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Hispanic link weekly report, December 15, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 15, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Florida Gov. -elect Bob Martinez says that Jeb Bush, son of Vice President George Bush and chairman of the Dade County Republican Party, is the top contender to head the state Department of Commerce... California Gov. George Deukmejian nominates Linda Escajeda of Monterey Park as a member of the Student Aid Commission. The commission administers federal scholarship grants .. New York Mayor Edward Koch names Amaiia Betanzos, chairwoman of the board of directors of the National Puerto Rican Coalition and president of the Wildcat Service Corp., and Aida Alvarez, former spokeswoman for the City Health and Hospitals Corp., as members of the city Charter Revision Commission. The 15-member commission is charged
with restructuring the voting scheme for the city's Board of Estimate, which dispenses city funds and contracts.. C6sar Ba6z Acosta and Eugenio Silva, the two men who pleaded guilty to illegally exporting ammunition in a scheme involving Nancy Reagan's maid Anita Castelo, are placed on probation after receiving two-year suspended sentences. Castelo’s charges were dropped earlier after federal authorities were convinced she did not know of the plot.. The U.S. National Guard honors Latinos Albert Baker of California, Tom Baca of Texas and Ed Silva of New Mexico as the top recruiters in their states in 1985. Also honored: Francisco Martinez of Puerto Rico. The four were presented their chief 50 Awards at a Pentagon ceremony... Sanson Candelaria, a dancer who performed with the Boston Ballet, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and Les Ballets Trock-adero de Monte Carlo, dies in New York at the age of 45 after a long illness. He was a New Mexico native...
Vo I. 4 No. 50
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
LULAC Calls Japanese Boycott
Tony Coelho Elected to No 3 Position in House
U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho, member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and outgoing chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, was elected Dec. 8 to the third most powerful position in the House of Representatives - the majority whip.
Coelho, 44 and entering his fifth term as the Democrat representative of the 15th Congressional District of California, defeated Rep. Charles Rangel(D-N.Y.), 167 to78.
For the first time, the slot was filled by an election of the House Democratic Caucus. Previously, the decision was left to the discretion of the House speaker. The caucus decided to change the selection process two sessions ago because its members felt the majority whip position was a steppingstone to the No. 1 slot in the House hierarchy, speaker of the House.
Coelho gained the respect of his colleagues with his stewardship of the DCCC. As chairman, he increased the amount of funds raised from $1.2 million in 1981 to $15 million in 1986. Along the way, he engineered the growth of its direct mail donors from 13,000 to300,000. Coelho, of Portuguese descent, joined the caucus in January 1985.
As majority whip, Coelho will keep tally of votes, make sure there are enough on crucial issues and serve as a liaison between the House leadership and its members.
Cuba Rights Group Forms
The Pro-Human Rights Committee of Cuba, the island nation’s only independent human rights group, announced Dec. 2 that it will establish its first U.S. chapter in Miami.
The committee, formed in 1976 by Ricardo Bofill, works for the civil rights and release of political prisoners in Cuba. Bofill has been in the French Embassy in Havana for the past three months seeking asylum.
Bofill's wife, Rebecca, who made the chapter announcement at a Washington, D.C., press conference, said there were about 200 committee members in Cuba. The committee will document human rights abuses and work tc end the mass arrests by Fidel Castro’s government, she said.
Indicating that negotiations with Japanese officials had reached an impasse, the League of United Latin American Citizens announced Dec. 12 that it was calling for its councils and members around the nation to boycott Japanese products.
LULAC President Oscar Mor6n made the announcement at a press conference in San Antonio.
The LULAC boycott comes three months after Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone commented at a political gathering there that the intelligence level of the United States suffers “because of its considerable number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans'! Nakasone later issued an apology and said his remarks referred to literacy and not intelligence.
The American Gl Forum declined to accept the apology and declared a national boycott in early October. The Congressional Hispanic Caucus, chaired by Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), accepted but said it would pursue establishing a trade mission with Japan.
NEGOCIATIONS DETERIORATED
On Oct. 9, Moran and two other LULAC officials met with the Japanese Ambassador to the United States, Nobuo Matsunaga, to outline proposals on improving relations with U.S. Hispanics. Included among these was that the Japanese government contribute funds to Hispanic educational institutions and organizations, award more dealerships of Japanese products to Hispanics and cultural exchanges.
Mor&n met with Japanese officials at least once more on.Oct 16. What at first seemed promising quickly deteriorated, according to various LULAC officials.
Andres Tobar, LULAC’s northeast vice president, stressed that the boycott applied to importers of Japanese products and that it should not be taken as an affront to the U.S. Japanese people or those in the island nation.
“We will continue the boycott until we see some tangible results, not just an apology,” said Tobar.
Annabelle Jaramillo, the national president of Image; an employment services organization, told Weekly Report that Image would announce
a selective boycott early this week. She said the boycott will center on a prime electronics manufacturer. She added that Image was not in favor of a general boycott because they were difficult to implement and the measurement of results was problematic
Jane Delgado, president of the National Consortium of Hispanic Organizations, said a boycott of all Japanese products was not “viable given their pervasiveness.” Delgado advised instead that Hispanic organizations attempt to nurture a more positive image of Hispanics held by Japanese. *Tm less concerned with the prime minister's statements as with the image left with the Japanese people.”
Weekly Report also learned that some" Japanese corporations, concerned about their image among U.S. Hispanic and black consumers, have hired consultants here to assist them in developing strategies to work with Hispanic and black organizations and media here.
Youth to Shoulder Elderly
Hispanic youth will shoulder a disproportionate burden in providing for the needs of the nation’s elderly as Latinos become a larger proportion of the labor force, Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Select Committee on Aging, said Dec. 10.
“If we do not provide young Hispanics with education, employment and job training, we will find ourselves with disadvantaged Hispanic elderly in the future,” Roybal also said during a Washington, D.C., press conference to release the Carnegie Corporation report “Hispanics in an Aging Society.” The report calls for increased Hispanic educational opportunities and discusses the relationship between the younger, growing Hispanic population and a general U.S. population which is older and lives longer.
The report will be used by congressional committees in considering social security legislation, education and employment training programs and the Older Americans Act, said Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus.


Texas New English Battleground |^ifo?RNHAMcha1i7
English-only groups have stepped up their campaigns against bilingual education and bilingual ballots in Texas, a state with a 20% Hispanic population, and Latino leaders there are increasing their efforts to counter the offensives.
Latest proponent efforts include:
• The Texas-based American Ethnic Coalition initiated a petition drive Dec. 4 asking state lawmakers to pass a constitutional amendment to make English Texas’ official language.
• The executive committee of the Texas Republican Party passed a resolution Nov. 15 calling for state and national constitutional amendments declaring English the official language,
I • Mass' mailings by English First, a national lobbying group; based in Springfield, Va, include "active” states Texas and Florida They are soliciting funds and signatures to support its state-level and federal cam-paigns.
Texas state Rep. Jim Horn (R-Denton) authored an English First solicitation letter in which he warned that if use of fpreign language ballots continues, “the next American President could well be elected by people who can’t read or speak English.”
Rub6n Bonilla chairman of the Texas Mexican American Democrats asked Texas Attorney
Border Arrests Off
The number of undocumented aliens apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border has declined noticeably since President Reagan signed the Immigration Reform and Control Act into law Nov. 6, say U.S. immigration officials but they don’t credit it exclusively with the downtrend.
Arrests for the entire border stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico dropped 19% the first week after Reagan signed the bill. The following week apprehensions fell 29%.
U.S. Immigration and Naturalization spokesmen said that publicity the law received in Mexico may have raised some questions about the need for alien workers here.
Other potential factors cited were a normal decrease in apprehensions during the holiday season, the abnormally high water level of the Rio Grande this year, a new requirement that Border Patrol agents obtain a warrant to search for illegal aliens onn farms and ranches, reluctance of some agents to apprehend
Latino Jobless Rate Dips
The Hispanic unemployment rate dropped from 10.5% in October to 9.5% last month, according to the U.S. Department of Labor.
The number of jobless Latinos decreased from 858,000 to 783,000. During September, there were 906,000 unemployed Hispanics.
General unemployment stayed at 7.0%. The rate for non-Hispanic whites was 6.1 and for blacks, 14.3%.
General Jim Mattox to investigate the legality of Horn’s solicitation, which he said misrepresented the facts in its pitch for support. Bonilla charged that it presented“an outright lie regarding bilingual education and its alleged failure.”
Mattox’s press secretary told Weekly Report that the attorney general was “appalled” by the letter and that the matter was still under investigation.
W.R. Morris, a spokesman with the Council of Hispanic Organizations of Houston, said that his group was mobilizing to fight all attempts “to gut the bilingual education and the bilingual ballot that would deny people the basic right to vote.”
A serious effort to pass English;only legislation isn’t likely to happen in the state legislature in 1987, it is generally agreed. “There is no chance of it passing at this time,” Royal Masset, director for the Texas Republican Party, told Weekly Report.
In Texas, a constitutional amendment proposal must receive two-thirds support from the state House and Senate before it can be offered as a public referendum. This differs from California law which allows voters to circumvent the legislature - as they did with the successful Official English Proposition 63 in November.
Since Bill Signed
persons because of the new law's legalization provision and a shifting of resources to stanch drug-smuggling operations
Arrests for the McAllen, Texas, sector, which begins at Brownsville and extends 267 border miles northwest, dropped from 7,780 in November 1985 to 5,599 in November 1986, or 28%. The INS’ El Paso sector reported a decline for the same period from 19,808 to 15,553, or 22%. The San Diego area, covering 60 miles of border, saw only a 2% decline, to 32,411.
Officials expect to be able to assess the law’s impact on border crossings more precisely in January, when there is normally a surge.
Surgery to Spur Growth
On Dec. 3, 13-year-old Juan Garcia of Altamonte Springs, Fla., became the first dwarf in the nation to undergo a radical surgical procedure to increase his height.
Garcia, in stable condition, is expected to grow eight inches from his current height of 3 feet 10 inches. The surgery was the first step in a two-year process.
The novel surgery, performed at the Orlando (Fla.) Regional Medical Center, consisted of breaking the youngster’s leg and attaching a clamp to keep the bones apart, extending the area every week by expanding the clamp After several months, bones would reattach through natural growth. In eight months the procedure will be performed on his right leg.
U.S. Senate Sergeant at Arms Ernie Garcia t is “actively considering” running for the chairmanship of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, his office confirmed to Weekly Report Dec. 9.
Garcia, 40 and a native of Kansas is the first Latino to be appointed Sergeant at Arms ; He was confirmed for the position by the Senate in June 1985.
RNHA will hold its biennial elections in i February. Current RNHA Chairman Fernando |g de Baca said he is sizing up his support to ! . determine whether he will run for re-election. I s The date and place for elections are currently |\ being negotiated, said de Baca
Anaya Promise Draws Ire
New Mexico law enforcement authorities are accusing Gov. Toney Anaya of interfering W | with the judicial process after Anaya promised, before a man charged with kidnapping and murder pleaded guilty, that he would commute j the man’s death sentence.
The assailant pleaded guilty Dec. 4. Anaya jj i promised his lawyers two weeks earlier he ' would commute the sentence. On the same 11 day, in an incident that received wide media I attention, Anaya commuted the sentences of five death row inmates.
Lawyers for the man, Terry Clark, 30, asked ! a state district judge to sentence their client I before Dec. 31, the day Anaya leaves office. j The state attorney general and the judge i overseeing the case have charged the governor j with blurring the separation between the | judicial and executive branches of govern- I ment.
$1 Million Bails Imposed |l
Million dollar bails were set Dec. 9 for two l Puerto Rican men held more than a year on j charges connected to a $7.6 million robbery j from a Wells Fargo depot in Connecticut.
Judge T. Emmet Clarie, in a federal district j court, set $1 million bonds for defendants j Orlando Gonzales Claudio and Isaac Camacho- : Negron and a $500,000 one for Elias Castro i Ramos, said Stanley ATwardy, the U.S Attorney t in Connecticut.
“They will be able to meet the conditions,” | said Juan Acevedo, coordinator of the defense l team for the 15 defendants alleged to be ! members of Los Macheteros, a clandestine | organization operating in Puerto Rico charged | with masterminding the robbe-y to finance ‘ the island's independence movement.
The release hearing was held Dec. 3 after ! Clarie was ordered to set bail conditions by j the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Nine ! defendants have spent 15 months in jail T under the new “preventative detention act,” a which permits incarceration of defendants without bail and for indefinite periods of time. > Defense attorneys had argued that holding the men was a violation of their right to a speedy trial.
Bail hearings for six other defendants in the case were to be announced early this [ week.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Phil Garcia, guest columnist
Borderline Vocabulary
Quick. What do fufurufu, huaflera and uta mean? cSepa chepa? “Who knows?” you ask.
You won’t find the answer in Webster’s or Rogefs or even in Cassell’s Spanish-English dictionary, but you will find it in El Librode Calo: The Dictionary of Chicano Slang.
In a new edition of their 1983 work, lexicographers Harry Polkinhorn, Alfredo Velasco and Malcolm Lambert unravel the riddle of fufurufu and other linguistic puzzles peculiar to the world of the youthful cholos (vatos locos and homeboys) who live in the barrios of the Southwest.
The revised edition, released Dec. 15 by Floricanto Press, defines fufurufu as“stuck up, arrogant or self centered ."Huaflera means a waffle iron, and uta is an exclamatory utterance unleashed at something surprising or impressive.
With more than 700 entries in its 100 pages, the book succeeds in expanding the level of understanding of the idiomatic subcultural dialect of slang spoken in many barrios along the U.S.-Mexico border in cities such as El Paso, Nogales, Calexico/Mexicali and San Diego/Tijuana and in major Southwest urban centers.
THE LANGUAGE OF MEXAMERICA In recent years, journalists and authors have identified the 2,000-mile-long U.S.-Mexico border as a land of its own, a MexAmerica where the people, culture and language are neither purely Mexican/ Spanish nor United States/English. The language spoken in this bicultural (some say tricultural) region has widely been identified as Spanglish, the bastardization of standard English and Spanish into a mix referred to as calo.
The wordsmiths define calo as “cant; argot; jargon of gypsies and criminals.” The non-standard meaning is the Spanish dialect used commonly by many Chicanos, vatos locos (crazy dudes) and homeboys (barrio buddies).
Calo includes some English words with a Spanish twist and vice versa. Among them: lonche for lunch, rite for ride, yonque for junk.
And there’s an entry for a/ca seiser. The etymology of the word can be found in the drugstore. But a/ca seiser, at least in the Tijuana area, is used as a euphemism for pimp.
At its core, the dictionary is a savior for the barrio outsider. The basic vocabulary that must be mastered to gain a minimal understanding of most any conversation among homeboys is covered. This would include orale ese (hey man!), que onda (whafs happening?), nel and chale(no; no way), Simon(yes, right on), ruca(girlfriend, chick),ya/e(a job, gig), and jodido (distressed).
“PISTO” CAN MEAN BOOZE OR MONEY
Some of the basic words in the calo of the Southwest mean the same in the street slang of Latino youths on the East Coast. For instance, intheca//c/?e, or slang, of Salvadoran youths, nel, Simon and que ondas have the same meaning as they do in calo.
But there are differences. While a Chicano in East Los Angeles might use perico to call someone a snitch, a Salvadoran in Washington, D.C., will understand it to mean cocaine. And the word pisto might mean booze on the West Coast and money in the East.
I counted more than a dozen references to the female organ and as many more for the male, from the suggestive chile{red pepper) to the more innocuous camote (standard meaning: sweet potato).
The authors note that some 20% of the entries in their 1983 edition were revised this time. This reflects their additional study, but also serves as a reminder that language is ever changing. How long ago was the border word gringo finally included in Webster’s columns? cQuien sabe? Who knows? cSepa chepa?
(Phil Garcia, of Washington, D.C., covers defense and space issues for the industry newsletters Military Space and SDI Monitor on Capitol Hill. He formerly worked as a reporter for the border area dailies, The Arizona Star in Tucson and The San Diego Union.)
Sin peios en la lengua
BORDER DIVERSIONS: El Libro de Cald, the subject otPhil. Garcia’s guest column this week, documents that special language used by U.S. - Mexico border youth. “As an anthropological record of a little-studied people, this work will have... permanent value,” reviewed Choice magazine.
Thatfs interesting. I looked it over carefully myself-and the one thing that impressed me was the number of words created by the cholos there to describe or define parts of the anatomy,sexual acts and drugs.
It certainly should answer any questions by future social anthropologists about what 20th century young folks along the border did for amusement.
Here are a few of el //bro's other definitions, mixed up for youth) match and cheGk your personal cholo content
1) Nosy person
2) Lazy person
3) Woman-chaser
4) Tag-along
5) Moocher
a) Coliche
b) Pedichi
c) Metiche
d) Viejero
e) Huevoh
6) Trouble
7) Crazy
8) Beer
9) Anglo 10)Womerfslegs
f) Bolillo
g) Ruedas
h) Cocos 0 Redo ijBirria
A hint or two for non-Spanish-speakprs:. A bolillo is a (white) bread roll and ruedas are wheels in mbre standard Spanish. And huevos are eggs or part of the male anatomv.
The answers: 1-c, 2-e (“A lazy person,” the book tells us, “one whose testicles gorw big from inactivity”), 3-d, 4-a, 5*b, 6-i, (Redo has many meanings.), 7-h, 8-j(ln standard Spanish, birria is a cured meat.) 9-f and 10-g.
Class dismissed.
GERALDO’S HYPE: Football commentators don’t get to carry the ball and score touchdowns TV weatherpersons aren’t permitted to seed clouds so they can scoop competitors with forecasts of rain. So why should television news personalities like Geraldo Rivera be allowed to go undercover on camera and buy cocaine-to be part of the story they're reporting?
They should, Geraldo proved again with his two-hour special, “American Vice: The Doping of a Nation,” Dec. 2, because the audience loves it and TV pays big money to performers who attract big audiences. Some 163 stations broadcast the show.
“There’s no explanation for Rivera’s attraction other than people must be drawn to him as they are to a freeway crash or a three alarm fire,” wrote Los Angeles Times critic Howard Rosenberg in reviewing Geraldo’s latest escapade.
“He has become an unintentional self-caricature,” wrote TV critic John Carman in the San Francisco Chronicle, who compared the action on the show to “a giant bug lumbering down the street mashing sedans and munching stragglers.”
But, as Florida reports show, you run a personal risk by NOT watching Geraldo. A group of five persons in Broward County were watching a competing show, Who’s the Boss?, when Geraldo’s vice commandos broke in and arrested them.
And another man, thinking the show was over after an hour, went out, purportedly participated in a dope deal and he, too, was nailed by Rivera’s raiders.
When Geraldo’s next special comes along, I’m not going to leave my chair, even for milk and cookies at commercial break, until I’m certain he’s turned the cameras off. - Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
JOSE ANTONIO RODRIGUEZ, the bus driver who sparked the Mariel boatlift six years ago by crashing through the Peruvian Embassy gates, commenting on a U.S. immigration judge’s order that he be deported from the United States for the crime of running down and killing a Cuban guard in the incident:
“/f looks like the judge is a Communist
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Dec. 15,1986
3


COLLECTING
U.S. IMMIGRANTS FROM MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN: The expected surge in the working-age population, economic stagnation and declining wages will boost legal and illegal immigration from these regions to the United States, according to a recent report from the Center for Immigration Studies. The 57-page report, “Many Hands, Few Jobs: Population, Unemployment and Emigration in Mexico and the Caribbean,” can be ordered by sending $6.95 to: CIS, 1424 16th St. NW, Suite 701, Washington, D.C. 20036.
ECONOMICS AND IMMIGRATION: George Borjas and Marta Tienda recently published a study titled“The Economic Consequences of Immigration.” For a copy of the 70-page monograph, send $3.50 to: Institute for Research on Poverty, 1180 Observatory Drive, 3412 Social Science Building, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. 53706.
WRITING SKILLS IN U.S. SCHOOLS: Latinos and blacks consistently scored lower on a survey of writing proficiency among fourth-, eighth- and 11 th-graders. “The Writing Report Card: Writing Achievement in American Schools” also examines writing skills according to geographic region, sex and several other variables. For a copy of the 112-page study, send $12.50 to: National Assessment of Educational Progress, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710.
BORDERUNE CONVERSATION: “£/ Libra de Ca/o: The Dictionary of Chicano Slang,” updating and enlarging the 1983 edition, contains 700 words and expressions commonly used by border youth. If s 100 pages* $32 for the soft-cover book available Dec 15. Order from: Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436.
STREET SLANG: The 31-page book “Ca/o, Cuento y Cancion,” written and illustrated by Latino youth in Washington, D.C., documents street slang common among Salvadoran and other Central American and Caribbean youth there. Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the D.C. Department of Recreation, it is available for free. Order Vol. 1, No. 1 from: Latino American Youth Center, 3045 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009.
AGING HISPANIC POPULATION: “Hispanics in an Aging Society” is a 65-page report on the growing Latino population and its effect on the nation’s future development. It is published by the Carnegie Corporation’s Aging Society Project. A free copy may be obtained by writing the project at.437 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10022 or calling (212) 371-3200.
CONNECTING
CHICAGO EMPLOYMENT FIGURES TOLD
The Chicago Reporter published in its December issue the results of its 11 th annual survey on racial and ethnic policies and practices of metropolitan Chicago’s major corporations.
This year 35 companies (down one from last year) participated; 89 declined to do so. Figures are for 1985.
Among findings of particular interest to Hispanics:
• Only one Latino, businessman Arthur R. Velasquez, was a corporate board member. He served on two boards: Illinois Bell and People’s Gas.
• No industrial corporations employed Hispanics as officials or managers in their Chicago-area operations at a percentage approaching Chicago’s 19% Latino population. Inland Steel Co., with 8,011 employees in the area, had the best record with 5.6%.
• Among others (number of area employees and percentage of Latino officials/managers in parentheses): Motorola Inc. (10,182, 2.0%), The Quaker Oats Co (2,280,1.7%), Amoco Corp (8,800,1.0%). Dart and Kraft Inc. (3,759,0.9%), and international printers R.R. Donnelley & Sons Inc. (3,679, 0.0%).
• Inland Steel had the highest percentage of Hispanic employees, 19.3%; Donnelley the lowest, 1.6%.
• Of the two participating retail corporations, McDonald’s reported 4,988 employees and 7.6% officials/managers; Sears, Roebuck and Co., 26,093 and 1.3%.
Copies of the 20-page issue may be obtained by sending a check for $ 2.50 to The Chicago Reporter, 18 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60603.
LATINOS SLIGHTED IN GRANTS
Latino social agencies in Chicago receive only 2.7% of the city’s private donations even though Hispanics represent 19% of the population, a new report from the Latino Institute says.
Titled “Strangers in the Philanthropic World: The Limited Latino Share of Chicago Grants,” the report was released Dec. 10 during a conference sponsored by the Institute to establish a dialogue between foundations and Hispanic agencies.
A copy of the 30-page report, which was written under Latino Institute Research Director Dr. John Attinasi, is available free from: Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, 6th floor, Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 663-3603.
Calendar
f ' • •' ,,.i .
As it has jn the past, Weekly Report will publish a list of major 1987 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in December. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone in or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of a contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N. St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
THIS WEEK
IMMIGRATION LAW CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Dec. 15
Implementing the new immigration reform law will be the topic of a day-long conference sponsored by an ad hoc coalition of Hispanic and other organizations, including the National Council of La Raza, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, League of United Latin American Citizens and the American Civil. Liberties Union.
Rose Briceno (202) 628-9600
TOURISM CAREERS Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Falls Church, Va. Dec. 16 and 18 Hispanos Unidosde Virginia will hold two workshops on career opportunities available within the tourism industry.
Denise Tsiaperas (703) 533-9300
CHRISTMAS DANCE Houston Dec. 20
The Houston Hispanic Fire Fighters Local 341 will host its 6th annual Christmas dance with music by Pio Trevino y el Grupo Majic and Ram Herrera and the Montana Band.
Juan Hernandez Jr. (713) 223-9166
COMING SOON
SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISING DINNER
University of Southern California Mexican American
Alumni Association
Los Angeles Feb. 12
Raul Vargas (213) 743-2456
JOURNALISM JOB FAIRS American Society of Newspaper Editors Ann Arbor, Mich. Jan. 15-17 Herb Boldt (313) 222-2319 Louisville, Ky. Jan. 15-17 Mervin Aubespin (502) 582-4191
JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA
Dec. 15, 1986
Latin American Jewish Studies Association, University of Florida at Gainesville.
Gainesville, Fla. Feb. 13-17.
Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880
ETHNIC STUDIES
National Association for Ethnic Studies San Diego Feb. 25-28 Charles Irby (714) 869-3593
SPOTLIGHT
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITYCONFERENCE: The California Chicano News Media Association will sponsor its 8th annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities in Los Angeles on Feb. 6,. 7. For the first time, the largest media job fair on the West Coast for minority professionals and students will also offer interviews in areas such as marketing, sales, advertising, circulation and promotion.
Registration packets may be obtained from: CCNMA, School of Journalism, the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695 (213) 743-7158. Registration materials should be postmarked by Jan. 9 and business interviewees should request a special registration form.
4


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
CALIFORNIA CITIZENSHIP COORDINATOR: Individual will be responsible for coordinating U.S. citizenship campaigns throughout the state of California
Position involves frequent travel both in and out of state although the majority of time will be spent at NALEOS’s East Los Angeles Office; individual should be able to work with community-based organizations, local school districts, the INS and elected/appointed officials to promote U.S. citizenship; individual should have the ability to work with local media in the promotion of project activities Position also requires fluent English/Spanish bilingual, excellent communication skills and the ability to work in an unstructured environment. Salary is $20,000-$25,000.
Send resume to: NALEO, 708 G St SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR - for KUNM, Albuquerque, New Mexica Responsible for radio development activities, including the planning, implementation and maintenance of all radio fundraising efforts Specific emphasis will be placed on on-air fundraising, program underwriting and program-guide advertising Bachelor’s degree in appropriate discipline with at least two years experience in fundraising required. Equivalent combination of education and experience will be accepted in lieu of degree on one year for one year basis Send letter of application, resume and three references to: Personnel, University of New Mexico, 1717 Roma NE, Albuquerque, N.M. 87131. Mention requisition #1029A EOE/AA
ENGINEER CORPS JOBS
The US. Army Corps of Engineers seexs qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant positions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks Persons wishing to get more information should contact Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, D.C. 20314-1000(202)272-0098.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
HISPANIC
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES If you are a Federal, State or Local public service employee, the Association of Hispanic Federal Executives invites you to join and become a member of an up- and- coming VOCAL, VISIBLE and RESPECTED Hispanic organization.
The Association was created in 1980 and is now recruiting members for 1987. Join with us in accomplishing our objectives of providing advancement and training opportunities. Dues are $24 a year.
Write today:
EDITOR
Professional membership association seeks experienced professional editor. Minimum three years experience and Bachelor's degree preferred. Proofreading, editing and production work required for professional journals and books. Must be well organized with in-depth knowledge of English required, knowledge of behavioral science preferred. Starting salary low twenties plus excellent benefits. Send resume to: Employment Specialist, National Association of Social Workers, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, Md. 20910.
EOE
COMPUTER SERVICES COORDINATOR
Candidate is responsible for effective delivery of computer support to administrative offices. Provides user documentation and training analyzes user problems, ensures proper equipment installation and coordinates the implementation of required changes in administrative production systems.
Bachelors degree and 2 years related experience required. Salary commensurate with experience. Excellent benefits.
Send resume to:
Mr. Joseph Middleton, Director Data Processing Lehman College/CUNY Bedford Park Blvd. West Bronx, New York 10468
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED
The deadline for submission of applications fora 12-month $15,000 internship to work as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C., has been extended to Dec. 15.
The internship, sponsored by the National Puerto Rican Coalition and funded by the; Gannett Foundation, is open to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage who demonstrates a desire and ability to pursue a journalism career.
Applications may be obtained by contacting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
MANAGER, FACILITIES MAINTENANCE (Department of Management and Finance) Salary$32,223-$45,190 Ann.#33167BDMF
Professional work with responsibility, for maintenance and repair of all County buildings. Employee will supervise approximately 44 County employees and will interact and negotiate with County personnel on daily corrective/preventive maintenance. Major responsibilities include implementing and managing a computerized preventive maintenance management system, developing a systematic approach to deferred maintenance, monitoring the maintenance budget and assisting in developing long range capital budget, coordinating energy conservation efforts in the County and managing the Court House area parking.
Requires Bachelor’s degree in Electrical, Mechanical, Civil Engineering or related area, plus 4 years experience in administration of maintenance or construction programs. An equivalent combination of training, education and experience may be substituted for the educational requirement Registration as a professional engineer in the Commonwealth of Virginia may be substituted for education.
FACILITIES PLANNER (Department of Management and Finance) Salary $33,644- $47,251 Ann. #36187AD M F
Professional facilities master planning and space allocation planning work with responsibilities pertaining to the design, construction and renovation of County buildings, including writing specifications for bids, reviewing design plans, negotiating contracts and other related duties
Requires Bachelor's degree supplemented ;bya Master's degree or 5-year degree in •‘engineering, architecture or in related area,
! plus 4 or more years experience in engineering, design, construction management or space planning. Experience may be substituted for all or part of the education requirement.
Official Arlington County application form required for both positions To request application materials please call (703) 558-2167 and refer to announcement number. Applications must be received in the Personnel-Department no later than Jan. 15,1987. Arlington County Personnel Department 2100 14th St., North Arlington, Va 22201
Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a' national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place a Corporate Classified ad, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
AHFE
P.O. BOX 23662 L’ Enfant Plaza Station Washington, D.C. 20026 1987 Officers
President Gil Chdvez, Department of Education Vice-President: Juan Ramirez, Office of Personnel Management
Treasurer: Gil Sandate, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Secretary: Al Macias, Department of Education
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number. 1 word).Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts& Entertainment
VIDEO UNDER THE CHRISTMAS TREE: Films on video are increasingly popular as holiday gift items, and many feature prominent performapces by Latinos.
Following is a random listing of titles available nationally, with distributors in parentheses. Many are also available on laser disc.
No Hispanic film produced in the United States has been as successful as El norte (CBS/Fox Home Video). The husband and wife team of Gregory Nava (director) and Anne Thomas (producer) won an Oscar nomination in 1985 for their screenplay about two Guatemalans and their search for a better life up North.
Kiss of the Spider Woman (Charter Entertainment) is the critically acclaimed film based on the novel by Argentina’s Manuel Puig. There are striking performances here by Raul Julia and Sonia Braga.
A film with limited theatrical exposure is director Robert Young’s The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez (Embassy Home Entertainment), with Edward James Olmos in the title role. More of him, in his pre-Miami Vice Days, can be seen in Blade Runner and Saving Grace(both from Embassy).
Few contemporary Hispanic actors have the box office appeal of Emilio Estevez. Find him in Repo Man and The Breakfast Club (MCA\ Home Video), St. Elmo's Fire (RCA/Columbia) or That Was Then, This Is Now (Paramount).
Compare Estevez’s acting abilities and looks with dad Martin Sheen’s on over 15 titles, ranging from Apocalypse Now(Paramount)
to That Championship Season (MGM/UA Home Video).
Some Hispanic performers cash in on their sex appeal. Fans of Steven Bauer may want to know that the videocassette version of his Thief of Hearts (Paramount) contains “adult” scenes not shown in U.S theaters.
Several Hollywood classics feature great Hispanic performances. You may see Jose Ferrer and Anthony Quinn in Lawrence of Arabia (RCA/Columbia) or Katy Jurado in High Noon (Republic Pictures Home Video).
Many musicals have wonderful performances by Hispanics: Dolores del Rio in Flying Down to Rio (Nostalgia Merchant),Linda Ronstadt in The Pirates of Penzance (MCA), Irene Cara in Fame (MGM/UA) and her music in Flashdance (Paramount), Adolfo Quinones in Breakin’and its sequel Electric Boogaloo(MGM/UA) or Yamil Borges in A Chorus Line (Embassy).
Alfonso Bedoya’s line in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (CBS/Fox Home Video or Key Video), “I don’t have to show you no stinkin’ badges,” epitomizes the type of roles often given to Hispanics. In spite of its Puerto Rican stereotypes, West Side Story (CBS/Fox) features Rita Moreno’s Oscar winning performance.
Moreno turns out a completely different characterization of a Puerto Rican woman in the comedy The Ritz (Warner)- The black comedy Eating Raoul (CBS/Fox) is now a cult classic, with an early look at Robert Beltran’s talent. Hector Elizondo’s performance in The Flamingo Kid (Vestron Video) is flawless.
Any of these movies should be well received in a Hispanic home that is enjoying the video revolution. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
STATION SOLD: Hallmark Cards Inc., whose purchase of 10 Spanish International Communications Corp. television stations is pending Federal Communications Commission approval, announced Dec. 1 that it is buying San Francisco’s KDTV(Ch. 13).
Like the other Spanish International Network affiliated stations, KDTV broadcasts in Spanish. Its president is Emilio Nicolas Jr.
The station, owned by Bahia de San Francisco Television Company, is a Peabody Award winner and recent nominee for a national Emmy for its Mexico earthquake coverage.
In January, FCC denied license renewal to SICC and Bahia stations, charging that through interlocking ownership and management, they
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT.
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 percolumn inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
were illegally under “alien ownership and control.” It concluded that SIN former president Reynold (Rene) Anselmo, who owns 42% interest in Bahia de San Francisco, was too closely tied with Emilio Azcarraga of Mexico who owns SIN.
Hallmark, with minor partner First Chicago Venture Capital, is paying $301.5 million for the 10 SICC stations.
NEWS SERVICE FUNDED AGAIN: The El Paso-based Latin American Newsservice, which distributed radio news features and weekly news summaries on Latin American events, has received new grant money from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
LANS initiated its programming last February with a 15-month, $300,000 grant from CPB. Its new grant, still being finalized, should carry it through November of
The service is headed by Isabel Alegria. It
presently serves 40 stations with daily seven-minute feeds offered in both English and Spanish, plus a weekly 14-minute “Latin American Week in Review” in English and a nine-minute “Semana Latinoamericana”
Working out of KXCR-FM in El Paso, it covers20 Latin American countries.
NAMES AND NOTES: Jose “Pepe" Del Rio closed a quarter of a century as host of the Voice of America’s Buenos Dias, America show Dec. 9 with his retirement His weekday morning broadcasts reached 23 Caribbean and Latin American countries “building bridges of goodwill between our peoples,’’said VOA Director Richard Carlson in a salute to Del Rio and his 11-person news staff... Angel Castillo Jr., former New York Times legal reporter, left private law practice to join the Miami Herald as assistant managing editor/ news. ... - Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Florida Gov . -elect Bob Martinez says that Jeb Bush, son of Vice President George Bush and chairman of the Dade County Republican Party , is the top contender to head the state Department of Commerce ... California Gov . George Deukmejian nominates Linda Escajeda of Monterey Park as a member of the Student Aid Commission. The commission administers federal scholarship grants. . . New York Mayor Edward Koch names Amalia Betanzos, chairwoman of the board of directors of the National Puerto Rican Coalition and president of the Wildcat S e r v ic e Corp., and Aida Alvarez, former spokeswoman for the City Health and Hospitals Corp., as members of the city Charter Revision Commission . The 15member commission is charged with restructuring the voting scheme for the city's Board of Estimate, which dispenses city funds and contracts. .. C6sar Ba6z Acosta and Eugenio Silva, the two men who pleaded guilty to illegally exporting ammunition in a scheme involving Nancy Reagan's maid An):U Castelo, are placed on probation after receiving two-yea r sentences. Castelo's charges were dropped earlier after federal authorities were convinced she did not know of the plot .. The U :S. National Guard honors Latinos Albert Baker of California. Tom Baca of Texas and Ed Silva of New Mexico as the top recruiters in their states in 1985. Also honored: Francisco Martinez of Puerto Ri6o. The four were presented their chief 50 Awards at a Pentagon ceremony... Sanson Candelaria, a dancer who performed with the Boston Ballet. Les Grands Ballets Canadiens and Les Ballets Troek adero de Monte Carlo, dies in New York at the age of 45 after a long illness. He was a New Mexico native ... HISPANIC LINK WEE Tony Coelho Elected to LULAC Calls Japanese Boycott No. 3 Position in House Indicating that negotiations with Japanese U.S. Rep. Tony Coelho, member of the officials had reached an impasse, the League Congressional Hi s panic Caucus and outgoing of United Latin American Citizens announced chairman of the Democratic Congressional Dec . 12 that it was calling for its councils and Campaign Committee, was elected Dec. 8 to the third most powerful position in the House products. of Representatives-the majority whip. LULAC President Oscar Moran made the Coelho, 44 and entering his fifth term as announcement at a press conference in San the Democrat representative of the 15th ConAntonio. gressional District of California, defeated Rep. The LULAC boycott comes three months Charles Rangel (D-N.Y.), 167 to 78. after Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro For the first time, the slot was filled by an Nakasone commented at a political gathering election of the House Democratic Caucus. there that the intelligence level of the United Previously , the dec ision was left to the disStates suffers "because of its considerable cretion of the House speaker. The caucus number of blacks, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans: decided to change the selection process two Nakasone later issued an apology and said sessions ago because its members felt the his remarks referred to literacy and not intelli majority whip position was a steppingstone gence. to the No . 1 slot in the House hierarchy, The American Gl Forum declined to accept speaker of the House. the apology and declared a national boycott Coelho gained the respect of his colleagues in early October . The Congressional Hispanic with his stewardship of the DCCC . As chairman, Caucus , chaired by Rep . Esteban Torres (D he increased the amount of funds raised from Calif.), accepted but said it would pursue $1. 2 million in 1981 to $15 million in 1986. establishing a lrade mission with Japan . Along the way, he engineered the growth of NEGOCIATIONS DETERIORATED its direct mail donors from 13,000 to300,000. On Oct. 9, Moran and two other LULAC Coelho, of Portuguese descent, joined the officials met with the Japanese Ambassador caucus in January 1985. to the United States, Nobuo Matsunaga. to As majority whip, Coelho will keep tally of outline proposals on improving relations with votes, make sure there are enough on crucial u.s. Hispanics. Included among these was issues and serve as a liaison between the that the Japanese government contribute House leadership and its members. funds to Hispanic educational institutions Cuba Rights Group Forms The Pro-Human Rights Committee of Cuba, the island nation's only independent human rights group, announced Dec. 2 that it will establish its first U.S. chapter in Miami. The committee, formed in 1976 by Ricardo Bofill, works for the civil rights and release of political prisoners in Cuba. Bofill has been in the French Embassy in Havana for the past three months seeking asylum. Bofilfs wife , Rebecca. who made the chapter announcement at a Washington, D . C . , press conference, said there were about 200 com mittee members in Cuba. The committee will document human rights abuses and work tc end the mass arrests by Fidel Castro's govern ment, she said . and organizations,
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,';;: Texas New English Battleground English-only groups have stepped up their campaigns against bilingual education and bilingual ballots in Texas, a state with a 20% Hispanic population, and Latino leaders there ,are increasing their efforts to counter the offensives. Latest proponent efforts include: • The Texas-based American Ethnic Coali tion initiated a petition drive Dec. 4 asking state lawmakers to pass a constitutional amendment to make English Texas ' officiall?nguage. e The executive committee of the Texas Republic$in Party passed a resolution Nov. 15 calling for state and national constitutional amendments declaring English the official .; • Mass m . ailings by English First, a lobbying groupj based in Springfield, Va . , include "active" states Texas and Florida. They are soliciting funds and signatures to support its state-level and federal cam paigns. Texas state Rep. Jim Horn (A-Denton) au thored an English First solicitation letter in Which he. warned that if use of f9reign language ballots continues, "the next American President could well be elected by people who can't read or speak English ." Ruben Bonilla, chairman of the Texas Mexican American Democrats, asked Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox to investigate the legality of Horn' s solicitation, which he said mis represented the facts in its pitch for support. Bonilla charged that it presented" an outright lie regarding bilingual education and its alleoed failure ." Mattox's press secretary told Weekly Report that the attorney general was "appalled'' by the letter and that the matter was still under investigation. W.R. Morris, a spokesman with the Council of Hispanic Organizations of Houston, said that his group was mobilizing to fight all attempts "to gut the bilingual education and the bilingual ballot that would deny people the basic right to vote . " A serious effort to pass Englis _ h :Q nly le9is lation isn't likely to happen in the state legislatun=i in-1987, it is generally agreed . " There is no chance of it passing at this time," Royal Masset, director for the Texas Republican Party, told Weekly Report. In Texas, a constitutional amendment pro posal must receive two-thirds support from the state House and Senate before it can be offered as a public referendum . This differs from California law which allows voters to circumvent the legislatureas they did with the successful Official English Proposition 63 in November. Border Arrests Off Since Bill Signed The number of undocumented aliens ap prehended at the U . S.-Mexico border has declined noticeably since President Reagan signed the Immigration Reform and Control Act into law Nov. 6, say U.S . immigration officials, but they don't credit it exclusively . with the downtrend. Arrests for the entire border stretching from the Pacific Ocean to the Gulf of Mexico dropped 19% the. first week after Reagan signed the bill. The following week appre hensions fell 29%. U.S. Immigration and Naturalization spokes men said that publicity the law received in Mexico may have raised some questions about the need for alien workers her e . Other potential factors cited were a normal decrease in apprehensions during the holiday season the abnormally high water level of the Rio' Grande this year, a new requirement that Border Patrol agents obtain a warrant to search for illegal aliens onn farms and ranches, reluctance of some agents to apprehend Latino Jobless Rate Dips The Hispanic unemployment rate dropped from 10.5% in October to 9 . 5% last month, according to the U.S . Department of Labor . The number of jobless Latinos decreased from 858,000 to 783,000 . During September, there were 906,000 unemployed Hispanics . General unemployment stayed at 7 . 0% . The rate for non-Hispanic whites was 6.1 and for blacks, 14. 3% . 2 persons because of the new law's legalization provision and a shifting of resources to stanch drug-smuggling operations. Arrests for the McAllen , Texas, sector, which begins at Brownsville and extends 267 border miles northwest, dropped from 7 ,780 in No vember 1985 to 5,599 in November 1986, or 28% . The INS' El Paso sector reported a decline for the same period from 19,808 to 15,553, or 22%. The San Diego area, covering 60 miles of border, saw only a 2% decline, to 32,411 . Officials expect to be able to assess the laW's impact on border crossings more precisely in January, when there is normally a surge . Surgery to Spur Growth On Dec . 3, 13-year-old Juan Garcia of Altamonte Springs , Fla . , became the first dwarf in the nation to undergo a radical surgical procedure to increase his height. Garcia, in stable condition, is expected to grow eight inches from his current height of 3 feet 10 inches . The surgery was the first step in a two-year process . The novel surgery, performed at the Orlando (Fla . ) Regional Medical Center, consisted of breaking the youngster's leg and attaching a clamp to keep the bones apart, extending the area every week by expanding the clamp . After several months , bones would reattach through natural growth . . In eight months, the procedure will be performed on his right leg. Ernie Garcia May Try Bid for RNHA Chair U.S . Senate Sergeant at Arms Ernie Garcia is "actively considering" running for the chair manship of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly, his office confirmed to Weekly Report Dec . 9. Garcia, 40 and a native of Kansas, is the first Latino to be appointed Sergeant at Arms. He was confirmed for the position by the " Senate in June 1985. RNHA will hold its biennial elections in r February . Current RNHA Chairman Fernando !'". de Baca said he is sizing up his support to determine whether he will run for re-election . l , The date and place for elections are currently being negotiated, said de Baca Anaya Promise Draws Ire New Mexico law enforcement authorities < are accusing Gov . Toney Anaya of interfering with the judicial process after Anaya promised, before a man charged with kidnapping and murder pleaded guilty, that he would commute the man's death sentence. The assailant pleaded guilty Dec. 4. Anaya 1 promised his lawyers two weeks earlier he ' 1 would commute the sentence. On the same " 1 day , in an incident that received wide med i a attention, Anaya commuted the sentences of five death row inmates . Lawyers for the man, Terry Clark, 30, asked a state district judge to sentence their client before Dec. 31, the day Anaya leaves office . The state attorney general and the judge overseeing the case have charged the governor with blurring ihe separation between the I ' judicial and executive branches of govern$e1t.Million Bails Imposed I Million dollar bails were set Dec . 9 for two Puerto Rican men held more than a year on charges connected to a $7. 6 million robbery from a Wells Fargo depot in Connecticut. Judge T . Emmet Clarie , in a federal district court, set $1 million bonds for defendants Orlando Gonzales Claudio and Isaac Camacho Negron and a $500,000 one for Elias Castro ! Ramos, said Stanley A Twardy, the U.S. Attorney f in Connecticut. ' "They will be able to meet the conditions," 1!1 said Juan Acevedo, coordinator of the defense team for the 15 defendants alleged to be 1. members of Los Macheteros, a clandestine organization operating in Puerto Rico charged 1 with masterminding the robbey to finance the island's independence movement. The release hearing was held Dec. 3 after Clarie was ordered to set bail conditions by the 2nd U . S . Circuit Court of Appeals . Nine defendants have spent 15 months in jail under the new "preventative detention act," which permits incarceration of defendants without bail and for indefinite periods of time . ' Defense attorneys had argued that holding • the men was a violation of their right to a speedy trial. Bail hearings for six other defendants in the case were to be announced early this week. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Phil Garcia, guest columnist Borderline Vocabula 'ry Quick. What do fufurufu, huaflera and uta mean? i,Sepa chepa? "Who knows?" you ask. You won't find the answer in Webster's or Rogel's or even in Cassell's SpanishEnglish dictionary, but you will find it in El Libra de . Calo: The Dictionary of Chicano Slang . In a new edit ion of their 1983 work, lexi cographers Ha n y Polkinhorn, Alfredo Velasco and Malcolm Lambert unravel the riddle of fufurufu and other linguistic puzzles peculiar to the world of the youthful cholos (vatos locos and homeboys) who live in the barrios of the Southwest. The revised edition, released Dec. 15 by Floricanto Press, defines fufurufu as"stuck up, arrogant or s elf centered." Huaflera means a waffle iron , and uta is an exclamatory utterance unleashed at something surprising or impressive. With more than 700 entries in its 100 pages, the book succeeds in expanding the level of understanding of the idiomatic subcultural dialect of slang spoken in many barrios along the U.S.Mexico border in cities such as El Paso , Nogales, Calexico/Mexicali and San Diego/Tijuana and in major Southwest urban centers. THE LANGUAGE OF MEXAMERICA I n recent years , journalists and authors have identified the 2 ,000mile-long U.S.-Mexico border as a land of its own, a MexAmerica where the people, culture and language are neither purely Mexican/ Spanish nor United States/English. The language spoken in this bicultural (some say tricultural) region has widely been identified as Spang/ish, the bastardization of standard English and Spanish into a mi x referred to as calo. The wordsmiths define ca/o as "cant; argot; jargon of gypsies and criminals. " The non -standard meaning is the Spanish dialect used commonly by many Chicanos, vatos /ocos(crazy dudes) and homeboys (barrio buddies) . Calo includes some English words with a Spanish twist and vice versa. Amo ng them: lonche for lunch, rite for ride, yonque for junk. And th ere's a n entry for alca se/ser. The etymology of the word can be found i n the drugstore. But a/ca selser, at least in the Tijuana area, is us ed as a euphemism for pimp. At its core, the dictionary is a savior for the barrio outsider. The basic vocabulary that must be mastered to gain a minimal understanding of most any conversation among homeboys is covered. This would include orale ese (hey man'), que onda (what's happening?), nel and chale(no; no way), simon (yes, right on) , ruca (girlfriend, chick), jale(a job, gig) , and jodido (distressed). "PISTO" CAN MEAN BOOZE OR MONEY Some of the basic words in the ca/o of the Southwest mean the same in the street slang of Latino youths on the East Coast. For instance, in the caliche, or slang, of Salvadoran youths, nel, simon and que ondas have the same meaning as they do in ca/o. But there are differences. While a Chicano in East Los Angeles might use perico to call someone a snitch, a Salvadoran in Washington, D.C., will understand it to mean cocaine. And the word pisto might mean booze on the West Coast and money in the East. I counted more than a dozen references to the female organ and as many more for the male, from the suggestive chile(red pepper) to the more innocuous camote (standard meaning: sweet potato). The authors note that some 20% of the entries in their 1983 edition were revised this time. This reflects their additional study, but also serves as a reminder that language is ever changing. How long ago was the border word gringo finally included in Webster's columns? i-Quien sa be? Who knows? iSepa chepa? (Phil Garcia, of Washington, D . C., covers defense and space issues for the industry newsletters Military Space and SOl Monitor on Capitol Hill. He formerly worked as a reporter for the border area dailies, The Arizona Star in Tucson and The San Diego Union.) BORDER DIVERSIONS: El Libro de Calo, the subject . of!P.hil . Garcia's guest column this . week, documents that languag , e used by U . S . Mexico border yo. uth. "As an anthropological recard of a little-studied people, this work will have ... p .ermanent value," reviewed Choice magazine. That's interesting. 1 : looked it .over ear.efully.myself,andth. e ,one thing that impressed me was the number of .words created;by the cholos there to describe or define parts acts and drugs. It certainly should answer any questions by future pologists about what 20th century young folks along.th. e borC:.ter did for. amusement. -' Hereare a few of. ellibro' s other definitions,,mb
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:COLLECTING IMMIGRANTS FROM MEXICO AND THE CARIBBEAN: The expected surge in the working-age population, economic stagnation and d1clining wages will boost legal and illegal immigration from these regions to the United States, according to a recent report from the Center for Immigration Studies. The 57-page report, "Many Hancjs, Few Jobs: Population, Unemployment and Emigration in Mexico and the Caribbean," can be ordered by sending $6.95 to: CIS, 1424 16th St. NW, Suite 701, Washington, D .C. 20036. ECONOMICS AND IMMIGRATION: George Borjas and Marta Tienda recently published a studytitled"The Economic Consequences of Immigration. " For a copy of the 70-page monograph, send $3.50 to: Institute for Research on Poverty, 1180 Observatory Drive, 3412 $ocial Scie;,ce Building, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis . 53706. WRITING SKILLS IN U.S. SCHOOLS: Latinos and blacks consistently c;cored lower on a survey of writing proficiency among fourth, eighthand 11th-graders. "The Writing Report Card: Writing Achieve ment in American Schools" also examines writing skills according to .geographic region, sex and several other variables . For a copy of the 112-page study, send $12.50 to: National Assessment of Educational : Prdgress, CN 6710, Princeton, N .J. 08541-6710. BORDERLINE CONVERSATION: "EI Libro de Ca/6: The Dictionary of Chicano Slang, " updating and enlarging the 1983 ed ition , contains 700 words and expressions commonly used by border youth. lfs 100 pages, $32 for the soft-cover book, available Dec 15. Order from Floricanto Press, 16161 Ventura Blvd. , Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436. STREET SLANG: The 31-page book "Ca/6, Cuento y Canci6n," written and illustrated by Latino youth in Washington, D.C., documents street slang common among Salvadoran and other Central American and Caribbean youth there. Funded by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the D.C. Department of Recreation, it is available for free. Order Vol. 1, No. 1 from : Latino American Youth Cente,r, 3045 15th St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20009. AGING HISPANIC POPULATION: "Hispanics in an Aging Society " is a 65-page report on the growing Latino population and its effect on the nation's future development. It is published by the Carnegie Corporation' s Aging Society Project. A free copy may be obiained by writing the project at: 437 Madison Ave. , New York, N .Y. 10022 or cal , ling (212) 371-3200 . CONNECTING CHICAGO EMPLOYMENT FIGURES TOLD The Chicago Reporter published in its December issue the results of its 11th annual survey on racial and ethnic policies and practices of metropolitan Chicago's major corporations. This year 35 companies (down one from last year) participated; 89 declined to do so. Figures are for 1985. Among findings of particular interest to His panics: • Only one Latino, businessman Arthur R. Velasquez, was a corporate board member. He served on two boards: Illinois Bell and People' s Gas. • No industrial corporations employed Hispanics as officials or managers in their Chicago-area operations at a percentage ap proaching Chicago's 19% Latino population. Inland Steel Co., with 8,011 employees in the area, had the best record with 5 . 6%. • Among others (number of area employees and percentage of Latino officials/managers in parentheses): Motorola Inc. (1 0, 182, 2 .0%), The Quaker Oats Co. (2,280, 1.7%), Amoco Corp. (8,800, 1.a>/o). Dart and Kraft Inc . (3,759, 0 . 9%) , and international printers R.R. Donnelley & Sons Inc. (3,679 , 0.0%) . • Inland Steel had the highest percentage of Hispanic employees, 19. 3 % ; Donnelley the lowest, 1.6%. • Of the two participating retail corporations, McDonald's reported 4,988 employees and 7 . 6% officials/managers; Sears, Roebuck and Co., 26,093 and 1 .3% . Copies of the 20-page issue may be obtained by sending a check for$ 2.50 to The Chicago Reporter, 18 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill. 60603. LATINOS SLIGHTED IN GRANTS Latino social agencies in Chicago receive only 2 . 7 % of the city's private donations even though Hispanics represent 19% of the population, a new report from the Latino Institute says . Titled "Strangers in the Philanthropic World: The Limited Latino Share of Chicago Grants," the report was released Dec. 10 during a conference sponsored by the Institute to establish a dialogue between foundations and Hispanic agencies. A copy of the 30-page report, which was written under Latino Institute Research Director Dr. John Attinasi, is available free from: Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, 6th floor, Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 663-3603. Calendar Falls Church, Va. Dec . 16 and 18 Latin American Jewish Studies Association, Uni versity of Florida at Gainesville. r As it has in the past, Weekly Report will publish a list of major 1987 conferences, seminars and ban quets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in December. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone in or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone num ber of a cont9ct person . Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N . St. Nw:washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 2340280. THIS WEEK IMMIGRATION LAW CONFERENCE Washington, D . C . Dec. 1 5 Implementing the new immigration reform law will be the topic of a day-long conference sponsored by an ad hoc coalition of Hispanic and other organizations, including the N.ational Council of La Raza, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, League of Un1ted Latin American Citizens and the American Civil. Liberties Union. Rose Briceno (202) 628-9600 TOURISM CAREERS Hispanic Link Weekl y Report Hispanos Unidos de Virginia will hold two workshops on career opportuniti es available within the tourism industry. Den i se Tsiaperas (703) 533-9300 CHRISTMAS DANCE Houston Dec . 20 The Houston Hispani c Fire Fighters L ocal 341 will host its 6th annual Christmas dance with music by Pio Trevino y el Grupo Majic and Ram Herrera and the Montana Band. Juan Hernandez Jr. (713) 223-9166 COMING SOON SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISING DINNER University of Southern California Mexican American Alumni Association Los Angeles Feb. 1 2 Raul Vargas (213) 743-2456 JOURNALISM JOB FAIRS American Society of Newspaper Editors Ann Arbor, Mich. Jan. 15-17 Herb Boldt (313) 222-2319 Louisville, Ky. Jan. 15-17 Mervin Aubespin (502) 582-4191 JEWS IN LATIN AMERICA Dec. 15, 1986 Gainesville, Fla . Feb . 13-17. Judith Elkin (313) 996-2880 ETHNIC STUDIES National Association for Ethnic Studies San Diego Feb. 25-28 Charles lrby (714) 869-3593 SPOTLIGHT JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITY CONFERENCE: The California Chicano News Media Association will sponsor its 8th annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities in Los Angeles on Feb. 6 , . 7. For the first time, the largest media job fair on the West Coast for minority professionals and students will also offer interviews in areas such as marketing, sales , advertising, circulation and promotion. Registration packets may be obtained from: CCNMA, School of Journalism, the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695 (213) 7 43-7158. Registration materials should be postmarked by Jan. 9 and business interviewees should request a special registration form. 4

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS CALIFORNIA CITIZENSHIP COORDINATOR: Individual will be respoosible for coordinat ing U . S . citizenship campaigns throughout the state of California. Position involves frequent travel both in and out of state although the majority of time will be spent at NALEOS' s East Los Angeles Offic e ; individual should be able to work w i th community based organizations, loc al school districts, the INS and e lecte d /appointed officials to promote U . S . citizenship; individual should have the ability to work with local m edia in the promotion of p r o ject activities. Position also requires fluent English/Spanish bilingual, e xcellent com munication skills and the ability to work in an unstructured environment. Salary is $20,000$25,000. Send r esume to: NALEO , 708 G St SE , Washington, D . C . 20003. DEVELOPMENT DIRECTORfor KUNM, Albuquerque , New Mex ico . Responsible for radio development a c tiv i ties , in c luding the planning , implementation and maintenance of all radio fundraising efforts. Specific emphasis will be placed on on-air fundr aising , program under writing and program-guide advertising. Bachelo(s degree in appropriate discipline with at least two years experience in fundraising required . Equivalent combination of education and e x perience will be accepted in lieu of degree on one year for one year basis. Send lette r of application, resume and three references to: Personnel, University of New Me xico, 1717 Roma NE, Albuquerque, N .M. 87131. Mention requi sition #1029A EOE/AA ENGINEER CORPS JOBS The u : s . Army Corps of Engineers seeKs qualified civilian applicants to fill vacant posit ions ranging from civil engineers to file clerks. Persons wishing more information should Department of the Army, Equal Employment Opportunity Office , U . S . Army Corps of Engineers, Washington , D . C . 20314-1000 (202) 272-0098. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md. , govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HISPANIC GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES If you are a Federal , State or Local public service employee , the Association of Hispanic Federal Executives invites you to j oin and become a member of an up-andcoming VOCAL, VISIBLE and RESPECTED Hispanic organization. The Association was created in 1980 and is now recruiting members for 1987. Join with us in a ccomplishing our objectives of providing advancement and training opportunities. Dues are $24 a year. Wri t e today: AHFE P.O . BOX 23662 L ' Enfant Plaza Station Washington, D . C . 20026 1987 Officers Presid ent Gil Chavez, Department of Education Vice-President: Juan Ramirez , Office of Per sonnel Management Treasurer: Gil Sandate, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Sec r et ary: AI Macias , Department of Education Hispa nic Link Weekly Report EDITOR Professional membership association seeks e x perienced professional editor . Minimum thre e years e x perience and Bachelo(sd e gree preferred. Proofreading, editing and production work re quired for professional journals and books. Must be well organiz e d with in-depth knowledge of English required, knowledge of behavioral science preferred. Starting salary low twenties plus excellent benef its. Send resume to: Employ ment Specialist, National Association of Social Workers, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring , Md. 20910. EOE COMPUTER SERVICES COORDINATOR Candidat e is responsible for e ffectiv e delivery of computer support to administrative offices. Provides user documentation and training, analy zes user problems, ensures proper equipment installation and coordinates the implementation of required changes in administrative produ c tion systems. Bachelo(s degree and 2 y e ars re lat e d e x perience required . Salary commensurate with e xperienc e . E xcellent benefits. Send r esume to: Mr. Joseph M iddleto n , D i re ctor Data Pro c e s sing L ehman College/CUNY B edford P a rk Blv d . W est Bronx, New Y o rk 10468 An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employe r . REPORTING INTERNSHIP DEADLINE EXTENDED The deadline f o r submission o f applications fora 12-mo nth $15,000 interns hip to w o r k as a reporter with H is p a n ic Li n k N ews S e rvice in Washington, D . C., has been ext e nd e d to Dec . 15. The internship, sp onsore d by the National Puerto Ric a n Coal ition and funded by the• Gannett Foundation, is o pen to anyone of Puerto Rican heritage wh o d emonstrates a desire and abil i ty t o purs u e a journalism career. Applications may be obtained by conta c ting Hector Ericksen-Mendoza, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0737. MANAGER, FACILITIES MAINTE (Department of Management and Fin . ance) Salary$32,223-$45,190 Ann . #33167BDMF Professional work with responsibility for maintenance and repair of all County buildings. Employee will supervise approximately 44 County employees and will interact and neg otiate with County personnel on daily corrective/preventive maintenance. Major responsibilities include implementing and managing a computerized preventive main tenanc e management system, developing a systemat i c approach to deferred maintenance , mon i toring the maintenance budget and assist l ing in developing long range capital bu dget, coordinating energy conservation efforts in the County and managing the Court House area parking . R equires Bachelor's degree in Electrical, Mechani c al , Civil Engineering or related area, plus 4 ye a rs e xperienc e in administration of maintenance or construction programs. An equival e nt c o mbination of training , education and experience may be substituted tor the nal requirement. Registration as a profess ional engineer in the Commonwealth of Virginia may be substituted for education. FACILITIES PLANNER (Department of Management and Finance) Salary$ 3 3 ,644$47,251 Ann. #36187 ADMF Professional fa cilities master planning and s pa c e a llocati o n pla .nning work with res lponsibilities pertaining to the design, con: struction and renovation of County buildings, in c luding wri t ing specifications for bids, re v iewing design plans, negotiating contracts and other related duties. R equire s Bac h e l o(s degree supplemented a M aster's d egree or 5-year degree in nginee ring , architecture or in related area, plus4 or more years experience in engineerinQ, design,' constru ction management or space planning. E x p erience may be substituted for a ll or part of the education requirement. Offi c i a l Arlington County application form r equired for both positions. To request cation materi als, please call (703) 558-2167 a nd refer to announcement number. Appli cations must be received in the Personnel Department no later than Jan. 15, 1987. Arlington County Pers,onnel Department 2100 14th St., North Arlington, Va. 22201 Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. DEAR PERS
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Arts & Entertainment VIDEO UNDER THE CHRISTMAS TREE: Film s on v id e o a r e increasingly popular as holiday gift it e ms, a nd man y f e at ure prom i ne n t performapces by Latinos. Following is a random listin g of titl es a v a il a bl e n a ti o n a l l y , w i t h distributors in parentheses. Many are also av a ilab le o n l as e r d i s c . No Hispanic film produced in the Unite d St a t es h as bee n as successful as El norte (CBS/Fox Home Video ) . Th e h usba n d an d wife team of Gregory Nava (direc tor) a nd Ann e Thom as (p r od ucer ) won an Oscar nomination in 198 5 fo r th e i r screenpl ay a b o ut t wo Guatemalans and their search for a better lif e up North. Kiss of the Spider Woman (Charter Entertainme nt) is th e c r i t i c a lly acclaimed film based on the nov e l by Argentina's M a nuel Pu ig. Th e r e are striking performances here by Raul Julia and Sonia Br aga. A film with limited theatrical e x po sure is direc tor R o be r t Yo un g ' s The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez (Embassy Home Entertainment), with Edward James Olmos in the titl e r o le. M o re of him , in his pre-Mia m i Vice Days, can be seen in Blade Runn e r a nd Sa v in g Grace(both from Embassy). Few contemporary Hispanic a ctors h av e th e b ox office a pp e al of Emilio Estevez. Find him in Repo Man a nd The Breakfas t Club (MCA , Home Video), St. Elmo' s Fire (RCA/Columbia) or Tha t Was Then , This Is Now (Paramount). Compare Estevez's acting a biliti es and looks w ith d a d Martin Sheen's over 15 titles , ranging from Apocaly p s e N o w (Paramount) "" to Tha t C h ampions hip Season (MGM/UA Home Video). S o m e Hi spanic performers cash in on their sex appeal. Fans of S t eve n B a u e r may want to know that the videocassette version of his Thief of He a rts (Paramount) contains "a dull" scenes not shown in U . S theaters. Seve r a l Hollywoo d c l as si c s feature grea t Hispanic performances. Yo u ma y se e Jose F erre r and Anthony Quinn in Lawrence of Arabia (RCA /Columbia) or Katy Jurado in High Noon (Republic Pictures Home Video). M a n y m u s i c als have wond e rful performances by Hispanics : Dolores de l Rio in Flying Down to Rio (Nostalgia Merchant), Linda Ronstadt in The Pirates o f Penzance (MCA), Irene Cara in Fame (MGM/UA) a nd h e r mu s i c in Flashdance (Paramount), Adolfo Quinones in Brea k in ' and its sequel Electric Boogaloo( MGM/UA) or Yamil Borges in A C h o ru s Lin e (Embassy). A lfon s o Bedoya's line in The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (CBS/Fox Home Video or Key Video), " I don't hav e to show you no stinkin' badges, " epitomizes the type of roles often given to Hispanics. In s pite of its Pue rto Rican stereotypes, West Side Story (CBS/Fox) feature s Rita Moreno' s Oscar winning performance. M o reno turns out a completely different characterization of a Pue rto Rica n woman in the comedy The Ritz (Warner). The black comedy E ating Raoul (CBS/Fox) is now a cult classic, with an early l o o k at Robert Beltran ' s talent. Hector Elizondo's performance in The Fla mingo Kid(Vestron Video) is flawless . Any of the s e movies should be well received in a Hispanic home that i s enjoy ing the video revolution. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report STATION SOLD: Hallmark C a rds In c., whose purchase of 10 Spanish International Communications Corp. telev ision st a ti ons is pending Federal Communications Com mission approval, announced Dec. 1 th a t it i s buying San Francisco' s KDTV (Ch. 13). w ere i ll e g a ll y u nde r " alie n ownership. and c ontrol." I t conc luded t h at SIN fo rmer presi de n t Reynol d ( R e n e) Anselmo, who owns 42% i n teres t in B ahia d e S a n Francisco, was too c lo se l y ti ed wi th Emilio A z carraga of M e x i c o w h o o wns SIN . presently serves 40 stations with daily seven minute feeds offered in both English and Spanish , plus a weekly 14-minute "Latin American Week in Review" in English and a nine-minute " Semana Latinoamericana" Working out of KXCR-FM in El Paso, it covers 20 Latin American countries. Like the other Spanish Internationa l Net work affiliated stations. KDTV broadcast s in Spanish. Its president is Emilio Nicol as Jr. The station, owned by Bahia d e San Fran cisco Television Company, is a Peabody Award winner and recent nom i nee fo r a n a tion a l Emmy for its Mexico earthquake cove rage . In January, FCC denied license ren e wal t o SICC and Bahia stations, charging that throu g h interlocking ownership and management , the y 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT_ a n ationa l publica ti o n o f Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publish er. Hector Eri c k s e n MendoL a Editor. F e li x P e rez Reporting : Charli e Ericksen . A nt o n i o M e j i as Rent a s , Melinda Machado No portion of H ispanic Link W e ekly R epo rt may be r epro du c ed or broadc a s t i n an y f o r m without advance p e r m i ssion. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLA SS IFIED : Ad r a t es are 75 cents per word. Displayadsare$35 p e r column in c h . A d s p laced b y . Tuesday will run in We e kly R eports m a iled Friday of s a m e week. Multiple use r ates on request. H a llmark , w i th minor pa rt ner First Chicago V enture C a p ita l , is p a y in g $ 301 . 5 mill io n for th e 10 SICC stat i o ns . NEWS SERVICE FUNDED AGAIN: The El Paso-based Latin American News Service, w hi c h distributed radio news features and weekly new s summaries o n Latin American e ve n ts , has recei ved n ew gra nt mon e y from th e Corporation for Public Broadcasting. LA NS initiat e d its p r ogramming last Feb rua r y wi t h a 15-month, $300,000 grant fr o m CPB. It s n e w grant, s till being finali z ed , should carr y i t through November of T h e servi c e is h ea d e d by Isa be l Alegria . It NAMES AND NOTES: Jose " Pepe " Del Rio closed a quarter of a century as host of the Voice of America' s Buenos Dias, America show Dec . 9 with his retirement. His weekday morn i ng broadcasts reached 23 Caribbean a n d Latin American countries. " building bridges o f goodwill between our peoples,"said VOA Director Ri c hard Carlson in a salute to Del Rio a nd his 11-person news staff. . . Angel Castillo Jr. , former New York Times legal reporter, left private law practice to join the Miami Herald as assistant managing. editor/ news . . . . -Charlie Ericksen