Dec. 18,1986. Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North Arlington, Virg i nia 22201 Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer . REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED The deadline for submission of applications fora 12-month$15,000 internshiptoworkas a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D . C., has been extended to Dec. 15. The inte rnship, sponsored by the Nationa l Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by thel Gannett Foundation, is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism career. Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737. CREATIVE WRITERS CHRISTMAS ARTICLES Hi s pani c Link News Service looks each year for memorable Christmas-season stories anecdotal pieces which reflect cultural influences fo r its syndicated feature service. 650-700 words. Payment on acceptance. Submissions by non-professional as well as professional writers encouraged. We work with authors. For write(s guidelines and samples of past seasonal columns, send a stamped, self-addressed envelope to: Charlie Ericksen, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. DENTAL ASSISTANT Community Healthcare Clinic is seeking bilingual Dental Assistant; 30 hours per week; previous experience preferred, but will train. Nan Sullivan National Health Plan Inc. 3020 14th St. NW Washington, D . C . 20009 EOE Hispanic Link Weekly Report Radio Producer/Writer University of Arizona Individual will work in the Spanish-language programming service of KUAT radio and will be responsible for producinq news, public affairs and occasional documentaries. Bachelo(s degree in communications, radio tv or related field plus two years n e ws and public affairs experience with proven work in radio. Additional experience may be considered in lieu of a degree. The individual must be equally capable in the writing, reading a nd delivery of English and Spanish, and be able to relatetoandworkwith Hispanic communities. Salary range is $18,836 $20,720. U sual Univers i ty benefit package. Please submit re sume and letter of interest to: Employment Office , University of Arizona, 1717 E. Speedway , Tucson, Ariz. 85721. Recruitment/Placement Director Non-profit, California-based corporation specializing in journalism-training programs for minorities seeks an aggressive individual with at least five years' experience as a newspaper reporter and/or a recruiter for a daily n ewspape r or journalism organization. Successful applicant must be wi llin g to r elocate , tr avel extensively throughout the United S t a te s recruiting applicants for ou r programs and meeting with editors. This j ob is demanding and requires thatthe person who fills it maintain a professional attitude at all times and be able to communicate well verbally . We are looking for a self s t arte r who can initiate proje c ts , work independently and produce results. Relocation expenses w ill be p a id . We offer a complete benefits package. Salary r ange: $29,000 to $35,000. Se nd resumes by Jan. 9 to: Vic e President/A dm inistration , The Ins titut e for Journa lism Education , 828 North Gate H all, University of California, B erkeley, Calif . 94720. DIRECTOR OF THE BECHTEL INTERNATIONAL CENTER at Stanford Univer s it y sought Salary range is $50-55,000 per year (depending on qualifications and experience). Applications must be postmarked by Feb . 10, 1987. For further information contact Kathy DeMoulin Stanford University Personnel Department Stanford , Calif . 94305 (415) 723-0918 Equal Opportunity Employer through Affirmativ e Action. DEVELOPMENT DIRECTORfor KUNM, Albuquerque, New Mexico . Responsible for radio development activities, including the planning, implementation and maintenance of all radio fundraising efforts. Specific emphasis will be placed on on-air fundraising, program under writing and program-guide advertising. Bachelo(s degree in appropriate discipline with at least two years experience in fundraising required. Equivalent combination of education and ex perience will be accepted in lieu of degree on one year for one year basis. Send letter of application, resume and three references to: Personnel , University of New Mexico, 1717. Roma NE , Albuquerque, N .M. 87' 131. Mention requisition #1029A EOE/AA HISPANIC FEDERAL EMPLOYEES You can now support the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund that awards college scholar ships given annually to outstanding Hispanic' students across the United States. The combined federal campaign now gives yo u the opportunity to write in your choice of organizations you want to receive your con tribution. The scholarship fund is a 501-C-3 tax exempt organization. Invest in your com munity today a nd support th e National His. panic Scholarship Fund. F o r scholarship info rmation: The National Scholarship Fund , P .O. Bo x 7 48, San Francisco; Calif. 941 01 (4 1 _ The Radio Marti Program of the Voice of America has openings in Washington, D.C., for a secretary for the Personnel Office and a clerk in the Music Department. Applicants for either position need to be skilled in both English and Spanish and must be able to type. The secretary position will be filled at the G&4 ($13,248), G& 5 ($14 , 822) or GS-6 ($16,521) based on qualifi ca tions and experience. The Music Department clerk will be hired at either the G&4 ($13, 248) or G&5 ($14,82
PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment are up for various national awards to be announced in Spain beginning this week. A RECORDED COLLECTION OF SAMPLES of American Engli sh dialects recently installed at the Library of Congress in cludes the speech styles of three U .S . Hispanic groups. The first of the awards, in literature, will be announced Dec . 11. A $17,000 grant goes to the author of a book published during the previous years in any of the Spanish tongues (Castilian, Catalan, Galician or Basque). Other national awards given this month will be for history (announced Dec. 15) and for translation of foreign works into Spanish tongues (Dec. 17) . The 118 hours of spoken word material, drawn from the archives of 50 linguists, dialectologists, folklorists and other speech collectors, was compiled by the non-profi t Center for Applied Linguistics in Washington, D.C . In 1983 t h e Center launched its Surve y and Collection of American English Dialect Recordings, and its completion was marked with a ceremony at the Library of Congress last month. On Dec . 18, the country's Real Academia de Ia Lengua Espanola will announce the winner of the Cervantes Award-Spain's counterpart to the Nobel in literature. High among the list of possible winners are Paraguay's Augusto Roa Bastos and Peru's Mario Vargas Llosa. Among the many ethnic dialects included in the collection, there are recordings of speech samples by Puerto Rican teenagers in New York City, Puerto Rican English speakers in the island-commonwealth , and Mexican American senior citizens from Ysleta , Texas. ONE LINERS: The National Endowmentforthe Arts has awarded . the Museo de Arte de Ponce, in Puerto Rico , $75,000 in matching funds to stimulate the institution's financial and administrative de velopment. .. Unpublished manuscripts in Spanish, English or a combination of both will be accepted through Feb . 23 for the 13th Chicano Literary Contest at the University of California at Irvine ; nine cash prizes total $1,800 ... Actor Richard Yniguez has been cast in a starring role in Ohara, Warner Bros. Television's new hour-long series for mid-season debut on ABC.. . -Antonio Meiff!sRentas The samples are expected to be of use to linguists, folklorists and theatrical performers, and many of them include verbatim transcripts. The CAL project was funded in pa r t by the Division of Research Programs of the National Endowment for the Humanities. WRITI;R THROUGHOUT THE SPANISH-speaking world Media Report 'CROSSROADS' COMING: Elizabeth Perez Luna's nor:Jprofit Earmark Inc. will receive a $300,000 grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to fully fund a half-hour weekly news and feature radio program nex t year. The award to the Philadelphia-based non profit production company marks the first time such support has been given to an independent producer. Pere z Luna will pro duce 52 editions of "Crossroads," a multicultural "magazine" that will look at minority culture and mainstream issues from a Third World perspective . It will include news, analysis, commentaries and features. The program will begin production early next year. It will be distributed by National Public Radio satellite for use starting next summer. The award was one of 11 made by CPS to fund "new, innovative programs to advance the art of radio and expand the public radio audience." More than 170 applicants com-6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher. Hector Eri c ksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix P e rez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antonio MeiiasRentas, Melinda Machado No portion of H ispanic Link Weekly Report may be rep r oduce d or broadcas t in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE C LASSIFIED: Ad rate s a re 75 cent s per word. Displayadsare$35 per column in c h . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. peted for a $3.2 million pot. HALLMARK SUPPORT: With the Federal Communications Commission expected to take final action soon on the $301.5 million bid by Hallmark Cards Inc . for 10 Spanish International Communications Corporation television stations, Hallmark has picked up some impressive Hispani c organizational support to counter petitions by un successful Hispanic bidders. Among those submitting letters of support to the FCC in recent weeks were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund(MALDEF), based in San Fran cisco, and the Camara de Comercio Latino de Los Est ados Unidos (CAMACOL) in M iami . Also adding his voice was the Most Reverend Patricio Flores , Archbishop of San Antonio. Following introduction last summer by U.S. Rep . Matthew Martinez ( D Calif.) of H R 5253, a bill which would have precluded the sale, four other Congressional Hispanic Caucus members-Henry B . Gonzalez, Albert Busta mante and E. (Kika) de Ia Garza of Texas and . Bill Richardson of New Mexico-sent out a "Dear Colleague" letter calling Martinez's bil i inappropriate and counterproductive. Gonzalez also sent a letter to Timothy Wirth (0-Colo.) , chairman of the House Sub committee on Telecommunications, Consumer Protection and Finance, to let him know the bill didn' t have caucus support. The bill died. Major stations involved in the sale include Los Angeles' KMEX-TV, San Antonio's KWEX TV, Miami's WLTV, WXTV in Paterson, N . J . , and KFTV in Fresno, Calif. MACHADO CHOSEN: Melinda Machado, a University of Texas journalism graduate who has worked in Texas with the Kerrville Daily Times, state Rep . Irma Rangel and t-he Southwest Voter Registration Education Pro ject, joined Hispanic Link News Service as a reporter this week. Machado was selected over more than 20 competitors for the first National Association of Hispanic Journalists/Adolph Coors Company journalism internship award. She will report for Hispanic Link in Washington, D . C . , for 12 months. Charlie Ericksen What Rock are 'lou. with ? Hispanic Link Weekly Report