Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, October 19, 1987

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, October 19, 1987
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This
U.S. Rep. E. “Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, accompanies the top Soviet government agriculture official, Victor Nikonov, on his eight-day tour of U.S. food and agribusiness centers. . . Pennsylvania Gov. Robert Casey announces the appointment of Wilfredo Seda as director of the 26-member Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community. . . Dr. Enrique Huertas of Miami is elected president of the World Medical Association. Huertas, president of the Miami-based Cuban Medical Association in Exile, was elected at WMA’s convention in Madrid, Spain... Eight-year-old Houston resident Roxanne Marfa Herndndez
undergoes two operations after being mauled by a lion on display at an area flea market. Hernandez suffered a cracl^f^^^ng part of her brain exposed, from the attack by the300-poima fierWlimandez was in serious but stable condition. . . Baspbaji (Martinez) Jackson, whose father was half^ani^,ienldl^nis 21-year career. Jackson finished with 663 home runs, 2,684 hits and 1,702 runs batted in... Denver resident Roberto Diaz, a41-year-old who spent40 years as an undocumented alien and who earned three Purple Hearts for his service in Vietnam, becomes a U.S. citizen. Diaz originally applied for legalization under the immigration law but instead was extended citizenship when his military record was uncovered. “This is the first time anyone has done anything for me because I was in Vietnam. No one’s even said thank you,” said Diaz...
**•«-4. #BHlsPANIcTlNi^WEii^Y^iEPO^^P^^
Hispanic Agenda Moves Ahead
One hundred of the nation’s top Latino elected, business and community leaders are gathered in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19-21 to fashion a unified H ispanic political agenda for presidential year 1988.
Chaired by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, the non-partisan meeting of National Hispanic Agenda 1988 will call on Democratic and Republican presidential candidates to support the agenda.
Cisneros will be joined in addressing participants by New York Gov. Mario Cuomo and a high-ranking Republican official.
Leaders from the Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican and other Latino communities are meeting in focus groups to iron out the wording of the issues, which will be presented at an Oct. 21 press conference.
“While Hispanics reside in different regions of the country and may have come here under different circumstances, a national Hispanic agenda demonstrates the common bonds that tie us together,” said Denver Mayor
Fifty-eight percent of the827,208 legalization applications received by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service as of Oct. 8 are from the agency's Western Region, which includes Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Utah and Guam, INS announced.
At a Washington, D.C., press conference, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said the agency is now receiving an average of 40,000 applications a week and expects about 2 million people to apply for the legalization program by the cutoff date of May 4,1988. As of Oct. 8,145,226 of the total applications received were from Special Agricultural Workers.
LEGALIZATION APPLICATIONS BY REGION
Eastern 66,318
Northern 86,873
Southern 198,521
Western 476,496
Total 827,208
Another 100,000 people could qualify for legalization under a change announced by
Federico Pefta.
According to Aida Alvarez, coordinator of the agenda’s unity task force, the goals of the agenda are to unite Latino leaders around key national issues, encourage Hispanics to vote in the 1988 presidential election and obtain commitments from presidential candidates in support of the documents positions
Among topics in the agenda draft are:
• Em powermen V Political Participation: Appointing Hispanics to cabinet-level positions the naming of a Latino to the Supreme Court, and opposing the “English only" movement.
• The Competitive Edge/Educational Achievement and Employment Opportunities: It recommends that the federal government commit to hiring more Latinos enforce non-discrimination statutes in the work place, require firms with government contracts to develop affirmative action plans, establish demonstration projects linking education with jobs for youth and create incentives for private-
continued on page 2
INS that would allow persons who resided in the United States illegally, left the country and returned using legal visas, to qualify.
The new ruling will primarily affect persons from Europe, Asia and Africa
INS also announced:
• Apprehensions this September declined more than 42% from September 1986, from 139,459 to 80,019 - a fact t he agency attributes to heavy publicity in the United States and Mexico concerning employer sanctions.
• INS has issued more than 100 citations to businesses that have continued employing undocumented workers after having been informed of the law by INS.
• The agency has formally established a
Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) system with Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Puerto Rico, New Mexico and Texas. The SAVE program instantly verifies a person’s immigration status and thereby prevents undocumented individuals from receiving federal benefits. Pilot programs are operating in California and New York. , ,
- Melinda Machado
Senate Tables Shift on Continuous Residency
Sen. John Chafee(D-R.I.) has requested a Senate hearing on waiving the continuous residency requirement for family members of a qualified legalization applicant under the immigration act, following his failure to attach the provision to a foreign relations authorization bill Oct. 7.
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has not issued a formal policy statement on family unity. However, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said Oct. 8 children of qualified parents would not be deported and the agency would decide on a case-by-case basis situations where only one parent is eligible for legalization.
Chafee’s amendment was tabled 55-45.
Fear that family members will be deported is supressing the number of legalization applicants, according to a National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials’ telephone survey of 50 Qualified Designated Entities, organizations aiding in the application process. NALEO lobbied in favor of Chafee’s amendment.
A spokesman for Chafee said the hearing request was made to Sen. Alan Simpson (R-Wyo.), the ranking minority member of the Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Immigration.
Senate Aids Cuban Exiles
The Senate, on a voice vote, passed a policy Oct 7 that eases the path for Cubans to immigrate to the United States from third countries.
The policy was sponsored by Frank Lauten-berg (D-N.J.) as an amendment to a bill authorizing State Department spending.
The bill, if passed by a House-Senate conference committee and signed by the president will help grant visas to Cubans trying to enter the United States while in exile in third countries In 1986 President Reagan ordered that the Cubans would not be granted visas unless they arrived in those countries before Aug. 22,1986.
There are approximately 10,000 to 12,000 Cubans in third countries trying to immigrate to the United States. More than half are in Panama.
827,000 Apply for Residency Status


Latino Families Optimistic About Economic Outlook
Hispanic families are optimistic about life in the United States, a recent survey finds. While previous studies documented the economic difficulties facing Hispanics, the Louis Harris survey paints a brighter picture. The study shows that H ispanic families’ spirits are not dampened by their lack of economic prosperity.
Among its findings:
• Hispanics feet their economic lot is improving and report fewer problems with their jobs and living conditions.
• Hispanics also report fewer spousal disputes.
Latinos tended to report less stress and tension than blacks. Both groups complain about how tough it is to raise children properly, agreeing it is harder than they anticipated.
The survey finds that Hispanic parents differ from their non-Hispanics counterparts in being the most worried about their children dropping out of school. They are also more concerned about drugs, teen-age pregnancy and promiscuity.
Its findings are being greeted cautiously by Rafael Valdivieso, vice president for research at Hispanic Policy Development Project In Washington, D.C. Valdivieso notes the study does not identify Hispanics by subgroup.
He says any comparisori toetween blacksand Hispanics should
take into account differences among Latino subgroups “The Puerto Rican situation in the Northeast is worse than the black situation. In the West and Southwest, Mexican Americans are worse off than blacks,” Valdivieso says.
Valdivieso adds the overall optimism may reflect a feeling by Hispanic families that “things have to get better because they’ve been pretty bad."
A cross-section of 3,000 family members participated in the survey, conducted early this year by the Philip Morris Company. Six percent of the total - 180 - were Hispanic.
Hispanics, blacks and whites satisfied with:
H B W
1) The kind of world their children will inherit 43% 27% 42%
2) The economic outlook for their family 71 59 76
3) Having the kind of home they want 71 67 80
4) Ability to pay for essentials 68 58 75
Agree that:
1) With good daycare centers, preschool classes 66 81 63
and housekeepers, both parents can work full time and raise children
- Ken OiiverMendez
Presidential Candidate Support Sought
continued from page 1
sector hiring.
The agenda also seeks increased Hispanic contracting with federal agencies, expansion of the Small Business Administration and its 8(a) contract set aside program and the development of Hispanic enterprise zones.
In the area of education, it recommends several national programs ranging from an, early childhood education initiative to serve impoverished four- and five-year-olds to the creation of a dropout prevention fund.
• Housing: The agenda recommends subsidy programs to create and maintain low-income housing.
• Healthcare: Theagendaasksforlegis-lation that extends health care coverage to all residents and to correct deficiencies in
Employees Sue Growers
Seven undocumented California strawberry pickers filed a class-action lawsuit in Monterey County Superior Court Oct 5 against their former employer, charging that the grower physically threatened them, offered no field drinking water or sanitary facilities and withheld part of their salaries.
Lydia Villareal, the California Rural Legal Assistance attorney representing the plantiffs, told Weekly Report that growers Manuel and Jos6 Salazar often threatened their workers with guns.
“When they ask for water they’re told to drink the water out of the truck radiator or the irrigation pipes,” said Villareal.
She said Manuel Corrales, Manuel Reyes, Javier Navarro, Saturnino Santos, Eloy Castillo, Jorge Velasquez and Rafael Tarelo, who range from 19 to 26 years of age, were denied pay for going to the bathroom, stretching when tired and for inquiring about pay
The suit is asking for several million dollars for the growers? approximately200 employees
the Medicaid program, which provides health insurance to families and individuals living belowthe poverty line It also calls for culturally sensitive services to the Hispanic elderly population and a national disease-prevention program for the Latino community.
Participants will discuss the reunification of Cuban families economic development along the U.S. -Mexico border and the Caribbean Basin Initiative. In addition, the agenda will focus special attention on the political, cultural and economic status of Puerto Rico.
- Melinda Machado
N.Y.C Voters Targeted
Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon announced in New York City Oct 13 a $500,000 campaign to register Puerto Rican voters there by Feb. 19, the state’s registration deadline for the presidential primary.
The program will enlist community leaders in door-to-door registration drives Officials estimate there are400,000 eligible Hispanic voters not registered in the city - most of them Puerto Rican.
Discrimination Rules Termed Anti-Employee
The U.S. Justice Department issued long- . awaited regulations Oct. 6 to handle discrimination complaints arising from 1986 federal immigration law. Civil-rights advocates sharply criticized the rules for what they charged was too demanding a standard of proof on the part of discrimination victims
The regulations designed to protect citizens and residents who are here lawfully from being fired or not being hired because they look or sound foreign, stipulate that an alleged discrimination victim must establish that the employer “knowingly and intentionally” discriminated against them. Previous employment-related civil-rights statutes and rules used discriminatory effect of an employer's policies as the basis for a violation.
Charles Kamasaki, director of policy analysis for the National Council of La Raza, pointed to literacy tests and “speak English only” rules as employer practices which have a clear discriminatory result but may not reflect a discriminatory intent.
CANF Hit With Second Resignation
A past vice chairman and active member of the Cuban American National Foundation has resigned from the lobbying and advocacy group. The resignation of Jos6 Luis Rodriguez follows by four months the resignation of CANFs executive director.
Rodriguez, a Hialeah, Fla., businessman, said he resigned because he was concerned about the organization’s growing role in local Miami politics. Frank Calzon, CANFs former executive director, resigned in June.
In his Sept. 28 resignation letter, Rodriguez expressed concern about CANF directors becoming involved in controversies with Miami city councilmen. He also denounced CANF member attempts at encouraging Cuban ath-
letes, stopping over in Miami this summer on their way to participate in Indiana’s Special Olympics, to defect
Antonio Font executive director of the Washington-based organization which was founded in 1980, told Weekly Report, “The policy of the Cuban American National Foundation is not to get involved in local politics. Sometimes some of the directors individually get involved in local activitiea”
Rodriguez also criticized the lack of democracy in decision-making within the foundatioa
Font responded, “Executive committee members are in touch with one another on a daily basis. All foundation decisions are made on a consensus basis.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Henry Cisneros, guest columnist
Challenging the Candidates
The time for Hispanic Americans to unite around a National Hispanic Agenda is now.
We are fast becoming the largest ethnic group in this country. Our families are young; our children, the future.
Hispanic issues are American issues. It is in the best interests of the country as a whole to meet the challenges posed by the National Hispanic Agenda.
The reasons are self-evident.
This American democracy needs to renew itself.
If we are to hold together the social fabric and better the national morale, we must develop our human capital. The Hispanic community, numbering more than 22 million now and rapidly growing, represents a great potential. On the other hand, our nation’s future is in jeopardy if our Hispanic youth are not educated, if they are denied the tools to earn a livelihood.
The National Hispanic Agenda’88 is a call to Hispanic Americans to unite around issues that require national attention, common needs that transcend narrow group interests. The so-called “good times” of today should not blind us to the persistent erosion underway. The entire nation will suffer if the needs of our children are not addressed.
Sin pelos en la lengua
MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE RANCH: As the nation’s Latino leadership is gathering in the nation’s capital to prepare for Election Year ’88, strange things have been happening in their strongholds around the country,
DOWN SOUTH: In Miami, for example, the Fraternal Order of Police voted to endorse Maurice Ferrfc in his bid to regain the mayor’s office from Xavier SuArez.
They instructed their president, Ken Nelson, to write the letter of endorsement. But they didn’t bother to tell him what to say.
Nelson doesn’t hold Ferr6 in the highest of esteem and it seems he let his personal feelings creep into the letter a bit For starters, his “endorsement” commented:
“A majority of the problems affecting the Miami Police Department are directly attributable to your role or lack of role as a leaderfor all of Miami.”
Then he blamed Ferre for the “undesirable” officers who were arrested, indicted or fired for a variety of crimes a couple of years ago. Most were picked up during a big hiring push while Ferr& was mayor. He charged Ferr6 with lying and calling the police “bums.” Finally, he allowed: “The membership met in an open meeting on Wednesday, Sept 30,1987, and chose to give you the FOPs endorsement. You’re endorsed.”
According to the Miami Herald, the letter prompted FOP vice president Sebastian Aguirre to tell rival Nelson, “We* re not going to tolerate it.”
The Herald story concluded:
“Meanwhile, the state attorney’s office is investigating an incident between Nelson and Aguirre that followed a meeting in which FOP leaders decided to endorse FerrA “Nelson has asked that criminal assault charges be filed against Aguirre. Aguirre said the incident began after Nelson made a derogatory remark about his mother.”
OUT WEST: In San Antonio, they’re still fighting the battle of the Alamo. Alamo curator Steve Beck has started a letter* writing campaign to pressure Mexico into returning the “New Orleans Greys” - the flag of the Louisiana volunteers which Gen. Antonio L6pez de Santa Anna’s troops cut down from the chapel and kept as a souvenir. Ifs presently in a museum in Mexico City's Chapultepec Park.
FARTHER WEST: In Los Angeles, the visit last month by Spain’s King Juan Carlos I was timed with a local battle over whether to move the statue of King Carlos III to historic Olvera Street there.
The statue was given to Los Angeles by King Juan Carlos during his 1981 visit. It has since stood in less ethnic MacArthur Park Our L.A council members Gloria Molina and Richard Alatorre joined in the fray, with Alatorre commenting, “To honor a Spanish king that reigned prior to Mexico’s independence would be to celebrate tyranny.” They convinced the local body to oppose the move. There were reports that Molina and Alatorre confused Carlos III, a contemporary of George Washington and at one point King of California, with Ferdinand V, who was around in the 15th century.
Some historians beat on them mercilessly, but Alatorre has a good excuse if he failed a history test He was educated in LA schools.
As reader F6lix Castro pointed out in The Los Angeles Times, at least there are a couple of great brandies named after Spanish kings.
AND IN NEW SPAIN: Not all the news is made to confuse. When Juan Carlos visited New Mexico, Eric Serna, chairman of the New Mexico Corporation Commission, presented him with blankets woven by descendants of early Spanish settlers in New Mexico, including one by Serna’s uncle, Ismael Trujillo of Chimayo.
- Kay B&rbaro
CALL FOR ACTION
This is also a call for action by the presidential candidates to seek solutions to the nation’s most pressing problems:
• to create an educational system devoted to excellence, one that teaches our children to read and write, that facilitates the transition from Spanish to English;
• to develop a healthcare system that aggressively tackles the problems posed by teen-age pregnancy, lack of prenatal care and the AIDS epidemic; and
• to reduce the gaps in prosperity and eliminate the obstacles to opportunity by assuring Hispanicsthe right to full political participation.
These and other related issues must move to center stage in the national debate.
PROUD AND WILLING TO DIE
Historically, Hispanics have enriched the national landscape, contributing at all levels- culturally, intellectually, in the workplace and on the battlefield. It is no accident that the highest numberof Medals of Honor have gone to Hispanics.
We are a patriotic people, proud of our nation, willing to die for it In turn, we want America to fulfill her promise to us.
The National Hispanic Agenda’88 signals the intention of Hispanic leaders to play an increasingly important role in developing policies and programs responsive not only to Hispanic needs but the needs of the entire nation.
We, as Hispanic leaders, intend to play a critical role in shaping our country’s future, at home and abroad.
FAMILY ACROSS BORDERS
We are the bridge with Latin America, our “Hispanic family across borders.” The new reality is that United States and Latin American interests are interdependent as never before. A North/South partnership is needed that is based on understanding and respect for the region. Issues such as immigration, employment and drugs otherwise will not be resolved.
The National Hispanic Agenda is a challenge to the presidential candidates to come to grips with the tough issues.
We intend to do our part for the nation.
They must, in turn, do theirs.
(Henry Cisneros was first elected as mayor of San An tonio, the 31st most populous city in the United States, in 1981. Cisneros recently withdrew his name as a possible candidate for the Texas gubernatorial race. He was interviewed in 1984 by Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale as a vice presidential running mate.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Oct. 19, 1987
3


COLLECTING
STATUS OF PUERTO RICANS: For a copy of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights' 38-page pamphlet titled “Status of Puerto Ricans in the United States 1987,” send $3 to the NCPRR at 160 W. Lippincott St, Philadelphia, Penn. 19133 (215) 634-4443.
FAMILY STUDY: “The Philip Morris Family Survey" is a 19-page report summarizing the findings of a spring 1987 survey conducted by Louis Harris&Associates. The booklet assesses the quality of the family life of Hispanics, blacks, and whites based on survey results, and offers responses to key questions. For a free copy, write to: Philip Morris Family Survey, 888 Seventh Ave., New York, N.Y. 10106.
FEDERAL CONSUMER INFORMATION: The General Services Administration recently released its list of federal consumer publications in Spanish titled “Publicaciones Federates en Espahol para el Con-sumidor.'rTbe listing offers publications that can be obtained at no cost To order free copies of the listing, write: Lista, Consumer Information Center (XC), Washington, D.C. 20405.
TAX INFORMATION BOOKLETS: The Internal Revenue Service is offering two free booklets explaining the changes in the new federal tax. The booklets - Publication 920 for individuals and Publication 921 for businesses - may be ordered by calling 1-800-424-FORM or phoning your local IRS office.
HISTORY OF U.S. LANGUAGE POLICY: “Official Languages in the U.S.: Policies, Polemics and Politics" is a 15-page paper by Reynaldo Macias on the history of language groups and language policy in the United States. For a copy, send $1 to: Tomas Rivera Center,710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714)625-6607.
SCHOLARSHIP GUIDE: The University of Southern California’s Office of Hispanic Programs has made available a list of scholarships for university-level Hispanics. For a free copy, send a self-addressed envelope with 22$ postage to: OHP, Dr. Samuel Mark, Director, University of Southern California, 727 W. 27th St, Los Angeles, Calif. 90007 (213)743-0977.
ALIEN DETENTION CENTER CONDITIONS: The Minnesota Lawyers International Human Rights Committee recently released a 55-page report, titled “Oakdale Detention Center The First Year of Operation,” on the conditions at the Oakdale (La.) Federal Alien Detention Center. For a copy send $3 to: MLIHRC, 430 Marquette Ave, Suite 402, Minneapolis, Minn. 55401 (612) 341-3302.
CONNECTING
ROYBAL CHAIR ENDOWED A tribute will be held Oct 21 in Washington, D.C, for the endowment of the Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) Chair in Gerontology and Public Service at California State University, Los Angeles. Roybal, chair of the U.S. House select committee on aging, has been an advocate for minorities and the elderly throughout his four-decade political career.
The endowment of the chair will provide funds for scholarships, training, community outreach and health care to minorities, elderly and the disadvantaged. It will link scholars, service providers and communities to address the needs of older persons.
For further information call the congressman’s office at (202) 225-6235. Contributions can be sent to Congressman Edward Roybal, P.O. Box 2884, Washington, D.C. 20013.
REAGAN HONORS BUSINESSMEN President Reagan presented two Latino entrepreneurs minority business awards at the White House Oct 7.
Ruben Hinojosa, president of H&H Meat Products Co. Inc. of Mercedes, Texas, was awarded the fifth annual Small Business Administration’s National 8(a) Graduate Firm of the Year Award.
Orlino Baldonado, of the EC Corporation - an engineering and consulting service - in Oakridge, Tenn, was presented the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Federal Contractor of the Year Award.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES National Image, a group that promotes employment of Hispanics in federal government, has moved its national office from Corvalis, Wash, to Washington, D.C. Manuel Olivarez, the president of Image, is the office director. The address is 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. . . The National Puerto Rican Coalition recently was granted $125,000 over two years by the Ford Foundation for projects in Philadelphia and Chicago to form coalitions to increase Puerto Rican participation in local policy making. . . The Southwest Voter Research Institute received a $63,500 grant from the Ford Foundation for research and litigation to increase Latino electoral participation...
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
NATIONAL AGENDA MEETING Washington, D.C. Oct 19-21 Hispanic leaders will participate in the National Hispanic Agenda 1988 forum aimed at drafting a document on Latino issues to be presented to the 1988 presidential candidates. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo and a high-ranking Republican official will address the group.
Alda Alvarez (212) 952-8958
YOUTH SYMPOSIUM Topeka, Kan. Oct. 21
The Kansas AdvisoryCommittee on Hispanic Affairs and the University of Kansas’ Office of Minority Affairs are hosting the second annual Kansas Hispanic Youth Symposium aimed at encouraging Latino students to graduate from high school and pursue a college education. The symposium will have workshops on peer pressure, career choices and college admissions.
Steve Ramirez (913) 296-3465 4
BILINGUAL AIDS PRESENTATION Los Angeles Oct. 21
The East Los Angeles Rape Hotline is providing Spanish-speaking referrals and information on AIDS and how it relates to the Latino community.
Alva Moreno (213) 267-0771
LA PROMESA ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION New York Oct 22
La Promesa, an organization providing professional and support services to New York Hispanics, is celebrating its 10th anniversary with an awards dinner and dance.
Jos6 Fernandez (212) 299-1100 ext. 34
HISPANIC JOURNALISTS CONFERENCE Ixtapa, Mexico Oct 22-24 The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and NOTIMEX, a Mexican news wire service, are sponsoring the first professional meeting of Mexican and U.S. Hispanic journalists. The conference will address issues affecting U.S.-Mexico relations, the journalism profession in both countries and the possibility of establishing permanent professional-exchange programs.
Frank Newton (202) 783-6228
NEW SONG FESTIVAL San Francisco Oct 23-25
The sixth annual Festival of the New Song will Oct 19,1987
feature 20 North American and Latin American folk groups in an effort to highlight the artists and their musical roots.
Juan Gonzalez (415) 239-3446
CENTRO DE LA RAZA ANNIVERSARY Seattle Oct. 24
El Centro de la Raze a social-service agency, will kick off its 15th anniversary of serving the Hispanic community in Seattle by honoring the farm worker. Roy Wilson (206) 329-9442
COMING SOON
LEGISLATIVE TRAINING CONFERENCE Mayor's Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs Chicago Oct 29 Marta Ayala (312) 744-4404
MEDIA CONFERENCE Latino Committee on the Media Chicago Nov. 4
Yolanda Rodriguez (312) 247-0707
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date Please include name of event sponsor, date location, contact name and phone number. Address items toe Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, DC 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
TRAINING AND MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE TRAIN ER/CONSU LTANT LATINO INSTITUTE
The Latino Institute seeks a Training and Management Assistance (TMA) Trainer to assist the TMA Director in the design, development and implementation of management training programs and agency consultations. Bachelor's degree or equivalent in administration, social services, or related fields is required. Must have good writing and verbal skills. Candidates must also have a minimum of three years experience in adult education and training and two years experience working with minority social service agencies. Fluency in English and Spanish preferred.
Salary: $19,000 - $24,000. Send cover letter and resume.
FUNDRAISING INTERNSHIP PROJECT COORDINATOR LATINO INSTITUTE
The Latino Institute seeks a Fundraising Internship Project Coordinator to assist the Training and Management and Assistance Director in the coordination, development, and implementation of the program and corresponding agency consultations.
Responsibilities will include designing the curriculum, organizing the advisory committee, and recruitment and monitoring of interns and conducting management consultations with the six agencies where interns will be placed. Must have good verbal and writing skills. Fluency in Spanish and English preferred. Bachelor's degree or equivalent in administration, social services or related fields and experience in adult education.
Salary: $23,000 - $27,000. Send cover letter and resume.
The Latino Institute is a non-profit organization that seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training, information and advocacy in all areas Service area is limited to Chicago.
Migdalia (Millie) Rivera, Director Training and Management Assistance Latino Institute 228 S. Wabash, Suite 600 Chicago, Illinois 60604
NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE.
Hums
INVEST IN YOUR COMMUNITY, SUPPORT NHSF
This year the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will be listed in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) literature, and all federal employees will be able to designate NHSF as their grantee.
To make a pledge, federal employees need to write #505 (NHSF) on the CFC designated pledge form.
Forthose individuals that are non-federal employees, they can send their check directly to NHSF. Checks are to be made payable to the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund. NHSF is a 501-(c)-3 tax exempt organization and all pledges are tax-deductible.
TEACHING POSITIONS Two positions. Doctorates required. Assistant or Associate rank, tenure track, fall 1988. Rhetoric or composition emphasis with English Education or Linguistics/TESOL secondary emphasis. Send application, vita, three letters of reference and a self addressed post card to: Robert J. Ward, Ph.D., Head, English Department University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614. Postmark deadline: December 15,1987. (319) 273-2822 for interview appointment at NCTE and M LA conferences. UN I is an AA/EEO Employer.
COMPUTER PROGRAMER Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred, also knowledge of Wordstar, SPSS*PC, Lotus, DBase. Duties include: research and technical assistance. Call or write John Attinasi, Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, Room600, Chicago, ill. 60604 (312) 663-3603.
ASSISTANT CHIEF, CATALOG DEPARTMENT Stanford University Libraries
Responsibilities: principal catalogerand oven sees NACO work for Dept; supervises, including general oversight of budget four cataloging units with staff of 23; assists in planning, goal and policy setting; writes documentation; participates in committees in and outside the Dept.
Required are MLS from ALA accredited graduate library school or equivalent degree; minimum 5 years original cataloging experience with automated cataloging system, AACR2, LC classification and subject headings; knowledge of authority control concepts; demonstrated capability of managing large unit, significant supervisory experience, including of librarians; ability to train staff; sound reading knowledge of one major Western European language. Desirable are experience with NACO& RLIN; experience in research library; knowledge of other languages; experience working with professional groups at national level.
Salary range $32,600-48,100 (Librarian ranty or $38,000-55,400 (Senior Librarian rank) depending on qualifications. Send letter, resume, supporting documentation & list of professional references by November 30,1987 (extended date), to Irene Yeh, Employment Coordinator, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif. 94305-6004. Cite #303/HL on correspondence.
DEAN OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES
(Search Reopened)
Lehman College of The City University of New York is seeking an outstanding scholar to serve as Dean of Arts and Humanities.
The Division of Arts and Humanities consists of the following academic departments: Academic Skills; Arts; Black Studies; Classical, Oriental, Germanic, and Slavic Languages; English; History; Music; Philosophy; Puerto Rican Studies; Romance Languages; and Speech and Theatre. These departments employ approximately 150 tenure-track and tenured faculty and 95 adjunct faculty members.
Lehman College, a senior college of The City University of New York, enrolls 9,300 undergraduate and graduate students in its four divisions: Arts and Humanities, Natural and Social Sciences, Nursing, and Professional Studies. Located in the northwest Bronx, the college attracts students from the five boroughs of New York City and from Westchester County to its beautiful 37-acre campus, which includes the Lehman College Art Gallery and Lehman
Center for the Performing Arts.
Candidates should have the following qualifications' an earned doctorate; a national reputation for scholarship and research; successful experience in university teaching; and evidencet>f the ability to offereducational and administrative leadership in a liberal arts college.
The salary range fora Dean in the Executive Compensation Plan of the University of New York is $74,203 - $82,561. Excellent fringe benefits package. The Appointment will begin no later than September 1,1988.
Nominations and applications, including a complete curriculum vitae and the names of five references, should be submitted by December 1 to:
Melvyn B Nathan son, Provost and vice President for Academic Affairs Lehman College^ Bedford Park Boulevard West, Bronx, New York 10468 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
MUJERES ON THE MOVE: Latinas make a vital contribution to the arts in the United States-as proven by several events this week.
Two distinguished Hispanic actresses have embarked on a six-state tour of the play Orinoco, a comedy about two fading actresses who travel on a cargo boat on their way to an engagement in an Amazonian oil camp.
Both Carmen Zapata and Ivonne Coll have prior experience performing in Orinoco, written by Mexico’s Emilio Carballido. Zapata produced it, as well as acted in it, in a staging last year by Los Angeles’ Bilingual Foundation of the Arts. Coll has performed the play on the New York stage as well as on tour in her native land, Puerto Rico.
The current tour of Orinoco, produced by the BFA, began Oct 6 in Tucson, Ariz., and continued through last week in Yuma and Phoenix, Ariz., and Albuquerque, N.M. This week the show moves to Texas, with performances in El Paso Oct. 18-20 and in San Antonio Oct. 21,
22 and 24. *
Two other distinguished mujeres - Argentines recognized the world over for their distinctive singing styles - continue on separate national tours this week.
One is Mercedes Sosa, who some call “the voice of the Americas” because of her issue-oriented repertoire. She will perform in Los Angeles Oct. 21 and 22. The other isLibertad Lamarque, known as “la novia de America" for hertangosand otherfolkloric renditions. She performs at Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Oct. 25.
Other Latinas in the news this week include:
• Ivanne Maria Soto, whose 1985 film Reflections of a Desire was well received this month at the first Latin American and Caribbean Women’s Film Festival held in Mexico.
• Amy Gonzalez is one of six theater directors nationwide chosen for a Theater Communications Group director fellowship.
• Elizabeth Perez Luna becomes the executive producer of Crossroads, a new National Public Radio half hour weekly newsmagazine that airs on some 100 stations. _ Antonjo Mejias.Rentas
Media Report
JOURNALISM JOB FAIRS: The American Society of Newspaper Editors and the Task Force on Minoritiesofthe American Newspaper Publishers Association this month kicked off their 1987-88 series of 15 regional events designed to attract more minorities to print journalism careers.
The first effort, held Oct. 9-10 in Tucson, Ariz., and coordinated by Edith Auslander of Tucson Newspapers, attracted 65 students plus 28 interviewers representing 22 separate news organizations About 80% of the student participants were Hispanic, she said.
Ernie Sotomayor, associate editor of the Dallas Times Herald, keynoted the activity.
The second job fair/conference, coordinated by Merv Aubespin, of Gannett Co, was staged in Arlington, Va, outside of Washington, D.C. Oct. 15-17.
Participants in the events include editors mostly from small and mid-size dailies, and
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen*Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy, Ken Oliver-Mdndez.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Ellas.
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
- Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Hispanic, black, Asian and Native American journalists working in the regions.
Sites, dates and editors coordinating future meetings are:
RALEIGH, N.C.fNorth Raleigh Hilton) Oct. 22-24 Ted Vaden, The News and Observer (919) 829-4555.
MIAMI (Omni International) Oct. 29-31 Mary Jean Connors, The Miami Herald (305) 376-3592.
CHICAGO (Marriott Downtown) Nov. 5-6 Ron Williams, The Chicago Tribune (312) 222-4573.
SAN FRANCISCO (Hotel Cecil) Nov. 5-7 Dianne Levy, The San Francisco Chronicle (415) 777-7120.
DENVER (Denver Inn) Nov. 12-13 David Hall, The Denver Post (303) 820-1327.
ANN ARBOR, Mich.(Campuslnn) Nov. 12-14 Brian Malone, The Ann Arbor News (313) 994-6870.
ATLANTA (Hyatt Regency) Nov. 12-14 Joan Hall, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution (404) 526-5699.
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Holiday Inn) Nov. 19-21 Dave Petty, The Arkansas Gazette (501)
371-3700-
BOSTON (Westin Hotel) Dec. 10-12 Dan Warner, The Boston Eagle Tribune (617) 685-1000.
ARLINGTON, Texas (Campus Inn Motel) Jan. 7-9 Paula LaRocque, The Arlington Morning News (214) 977-8770.
CINCINNATI (Omni Netherland) Jan. 14-16 George Blake, The Cincinnati Enquirer (513) 369-1955.
PHILADELPHIA (Franklin Plaza) Jan. 22-23 Stu Anmuth, Philadelphia Newspapers (215) 854-4805.
SEATTLE (University Plaza Hotel) Jan. 28-29 June Almquist, The Seattle Times(206) 464-2111.
The program, now in its fourth year, is geared primarily for students seeking internships and entry-level jobs. Last year, of the 2,500 people participating in the conferences, about 1,600 were college upperclassmen or recent graduates. Job Fair Director Denise Johnson says Hispanic students have been well represented At several conferences they made up a majority of the participants, she said. _ Ken Oliver-Mendez
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week U .S. Rep. E. "Kika" de Ia Garza(D-Texas), ofthe House Agriculture Committee, accompanies the top Soviet government agriculture official, Victor Nikonov, on his eight-day tour of U.S. food and agribusiness centers. . . Pennsylvania Gov. Robert Casey announces the appointment of Wilfredo Seda as director of the 26-member Governor's Council on the Hispanic Community. . . Dr. Enrique Huertas of Miami is elected president of the World Medical Association . Huertas, president of the Miami-based Cuban Medical Association in Exile , was elected at WMA's convention in Madrid, Spain ... Eight-year-old Houston resident Roxanne Marla Hernandez .. undergoes two operations after being mauled by a !ion . on display at an area flea market. Hernandez suffered a part of her brain exposed, from the attack by the 300-andez was in serious but stable condition. . . gJe$1.t,..6fggie (Martinez) Jackson, whose father was 21-year career. Jackson finished with 563 home runs, 2,584 hits and 1,702 runs batted in . .. Denver resident Roberto Dlaz, a41-year-old who spent40 years as an undocumented alien and who earned three Purple Hearts for his service in Vietnam, becomes a U .S. citizen. Diaz originally applied for legalization under the immigration law but instead was extended citizenship when his military record was uncovered. "This is the first time anyone has done anything for me because I was in Vietnam. No one's even said thank you," said Diaz ... Vol. 5 No. 41 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY Hispanic Agenda Moves Ahead One hundred of the nation's top Latino elected, business and community leaders are gathered in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19-21 to fashion a unified Hispanic political agenda for presidential year 1988. C'haired by San Antonio Mayor Henry Cis neros, the non-partisan meeting of National Hispanic Agenda 1988 will call on Democratic and Republican presidential candidates to support the agenda . Cisneros will be joined in addressing par ticipants by New York Gov . Mario Cuomo and a high-ranking Republican official. Leaders from the Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican and other Latino communities are meeting in focus groups to iron out the wording of the issues, which will be presented at an Oct. 21 press conference. "While Hispanics reside in different regions of the country and may have come here under different circumstances, a national His panic agenda demonstrates the common bonds that tie us together," said Denver Mayor Federico Pena. According to Aida Alvarez, coordinator of the agenda's unity task force, the goals of the agenda are to unite Latino leaders around key national issues, encourage Hispanics to vote in the 1988 presidential election and obtain commitments from presidential can didates in support of the documenfs positions. Among topics in the agenda draft are: • Empowerment/Political Participation: Appointing Hispanics to cabinet-level positions, the naming of a Latino to the Supreme Court, and opposing the" English only" movement. • The Competitive Edge/Educational Achievement and Employment Opportun ities: It recommends that the federal govern ment commit to hiring more Latinos, enforce non-discrimination statutes in the work place, require firms with government contracts to develop affirmative action plans, establish demonstration projects linking education with jobs for youth and create incentives for private-continued on page 2 827,000 Apply for Residency Status Fift-reight percent of the827,2081egalization applications received by the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service as of Oct. 8 are from the agency's Western Region, which includes Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Utah and Guam, INS announced. At a Washington, D.C., press col)ference, INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said the agency is now receiving an average of 40,000 ap plications a week and expects about 2 million people to apply for the legalization program by the cutoff date of May4, 1988. As of Oct. 8, 145,225 of the total applications received were from Special Agricultural Workers. LEGALIZATION APPLICATIONS BY REGION Eastern Northern Southern Western Total 65,318 86,873 198,521 476,496 827,208 Another 1 00,000 people could qualify for legalization under a change announced by INS that would allow persons who resided in the United States illegally, left the country and returned using legal visas, to qualify. The new ruling will primarily affect persons from Europe, Asia and Africa. INS also announced: • Apprehensions this September declined more than 42% from September 1986, from 139,459 to80,019a fact the agency attributes to heavy publicity in the United States and Mexico concerning employer sanctions. • INS has issued more than 100 citations to businesses that have continued employing undocumented workers after having been informed of the law by INS. • The agency has formally established a Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements (SAVE) system with Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Puerto Rico, New Mexico and Texas. The SAVE program instantly verifies a person's immigration status and thereby prevents un documented individuals from receiving federal benefits. Pilot programs are operating in Cali fornia and New York. Melinda Machado EPORT Senate Tables Shift on Continuous Residency Sen. John Chafee (D-R. I.) has requested a Senate hearing on waiving the continuous residency requirement for family members of a qualified legalization applicant under the immigration act, following his failure to attach the provision to a foreign relations authorization bill Oct. 7. The U.S . Immigration and Naturalization Service has not issued a formal policy state menton family unity. However, INS Commis sioner Alan Nelson said Oct. 8 children of qualified parents would not be deported and the agency would decide on a case-by-case basis situations where only one parent is eligible for legalization. Chafee's amendment was tabled 55-45. Fear thatfamily members will be deported is supressing the number of legalization ap plicants, according to a National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials' telephone survey of 50 Qualified Designated Entities, organizations aiding in the application process. NALEO lobbied in favor of Chafee's amendment. A spokesman for Chafee said the hearing request was made to Sen. Alan Simpson (R Wyo.), the ranking minority member of the Judiciary Committee's Subcommittee on Im migration. Senate Aids Cuban Exiles The Senate, on a voice vote, passed a policy Oct. 7 that eases the path for Cubans to immigrate to the United States from third countries. The policy was sponsored by Frank Lauten berg ( D-N.J. ) as an amendment to a bill author izing State Department spending. The bill, if passed by a House-Senate con ference committee and signed by the president, will help grant visas to Cubans trying to enter the United States while in exile in third countries. In 1986 President Reagan ordered that the Cubans would not be granted visas unless they arrived in those countries before Aug. 22, 1986. There are approximately 10,000 to 12.000 Cubans in third countries trying to immigrate to the United States. More than half are in Panama.

PAGE 2

Latino Families . Optimistic About Economic Outlook Hispanic families are optimistic about life in the United States, a recent survey finds. While previous studies documented the economic difficulties facing Hispanics,. the Louis Harris survey paints a brighter picture. The study shows that Hispanic families' spirits are not dampened by their lack of economic prosperity. take into account differences among Latino subgroups. "The Puerto Rican situation in the Northeast is worse than the black situation. In the West and Southwest, Mexican Americans are worse off than blacks," Valdivieso says. Among its findings: • Hispanics feel their economic lot is improving and report fewer problems with their jobs and living conditions. Valdivieso adds the overall optimism may reflect a feeling by Hispanic families that "things have to get better because they've been pretty bad." • Hispanics also report fewer spousal disputes. Latinos tended to report less . stress and tension than blacks. A cross-section of 3,000 family members participated in the survey, conducted early this year by the Philip Morris Company. Six percent of the total-180were Hispanic. Both groups complain about how tough it is to raise children properly, agreeing it is harder than they anticipated. Hispanics, blacks and whites satisfied with: H The survey finds that Hispanic parents differ from their non Hispanics counterparts in being the mo"st worried about their children dropping out of school. They are also more concerned about drugs, teen-age pregnancy and promiscuity. 1) The kind of world their children will inherit 43% B 27% 59 67 58 w 42% 76 80 75 2) The economic outlook for their family 71 3) Having the kind of home they want 71 4) Ability to pay for essentials 68 Agree that: Its findings are being greeted cautiously by Rafael Valdivieso, vice president for research at Hispanic Policy Development Project in Washington, D.C. Valdivieso notes the study does not identify Hispanics by subgroup. 1) With good daycare centers, preschool classes 66 and housekeepers, both parents can work full time and raise children 81 63 He says any comparisori between blacks and Hispanics should Presidential CandidateSupport ' Sought continued from page 1 the Medicaid program, which provides health sector hiring. insurance to families and individuals living The agenda also seeks increased Hispanic below the poverty line. It also calls for culturally contracting with federal agencies, expansion sensitive ser;ices to the Hispanic elderly of the Small Business Administration and its population and a national disease-preven S(a) contract set aside program and the develop. tion program for the Latino community. ment of Hispanic enterprise zones. Participants will discuss the reunification In the area of education, it recommends of Cuban families, economic development several national programs ranging from an . along the U.S. -Mexico border and the Carib early childhood education initiative to serve bean Basin Initiative. In addition, the agenda impoverished fourand five-year-olds to the will focus special attention on the political, creation of a dropout prevention fund. cultural and economic status of Puerto Rico. • Housing: The agenda recommends -Melinda Machado subsidy programs to create and maintain low-income housing; • Health Care: The agenda asks for legis lation that extends health care coverage to all residents and to correct deficiencies in Employees Sue Growers N. Y.C. Voters Targeted Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n announced in NewYorkCityOct 13 a$500,000 campaign to register Puerto Rican voters there by Feb. 19, the state's registration deadline for the presidential primary. The program will enlist community leaders in door-to-door registration drives. Officials estimate there are400,000 eligible Hispanic voters not registered in the city-most of them Puerto Rican . Ken Oliver-Mendez Discrimination Rules Termed AntiEmployee The U.S. Justice Department issued long. awaited regulations Oct. 6 to handle discrimi nation complaints arising from 1986 federal immigration law. Civil-rights advocates sharply criticized the rules for what they charged was too demanding a standard of proof on the part of discrimination victims. The regulations, designed to protect citizens and residents who are here lawfully from being fired or not being hired because they look or sound foreign, stipulate that an alleged discrimination victim must establish that the employer "knowingly and intentionally'' dis criminated against them. Previous employment related civil-rights statutes and rules used discriminatory effect of an employer's policies as the basis for a violation. Charles Kamasaki, director of policy analysis for the National Council of La Raza, pointed to literacy tests and "speak English only'' rules as employer practices which have a clear discriminatory result but may not reflect a discriminatory intent. Seven undocumented California strawberry pickers filed a class-action lawsuit in Mon terey County Superior Court Oct 5 against their former employer, charging that the grower physically threatened them, offered no field drinking water or sanitary facilities and withheld part of their salaries. CANF Hit With Second Resignation Lydia Villareal, the California Rural Legal Assistance attorney representing the plantiffs, told Weekly Report that growers Man . uel and Jose Salazar often threatened their workers with guns. ! 'When they ask for water they're told to drink the water out of the truck radiator or the irrigation pipes," said Villareal. She said Manuel Corrales, Manuel Reyes, Javier Navarro, Saturnino Santos, EloyCas tillo, Jorge Velasquez and Rafael Tarelo, who range from 19 to 26 years of age, were denied pay for going to the bathroom, stretch ing when tired and for inquiring about pay The suit is asking for several million dollars for the growers' approximately 200 employees. 2 A past vice chairman and active member of the Cuban American National Foundation has resigned from the lobbying and advocacy group. The resignation of Jose Luis Rodriguez follows by four months the resignation of CANPs executive director. Rodriguez, a Hialeah, Fla., businessman, said he resigned because he was concerned about the organization's growing role in local Miami politics. Frank Calz6n, CANPs former executive director, resigned in June . In his Sept. 28 resignation letter, Rodriguez expressed concern about CANF directors becoming involved in controversies with Miami city councilmen. He also denounced CANF member attempts at encouraging Cuban athletes, stopping over in Miami this summer on their way to participate in Indiana's Special Olympics , to defect. Antonio Font executive director of the Wash-ington-based organization which was founded in 1980, told Weekly Report, "The policy of the Cuban American National Foundation is not to get involved in local politics. Sometimes some of the directors individually get involved in local activities." Rodriguez also criticized the lack of demo cracy in decision-making within the foundation. Font responded, "Executive committee members are in touch with one another on a daily basis. All foundation decisions are made on a consensus basis." Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Henry Cisneros, guest columnist Challenging the Candidates The time for Hispanic Americans to unite around a National Hispanic Agenda is now. We are fast becoming the largest ethnic group in this country. Our families are young; our children, the future. Hispanic issues are American issues. It is in the best interests of the country as a whole to meet the challenges posed by the National Hispanic Agenda. The reasons are self-evident. This American democracy needs to renew itself. If we are to hold together the social fabric and better the national morale , we must develop our human capital. The Hispanic community, numbering more than 22 million now and rapidly growing, represents a great potential. On the other hand, our nation's future is in jeopardy if our Hispanic youth are not educated, if they are denied the tools to earn a livelihood . The National Hispanic Agenda '88 is a call to Hispanic Americans to unite around issues that require national attention, common needs that transcend narrow group interests. The so-called "good times" of today should not blind us to the persistent erosion underway . The entire nation will suffer if the needs of our children are not addressed . CALL FOR ACTION This is also a call for action by the presidential candidates to seek solutions to the nation's most pressing problems: • to create an educational system devoted to excellence, one that teaches our children to read and write, that facilitates the transition from Spanish to English; • to develop a healthcare system that aggressively tackles the problems posed by teen-age pregnancy , lack at prenatal care and the AIDS epidemic; and • to reduce the gaps in prosperity and eliminate the obstacles to opportunity by assuring Hispanics the right to full political participation : These and other related issues must move to center stage in the national debate. PROUD AND WILLING TO DIE Historically, Hispanics have enriched the national landscape, con tributing at all levels-culturally, intellectually, in the workplace and on the battlefield. It is no accident that the highest number of Medals of Honor have gone to Hispanics . We are a patriotic people, proud of our nation, willing to die for it. In turn , we want America to fulfill her promise to us . The National Hispanic Agenda '88 signals the intention of Hispanic leaders to play an increasingly important role in developing policies and programs responsive not only to Hispanic needs but the needs of the entire nation . We, as Hispanic leaders , intend to play a critical role in shaping our country's future, at home and abroad. FAMILY ACROSS BORDERS We are the bridge with Latin America, our" Hispanic family across borders. " The new reality is that United States and Latin American interests are interdependent as never before. A North/South partner ship is needed that is based on understanding and respect for the region . Issues such as immigration, employment and drugs otherwise will not be resolved . The National Hispanic Agenda is a challenge to the presidential candidates to come to grit:)s with the tough issues . We intend to do our part for the nation . They must, in turn, do theirs. (Henry Cisneros was first elected as mayor of San Antonio , the 31st most populous city in the United States, in 1981. Cisneros recently withdrew his name as a possible candidate for the Texas gubernatorial race . He was interviewed in 1984 by Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mandate as a vice presidential running mate.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua MEANWHILE, BACK AT THE RANCH: As the nation's Latino leadership is gathering in the nati on's capital to prepare for Election Year ' 88, strange things have been happening in their strongholds around the country. DOWN SOUTH: In Miami, for example, the Fraternal Order of Police voted to endorse Maurice Ferre in his bid to regain the mayot's office from Xavier Suarez. They instructed their president, 'Ken Nelson, to write the letter of endorsement. But they didn't bother to tell him what to say. Nelson doesn't hold Ferre in the highest of esteem and it seems he let his personal feelings creep into the letter a bit For starters, his "endorsemenf' commented: "A majority of the problems affecting the Miami Police Department are directly attributable to your role or lack of role as a ieaderfor all of Miami." Then he blamed Ferre for the " undesirable" officers who were arrested , indicted or fired for a variety of crimes a couple of years ago. Most were picked upduringa big hiring push while Ferre was mayor. He charged Ferre with lying and calling the poliqe"bums." Finally, he allowed: "The membership met in an open meeting on Wednesday , Sept. 30, 1987, and chose to give you the FOPs endorsement. You're endorsed." According to the Miami Herald, the letter prompted FOP vice president Sebastian Aguirre to tell rival Nelson, "We're not going to tolerate it." The llerald story concluded: " Meanwhile , the state attorney's office is investigating an incident between Nelson and Aguirre that followed a meeting in which FOP leaders decided to endorse Ferre. " Nelson has asked that criminal assault charges be filed against Aguirre . Aguirre said the incident began after Nelson made a derogatory remark about his mother." OUT WEST: In San Antonio, they're still fighting the battle of the Alamo . Alamo curator Steve Beck has started a letter-writing campa i gn to pressure Mexico into returning the "New Orleans Greys " the flag of the Louisiana volunteers which Gen. Antonio L6pez de Santa Anna's troops cut down from the chapel and kept as a souvenir. lfs presently in a museum in Mexico City's Chapultepec Park. FARTHER WEST: In Los Angeles, the visit last month by Spain's King Juan Carlos I was timed with a local battle over whether to move the statue of King Carlos Ill to historic Olvera Street there. The statue was given to Los Angeles by King Juan Carlos during his 1981 visit. It has since stood in less ethnic MacArthur Park Our LA council members Gloria Molina and Richard Alatorre joined in the fray, with Alatorre cOmmenting, "To honor a Spanish king that reigned prior to Mexico's independence would be to celebrate tyranny." They convinced the local body to oppose the move . There were reports that Molina and Alatorre confused Carlos Ill, a contemporary of George Washington and at one point King of California, with Ferdinand V, who was around in the 15th century. Some historians beat on them mercilessly, but Alatorre has a good excuse if he failed a history test. He was educated in L.A schools. As reader Felix Castro pointed out in The Los Angeles Times, at least there are a couple of great brandies named after Spanish kings. AND IN NEW SPAIN: Not all the news is made to confuse . When Juan Carlos visited New Mexico, Eric Serna, chairman of the New Mexico Corporation Commission , presented him with blankets woven by descendants of early Spanish settlers in New Mexico, including one by Serna's uncle, lsmaeiTrujlllo of Chimayo. Kay Barbaro Hispan ic Link Wee k ly R e port Oct. 19, 1987 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING STATUS OF PUERTO RICANS: For a copy of the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights ' 38-page pamphlet titled "Status of Puerto Ricans in the United States 1987 ," send $3 to the NCPRR at 160 W . Lippincott St, Philadelphia , Penn. 19133 (215) 634. FAMILY STUDY: "The Philip Morris Family Survey" is a 19-page report summarizing the findings of a spring 1987 survey conducted by Louis Harris & Associates. The booklet assesses the quality of the family life of Hispanics, blacks, and whites based on survey results, and offers responses to key questions. For a free copy, write to : Philip Morris Family Survey, 888 Seventh Ave., New York , N.Y . 10106. FEDERAL CONSUMER INFORMATION: The General Services Administration recently released its list of federal consumer publications in Spanish titled " Publicaciones Federales en Espaflol para el Consumidor. "The listing offers publications that can be obtained at no cost. To order free copies of the l i sting , write: Lista , Consumer Information Center (XC), Washington, D.C. 20405. TAX INFORMATION BOOKLETS: The Internal Revenue Service is offering two free booklets explaining the changes in the new federal tax. The booklets Publication 920 for individuals and Publication 921 for businesses-may be ordered by calling 1-424-FORM or phoning your local IRS office. HISTORY OF U.S. LANGUAGE POLICY: "Official Languages in the U.S.: Policies , Polemics and Politics" is a 15-page paper by Reynaldo Macias on the history of language groups and language policy in the United States. For a copy, send $1 to: Tomas Rivera Center,71 0 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714)625-6607. SCHOLARSHIP GUIDE: The Universityof Southern California's Office of Hispanic Programs has made available a list of scholarships for university-level Hispanics . For a free copy, send a self-addressed envelope with 22 postage to: OHP, Dr. Samuel Mark, Director, University of Southern California , 727 W . 27th St., Los Angeles , Calif . 90007 (213) 743-0977. ALIEN DETENTION CENTER CONDITIONS: The Minnesota Lawyers International Human Rights Committee recently released a 55-page report , titled "Oakdale Detention Center: The First Year of Operation," on the conditions at the Oakdale (La.) Federal Alien Detention Center. For a copy send $3 to: MLIHRC, 430 Marquette Ave., Suite 4 02, Minneapolis, Minn. 55401 (612) 341-3302. CONNECTING ROYBAL CHAIR ENDOWED A tribute will be held Oct. 21 in Washington, D.C., for the endowment of the Edward Roybal (D-Calif . ) Chair in Gerontology and Public Service at California -State University, Los Angeles . Roybal, chair of the U.S. House select committee on aging, has been an advocate for minorities and the elderly throughout his four-decade political career. The endowment of the chair will provide funds for scholarships, training , community outreach and health care to minorities, elderly and the disadvantaged . It will link scholars, service providers and communities to address the needs of older persons. For further information call the congressman's office at (202) 225-6235. Contributions can be sent to Congressman Edward Roybal, P . O . Box 2884, Washington , D.C. 20013. REAGAN HONORS BUSINESSMEN President Reagan presented two Latino entrepreneurs minority business awards at the White House Oct. 7. Ruben Hinojosa, president of H&H Meat Products Co. Inc. of Mercedes, Texas , was awarded the fifth annual Small Business Administration's National 8(a) Graduate Firm of the Year Award. Orlino Baldonado , of the EC Corporation an engineering and consulting service in Oakridge , Tenn . , was presented the U . S . Department of Commerce's Federal Contractor of the Year Award . OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES National Image, a group that promotes employment of Hispanics in federal government, has moved its national office from Corvalis, Wash. , to Washington , D.C. Manuel Oliverez , the president of Image, is the office director. The address is 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600. . . The National Puerto Rican Coalition recently was granted $125,000 over two years by the Ford Foundation for projects in Philadelphia and Chicago to form coalitions to increase Puerto Rican participation in local policy making . . . The Southwest Voter Research Institute received a $63,500 grant from the Ford Foundation for research and litigation to increase Latino electoral participation . . . -Julio Laboy Calendar "BILINGUAL AIDS PRESENTATION Los Angeles Oct. 21 feature 20 North American and Latin American folk groups in an effort to highlight the artists and their musical roots. THIS WEEK NATIONAL AGENDA MEETING Washington , D.C. Oct. 19-21 Hispanic leaders will participate in the National H i spanic Agenda 1988 forum aimed at drafting a document on Latino issues to be presented to the 1988 presidential candidates. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros , New York Gov . Mario Cuomo and a high-ranking Republican official will address the group. Aida Alvarez (212) 952 YOUTH SYMPOSIUM Topeka , Kan . Oct. 21 The KansasAdvisoryCommittee on Hispanic Affairs and the University of Kansas ' Office of Minority Affairs are hosting the second annual Kansas His panic Youth Symposium aimed at encouraging Latino students to graduate from high school and pursue a college education. The symposium will have work shops on peer pressure , career choices and college admissions. Steve Ramirez (913) 296-3465 4 The East Los Angeles Rape Hotline is providing Spanish-speaking referrals and information on AIDS and how it relates to the Latino community. Alva Moreno (213) 267-0771 LA PROMESA ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION New York Oct. 22 La Pro mesa, an organization providing professional and support services to New York Hispanics , is celebrating its 1Oth anniversary with an awards dinner and dance. Jose Fernandez (212) 299-11 oo ext. 34 HISPANIC JOURNALISTS CONFERENCE lxtapa , Mexico Oct 22-24 The National Association of Hispanic Journalists and NOTIMEX, a Mexican news wire service , are sponsoring the first professional meeting of Mexican and U .S. Hispanic journalists . The conference will address issues affecting U.S.-Mexico relations , the journalism profession in both countries and the possibility of establishing permanent professional exchange programs . Frank Newton (202) 783 NEW SONG FESTIVAL San Francisco Oct 23-25 The sixth annual Festival of the New Song will Oct 19, 1987 Juan Gonzalez (415) 239-3446 CENTRO DE LA RAZA ANNIVERSARY Seattle Oct 24 El Centro de Ia Raza, a agency, will kick off its 15th anniversary of serving the Hispanic community in Seattle by honoring the farm worker. Roy Wilson (206) 329-9442 COMING SOON LEGISLATIV E TRAINING CONFERENCE Mayor's Advisory Commission on Latino Affairs Chicago Oct 29 Marta Ayala (312) 7 44-4404 MEDIA CONFERENCE Latino Committee on the Media Chicago Nov. 4 Yolanda Rodriguez (312) 247 Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be re ceived two Fridays before publication date . Please include name of sponsor, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to : Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly 1420 N St . NW, Washington , D.C. 20005 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS TRAINING AND MANAGEMENT ASSISTANCE TRAINER/CONSULTANT LATINO INSTITUTE The Latino Institute seeks a Training and Management Assistance (TMA) Trainer to assist the TMA Director in the design, development , and implementation of management training programs and agency consultations. Bachelor's degree or equivalent in adminis trat ion, social services , or related fields is requ ir ed . Must have good writing and verbal skills . Candidates must also have a minimum of three years experience in adult education and training and two years experience working with minority social service agencies. Fluency in English and Spanish preferred. Salary: $19,000-$24,000. Send cover letter and resume . FUNDRAISING INTERNSHIP PROJECT COORDINATOR LATINO INSTITUTE The Latino Institute seeks a Fund raising Internship Project Coordinator to assist the Training and Management and Assistance Director in the coordination , development , and implementation of the program and corresponding agency consultations . Responsibilities will include designing the curriculum , organizing the advisory committee, and recruitment and monitoring of interns and conducting management consultations with the six agencies where interns wil l be placed. Must have good verbal and writing skills . Fluency in Spanish and English prefe r red . Bachelor's degree or equivalent in administration, social services or related fields and experience in adult education. Salary: $23,000-$27, 000. Send cover letter and resume. The Latino Institute is a non-profit organization that seeks to improve the life of U.S. Hispanics by providing training , information and advocacy in all areas Service area is limited to Chicago . Migda l ia (Millie) Rivera, Director Training and Management Assistance Latino Institute NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE. 228 S . Wabash , Suite 600 Chicago , Illinois 60604 INVEST IN YOUR COMMUNITY, SUPPORT NHSF This year the National His panic Scholarship Fund will be listed in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) literature, and all federal employees will be able to designate NHSF as their grantee . To make a pledge, federal employees need to write #505 (NHSF) on the CFC designated pledge form. For those individuals that are employees, they can send their check directly to NHSF . Checks are to be made payable to the Nat i onal Hispanic Scholarship Fund . NHSF i s a 501-(c)-3 tax exempt organization and all pledges are tax-deductible . TEACHING POSITIONS Two positions. Doctorates required . Assistant or Associate rank, tenure track , fall1988. Rhe toric or composition emphasis with English Education or Linguistics/TESOL secondary emphasis. Send application, vita, three letters of reference and a self addressed post card to: Robert J . Ward, Ph. D., Head , English Depart ment, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614. Postmark deadline: December 1 5 , 1 987 . (31 9) 273-2822 for interview appoint ment at NCTE and MLAconferences. UNI is an AA!EEO Employer. COMPUTER PROGRAMER Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred , also knowledge of wordstar, SPS&PC, Lotus , DBase. Duties include : research and technical assis tance. Call or write John Attinasi, Latino Institute, 228s. Wabash, Room 600, Chicago, Ill . 60604 (312) 663-3603. ASSISTANT CHIEF, CATALOG DEPARTMENT Stanford University Libraries Responsibilities: principal cataloger and over sees NACO work for Dept; supervises, including general oversight of budget four cataloging units w i th staff of 23; assists in planning, goal and policy setting ; writes documentation ; cipates in committees in and outside the Dept. Required are MLS from ALA accredited grad uate library school or equivalent degree; minimum 5 years original cataloging experience with automated cataloging system , AACR2, LC clas sification and subject headings ; knowledge of authority control concepts; demonstrated capa bility of managing large unit; significant super visory experience , including of librarians ; ability to train staft, sound reading knowledge of one major Western European language . Desirable are experience with NACO & RLI N ; experience in research library; knowledge of other lan guages ; experience working with professional groups at national level. Salary range $32,600-48 , 1 00 (Librarian rank) or $38,00Q-55,400 (Senior Librarian rank) de pending on qualifications. Send letter, resume, supporting documentation& list of professional references by November 30, 1987 (extended date), to Irene Yeh, Employment Coordinator , Stanford University Librar i es , Stanford , Calif. 94305-_6004. Cite #303/HL on correspondence . DEAN OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES (Search Reopened) Lehman College of The City University of New York is seeking an outstanding scholar to serve as Dean of Arts and Humanities. The Division of Arts and Humanities consists of the following academic departments: Academic Skills ; Arts ; Black Studies; Clas sical , Oriental , Germanic, and Slavic Languages ; English ; History; Music ; Philosophy; Puerto Rican Studies ; Romance Languages; and Speech and Theatre . These departments employ approximately 150 tenure-track and tenured faculty and 95 adjunct faculty members . Lehman College , a senior college of The City University of New York, enrolls 9 ,300 undergraduate and graduate students in its four divisions : Arts and Humanities, Natural and Social Sciences, Nursing , and Professional Studies. Located in the northwest Bronx, the college attracts students from the five boroughs of New York City and from Westchester County to its beautiful37acre campus , which includes the Lehman College Art Gallery and Lehman H is p a nic Link We ekly R e p o rt Center for the Performing Arts . Candidates should have the following qualifications: an earned doctorate ; a national reputat i on for scholarship and research; successful experience in university teaching ; and evidence-of the ability to offereducational and administrative leadership in a liberal arts college. The salary range for a Dean in the Executive Compensat ion Plan of the University of New York is $74,203-$82,561. Excellent fringe benefits package . The Appointment will begin no later than September 1 , 1988. Nom i nations and applications, including a complete curriculum vitae and the names of five references, should be submitted by December 1 to: Melvyn B Nathanson, Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Lehman College, Bedford Park Boulevard Bronx, New York 10468 EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment 2 . 2 a Q d c2,.4 . " Two other d i stinguis h ed mujere s Argentines recog ni zed t he world over for distinctive singing stylescontinue on separate nat i onal tours this week. MUJERES ON THE MOVE: Latinas make a vital contribution to the . arts i n the Un ited States'as proven by several events this week . One is Mercedes Sosa, .who some call "the vo i ce of the Americas" because of her issue-oriented repertoire . She will perform in Los Angeles Oct. 21 and 22 . The other is Libertad Lamarque , known as "Ia no via de America" for her tangos and other folkloric r enditions . She performs at Kennedy Center in Wash i ngton, D.C., Oct. 25. Two distinguished Hispanic actresses have embarked on a six state tour of the play Orinoco, a comedy about two fading actresses .who travel on a cargo boat on their way to ari engagement in an .,.Amazonian oil camp. Both Carmen Zapata and lvonne Coli have prior experience perform i ng in Orinoco, written by Mexico's Emilio Carballido. Zapata produced it, as well as acted in it, in a stag i ng last year by Los Angeles ' Bilingual Foundation of the Arts. Coli has performed the p lay on the New York stage as well as on tour i n her native land, Puerto Rico . Other Latinas in the news this week include: • Iva nne Maria Soto ; ' \ vhose 1985 film Reflections of a Desire was well received this month at the first Latin American and Car i bbean Women ' s Film Festival held in Mexico . • Amy Gonzalez is one of six theater directors nationwide chosen for a Theater Communications Group director fellowsh ip. The current tour of Orinoco , produced by the BFA, began Oct. 6 in Tucson , Ar i z., and continued through last week in Yuma and Phoenix, Ariz., and Albuquerque, N .M. This week the show moves to Texas , with performances in El Paso Oct. 18 and in San Antonio Oct. 21, • Elizabeth Perez Luna becomes t h e executive producer of Crossroads , a new National Public Radio half hour weekly news magazine that airs .on some 100 stations. _Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report , JOURNALISM JOB FAIRS: The American Society of Newspa'per Editors and the Task Force on Minorities of the American News paper Publishers Association this month kicked off thei r 1987 series of 15 regional events designed to attract more minorities to p r int journalism careers . The first effort, held Oct. 9 0 in Tucson, Ariz. , and coordinated by Edith Auslander of Tucson Newspapers, attracted 65 students plus 28 interviewers representing 22 separate news organizations. . About 80% of the student partic i pants were Hispanic, she said. Ernie Sotomayor , assoc i ate editor of the Dallas Times Herald, keynoted the activity . The second job fair/conference , coordinated by Merv Aubesp in, of Gannett Co., was staged in Arlington , Va., outside of Wash i ngton , D . C . O ct. 15-i?. Part i c i pants in the events include editors , mostly from small and mid-size dailies , and HISPANIG LINK WEEKLY REPORT a na ti o n al publication o f Hispanic Link News SerVice Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234 or 234-Q737 Publ is ner Hector E ric kser>-Mend o za E di t o r F elix P e r e z Repor ti n g : Ant o n io Mejias'Rentas, Melinda Mac h a d o . . J uli o L a b oy, Ken Oliver Mendez. Graphics/Produ c t io n : C arlos Arr ie n . Zoila El i as . No portion of Hispanic Weekly Re port may be repro duced o r broadcas t i n any fo r m with out adv an ce p e rmission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 T rial ;ubscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORA T E C L ASS I F I ED : Ad r ates 75 cent s pe r word. Oisolay ad s are $35 pe r colum n i n c h . Ad s placPd by will run in Weekly Report s m a iled Fr i day of sam e week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 Hispanic, black, Asian and Native Ameri can 371. journalists working in the regions . BOSTON . (Westin Hotel) Dec. 1 0 Dan Sites, dates and editors coordinating future Warner , The Boston Eagle Tribune (617) 685 meetings are: rooo. RALEIGH, N.C.(North Raleigh Hilton) Oct. ARLINGTON, Texas (Campus Inn Motel) 22 Ted Vaden , The News and Observer Jan . 7 Paula LaRocque , The Arlington Morn(919) 829. ing News (214) 977. MIAMI (Omni International) Oct. 2931 CINCINNATI (Omn i Netherland) Jan. 14 Mary Jean Connors, The Miami Herald (305) 16 George Blake , The C i ncinnat i Enqu i rer 376. (513) 369. CHICAGO (Marriott Downtown) Nov . 5 PHILADELPHIA (Franklin Plaza) Jan . 22 Ron W i lliams , The Chicago Tribune (312) 23 Stu Anmuth, Philadelphia Newspapers 222. (215) 854. SAN FRANCISCO (Hotel Cecil) Nov. 5 7 SEATTLE (Un i versity Plaza Hotel) Jan. Dianne Levy, The San Francisco Chronicle 28 June Almquist, The Seattle Times(206) (415) 777. 464 . DENVER (Denver Inn) Nov . 12 David The program , now in its fourth year, is Hall , The Denver Post (303) 820. geared primarily for students seeking intern ANN ARBOR, Mich.(Campus Inn) Nov .12 . ships and entry-level jobs . Last year , of the 14 Brian Malone , The Ann Arbor News (313) 2,500 people participating in the conferences, 994. about 1 ,600 were college upperclassmen or ATLANTA (Hyatt Regency) Nov . 12 recent graduates . . Job Fair Director Denise Joan Hall, The At l anta Journal and Constitution Johnson says l:!ispanic students have been (404) 526. well represented. At several conferences they LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Holiday Inn) Nov. 19 ' made up a majority of the partic i pants, she 21 Dave Petty, The Arkansas Gazette (501) . said . _ Ken QliverMemdez H i span i c Link Weekly Repo rt