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Hispanic link weekly report, December 22, 1986

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 22, 1986
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Reps. E. “Kika” de la Garza and Albert Bustamante, both Democrats from Texas, are mentioned as targets in a reported campaign this year by Lt. Col. Oliver North to defeat opponents of military aid to Nicaragua. North was dismissed from the National Security Council last month for what has come to be known as “Contragate”. . . New York Gov. Mario Cuomo nominates Frank Diaz, a Bronx criminal court judge, and Cfesar Quinones, a City Family Court judge from Brooklyn, to two of the 23 $82,000-a-year judgeships at the newly created Court of Claims... Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Salvador Arturo Rivera y Damas, making his first pastoral visit to the largest Salvadoran community outside El Salvador-Los Angeles, assails the new U.S. immigration law... The New Mexico
Small Business Administration names Estanislao Rosales, president of High Tech Inc., as the Minority Small Business Person of the Year... The Fund for the City of New York recognizes Avilda Santiago as one of eight persons to receive its 14th annual Public Service Awards. Santiago heads the emergency room at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx. . . Activist Alamosa, Colo., lawyer Francisco “Klko” Martinez is sentenced to 90 days, plus 4 1/2 years probation, for lying in 1980 to a federal magistrate about his.citizenship after he was apprehended re-entering the United States from Mexico,.. The project on Equal Education Rights of the National Organization for Women gives its Golden Gazelle Award to Cecilia Preciado Burciaga for her affirmative action efforts at Stanford University. Burciaga is the associate dean for graduate studies and research at the prestigious California school...

Luis Nogales to Head New TV News Network
Luis Nogales, former chairman and chief executive officer of United Press International, was named Dec. 16 as president of the international television news agency ECO, a new media entity evolving from SIN Television Network's news division.
ECO will be headquartered in Los Angeles and formally launched iq the first quarter of 1987. It will serve the SIN network of 409 satellite-interconnected affiliates but also seek other subscribers in the U-nited States and Latin America NOGALES
Moving from a print-dominant news organization to a broadcast one and from an English-dominant agency to a Spanish one, the 43-year-old Nogales - born and raised in the
Ballesteros Appointed to San Diego Council
Celia Ballesteros, a San Diego activist attorney, was selected Dec. 8 by unanimous vote to complete the term of former City Councilman Uvaldo Martfnez, who was forced to resign recently.
Ballesteros, 55, a college trustee and restaurateur, was selected to finish the last 12 months of Martinez’s term by the eight council members. Martinez, formerly the highest ranking Latino Republican in the state, resigned last month after he was convicted of using city funds for personal entertaining.
The City Council stipulated that whoever completed Martinez’s term could not run for re-election.
Ballesteros had defeated Martinez in the 1983 Council primary, but because neither candidate received a majority, the race was decided in a citywide runoff. Martinez lost in the district, the 8th, but won the citywide race.
A Democrat, Ballesteros was born in East Los Angeles, the second of eight children.
California bordertown of Calexico - remains one of the industry’s most powerful news executives.
He told Weekly Report that his immediate plans call for opening national news bureaus in San Antonio and Los Angeles plus international bureaus in Mexico City, Madrid and the Middle East
These will accompany bureaus it will inherit from SIN’s news network in NewYork, Miami, Washington, D.C., London, Buenos Aires and San Salvador, he said. Others will be added as the system grows.
Nogales directed a major reorganization at UPI that in 1985 resulted in the news service’s first profitable year after more than two decades of growing debt He guided the agency through a bankruptcy and sale to Mexico media magnate Mario Vazquez Rafta late last year but left the organization this year when he and Vazquez Rana could not agree on the degree of power he would retain.
At ECO, Nogales will be working for another powerful Mexican media figure, Emilio Azcarraga,
Quinones Pact Extended
New York City Board of Education Chancellor Nathan Quihones was reappointed Dec. 17 by the board after objections by two members that he was not a forceful enough leader.
Quihones is the second Latino and minority to serve as chancel lor. The other was Anthony Alvarado, who was forced to resign because of financial irregularities.
Normally, the terms for chancellor are for two years. Two of the seven board members, however, persuaded the board to extend the contract for 12 months through June 1988. The New York School District is the second largest in the nation behind Los Angeles’. Its budget for the 1986-87 academic year is $4.3 billion.
Quihones, who earns $110,000 a year, is a former teacher, high school principal and high school division chief. He is 56 years old.
whose omnipresence at SIN-served stations caused the Federal Communications Commission to withhold license renewals for 10 Spanish International Communications Corporation stations, as well as others, in January. Sale of several of those stations to Hallmark Cards Inc. is now awaiting FCC approval.
Nogales said that after hours of meeting with Azcarraga, who heads the investment group that owns ECO, he was fully satisfied that he would have the autonomy and resources he needed to insure ECO’s integrity and success as a news-gathering and distribution system.
“I have a long-term arrangement and explicit guarantees of control over the editorial product” he said.
One of Nogales' first actions was to hire Sylvana Foa, UPI foreign editor who departed
continued on page 2
Refugee Center to Move
Cameron County, Texas, Commissioners reversed a previous decision and granted on Dec. 9 Casa Oscar Romero, a Central American refugee center run by the Catholic Diocese of Brownsville, the necessary utility permits for a new site.
The commissioners suspended the permits last month because of objections of mobile home park residents about the center moving nearby. Residents have since filed a lawsuit.
Casa was ordered to leave its present site in San Benito Dec. 5 after neighborhood complaints there. Up to 500 residents have been sheltered at Casa at one time. The center violated San Benito housing code restrictions when the number of occupants surpassed 50. The city is levying a $100-a-day fine till the center closes.
Hernan Gonzalez, a spokesman for the church, said the 4-year-old shelter’s move to a 6-acre lot outside Brownsville could be completed by January.
Cameron County Attorney Brian Janis said he advised the commissioners that withholding the permits could be a civil rights violation.


Gonzalez Appointed to S.F. Supervisors Board
Jim Gonzalez was sworn in Dec. 8 to the 11-member San Francisco County Board of Supervisors, the second Latino in the history of the board Mayor Dianne Feinstein appointed Gonzalez, her former aide, on Dec. 5 to fill a seat vacated by state Sen.-elect Quentin Kopp.
In November, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution calling for the mayor to appoint a Latino to the vacant seat. Gonzalez, 36, will seek election to the 4-year seat after his 2-year appointment ends, aide Elizabeth Aguilar said.
Gonzalez ran an unsuccessful race for the state Senate this year and returned to the mayor’s office where he had been special assistant to Feinstein since 1981.
No Latino has served on the board since incumbent Bob Gonzales was defeated in 1980.
News Network Formed
continued from page 1
the wire service shortly after Nogales left, as ECO’s news editor. She also has a long-term agreement which spells out her editorial authority, he said.
Foa, 41, rose through UPl’s ranks in 15 years, reporting and managing bureaus worldwide.
Other immediate hirings include Sonia Colin, formerly with KWEX-TV in San Antonio, to run ECO’s San Antonio bureau and Man'a Antonieta Collins, formerly with the “24 Horas" newscast in Mexico City, for its Los Angeles bureau. That program was produced by Televisa, another Azcarraga property.
When SI N first announced the incorporation of ECO in September, it said that “24 Horas” anchor Jacobo Zabludovsky would head it That created a storm among SIN newspersons, particularly in Miami. SIN news director Gustavo Godoy resigned and he was followed out the doorbyabout20 others. Zabludovsky, whom they complained was too pro-government in his domestic Mexican coverage, later said that he would not make the move “for personal reasons.”
Meanwhile, Godoy was hired to head the newly formed Hispanic American Broadcasting Network by a group of Miami investors HABN is expected to start competing half-hour nightly newscasts in many major U.S. Spanish-language markets early next year.
Godoy told Weekly Report in November that HABN would open bureaus in Texas and California, something SIN would not grant budget approval for during his 5-year tenure as news director there, he said.
Reacting to the impending emergence of HABb|‘Nogales said, “It certainly gives consumers a choice- and that’s good. Sometimes when there is more than one party in the market, it heightens sponsor awareness. It can make for better journalism.
“To me, in the environments where I’ve been, competition is not newHj
- Charlie Ericksen
N.Y.C. Hispanics Ignored, Says Study
The basic needs of New York City’s 1.5 million Hispanics are not being met by city agencies, according to a report from the New York Mayor’s Commission on Hispanic Concerns released Dec. 10.
Mayor Ed Koch hassaid he will not respond to the 196-page report until Feb. 12, after he meets with city agency heads. However, the mayor has already rejected a recommendation from the 13-member commission to create a panel to screen candidates for the Board of Education to insure a Hispanic is named to the board.
“It disturbed some commissioners. They felt he was jumping the gun,” the commission’s executive director, Dennisde Le6n,said. According to De Le6n, Koch would agree to a screening panel only if the state Legislature increased his appointees to the board. The mayor currently is allowed to name two board members.
Education and unemployment received a strong emphasis from the commission. “The social and economic advancement of Hispanic youth depends on their educational advancement-yet the Hispanic dropout rate is
Villalpando in RNHA Bid
Cathi Villalpando, who served as special assistant to President Reagan for Hispanic affairs in 1983-85, announced her intention Dec. 16 to run for chair of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly.
RNHA’s biennial election will be conducted when the body meets in Phoenix in February.
Los Angeles businessman Al Villalobos, U.S. Senate Sergeant at Arms Ernie Garcia and incumbent chair Fernando de Baca of Washington, D.C, also are considering entering the race.
Villalpando is senior vice president of the Atlanta-based telecommunications corporation Communications International, representing it in Washington, D.C. A native of Texas, she has been active in Hispanic Republican politics there and in Washington for more than 15 years.
Island Pop. Up Slightly
Puerto Rico’s population grew2.7% between 1980-85, the lowest growth rate of any U.S. territory, a Census Bureau report released Dec. 11 said.
Contributing to this low growth was a net migration of 157,000 people from the island commonwealth to the United States in the last five years. As of July 1985, there were nearly 3.3 million residents on the island. More Puerto Ricans migrated to the United States in the ‘80s than in any other decade since the ‘50s.
Following are the Puerto Rican population figures from 1980-85:
1980 3,197,000 1983 3,265,000
1981 3,245,000 1984 3,269,000
1982 3,262,000 1985 3,282,000
the highest of all ethnic and racial groups in the city,” the commission said Recent reports have put New York City’s rate as high as 80%.
The most shocking figures are in government employment, De Leon said, particularly in managerial positions. xDf the 3,856 managers in city agencies in June 1986, 2,990, or 77.5%, were white, 617, or 16%, were black and 164, or 4.3%, were Hispanic, the report, shows.
Among the more than 150 recommendations and findings made by the panel are:
• Education: institutionalized accountability for student retention, expanded mentoring programs, increased parental participation in schools and recruitment of bilingual teachers. The Board of Education must ensure that all entitled students receive bilingual education, the report said, stating that during the 1984-85 school year 15,000 students entitled to it did not get it.
• Economic Development: creation of a Hispanic Economic Development Office to advocate on behalf of Hispanic businesses.
• Housing: creation of the Hispanic Public Benefit Corporation to initiate, finance and develop low- and moderate-income housing.
• Unemployment: provide training programs, recruit Hispanics, improve monitoring of equal employment opportunities.
• Health: appoint qualified Hispanics to policy-making positions at the citys municipal hospitals, appoint Hispanic physicians and bilingual mental health workers.
• Criminal Justice: increase drug treatment programs to substance abusers and services to crime victims.
To improve city services for New York Hispanics, the report calls for increasing bilingual language services in all agencies and creating a Spanish hotline. _ /^e//nc/a Machado
Corp. Recognition Sought
A divergent group of leaders from the North-1 east announced Dec. 12 the formulation of a coalition to make corporations more responsive to the Puerto Rican community.
I n October the Puerto Rican Task Force for a Corporate Strategy met and formed a seven-member working committee to begin considering strategies.
Angelo Falcon, president of the I nstitute for Puerto Rican Policy and a working-committee member, said the task force is currently considering boycotts and public relations campaigns if the targeted corporations failed to respond. He declined to identify any of the corporations or specific complaints.
“The irony of all this is that we are in the corporate center of the world and we are faithful consumers, yet we are ignored,” Falcon said.
He mentioned as objectives the installment of affirmative hiring policies, recruiting Puerto Ricans as entry-level employees and managers, and establishing a community foundation.
The task force will meet in New York Jan. 31 toannounceitsstrategyandthecorporations it will target.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Julio Ojeda, guest columnist
Feeding the Camels
At age 6, this Puerto Rican kid was in materialistic, consumer-istic heaven. After Santa barraged me with toys on Christmas morning, I could count on los Tres Reyes Magos- The-Three Kings - to unleash a second torrent on Jan. 6.
All that the reyes asked in return was a plate of cookies,-three glasses of milk and - this was the most important part-three shoe boxes full of grass for the camels.
At age 8, I suffered double heartbreak.
Santa was exposed as a transparent phony, and the kings were also revealed as a trio of fakers. What a revelation: my parents had purchased the gifts at the mall.
But a mystery remained. Though I could imagine Mom and Dad munching the cookies and drinking the milk I had considerable difficulty picturing them with grass in their mouths.
At age 9,1 realized with a certain adult pride that I would no longer have to venture out, shoe box in hand, to pluck grass from the neighbor’s lawn. Such childish pastimes were behind me now.
Not so fast, said Mom. “ If you want to find any presents next to your bed tomorrow, you better get grass for the camels.”
“But, Mom,” I replied, “there are no camels.”
“You heard me,” Mom said, handing me a shoe box My mother, the extortionist
‘I’M IN COLLEGE NOW5
At age 19, home in Santurce, Puerto Rico, for Christmas vacation after my first semester of college-cooked dorm food, I emerged from my bedroom to encounter my mother approaching and brandishing a' shoe box.
“But Mom, I’m in college now.”
“You know what I want,” said the extortionist sweetly.
Skulking around the bushes next to the parking lot (my parents lived in a condo now), I cursed my mother's holiday obsession. What was she trying to prove? What could she possibly accomplish by making her fully grown son pick at grass like a cow?
Now I am 23, out of college and reporting for a newspaper in Chicago, far from Santurce.
The other morning, I awakened with a strange longing to hear aguinaldos, the music sung by jibaros in the mountains of Puerto Rico. Odd. I had never cared for that music when I lived in Puerto Rico. Van Halen is a lot faster and aguinaldo singers don’t use bass guitars.
I called home and pleaded, “ Mom, will you please send me some of that le/lo/lai music?”
She sent me Alegria Navideha, “Christmas Joy,” by Herman Rosario and El Indio de Bayamon.
THE CAMELS WOULD GAG
Listening to El Indio on my Walkman as the icy Lake Michigan wind bit through my coat, I was acutely conscious that this would be my first Christmas away from home. I had a sudden urge to stuff grass in' a shoe box.
The only grass to be found in Chicago in December is dry, brown and crinkly. The camels would gag.
But wait a minute. I do have a shoe box in my closet and the botanical garden isn’t far from where I live.
I could visit there, walk casually among its flowers and greenery, wait for the moment when no attendant was in sight and whip out my shoe box.
If I get caught and arrested, I know the policemen would never understand.
But my mother would.
(Julio Ojeda is a reporter with the civil rights monthly, The Chicago Reporter. He earned his graduate journalism degree at the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
ROCKY ROAD: Rocky Barilla was sworn in as an Oregon state Representative for District 31 in Salem on Dec 12, and therein lies one of the more upbeat stories of election year 1986.
Some of the elements that made the story special:
1) No Latino had ever been elected to the Oregon Legislature in history. (One, Cuba-born lawyer Raul Soto-Seelig, was appointed to a state Senate seat in 1977 but he lost it in the next year’s ejection.)
2) A Democrat, Rocky ran in a district in which registered Republicans outnumber Democrats, 13,043 to 10,496.
3) Less than 1/2 of 1% of the district's voters are Hispanic or black.
4) The election marked Rocky’s first try for public office.
5) His opponent, Al Riebel, had been elected in the district three times before. (He chose not to run in ‘82 and ‘84, but decided this year to recapture his old seat)
With all those factors working against him, what did Rocky have going for him?
1) He was fully qualified for the job. Raised in Los Angeles, he earned his law degree at the University of Southern California in 1975 before heading to the state where many Californians have been seeking refuge in recent years. At the time of the election, he was serving as legal counsel for the Oregon House’s Judiciary Committee.
2) Still a marathon runner at age 38, he visited “every house in the district at least once.”
3) Jim Hill.
Hill, a black Democrat and indefatigable campaigner, paved the way for Rocky by scoring a stunning victory in House District 31 in 1982 and repeating in ‘84. “If there’s something called the color barrier, Hill broke it,” says Rocky. This year, Hill decided to take a shot at a Senate seat.
He was the one who first encouraged Rocky to run for the seat he was vacating and then - by Rocky’s admission- pushed him to his endurance limits to capture it.
“When it was raining hard, when it was cold, when I was tired, I thought of Jim Hill,” Rocky told reporters after his victory.
Election-day tally put Rocky ahead of Riebel by a scant but sufficient 350 votes - 10,284 to 9,934.
Hill won his Senate bid, too.
The reason that Rocky was sworn in ahead of the other freshmen legislators - who’ll take their oaths Jan. 12 - is again tied to Hill. Hill vacated his House seat to join the Senate early because the seat he won had become vacant
Could there have been any other factors involved in Rocky’s victory?
Well, there was a poster on the wall of his campaign headquarters of the other Rocky, Sylvester Stallone.
It just could be that special things happen to underdogs named Rocky who aren’t afraid to work hard to achieve their goals.
- Kay Barbaro
Quoting..
LUIS NOGALES, new president of the ECO Spanish-language international television news service, on the growing English-only movement:
“Ifs a real threat to all immigrants and, I think, to this whole society. Part of my job will be to explain what our network does and why it does it, to talk about the aspirations and the challenges that Hispanics face. I will be in a position to reflect on that to public bodies as well as to private enterprise.”
RAFAEL CORTADA, president of California’s El Camino Community College, on his Hispanic/black heritage :
“/ alternate what (racial/ethnic) designation I check. I think it’s kind of absurd, anyway
Dec. 22,1986


COLLECTING
LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: “Marital Status and Living Arrangements: March 1985," a 91-page report, details the incidence of single-head families among Latinos, blacks and whites. For a copy, order Series P-20, No. 410 from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
HISPANICS IN NEW YORK: The Mayor’s Commission on Hispanic Concerns has issued its report on the status of Latinos in that city. A limited number of free copies of the 34-page report can be obtained by writing to: MCHC, 100 Church St., Suite 6C2, New York, N.Y. 10007 (212)566-1080.
POPULATION CHANGES FOR PUERTO RICO: “Estimates of the Population of Puerto Rico and the Outlying Areas: 1980 to 1985,” a 7-page booklet by the U.S. Census Bureau, can be ordered by writing for Series P-25, No. 997 from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402. (Price was not available at press time.)
IMMIGRATION ACT QUESTIONNAIRE: The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is soliciting advice in the development of its public education efforts while implementing the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. If you have views on how it should proceed in the areas of legalization, employer sanctions and/or special agricultural workers, request a questionnaire from the Office of Plans & Analysis, INS, 4251 St. NW, Room 6100, Washington, D.C. 20536.
ART CONTEST: The Adolph Coors Co. is sponsoring a national art contest. Winners’ works will be showcased in a national art tour, “Expresiones Hispanas." _ Entries will be accepted through March 1987. For-more information, write to: Expresiones Hispanas, c/o Artistics Images, Maureen Acosta, P.O. Box 11434, Denver, Colo. 80211.
IMMIGRATION REPORTS: The Urban Institute has prepared two reports on immigration: “immigration to Southern California: Fact and Fiction,” 26 pages, $5; “Why the United States Needs Immigrants,” 39 pages, $5.75. All orders must be prepaid. Writeto: Library/Information Clearinghouse, TUi, P.O. Box7273, Dept. C, Washington, D.C. 20044.
COUNSELING PRE-COLLEGE STUDENTS: “Counseling Hispanic College-Bound High School Students” is an 86-page book that addresses the need for improving counseling services to Hispanic students, reviews resources and helps find financial aid. To obtain a copy, send a $6.50 prepaid order to: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027.
CONNECTING
(Late news on what’s occurring within the U.S. Hispanic community](i\ and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
TENTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATED The Washington, D.C., Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs commemorate®*! its 10th anniversary Dec. 11, inviting community members to rat celebration at its offices at the new Reeves Municipal Center. j i The District of Columbia, it claims, is the only city in the country thaw has committed itself to providing equitable services to Latino residentsbr by creating an agency to monitor the delivery of its services.
A fall 1986 public school enrollment survey by The Washington^ Post showed that Hispanic and Asian students, who made up juste 1.5% of the area’s school enrollment in 1970, increased to 5.6% b^;d 1980 and now comprise nearly 10%.
Public schools in the District itself are 91.8% black, with Hispanicsp passing whites this year, 3.7% to 3.6%. Asians are 0.9%.
$50,000 FOR WASHINGTON OFFICE Anheuser-Busch Companies have awarded a $50,000 grant to thebrl U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce to help support the chamber’s^ newly established Washington, D.C., legislative office.
The office, located at 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 200, isjji managed by Jorge Negron.
CALENDAR OFFERS CONGRESSMEN’S PORTRAITS : Portraits of 11 Hispanic congressmen are featured in a 1987 Millerne High Life Hispanic calendar available through its distributors this i\ month. Theywere painted by artist Juan Maldonado, artist-in-residence ? at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York.
LABOR AWARDS $750,000 GRANT
The U.S. Department of Labor has awarded a $750,000 two-year |; grant to the American Society fpr Training and Development tojb examine basic skills training now being offering both to disadvantaged Ifc and new immigrants, including on-the-job training in reading, math r and adaptation to the workplace.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Los Angeles Dodgers pitching star Fernando Valenzuela has p signed a 3-year contract to advertise and promote the soft drink (I products of The Coca-Cola Company.. .Elia Kerr, manager of the U.S t. Department of Labor’s internal Hispanic programs, has taken office e as chairperson of the 200-member Washington, D.C., Council of I Hispanic Employment Program managers...
Calendar
COMING SOON
DIA DE LOS REYES
Immaculata College
Immaculata, Pa. Jan. 10
Sister Mary Consuela (215) 647-4400
WOMEN’S LEGISLATIVE BRIEFING
Commissions for Women of Prince Georges and
Montgomery counties
College Park, Md. Jan 11
Marge Zimmerman (301) 952-3383
LITERARY AWARDS DINNER Letras de Oro Miami Jan. 22
Ambler H. Moss (305) 284-4303
GALA DINNER DANCE Archdiocesan Catholic Charities Washington, D.C. Jan. 31 Kathy Schrader (202) 265-0515
RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS BANQUET Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters Washington, D.C. Feb. 4 Dan Nicholas (201) 428-5400
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE California Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Feb. 6,7 Magdalena H. Beltran (213) 743-7158
SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISING DINNER University of Southern California Mexican American Alumni Association Los Angeles Feb. 12 George Pla (213) 743-2456
EDUCATIONAL FUND BENEFIT BANQUET League of United Latin American Citizens, Northeast
s^saaaaaaiBflEffi,MMBB»Baasaa3;3gMBE8aMB»jaBBHaBWMiBMiBi' -------—------------------—--------------*
Region
Washington, D.C. Feb. 19 Andres Tobar (202) 347-1493
SPOTLIGHT
COMBATING YOUTH ILLITERACY: Texas LULAC I is sponsoring the “School Dropout Symposium: | Preventing Wasted Lives and Wasted Dollars” in I San Antonio on Jan. 15 and 16.
William Bennett, U.S. Secretary of Education, will | attend, and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will ] moderate the Jan. 16 panel discussion featuring 1 Texas Commissioner of Education William Kirby, I President of the Texas Association of School Boards j Oscar Hernandez, and Lupita Quintanilla, assistant vice president for academic affai rs at the University : of Houston. Four workshops on effective teaching, I parental/community i nvolvement, creating corporation/ school partnerships and preventive and recovery programs are scheduled. Recommendations arising ' from the symposium will be sent to the Texas Legislature. For more information, contact: Enrique Gallegos (512) 342-5157.
Dec. 22, 1986
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
LEHMAN COLLEGE
TENURE TRACK FACULTY POSITIONS Anticipated September 1,1987
ART Applied art (1 year substitute position).
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Immunology; ability to establish research program and supervise Ph.D. students.
ECONOMICS AND ACCOUNTING (1) Economics; (2) Accounting.
ENGLISH (1) Director of English composition; (2) professional writing specialist.
HEALTH SERVICES Health services administration, including courses in health planning, management, and finance.
HISTORY Specialization in Soviet, and Middle Eastern, or African history.
MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTER I SCIENCE (1) mathematics; (2) computer science.
MUSIC Choral director.
NURSING Clinical and classroom instruction in most specialty areas.
! POLITICAL SCIENCE Public administration, including instruction in health policy, administration, and finance.
PUERTO RICAN STUDIES Latin American history, literature, and politics. Instruction in ES.L. and Bilingual programs. j
ROMANCE LANGUAGES (1) French; (2) Spanish.
SECONDARY, ADULT, AND BUSINESS EDUCATION (1) Foreign languages, and E.S.L.; (2) Business education and corporate training; (3) psychological foundations, and history and philosophy of education.
SPECIALIZED SERVICES IN EDUCATION Specialty in reading.
SPEECH AND THEATRE (1) Audiology and hearing science; (2) speech and hearing science; supervise speech and hearing center; (3) mass communications (1 year substitute position).
Strong commitment to teaching and research. Ph.D. required.
SALARY RANGE: (1986-87): Professor, $40,623 - $58,167; Associate Professor, $32,726 - $48,403; Assistant Professor, $25,114 - $40,505.
Send resume by January 20,1987 to: Chair, Department indicated.
LEHMAN COLLEGE, Bronx, NY 10468-1589 W WJTM H A MT AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION | 1WI/m i^l
LEHMAN COLLEGE - THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF ASSOCIATE
IUP/SSRC Committee-on Public Policy Research on Contemporary Hispanic Issues
The Staff Associate is responsible for developing and administering innovative research programs related to research on public policy issues in the Hispanic community. Specific areas involve a wide range of social scientific fields of inquiry. The full-time position involves administering fellowship and grants competitions; the planning of seminars, workshops and conferences; preparing reviews of relevant fields; negotiating grant proposals; and maintaining relationships with academic institutions and other organizations ,in the Hispanic research and public policy communities. The program is jointly sponsored with the Inter-University Program for Latino Research.
As a member of the SSRC staff, the staff associate also develops and maintains contact with other relevant programs at the Council, assists with the development of new programs in relevant areas, and is involved in a variety of general organizational activities.
Candidates for this position must have a Ph.D in one of the social sciences, must have carried out research on Hispanic issues, must have command of written and spoken Spanish and have established connections with the Hispanic community.
Applications are sought from scholars with two-to-four years of teaching, research and/or administrative experience beyond the doctorate, although recent recipients of the Ph.D. will also be considered. Council salaries are competitive with those at universities, and provisions are made to enable staff members to continue their professional development. The Council is seeking an applicant who can take up the position early in 1987, certainly no later than Summer of 1987.
Applicants should send a letter and a curriculum vitae to:
IUP/SSRC Committee on Contemporary Hispanic Issues Staff Associate Search Social Science Research Council 605 Third Avenue New York, New York 10158
HISPANIC
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
If you are a Federal, State or Local public service employee, the Association of Hispanic Federal Executives invites you to join and become a member of an up- and- coming VOCAL, VISIBLE and RESPECTED Hispanic organization.
The Association was created in 1980 and is now recruiting members for 1987. Join with us in accomplishing our objectives of providing advancement and training opportunities. Dues are $24 a year.
Write today:
AHFE
P.O. BOX 23662 L’ Enfant Plaza Station Washington, D.C. 20026 1987 Officers
President Gil Chavez, Department of Education
Vice-President: Juan Ramirez, Office of Personnel Management
Treasurer: Gil Sandate, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
Secretary: Al Macias, Department of Education >
CALIFORNIA CITIZENSHIP COORDINATOR: Individual will be responsible for coordinating U.S. citizenship campaigns throughout the state of California
Position involves frequent travel both in and out of state although the majority of time will be spent at NALEO’s East Los Angeles Office; individual should be able to work with community-based organizations, local school districts, the INS and elected/appointed officials to promote U.S. citizenship; individual should have the ability to work with local media in the promotion of project activities Position also requires fluent English/Spanish bilingual, excellent communication skills and the ability to work in an unstructured environment. Salary is $20,000-$25,000.
Send resume to: NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT: for fast paced human rights office. Work with administrative team. Responsible to the director for accounting and budget oversight. Requires attention to detail and organization, excellent writing, proofing and editing skills, 60 wpm. Salary $16,000 or commensurate with experience plus oenefits. Send resume to: Search Committee, 110 Maryland Ave. NW, Suite 404, Washington, D.C. 20002. EOE.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Report s new ‘guest columnist” feature. Approx. 500 words. For writer's guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005
anic Lifik Weekly Report


Arts& Entertainment
FILMS FROM LATIN AMERICA CONTINUE togain international recognition at screening events around the world this month.
Here in the United States, the Spanish Pictures Exhibitors Association held its eighth annual convention in Las Vegas Dec. 1-3. The event is a film market that gathers producers with exhibitors and members of the press, and trailers of upcoming material are screened.
A special tribute to the late Mexican director Emilio “El Indio” Fernandez was held, with a 25-minute program made up of clips from his various productions. During closing night ceremonies, SPEA handed out its Cuauhtemoc Awards in several categories, including best producer, best director and best actor and actress.
In Spain, the 12th annual Festival de Cine Iberoamericano de Huelva was held Dec. 1-7. Among the various festival events, an open discussion on “film and literature” brought together the directors of the national film companies of Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela and Peru.
The festival’s grand prize, the Colon de Oro, went to Pobre Mariposa, an entry by Argentine director Raul de la Torre. A special audience award went to another Argentine product: Americo Ortiz de Zarate’s Otra Historia de Amor.
Back in Buenos Aires, a total of six films from Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela and Argentina were exhibited Dec. 4-9 in a
special event sponsored by the Asociacidn Cinematografica Latino-americana All of the participating countries, plus Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Panama, are members of the ACLA, which was established in 1984 to create a Latin American market and promote co-productions among member countries.
In Havana, the eighth Festival Internacional de Nuevo Cine Latino-americano, Dec. 3-17, coincided with the establishment on Dec. 16 of the new International School of Film, Radio and Television.
More than 400 shorts and feature films were screened at the Havana festival, which began with a screening of Maria Luisa Bemberg’s Miss Mary, an Argentine film starring British actress Julie Christie. Opening night celebrities included two South American novelists whose works have been converted into film: Colombia’s Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Brazil’s Jorge Amado.
Visitors from the United States included director Sidney Pollack (Tootsie), who told Cuba’s news agency Prensa Laf/'nathat he aspired to do a film with a Latin American theme. Accompanying Pollack were singer Harry Belafonte and producers Mark Rosenberg and Paula Walstein.
ONE LINER: A Hollywood-based public relations and marketing firm, Hispanic Entertainment Specialists, has announced it will produce the first Hispanic film shot in Los Angeles in simultaneous Spanish and English versions. Dangerous Streets has a $400,000 budget and is expected to be released with a music video and record albums in both languages...
Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
VISTA PASSES MILLION: Vista, an English-language monthly magazine covering the U.S. Hispanic community, will pass the one-million circulation mark in January, publisher Arturo Villar reports.
Based in Coral Gables, Fla., the Hispanic-owned weekend newspaper supplement is carried by 25 daily newspapers nationally, including 11 in Texas, seven in California, three in Florida, two in Arizona and one each in Illinois and New Mexico.
Its circulation is targeted to Hispanic subscribers by most newspapers that distribute it.
In January, the Corpus Christi Caller-Times
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Charlie Ericksen, Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
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in Texas will increase its distribution of the supplement from 50,000 to its full readership of 89,000. That and other smaller gains will give Vista a national circulation of 1,040,800.
Vista began monthly publication in September 1985. It is considering converting to weekly later next year.
POST, COMMUNITY MEET: The Washington Post took a first step in its commitment to be more responsive to the growing Latino community in the nation’s capital by hosting a reception/dialogue with community leaders Dec. 16. Greeting and interacting with some 15 Latino leaders were metro editor Milton Coleman, city editor Eugene Robinson and several reporters who cover the city.
Future meetings with Latino activists and leaders in Virginia and Maryland will be held soon.
The Hispanic News Media Association and the Washington chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences are coordinating the sessions.
Settlement to a protest by blacks against the Post, directed by WOL-AM radio station owner Cathy Hughes, was reached Dec. 14. The protest focused on portrayals of blacks in the premiere edition of a new Post Sunday magazine in September. As part of the agreed resolution, Post publisher Donald Graham and two other top executives appeared on Hughes’ morning call-in talk shows on successive days.
ON TELEVISION: On Dec. 23, the SIN Television Network presents a 30-minute special at 10 p.m. (ET) on the 22,000 U.S. Hispanic children in need of adoption.
- Charlie Ericksen
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week Small Business Administration names Estanislao Rosales, president of High Tech Inc. , as the Minority Small Business Person of the Year ... The Fund for the City of New York recognizes Avilda Santiago as one of eight persons to receive its 14th annual Public Service Awards. Santiago heads the emergency room at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx . . . Activist Alamosa , Colo . , lawyer Francisco "Kiko" Martinez is sentenced to 90 days, plus 4 1/2 years probation , for lying in 1980 to a federal magistrate about his . citizenship after he was apprehended re-entering the United States from Mexico ... The project on Equal Education Rights of the National Organization for Women gives its Golden Gazelle Award to Cecilia Preciado Burciaga for her affirmative action efforts at Stanford University. Burciaga is the associate dean for graduate studies and research at the prestigious Cal i fornia school. .. U.S. Reps . E. "Kika" de Ia Garza and Albert Bustamante, both Democrats from Texas, are mentioned as targets in a reported campaign this year by Lt . Col. Oliver North to defeat opponents of military aid to Nicaragua . North was dismissed from the National Security Council last month for what has come to be known as "Contragate " ... New York Gov . Mario Cuomo nominates Frank Diaz, a Bronx criminal court judge, and Cesar Quinones, a City Family Court judge from Brooklyn , to two of the 23 $82 , 000-ayear judgeships at the newly created Court of Claims ... Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Salvado r Arturo Rivera y Damas, making his first pastoral visit to the largest Salvadoran community outside El Salvador Los Angeles , assails the new U . S . immigration law . .. The New Mexico HISPANIC LINK WEE Dec. 22, 1986 Luis Nogales to Head New TV News Network Luis Nogales, former chairman and chief executive officer of United Press International, was named Dec . 16 as president of the inter national television news agency EGO, a new media entity evolving from SIN Television Network's news division. ECO will be head-,._ ___ _ quartered in Los Angeles and formally l aun c he d io. t he fir s t q uarte r o f 1 987. It w ill serv e the SIN netw or k of 409 satellite-inter connected affiliates but also seek other subscribers in the U nited States and Latin--....,. America Moving from a print-dominant news organ ization to a broadcast one and from an English. . . dominant agency to a Spanish one, the 43 year-old Nogales born and raised in the Ballesteros Appointed to San Diego Council Celia Ballesteros, a San Diego activist attar ney , was selected Dec. 8 by unanimous vote to complete the term of former City Councilman Uvaldo Martinez, who was forced to resign recently. Ballesteros , 55 , a college trustee and res taurateur, was selected to finish the last 1 i months of Martinez's term by the eight councii members . Martinez, formerly the highest rank ing Latino Republican in the state, resigned last month after he was convicted of using city funds for personal entertaining. The City Council stipulated that whoever completed Martinez's term could not run for re-election . Ballesteros had defeated Martinez in the 1983 Council primary, but because neither candidate received a majority, the race was decided in a citywide runoff. Martinez lost in the district, the 8th, but won the citywide race. A Democrat, Ballesteros was born in East Los Angeles, the second of eight children. California bordertown of Calexico-remains one of the industry's most powerful news executives . He told Weekly Report that his immediate pla ns c all fo r opening na t ional news bureaus in San Antonio and Los Angeles plus inter national bureaus in Mexico City , Madrid and the Middle East. These will accompany bureaus it will inherit f rom SIN 's news netwo r k in New York, Mi ami, Washington , D .C., London , Buenos Air e s an d San Salvador , h e s aid. O t hers will b e add e d as th e sys tem grows . Nogales directed a major reorganization at UPI t hat in 1985 resulted in the news service's first profitable year after more than two decades of growing debt He guided the agency through a bankruptcy and sale to Mexico media magnate Mario Vazquez Rana late last year but left the organizat
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GonzalezAppointedto N.Y.C. Hispanics Ignored, Says Study S.F. Superv1sors Board . . . . Jim Gonzalez was sworn in Dec. 8 to the 11-member San Francisco County Board of Supervisors, the second Latino in the history of the board. Mayor Dianne Feinstein appointed Gonzalez, her former aide, on Dec . 5 to fill a seat vacated by state Sen.-elect Quentin Kopp. In November, the San Francisco Board of Supervisors adopted a resolution calling for the mayor to appoint a Latino to the vacant seat. Gonzalez, 36, will seek election to the 4-year seat after his 2-year appointment ends, aide Elizabeth Aguilar said. Gonzalez ran an unsuccessful race for the state Senate this year and returned to the mayor's office where he had been special assistant to Feinstein since 1981. No Latino has served on the board since incumbent Bob Gonzales was defeated in 1980. News Network Formed continued from page 1 the wire service shortly after Nogales left, as ECO' s news editor. She also has a long-term agreement which spells out her editorial authority, he said. Foa, 41, rose through UPI's ranks in 15 years, reporting and managing bureaus world wide. Other immediate hirings include Sonia Colin, formerly with KWEX-TV in San Antonio, to run ECOs San Antonio bureau and Maria Antonieta Collins, formerly with the "24 Horas" newscast in Mexico City, for its Los Angeles bureau. That program was produced by Televisa, another Azcarraga property. When Sl N first announced the incorporation of ECO in September, it said that "24 Horas" anchor Jacobo Zabludovsky would head it. That created a storm among SIN newspersons, particularly in Miami. SIN news director Gustavo Godoy resigned and he was followed out the door by about 20 others. Zabludovsky, whom they complained was too pro-government in his domestic Mexican coverage, later said that he would not make the move "for personal reasons." Meanwhile, Godoy was hired to head the newly formed Hispanic American Broadcasting Network by a group of Miami investors. HABN is expected to start competing half-hour nightly newscasts in many major U.S. Spanish-language markets early next year. Godoy told Weekly Report in November that HABN would open bureaus in Texas and California, something SIN would not grant budget approval for during his 5-year tenure as news director there, he said . Reacting to the impending emergence of HABN, Nogales said, "It certainly gives con sumers a choice-and thafs good. Sometimes when there is more than one party in the market, it heightens sponsor awareness . It can make for better journalism. "To me, in the environments where I've been, competition is not new." Charlie Ericksen 2 The basic needs of New York City's 1.5 the highest of all ethmc and rac1al groups 1n j million Hispanics are not being met by city . the city," the commission said Recent reports agencies, according to a report from the New have put New York City's ' rate as high as 80% . '.l York Mayor's Commission on Hispanic ConThe most shocking in government I' cerns released Dec. 10. employment, De said, particularly in , Mayor Ed Koch has said he will not respond managerial positions. "of the 3,856 managers t to the 196-page report until Feb. 12, after he in city agencies in June 1986, 2,990, or meets with city agency heads. However, the 77.5%, were white, 617, or 16%, were black j1 mayor has already rejected a recommendation and 164, or 4.3%, were Hispanic, the report, from the 13-member commission to create a shows. l panel to screen candidates for the Board of Among the more than 150 recommendations l Education to insure a Hispanic is named to and findings made by the panel are: I the board. e Education: institutionalized accountI . "It disturbed some commissioners . They abilityforstudentretention,expandedmentoring t felt he was jumping the gun," the commission's programs, increased parental participation in executive director, Dennis de Leon, said. Acschools and recruitment of bilingual teachers. cording to De Leon, Koch would agree to a The Board of Education must ensure that all screening panel only if the state Legislature entitled students receive bilingual education, increased his appointees to the board. The the report said, stating that during the 1984mayor currently is allowed to name two board 85 school year 1 5,000 students entitled to it members. did not get it. Education and unemployment received a e Economic Development creation of a strong emphasis from the commission. "The Hispanic Economic Development Office to social and economic advancement of Hispanic advocate on behalf of Hispanic businesses. youth depends on their educational ade Housing: creation of the Hispanic Public vancement-yet the Hispanic dropout rate is Benefit Corporation to initiate, finance and Villalpando in RNHA Bid Cathi Villalpando, who served as special assistant to President Reagan for Hispanic affairs in 1983-85, announced her intention Dec. 16 to run for chair of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly. RNHA's biennial election will be conducted when the body meets in Phoenix in February. Los Angeles businessman AI Villalobos, U . S . Senate Sergeant at Arms Ernie Garcia and incumbent chair Fernando de Baca of Washington, D.C., also are considering entering the race. Villalpando is senior vice president of the Atlanta-based telecommunications corporation Communications International, representing it in Washington, D.C. A native of Texas, she has been active in Hispanic Republican politics there and in Washington for more than 15 years. Island Pop. Up Slightly Puerto Ricds population grew2.7% between 1980-85, the lowest growth rate of any U.S. territory, a Census Bureau report released Dec. 11 said. Contributing to this low growth was a net migration of 157,000 people from the island commonwealth to the United States in the last five years . As of July 1985, there were nearly 3.3 million residents on the island. More Puerto Ricans migrated to the United States in the '80s than in any other decade since the '50s. Following are the Puerto Rican population figures from 1980-85: 1980 3,197,000 1981 3,245,000 1982 3,262,000 1 983 3,265,000 1984 3,269,000 1985 3,282,000 develop lowand moderate-income housing. e Unemployment provide training pro grams, recruit Hispanics, improve monitoring of equal employment opportunities. • Health: appoint qualified Hispanics to policy-making positions at the city's municipal hospitals, appoint Hispanic physicians and bilingual mental health workers. • Criminal Justice: increase drug treatment programs to substance abusers and services to crime victims. To improve city services for New York His panics, the report calls for increasing bilingual language services in all agencies and creating a Spanish hotline. -Melinda Machado Corp. Recognition Sought A divergent group of leaders from the Northeast announced Dec. 12 the formulation of a coalition to make corporations more re sponsive to the Puerto Rican community. In October the Puerto Rican Task Force for a Corporate Strategy met and formed a seven member working committee to begin consider ing strategies. Angelo Falcon, president oft he Institute for Puerto Rican Policy and a working-committee member, said the task force is currently con sidering boycotts and public relations cam paigns if the targeted corporations failed to respond. He declined to identify any of the corporations or specific complaints. "The irony of all this is that we are in the corporate center of the world and we are faithful consumers, yet we are ignored," Falcon said. He mentioned as objectives the installment of affirmative hiring policies, recruiting Puerto Ricans as entry-level employees and managers, and establishing a community foundation. The task force will meet in New York Jan. 31 to announce its strategy and the corporations it wi II target. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Julio Ojeda, guest columnist Feeding the Camels At age 6, this Puerto Rican kid was in materialistic, consumer istic heaven. After Santa barraged me with toys on Christmas morning, I could count on los Tres Reyes Magos-TheThree Kings-to unleash a second torrent on Jan . 6. All that the reyes asked in return was a plate of cookies, three glasses of milk and-this was the most important partthree shoe boxes full of grass for the camels. At age 8, I suffered double heartbreak. Santa was exposed as a transparent phony, and the kings were also revealed as a trio of fakers. What a revelation: my pa_rents had purchased the gifts at the mall. But a mystery remained. Though I could imagine Mom and Dad munching the cookies and drinking the milk, I had considerable difficulty picturing them with grass in their . mouths. At age 9, I realized with a certain adult pride that I would no longer have to venture out, shoe box in hand, to pluck grass from the neighbor's lawn. Such childish pastimes were behind me now. Not so fast, said Mom. "If you want to find any presents next to your bed tomorrow, you better get grass for the camels." "But, Mom," I replied, "there are no camels." "You heard me," Mom said, handing me a shoe box. My mother, the extortionist. 'I'M IN COLLEGE NOW' At age 19, home in Santurce, Puerto Rico, for Christmas vacation afte r my first semester of college-cooked dorm food, I emerged from my bedroom to encounter my mother approaching and brandishing a shoe box . "But Mom, I'm in college now." "You know what I want," said the extortionist sweetly. Skulking around the bushes next to the parking lot (my parents lived in a condo now), I cursed my mother's holiday obsession. What was she trying to prove? What could she possibly accomplish by making her fully grown son pick at grass like a cow? Now I am 23, out of college and reporting for a newspaper in Chicago, far from Santurce. The other morning, I awakened with a strange longing to hear aguinaldos, the music sung by jibaros in the mountains of Puerto Rico . Odd. I had never cared for that music when I lived in Puerto Rico. Van Hal en is a lot faster and aguinaldo singers don't use bass guitars. 1 called home and pleaded," Mom, will you please send me some of that le/lo/lai music?" She sent me Alegria Navideiia, "Christmas Joy," by Herman Rosario and El Indio de Bayam6n. THE CAMELS WOULD GAG Sin pe/os en Ia lengua ROCKY ROAD: Rocky Barilla was sworn in as an Representative for District 31 in Salem on Dec. 12, and therem hes one of the more upbeat stories of election year 1986. Some of the elements that made the story special: 1) No Latino had ever been elected to the Oregon Legislature in history. (One, Cuba-born lawyer Raul Soto-Seelig, was ap pointed to a state Senate seat in 1977 but he lost it in the next year's election.) 2) A Democrat, Rocky ran in a district in which registered Republicans outnumber Democrats, 13,043 to 1 0,496. 3) Less than )/2 .of 1% of the districfs voters are Hispanic or black. 4) The election marked Rocky's first try for public office. 5) His opponent, AI Riebel, had been elected in the district three times before. (He chose; not to run in '82 and '84, but decided this year to recapture his old seat.) With all those factors working against him, what did Rocky have going for him? 1) He was fully qualified for the job. Raised in Los Angeles, he earned his law degree at the University of Southern California in 1975 before heading to the state where many Californians have been seeking refuge in recent years. At the time of the election, he was serving as legal counsel for the Oregon House's Judiciary Committee. 2) Still a marathon runner at age 38, he visited "every house in the district at least once." 3) Jim Hill. Hill, a black Democrat and indefatigable campaigner, paved the way for Rocky by scoring a stunning victory in House District31 in 1982 and repeating in '84. "It' there's something called the color barrier, Hill broke it," says Rocky. This year, Hill decided to take a shot at a Senate seat. He was the one who first encouraged Rocky to run for the seat he was vacating and then-by Rocky's admission-pushed him to his endurance limits to capture it. "When it was raining hard, when it was cold, when I was tired, I thought of Jim Hill," Rocky told reporters after his victory. Election-day tally put Rocky ahead of Riebel by a scant but sufficient 350 votes-1 0,284 to 9,934. Hill won his Senate bid, too. The reason that Rocky was sworn in ahead of the other freshmen legislators-who'll take their oaths Jan. 12 is again tied to Hill. Hill vacated his House seat to join the' Senate early because the seat he won had become vacant. Could there have been any other factors involved in Rocky's victory? Well, there was a poster on the wall of his campaign headquarters of the other Rocky, Sylvester Stallone. It just could be that special things happen to underdogs named Rocky who aren't afraid to work hard to achieve their goals. Kay Barbaro Listening to Ellndio on my Walkman as the icy Lake Michigan wind •••••••••••••••••••••••••• bit through my coat, I was acutely conscious that this would be my • first Christmas away from home. I had a sudden urge to stuff grass in ' Quotl ng. a shoe box. • • The only grass to be found in Chicago in December is dry, brown LUIS NOGALES, new president of the ECO Spanish-language and crinkly. The camels would gag . . international television news service, on the growing English-only But wait a minute. 1 do have a shoe box 1n my closet and the movement: botanical garden isn't far from where I live: "It's a real threat to all immigrants and, I think, to this whole I could visit there, walk casually among Its flowers and society. Part of my job will be to explain what our network does and wait for the moment when no attendant was In Sight and whip out my Why it does it to talk about the aspirations and the challenges that shoe box. Hispanics face. I will be in a position to reflect on that to public bodies If I get caught and arrested, I know the policemen would never as well as to private enterprise." understand. But my mother would. RAFAEL CORTADA, president of California's El Camino Community (Julio Ojeda is a reporter with the civil rights monthly, The Chicago College, on his Hispanic/black heritage: Reporter . He earned his graduatejoumalism degree at the University "I alternate what(racial/ethnic) designation I check. I think it's kind of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign.) . of absurd, anyway . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report Dec. 22, 1986 3

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COLLECTING LIVING ARRANGEMENTS: "Marital Status and Living ArrangeCONNECTING ments: March 1985," a 91-page report, details the incidence of 1--------.--.,.-----------------, single-head families among Latinos, blacks and whites. For a copy, (Late news on what's occurring within the U . S Hispanic communityi{\i order Series P-20, No..41 o from the Superit:"ltendent of Documents, and those agencies and corporations that work with it) J u.s. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-TENTH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATED 11 3238. (Price was not available at press time.) HISPANICS IN NE 0 The Washington, D.C., Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs W Y RK: The Mayor's Commission on Hispanic its 1Oth anniversary Dec. 11, inviting community members to , , < Concerns has issued its report on the status of Latinos in that city. A celebration at its offices at the new Reeves Municipal Center. lil"(lited numbEV of free copies of the 34-page report can be obtained The District of Columbia, it claims, is theonlycityinthecountrytha r by writing to: MCHC, 100 Church St. , Suite 6C2, New York, N.Y. has committed itself to providing equitable services to Latino resident .tr 10007 (212) 56?-1 080. by creating an agency to monitor the delivery of its services. POPULATION CHANGES FOR PUERTO RICO: "Estimates of A fall 1986 public school enrollment survey by The Washington o the Population of Puerto Rico and the Outlying Areas : 1980 to Post showed that Hispanic and Asian students, who made up jus B L 1985," a 7 -page booklet by the U.S. Census Bureau, can be ordered 1 . 5% of the area's school enrollment in 1970, increased to 5.6% by writing for Series P-25, No. 997 from the Superintendent of 1980 and now comprise nearly 1 I Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Public schools in the District itself are 91.8% black, with Hispanics p 20402. (Price was not ?V"\ilable at press time . ) passing whites this year, 3.7% to 3.6%. Asians are 0.9% . j IMMIGRATION ACT QUESTIONNAIRE: The U.S. Immigration $ 0 00 FOR WASHINGTON OFFICE il and Naturalization Service is soliciting advice in the development of 5 ' 0 its public education efforts while implementing the Immigration Anheuser-Busch Companies have awarded a $50,000 grant to the1}rl Reform and Control Act of 1986. If you have views on how it should U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce to help support the chamber'sl'h proceed in the areas of legalization, employer sanctions and/or newly established Washington , D.C., legislative office. special agricultural workers, request a questionnaire from the Office The of f ice, located at 111 Massachusetts Ave . NW, Suite 200, isli of Plans& Analysis, INS,4251 St. NW, Room 6100, Washington, D . C . managed by Jorge Negron. t 20536. CALENDAR OFFERS CONGRESSMEN'S PORTRAITS ART CONTEST: The Adolph Coors Co. is sponsoring a national art Winners ' works will be showcased in a national art tour, " Expresiones Hispanas . " . Entries will be accepte d through March 1987. For more information, write to: Expresione s Hisp anas, c/o Artistics Images , Mauree n Acosta , P . O . Box 11434, Denver, Colo . 8021 1 . Portraits of 11 Hispanic congressmen are featured in a 1987 M i ller 1 e High Life Hispanic calendar available through its distributors th i s month . They were painted by artist Juan Maldonado, artist-in-residence : at the Bronx Mus eum of the Arts in New York . LABOR AWARDS $750,000 GRANT j IMMIGRATION REPORTS: The Urban Institute has prepared two reports on immigration : " Immigration to Southern California : Fac t and Fiction," 26 pages, $5; " Why the United States Needs Immigrants," 39 pages , $5. 75 . All orders must be prepaid. Write to: Library/Infor mation Clearinghouse, TUI , P .O. Box7273, Dept. C , Washington , D . C . 20044. The U.S. Department of Labor has awarded a $750,000 two-year{1i grant to the American Society for Training and Development t o J examine basic skills training now be ing offer ing both to disadvantaged 1 and new immigrants, including on the-job training in reading, and adaptation to the workplace. COUNSI;LING PRE-COLLEGE STUDENTS: "Counseling Hispanic College-Bound High School Students'' is an 86-page book that addresses the need for improving counseling services to Hispanic students, reviews resources and helps find financial aid . To obtain a copy, send a $6.50 prepaid order to: ERIC Clearinghouse on Urban Education, Box 40, Teachers College, Columbia University , New York, N . Y . 10027. OTHER F ACES, OTHER PLACES Los Angeles Dodgers pitching star Fernando Valenzuela has a signed a 3-year contract to advertise and promote the sof t drink products of The Coca-Cola Company ... Eiia Kerr, manager of the U.S. ;, Department of Labor's internal Hispanic programs , has taken office c as chairperson of the 200-member Washington , D . C., Council of l Hispanic Employment Program managers . . . Calendar COMING SOON DIA DE LOS REYES Immaculata College Immaculata, Pa. Jan. 10 Sister Mary Consuela (215) 64 7-4400 WOMEN ' S LEGISLATIVE BRIEFING Commissions for Women of Prince Georges and Montgomery counties College Park, Md. Jan 11 Marge Zimmerman (301) 952-3383 LITERARY AWARDS DINNER Letras de Oro Miami Jan. 22 Ambler H. Moss (305) 284 4 GALA DINNER DANCE Archdiocesan Catholic Charities Washington, D . C . Jan. 31 Kathy Schrader (202) 265-0515 RELIGIOUS BROADCASTERS BANQ UET Hispanic National Religious Broadcasters Washington, D . C . Feb. 4 Dan Nicholas (201) 428-5400 JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITIES CONFERENCE California Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Feb. 6, 7 Magdalena H. Beltran (213) 743-7158 SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISING DINNER University of Southern California Mexican American Alumni Association Los Angeles Feb. 12 George Pia (213) 743-2456 EDUCATIONAL FUND BENEFIT BANQUET League of United Latin American Citizens, Northeast Dec. 22, 1986 Region •1 Washington, D.C. Feb. 19 Andres Tobar (202) 347-1493 SPOTLIGHT COMBATING YOUTH ILLITERACY: Texas LULAC ' is sponsoring the "School Dropout Symposium: i Preventing Wasted Lives and Wasted Dollars" in f San Antonio on Jan. 15 and 16. William Bennett , U . S . Secretary of Education, will attend, and San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will moderate the Jan. 16 panel discussion featuring Texas Commissioner of Education William Kirby, President of the Texas Association of School Boards Oscar Hernandez, and Lupita Quintanilla, assistant vice president for academic affairs at the University 1 of Houston. Four workshops on effective teaching , l parental/community involvement, creating corporation/ ' school partnerships and preventive and recovery : programs are scheduled. Recommendations arising • from the symposium will be sent to the Texas Legislature. For more information, contact: Enrique Gallegos (512) 342-5157 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH COUNCIL STAFF ASSOCIATE IUP/SSRC Committee..on Public Policy Research on Contemporary Hispanic Issues The Staff Associate is responsible for developing and administering innovative research programs related to research on public policy issues in the Hispanic community . Specific areas involve a wide range of social sc i entific fields of inquiry . The full-time position involves administering fellowship and grants competitions; the planning of seminars, workshops and conferences; pre paring reviews of relevant fields; negotiating grant proposals ; and maintaining relationships with academic institutions and other organizations , in the Hispanic research and public policy communities . The program isjointlysponsored with the Inter-University Program for Latino Research. As a member of the SSRC staff, the staff associate also develops and maintains contact with other relevant programs at the Council , assists with the development of new programs in relevant areas , and is involved in a variety of general organizational activities. Candidates for this position must have a Ph. D in one of the social sciences , must have carried out research on Hispanic issues , must have command of written and spoken Spanish and have established connections with the Hispanic community. Applications are sought from scholars with two to-four years of teaching, research and/or administrative experience beyond the doctor:gte, although recent recipients of the Ph. D . will also be considered. Council salaries are competitive with those at universities , and provisions are made to enable staff members to continue their professional development. The Council is seek ing an applicant who can take up the position early in 1987 , certainly no later than Summer of 1987 . Applicants should send a letter and a curriculum vitae to: IUPISSRC Committee on Contemporwy Hispanic Issues Staff Associate Search Social Science Research Counci l 605 Third Avenue New York, New York 10158 HISPANIC GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES If you are a Federal, State or Local public service employee , the Association of Hispanic Federal Executives invites you to join and ; become a member of an up-andcoming VOCAL, VISIBLE and RESPECTED Hispanic organiJiation . The Assoc i ation was created in 1980 enefits . Send resume to: Search Committee, 110 Maryland Ave. NW, Suite 404, Washington, D . C . 20002. EOE. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS : Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's new ' guest columnisf' feature . Approx. 500 words . For writer's guidelines , send self-addressed , stamped envelope to: Guest column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. N.W. , Wash ington , D . C . 20005 5

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Ait$ & Enterta .inment ' ' FI .LMSfROM LATINAPJ!ERICACONTINUEtogain international at screening events around the world this month . the United States, the Spanish Pictures Exhibitors Association held its eighth annual convention in Las Vegas Dec. 1-3: The ' event is a film market that gathers producers with exhibitors anctVmembers of the press, and trailers of upcoming material are screened. ' A speCial tribute to the late Mexican director Emilio "EI Indio" Fernandez was held, with a program made up of clips from his various productions. During closing night ceremonies, SPEA han , ded out its Cuauhtemoc Awards in several categories, including best prpducer, best director and best actor and actress . In Spain, the 12th annual Festival de Cine lberoamericano de Huelva was held Dec . 1-7. Among the various festival events, an open on "film and literature" brought together the directors of the national film companies of Mexico, Argentina, Venezuela and Peru . The festival's grand prize, the Colon de Oro, went to Pobre Mariposa, an entry by Argentine director Raul de Ia Torre. A special audience avyard went to another Argentine product: Americo Ortiz de Zarate's Otra Historia de Amor. Back ' in Buenos Aires, a total of six films from Brazil, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Venezuela and Argentina were exhibited Dec . 4-9 in a special event sponsored by the Asociaci6n Cinematogratica Latina americana All of the participating countries, plus Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Panama, are members of the ACLA, which was established in 1984 to create a Latin American market and promote co-productions among member countries. In Havana, the eighth Festivallnternacional de Nuevo Cine Latino americano, Dec. 3-17, coincided with the establishment on Dec. 16 of the new International School of Film, Radio and Television. More than 400 shorts and feature films were screened at the Havana festival, which began with a screening of Marfa Luisa Bemberg's Miss Mary, an Argentine film starring British actress Julie Christie. Opening night celebrities included two South American novelists whose works have been converted into film: Colombia's Gabriel Garda Marquez and Brazil's Jorge Amado. Visitors from the United States included director Sidney Pollack (Tootsie), who told Cuba's news agency Prensa Latina that he aspired to do a film with a Latin American theme. Accompanying Pollack were singer Harry Belafonte and producers Mark Rosenberg and Paula Walstein. ONE LINER: A Hollywood-based public relations and marketing firm, Hispanic Entertainment Specialists, has announced it will produce the first Hispanic film shot in Los Angeles in simultaneous Spanish and English versions. Dangerous Streets has a $400,000 budget and is expected to be released with a music video and record albums in both languages . . . Antonio Mej{as-Rentas Media Report , in Texas will increase its distribution of the supplement from 50,000 to its full readership of 89,000. That and other smaller gains will give Vista a national circulation of 1 ,040,800. The Hispanic News Media Association and the Washington chapter of the Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences are coordinating the sessions. VISTA PASSES MILLION: Vista, an English language monthly magazine covering the U.S. Hispanic community, will pass the one million circulation mark in January, publisher Arturo Villar reports . Based in Coral Gables, Fla., the Hispanic owned weekend newspaper supplement is carried by 25 daily newspapers nationally, including 11 in seven in California, three in Florida, two in Arizona and one each in Illinois and New Mexico . Its circulation is targeted to Hispanic sub scribers by most newspapers that distribute it. In January, the Corpus Christi CallerTimes HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service, Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234-0737 Publisher Hector Ericksen Mendoza Editor Felix Perez Reporting: Charlie Ericksen , Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (52 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates are 75 cents per word. Displayadsare$35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 Vista began monthly pub lic ation in Sep tembe r 1985. It is considering converting to weekly later next year. POST, COMMUNITY MEET: The Washington Post took a first step in its commitment to be more responsive to the growing Latino community in the nation's capital by hosting a reception/dialogue with community leaders Dec. 16. Greeting and interacting with some 15 Latino leaders were metro editor Milton Coleman, city editor Eugene Robinson and several reporters who cover the city. Future meetings with Latino activists and leaders in Virginia and Maryland will be held soon. Settlement to a protest by blacks against the Post, directed by WOL-AM radio station owner Cathy Hughes, was reached Dec. 14. The protest focused on portrayals of blacks in the premiere edition of a new Post Sunday magazine in September . As part of the agreed resolution, Post publisher Donald Graham and two other top executives appeared on Hughes' morning call-in talk shows on suc cessive days . ON TELEVISION: On Dec. 23, the SIN Television Network presents a 30-minute special at 1 0 p.m. (En on the 22,000 U .S. Hispanic children in need of adoption. Charlie Ericksen Hispanic Link Weekly Report