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Hispanic link weekly report, October 26, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 26, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This
The National Women’s Political Caucus honors Tony Coelho(D-Calif.), the House Majority Whip and a member of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, as one of 10 recipients of its Good Guys Awards. The award goes to men who have made notable contributions to the advancement of women through their careers... Florida Gov. Bob Martinez recognizes Brenda Z6ldivar, a student at Miami’s Robert Morgan Vocational Technical Institute, for her first-place finish in the National Health Occupations Students of America academic competitions. .. The FBI subpoenas the financial records of Hialeah, Fla., Mayor Raul Martinets Spanish-language newspaper, ElSolde Hialeah, and records of his campaign finances. The federal agency declined
to comment on why the records were subpoenaed... The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards adds Ernesto Cdrtes, a member of the national staff of the Industrial Areas Foundation from Austin, Texas, Jaime Escalante, a math teacher at Garfield High School in Los Angeles, and Corpus Christi, Texas, bilingual prekindergarten teacher Rebecca Zavalos as three of its 34 new members. The 63-member board has one other Hispanic, San Antonio teacher/ principal Sonia Herndndez... Roberto Lorca, a Spanish dancerand founder and director of the Spanish Dance Arts Company, dies in New York at the age of 49 from an AIDS-related illness. Lorca was a native of California .. Concepcibn Valenzuela, 72, the mother of the late rock star Ritchie Valens, dies in Watsonville, Calif., after a long illness...
^M^HISPANIC
Leaders Agree on Latino Agenda
LULAC to Battle Ariz. English-Only
said San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, who chaired the unity task force of National Hispanic Agenda 1988.
The 22-page agenda was approved unanimously after daylong discussions on issues ranging from strong opposition to the English-only movement to a compromise statement on peace in Latin America In order for the Cuban representatives to accept the document an earlier approved statement supporting the Arias Peace Plan was changed to a state-
continued on page 2
Hispanic state representatives and community organizations called Arizona English, seeks an initiative that recognizes English as the dominant language but opposes any law stating so. Both drives must gather 134,048 signatures by July 1988 to be placed on the November 1988 ballot.
Composed of LULAC national vice presidents and state directors, the committee will also release a presidential straw poll
Commenting on the National Hispanic Agenda’88 meeting, LULAC National President Oscar Mor&n said, “The summit is very key to many of the issues LULAC has been articulating.”
Ruling Aids Nev., Ariz. Farm Workers
A non-partisan consensus Hispanic agenda, endorsed by more than 100 of the nation’s top Latino elected, business and community leaders in Washington, D.C.,Oct. 20, will be presented to 1988 presidential candidates and disseminated throughout the Cuban, Mexican American, Puerto Rican and other Latino communities.
“We have dispelled the myth that it is not possible to bring together Cubans, Puerto Ricans and Mexican Americans from all areas of the country and put aside our differences,”
About 50 members of the League of U nited Latin American Citizens^ Executive Committee discussed LULACs role in pursuing the National Hispanic Agenda 1988 and counteracting the English-only movement in Arizona during the group’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C., Oct. 23-24.
Two statewide petition drives recently got underway in Arizona concerning the English-only movement there. One seeks an initiative that would make English the official language. The other, spearheaded by a coalition of
Corky Gonzales ‘Stable’
Pioneer Chicano activist Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzales remains in serious but stable condition following an Oct. 9 accident in Denver in which he punctured a lung after suffering cardiac arrhythmia while driving.
Gonzales, 59, felt ill while jogging and decided to drive home, according to his family. He blacked out in the car, swerved, hit a house and suffered head lacerations and lung damage. Following emergency surgery, he developed pneumonia Arrhythmia is an irregular beating of the heart Gonzales suffered no heart muscle damage.
A professional prize fighter in his youth, Gonzales founded the Crusade for Justice in 1963 and led it and other Chicano empowerment groups in the ’60s and ’70s. Gonzales was the first Hispanic district captain of the Denver Democratic Party.
Immigration officers in Arizona and Nevada who detain farm workers must assure that workers eligible to remain in the United States under the new immigration law do not unknowingly accept deportation, according to an Oct. 15 ruling by a federal district judge in Phoenix.
The Special Agriculture Workers provision of the immigration law says that farm workers who have worked in agriculture for 90 days between May 1,1985, and May 1,1986, are eligible for legalization. When detained by immigration officials, however, workers often are not asked of their eligibility status, charged the plantiffs.
The injunction by Judge Robert Broomfield holds that government officials in the two states must now ask undocumented persons
House Bill Addresses Population Undercount
Rep. Mervyn Dymally (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Subcommittee on Census and Population, introduced legislation Oct. 20 that would require the U.S. Census Bureau to adjust its 1990 population count to account for the undercount of Hispanics, blacks and otheujg|gfttEk
JmHIiI#to* Terri Ann Lowenthal, staff director for th^apnsus subcommittee, the natipfahiftpIBBron was undercounted by lQ%+dfe^fmillion - in 1980.The undercount was 5.9% for blacks and slightly lower for Hispanics, she said.
Dymaltys bill would have the Census Bureau adjust its figures before it reports them to the president and Congress Dec. 31,1990. The legislation does not specify the methodology to be used for arriving at the recalculated figures.
Lowenthal said there are available accurate adjustment methods but that the Census Bureau has declined to use them or comment on their validity.
“The problem is that the Census Burqau is reluctant because the Department of Commerce puts reins on it for political reasons,” Lowenthal told Weekly Report.
The Census Bureau is a branch of the Commerce Department.
whether they are eligible for legalization as agricultural workers. If they are eligible, they must be allowed to remain in the United States.
“When asked by officials what date they entered the country, many farm workers would say yesterday or the day before and therefore be asked to leave,” Nadine Wettstein, the Arizona Farm Workers Union attorney representing the plantiffs, told Weekly Report. Wettstein said that the workers would be asked to leave the country but not interviewed to see if they were eligible to stay under the SAW program.
Wettstein told Weekly Report that she hopes the case will be used as an example in other states, thereby broadening the ruling’s application.


Proposed Census Changes Said to Hurt Latino Elderly
The National Council of La Razacriticized proposed changes in the 1990 census at an Oct 20 hearing of the House Select Committee on Aging, charging that the changes can harm Hispanic elderly.
Emily McKay, NCLR executive vice president said that if changes proposed by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget are accepted, Hispanic elderly will not be allocated their “share” of special programs and funds that are based on census figures.
OMB proposed that the Census Bureau delete three form questions regarding utility usage and asked that seven other questions, including inquiries about rent the number of rooms per family household and telephone ownership, be moved to a less-used long form.
She said the changes wou Id limit the amount of accurate data on the elderly and contribute to the lack of data on Hispanics. Latinos are about 3% of the total elderly but are the fastest growing segment among the 65-and-over group.
TOP LATINO ELDERLY STATES 1980
Number Percent*
California 169,787 25.3%
Texas 145,333 21.6
Florida 93,815 14.0
New York 72,075 10.7
New Mexico 29,788 4.4
*% of Hispanic elderly in nation McKay criticized the lack of regional and subgroup data on Hispanic elderly. “That
(national data) is not sufficient to plan programs and it is not sufficient to make policy,” she said.
“If you can’t document a problem with statistics, there is too often the assumption that there is no problem,” McKay told the committee.
According to a La Raza report, Hispanic elderly are:
• more likely to live in multigenerational families than other elderly and far less likely than white elderly to live in homes for the aged;
• the least educated elderly subgroup; and
• less likely than blacks or whites to receive social security.
- Julio Laboy
Presidential Forum Sought for Agenda Gov. Dukakis Favorec
continued from page 1
ment reading, “We support a peace plan as an essential step toward a fMcefttlteglution of the present crisis in CentrawIm^fM)
“We must articulate a wggtopg agenda It is overdue,” Cisneros said aPaffC^Olfpsess conference announcing the documenvWe was joined by Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n, Repi Esteban Torres(D-Calif.), Florida state Rep. Arnhilda Badia Gonzalez Quevedo (R-Coral Gables), Denver Mayor Federico Pena, Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.), Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre, New York Sen. Olga M§ndez (D-Bronx) and leaders of key national organizations.
League of United Latin American Citizens National President Oscar Mor&n said that while leaders of Latino organizations have come together in the past, this is the first broad-based agenda to be outlined by leaders and elected officials from all regions.
Pablo Sedillo, one of the organizers of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, said dialogue and refinement of the document would be continued at his groups conference in April. Participants will also seek its adoption by their local communities and state parties.
In a dinner address to agenda participants, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo said that the “Hispanic community represents a vast untapped potential now denied to the country.”
Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira was suspended Oct. 20 with pay followin'' "it.
16 indictment on three third-degre^ .*..w.ny theft charges for purchasing seven stolen designeMabel suits from clothier Emeterio Marino Pijeira.
Pereira was the only customeroutof hundreds who bought suits from the unlicensed duplex to be indicted by the Dade County grand jury - raising cries from the local Cuban community that he is being singled out because he is Cuban and because he held the county’s most powerful position.
“I have done nothing in violation of the
Among some of the key points were:
• Substituting a section titled “The U.S. and Latin America Developing a New Partnership for Peace and Economic Stability in Latin America” for the previously titled “The Hispanic Family Across Borders.” The new section calls on the president to include Hispanics in Latin American policy development, calls for a summit of the presidents of the Americas, and seeks reform of the political asylum process in the United States.
• Cisneros cited the section on Empowerment/Political Participation as the mostcrucial That section calls for Hispanics to be appointed to cabinet-level positions, opposition to the English-only movement reform of the citizenship naturalization process and establishment of national voter registration standards, including mail-in registration and election day registration.
• Willie Velasquez, director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project expressed a more cynical view. “Frankly, I am not sure there is a coherent Hispanic agenda. There is not one Hispanic vote. It’s futile for such disparate opinions to be boiled down into one.”
Presidential candidates will be asked for a written response to these issues and will be invited to participate in a national forum.
- Melinda Machado
law. I am innocent of all charges included in the grand jury indictment I cannot comprehend why I have been singled out for prosecution,” said Pereira.
According to the special prosecutor’s office, there was insufficient evidence to indict other promiment purchasers of clothing. The clothier, Pijeira, wascharged with racketeering, grand theft dealing in stolen property and failure to pay sales taxes.
County manager Pereira was appointed in January 1986 to the $114,000-a-yearjoh He was responsible for managing a $1.5 billion budget and 23,000 employees.
in MVREP Straw Poll
Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis was the top choice in a presidential straw poll taken at the Midwest Voter Registration Education Project’s fifth annual leadership conference in Chicago Oct 16-18. Theconference also was the launching site of a voter registration drive.
With more than 1,000 Hispanic leaders present at the conference, including mayors, former governors and other elected and appointed officials, Dukakis polled 37% of the 344 returned questionnaires.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson followed Dukakis with 25% of the vote and Sen. Paul Simon (D-III.) came in third with 7%. Vice President George Bush led Republicans with 3%.
Juan Andrade, MVREP executive director, told Weekly Report that his organization kicked off its drive to register voters for the 1988 presidential election. Latino organizations are seeking to register 1 million more voters nationwide.
Andrade said the group also put together at the conference a preliminary agenda on Hispanic issues that was sent to Washington, D.C., where the National Hispanic Agenda’88 was drafted Oct. 19-21.
Immigrant Ed. RiderGains
The U.S. Senate approved Oct 14a rider providing $1.3 million in immigrant education funds to 29 Texas school districts which had missed a filing deadline for the federal Emergency Immigrant Education program.
Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) attached the rider to the Labor, Health and Human Services appropriations bill which is now scheduled for a House-Senate conference committee.
The $30 million federal program is administered by the U.S. Education Department. It had a May 22 deadline for school districts to report the number of children qualified.
Texas had expected$3.3 million for47,400 immigrant students and was notified Oct. 1 that it would not receive the entire amount. The rider makes up the $15 million deficit.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Indictment of Pereira Termed Biased
2


L. Houle Gutierrez, guest columnist
Border-Hopping Goblins
In most U.S. towns and cities, Halloween is an orderly procession of tiny, chaperoned children dressed in elaborate costumes and toting trendy candy bags. In Nogales and other communities along our border with Mexico, it is something different. Very different.
Actually, there are two Nogaleses. There is Nogales, Ariz., with its population of 20,000. And there is its Mexican sister, Nogales, Sonora, with 12 times that population.
The two communities are separated by a huge “cut-proof’ chain-link fence, which remained uncut for nearly four days after its installation long ago. Beyond our city limits, the fence gives way to a barbed-wire model, smaller and even more easily transgressed.
At Halloween’s nightfall, our streets are filled with more children than a Disney movie.
Driving along the border, down International Street one detects hundreds of tiny shadows squeezing through holes in the fence at an incredible rate. The normally quiet (local teen-agers use the word “boring”) streets teem with activity. Its more like New York City at rush hour.
But you can tell you’re in a border town when your doorbell rings and, instead of two or three plump little She-Ras or ETs, you’re greeted by about 10 or 12 thin children without costumes except for some random paint smears on their faces.
SHOUTS OF ‘TRIQUI-TRI’
“Triqui-Tri!’’ Their shouts are accompanied by the world’s happiest expressions.
Unlike their norteamericano counterparts, these children don’t complain about the type of candy you’re handing out. You will not hear “Ohhhhh, gross - more Dum-Dums. That makes 16 already” from the children from Mexico. But they do say “thank you” in English, just like the Arizona kids.
Actually, here on the border, we vary the holiday’s booty, including such Mexican treats as chupaletas de cajeta or cola - fruit- or cola-flavored suckers - or Tomies- rich caramels made with goafs milk.
On an average Halloween, we host about 150 trick-or-treaters between 6 and 9 p.m. After that, ifs groups of what appear to be young men auditioning for the part of Stanley Kowalski in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” They don’t say anything. They just hold out a grocery bag or a pillowcase or their hats.
The appearance of these older teen-agers causes some concerned residents to call the Border Patrol office. If the teen-agers are picked up, they are taken to the station, where they sit and eat their candy until driven back to the border and released.
BORDER PATROL OVERWHELMED
There is a popular belief that the U.S. Border Patrol looks the other way as Mexican youngsters surge in on Halloween. Officials here deny that. Vandalism and theft increase on that night, but they also do so in most U.S. communities. Because of the potential for illegal activity, the patrol staffs up more than on normal nights.
Still, it is overwhelmed.
One border officer recounted to me a Halloween night when he parked his patrol car near the international fence to question a group of people walking in the street. As he was talking to them, he glanced back to see dozens more, large and small, climbing across the fence and using the hood of his vehicle as a springboard.
Patrol personnel don’t seek out residential areas to go around peeking under masks. They concentrate on the border itself.
And most local families, merchants and government officials take pleasure in sharing the U.S. version of a Celtic celebration with their neighbors from the “other” Nogales.
Our young visitors have the energy. We have the candy. Partnerships have been built on less than that.
(L Houle Gutierrez is a reporter with Nogales International newspaper, in Nogales, Ariz.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
DAY OF THE DEAD: In this week’s guest column, L Houle Gutierrez describes Halloween along the northern edge of the U.S. -Mexico border.
Two days later, when Mexicans celebrate /a noche de los muertos, those same Sonoran children she writes about will be enjoying candy skulls instead of grinning at jack-o'-lanterns.
How the United States and Mexico celebrate the two holidays-separated by All Soul’s Day - says much about our different attitudes toward death. And no one captured those differences better than Mexican philosopher Octavio Paz in his book “The Labyrinth of Solitude.” Paz observed:
“The word death is not pronounced in New York, in Paris, in London, because it burns the lips. The Mexican, in contrast is familiar with death, jokes about it caresses it sleeps with it celebrates it it is one of his favorite toys and his steadfast love...
“We decorate our houses with death’s heads, we eat bread in the shape of bones on the Day of the Dead, we love songs and stories in which death laughs and cracks jokes...”
The Mexican, Paz explained, is indifferent toward death because he is indifferent toward life. “He views not only death but also life as nontranscendent”
Norteamericano “ laws, customs and public and private ethics all tend to preserve human life,” he wrote, but after describing the fascination exhibited by the U.S. press and public with murderers and our “recognized inefficiency of the systems of prevention,” he suggested that “the respect for life of which Western civilization is so proud is either incomplete or hypocritical.”
His conclusion? “The cult of life, if it is truly profound and total, is also the cult of death, because the two are inseparable A civilization that denies death ends by denying life.”
VOICE IN THE GRAVEYARD: There’s also a nice Mexican dicho to remind us that death is the great equalizer Uegando al campo santo no haycalaveras plateadas On reaching the graveyard, there are no gold-plated skulls.
CUOMO WEARS CHAPS: On to more cheery subjects, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo brought his greatest applause at the Hispanic National Agenda conference in Washington, D.C., Oct 20 when he did an imitation of Clint Eastwood/Ronald Reagan.
Recalling his early education, he recounted that he missed 39 days in his first year of school. “I didn’t speak the language. I was embarrassed to go to school. They didn’t have a teacher to talk to me in Italian. I was lost and disoriented. I became hysterical and stayed home.
“I will not forget how difficult it is,” he told the blue-ribbon gathering of national Latino leaders.
“The movement in New York to make English the official language of the United States denies our history. It isa repugnant proposal. I have already opposed it. I will continue to oppose it
“I don’t believe it will make it past our Senate and Assembly but-I hesitate to say this- if ever a bill gets through our legislature and it reaches my desk, then I say for the benefit of all you Republicans, it will make my day.” - Kay B&rbaro
Quoting...
ARNHILDA BADIA GONZALEZ QUEVEDO, Republican Florida state representative from Coral Gables, at the National Hispanic Agenda 1988 meeting:
“This is a non-partisan process. Whether Republican or Democrat issues of Hispanics in the United States transcend party affiliation. We have a united agenda.*
Corrections: San Antonio’s ranking among U.S. cities was incorrect in last week’s guest column. It is the ninth largest city.
The Sept 28 Sin Pelos gave the wrong number of Latino congressmen. There are 14. Eleven are voting members.
Oct. 26, 1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


STATUS 6#EfcfiEBLYr The National Council of La Raza’s 31-page rep<5ft,“The Hispanic Elderly. A Demographic Profile,” includes information on the socioeconomic status of the Hispanic elderly and the problems th^y^face. Fora copy send $3 to: NCLR,c/o Rosemary Aguilar, 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-960CL v ,
MVREP POLL: The'results of the Midwest Voter Registration Education Prefect’s OCt.' 16-18 leadership conference poll will be available for freebytheerrd of the month. Send requests to: MVREP, 43T S. Dearborn; Suitd l 1?03;‘ Chicago, III. 60605.
CONGRESSIONAL INTERNSHIPS: The Congressional Hispanic l Caucus Institute isseekingcojlegegraduatesandgraduatestudents as applicants for its nine-month Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, the 12 individuals selected will work with congressional qornmjtteOs apd subcommittees, other government-related institutions and tfie mejSia Jhe deadline for applications is Nov. 13. For information ? and applications, contact Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, CHCI. 504 C St NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771.
DROPOUT SOLUTIONS: “What To Do About Dropouts? A Summary of Solutions” Js a 32-page digest of 14 dropout programs throughout the United States* Specific program characteristics, such as costs targets and outcomes are discussed. For a copy, send $5 to: Hispanic Policy,Development Project, 1001 Connecticut Ave. 1 NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8414.
CONTEMPORARY MEXICO RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: The Center foftJiS.-Mexican Studies at the University of California San Diego, is seeking individuals at the postdoctoral and predoctoral level for its Visiting Research Fellowships The fellowships are for writing-arid research on any aspect of modern Mexico (excluding literature and the arts). The application deadline is Jan. 1. Request application packets from: GraCiela Platero, Fellowship Coordinator, Center for, U.S. -Mexican Studies UC-San Diego, La Jolla Calif. 92093 (619) 534r4503.
- NATIONAL HISPANIC AGENDA: Copies of the National Hispanic Agenda 1988, a 22-page non-partisan consensus document on issues:"important to the Latino community in the United States, are available by request from Aida Alvarez at Bear, Stearns, 7 Hanover Square, New York, N.Y. 10004 (212) 952-8958.
CONNECTING
ARIZONA ENGLISH OPENS OFFICE
Arizona English, a coalition of Latino activists, organizations and s state representatives opposing the English-only movement in Arizona opened an office Oct. 23 in Phoenix.
The group began Oct 9 a statewide petition drive to put on the November 1988 ballot an initiative recognizing English as the j dominant language of the state but opposing the need for a statute to say so.
For further information, contact Julianne Holroyd, P.O.Box25213, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602) 829-8062.
INTERN RECIPIENTS CHOSEN
The Center for Community Leadership Development, ASPIRA of j Illinois, Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement, Hispanic Housing Development Corporation, the Latin United Community Housing l Association and Social and Educational Services were selected Oct. j
15 to participate in the Latino Institute’s Fund-Raising Internship Program.
The program provides each of the groups with a paid intern who will be trained over a one-year period to become the permanent development officer at each Hispanic agency, helping to increase its fundraising capabilities.
The program is funded by a $150,000 grant from the Amoco j Foundation.
SCHOOLS TARGET HISPANICS, BLACKS
The University of Texas at Austin and Texas A&M University announced Oct. 12 the University Outreach Program to help greater numbers of Hispanicsand blacks prepare for university-level studies.
The program will establish outreach centers in Houston, San Antonio, Dallas-Fort Worth and in the predominantly Hispanic Rio Grande Valley.
It will identify and work with Hispanics and blacks, preparing them for college. Students will be targeted as early as the seventh and eighth grades.
The program will cost each school roughly $200,000. The University of Texas at Austin is 9.4% Hispanic and Texas A&M is 6.2% Hispanic.
The state is 21% Hispanic. - Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP DINNERS
San Francisco Oct. 28, San Juan, Puerto Rico Oct. 29, San Diego and Houston Oct. 30 The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund is hosting a series of gala banquets to raise scholarship money for undergraduate and graduate Latino students. Judy Chapa (213) 551-1714
CALiFORNIJVMEXICO BUSINESS CONFERENCE Los Angeles Oct. 28-29
The first California/Mexico Business Conference is being sponsored bytheCalifornia Governor’sOffice of California/Mexico Affairs and the state’s Hispanic Chamber of Commerce The purpose of the conference is to stimulate trade between California and Mexico by bringing together experts in international trade and business Among the topics addressed will be updates on the maquiladoras, an overview of the Mexican economy and investmentclimate, import/ export financing and technology.
Larry L6pez (916) 454-1908
LAW ENFORCEMENT/CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMINAR
Pomona, Calif. Oct. 28-30 4
Immigration issues and minorities and the criminal justice system will be topics addressed at a national institute on law enforcement and criminal justice seminar sponsored by the National Conference of Christians and Jews. Among the speakers will be Rep Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), Leo Estrada, a University of California at Los Angeles professor, Diego Vigil, an urban anthropologist at the University of Southern California, and Antonio Rodriguez, executive director of the Los Angeles Center for Law and Justice.
Henry Corrales (213) 385-0491
LEGISLATIVE TRAINING CONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 29
The Mayoi'sCommission on Latino Affairs, the Latin American Recruitment and Educational Services and the Rafael Cintron Ortiz Cultural Center at the University of Illinois are sponsoring a legislative workshop to train community leaders and activitists on the legislative process, at municipal, state and federal levels, policy development and lobbying. Marta Ayala (312) 744-4404
COMING SOON
MEDIA CONFERENCE Latino Committee on the Media Chicago Nov. 4
Yolanda Rodriguez (312) 247-0707
INNER-CITY POVERTY CONFERENCE Oct. 26, 1987
Youth Policy Institute and the Eisenhower Foundation Washington, D.C. Nov. 4 John Bolz (202) 635-6087
IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition Boston Nov. 5
Muriel Heilberger(617) 375-6000 ext. 448
LEGALIZATION STATUS MEETING National Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Forum Dallas Nov. 6
Norma Plascencia (512) 474-1773
MULTIETHNIC FAMILY CONFERENCE Queens College of the City University of New York New York Nov. 13 Ron Cannava(718) 670-4170
HISPANIC STAR GALA AWARDS Hispanic Institute for the Performing Arts Washington, D.C. Nov. 22 Myrna Torres (202) 289-8541
Calendar will announce events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before publication date. Please include name of event, sponsor, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


The Following Positions Close November 5, 1987 at 5:00 PM:
Senior Employee Development Specialist Salary; $32,115.20 - $45,102.72 Announcement #1807-8A-PER
This is highly specialized work developing, coordinating and implementing a comprehensive training and career development program for Arlington County employees. Directly responsible for management training programs and supervising one other professional in implementing training programs for other employees. Consults with management to assess needs, develops curricula, conducts training programs and arranges organizational development programs or interventions.
Requires BS in related area and four years experience in training, employee/organizational development or closely related field. See official announcement for preferred qualifications.
EEO Recruitment-Outreach Specialist
(Personnel Department)
Salary; $25,883.52 - $28,512.65 Announcement #1805-8A-PER
Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit targeted populations, including minorities, women and disabled persons. Duties include identifying and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials, community groups, etc.; developing outreach plans, ads, brochures, etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis.
Requires at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university in public, business or personnel administration or related field. Knowledge of outreach methodsand recruitment sources. Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following: a) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system; b) language capabilities in one or more languages represented in the community.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on the closing date. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department
2100 14th Street, North, Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH
MM
INVEST IN YOUR COMMUNITY, SUPPORT NHSF
This year the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will be listed in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) literature, and all federal employees will be able to designate NHSF as their grantee.
To make a pledge, federal employees need to write #505 (NHSF) on the CFC designated pledge form.
For those individuals that are non-federal employees, they can send theircheck directly to NHSF. Checks are to be made payable to the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund. NHSF is a 501-(c)-3 tax exempt organization and all pledges are tax-deductible.
P.O. Box 748, San Francisco, California 94101.
ASSISTANT CHIEF, CATALOG DEPARTMENT Stanford University Libraries
Responsibilities: principal catalogerand oversees NACO work for Dept; supervises, including general oversight of budget four cataloging units with staff of 23; assists in planning, goal and policy setting; writes documentation; participates in committees in and outside the Dept.
Required are MLS from ALA accredited graduate library school or equivalent degree; minimum 5 years original cataloging experience with automated cataloging system, AACR2, LC classification and subject headings; knowledge of authority control concepts; demonstrated capability of managing large unit, significant supervisory experience, including of librarians; ability to train staff; sound reading knowledge of one major Western European language. Desirable are experience with NACO& RLIN; experience in research library; knowledge of other languages; experience working with professional groups at national level.
Salary range $32,600-48,100 (Librarian rank) or $38,000-55,400 (Senior Librarian rank) depending on qualifications. Send letter, resume, supporting documentation & list of professional references by November 30,1987 (extended date), to Irene Yeh, Employment Coordinator, Stanford University Libraries, Stanford, Calif. 94305-6004. Cite #303/HL on correspondence
COMPUTER PROGRAMER
Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred, also knowledge of Wordstar, SPSS-PC, Lotus, DBase. Duties include: research and technical assistance. Call or write John Attinasi, Latino Institute 228 S. Wabash, Room600, Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 663-3603.
TEACHING POSITIONS
Two positions Doctorates required. Assistant or Associate rank, tenure track, fall 1988. Rhetoric or composition emphasis with English Education or Linguistics/TESOL secondary emphasis Send application, vita, three letters of reference and a self addressed post card to: Robert J. Ward, Ph.D., Head, English Department, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls Iowa 50614. Postmark deadline: December 15,1987. (319) 273-2822 for interview appointment at NCTE and M LA conferences. U NI is an AA/EEO Employer.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C.,provides: • Design# Illustration• Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. Barrio Graphics 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-7755.
CIVIL ENGINEER III $35,027-$47,216
Applies professional supervised engineering knowledge and skills to difficult civil engineering functions. Duties include supervision of staff in: evaluation and materials testing, construction inspection; plans preparation and review; preliminary and construction layout; and writing specs.
Requires 4 years experience in civil engineering, including 1 year supervisory experience and a Bachelor’s degree in Civil Engineering or related field.
To request application, call (602) 262-6277 or write City of Phoenix, Personnel Department, 300 W. Washington, Phoenix, Arizona 85003. AA/EEO/H Employer.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
ONE LINERS: An assortment of news items involving Hispanic artists and entertainers in various fields:
THEATER: New York Hispanic companies have a variety of offerings this week Edwin Sanchez’s new play, Floorshow: Doha Sol & Her Trained Dog, opened at Brooklyn Playworks Oct. 22. . . INTAR Hispanic American Theater premieres Apasionado, a“dance-music-theater” collaboration based on the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, with previews beginning Oct. 28... Thalia Spanish Theatre presents Miguel Mihura’s Maribel y la familia extraha Oct. 30 to Dec. 13... And Vina, a trilogy of one-acts by Sergio Vodanovic, is presented by the Latin American Theatre Ensemble through Nov. 1...
The Puerto Rican Travelling Theatei's Miriam Col6n plays the title role in Federico Garcia Lorca’s La casa de Bernarda Alba, which plays through Nov. 22 at the Sir Tyrone Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis... And in Washington, D.C, Gala Hispanic Theater continues its run of Matatangos, a comedy by Marco Antonio de la Parra, through Nov. 1...
RECORDS: Lisa Lisa & The Cult Jam's single Lost in Emotion reached the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100 charts the week of
Oct. 17, four months after doing the same with Head to Toe. Puerto Rican singer Lisa Velez and her band have been named the spokesgroup of the Youth Suicide National Center, and their song Someone to Love Me for Me has been named the organization’s theme...
FILM: Puerto Rico’s Resident Commissioner in Washington, D.C., Jaime Fuster, entered into the Congressional Record his commendation for the Puerto Rican film La gran fiesta, which screened at the nation’s capital Oct. 23 and 24 as part of the Latin American Film Festival of the American Film Institute ..
TELEVISION: Juarez, a new drama about a Mexican American police officer whose brother across the Mexico border is in trouble with the law, is scheduled to begin shooting in El Paso Nov. 19. The pilot, yet to be cast, is for ABC from Columbia/Embassy Television and Tri-Star Television...
ART: From the Center, a video installation by Eugenia Balcells, continues at New York’s El Museo del Barrio through Dec. 6. . . Outside Cuba/Fuera de Cuba can be seen at the Miami University Art Museum in Oxford, Ohio, through Dec. 20.. .Art of the Fantastic: Latin America, 1920-1987 is at the Queens Museum in New York through Jan. 6...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MARKET STUDY BEGINS: The Tele-mundo Group, a Spanish-ianguage television company with broadcast stations in Puerto Rico, Los Angeles, New York, Miami and San Francisco-San Jose, commissioned a comprehensive study of the Hispanic American market to assist the group and advertisers in reaching the Latino market, it was announced Oct. 8.
The study, to be conducted by the Detroit-based Market Opinion Research, will examine Hispanic attitudes toward television and advertising, as well as language preference, buying habits, product usage and demographics.
“This may be the most comprehensive market research on Hispanic America ever undertaken by a Spanish television network,” said Donald Raider, Telemundo’s chief operating officer.
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports rhailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Initial findings of the $250,000 project will be ready for release by the end of the year.
NEW JOURNAL: The Center for Mexican American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin has begun publishing a biannual journal, titled Ethnic Affairs, that focuses on current research and issues on Hispanic affairs
The inaugural issue is 115 pages and is available for$5 by writing CMAS Publications Center for Mexican American Studies SSB 4.120, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712.
EDITOR RETURNS AS COUNSEL: Angel Castillo, former editor of El Herald, announced that he will become the outside legal counsel to the Miami Herald’s Spanish-ianguage daily. He quit abruptly Sept. 30,charging TheMiami Herald with censorship.
Castillo, a lawyer, had accused The Miami Herald of not printing a column about a controversy involving Radio Marti.
Miami Herald officials told Castillo, who was also an assistant editor of The Miami
Herald and one of its top Hispanic executives, that the column by Tom&s Regalado did not run because of a factual error. Miami Herald officials said that they tried to consult with Castillo but could not reach him.
DISTRIBUTION COMPANY STARTED: Rene Enriquez, featured in NBCs now-defunct “Hill Street Blues” for seven years, has formed PAD Enterprises, a distribution company that will release Spanish-ianguage films to theaters and television stations in the United States that air Hispanic products.
Yolanda Moctezuma, a long-time figure in the Mexican film and television industry and an art dealer, is Enriquez’s business partner.
NEW ADDRESS: Hispanic, a new genera I interest photo-feature magazine published by former New Mexico Gov. Jerry Apodaca, has moved its office to 111 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 682-9023.
Hispanic’s prototype will be ready early next month. _ julio Laboy
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week The National Women ' s Political Caucus honors Tony Coelho (D Calif . ) , the House Majority Whip and a member of the Congress i onal Hispanic Caucus, as one of 10 recipients of its Good Guys Awards. The award goes to men who have made notable contributions to the advancement of women through their careers. . . Florida Gov . Bob Martinez recognizes Brenda Zaldivar, a student at Miami ' s Robert Morgan Vocational Techn i cal Institute , for her first place finish in the National Health Occupations Students of Amer i ca academic com petitions ... The FBI subpoenas the financial records of Hialeah , Fla . , Mayor Raul Martinez's Spanish-language newspaper , El Sol de Hialeah , and records of his campaign finances . The federal agency declined to comment on why the records were subpoenaed ... The National Board for Professional Teaching Standards adds Ernesto C6rtes, a member of the national staff of the Industrial Areas Foundation from Austin , Texas, Jaime Escalante, a math teacher at Garfield High School in Los Angeles, and Corpus Christi , Texas , bilingual p reki nder garten teacher Rebecca Zavalos as three of its 34 new members. The 63-member board has one other Hispanic , San Antonio teacher/ principal Sonia Hernandez. . . Roberto Lorca, a Spanish dancer and founder and director of the Spanish Dance Arts Company , dies in New York at the age of 49 from an AIDS-related illness. Lorca was a native of California . . . Concepci6n Valenzuela, 72, the mother of t he late rock star Ritchie Valens, dies in Watsonville , Calif . , after a long i llness . . . Oct••'9871 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT 1Vol5 No.42 Leaders Agree on Latino Agenda A non-partisan consensus Hispanic agenda, endorsed by more than 100 of the nation ' s top Latino elected , business a ri d commun ity leaders in Washington, O . C . , Oct. 20, will be presented to 1988 presidential candi dates and d i sseminated throughout the Cuban, Mexican Amer i can, Puerto Rican and other Latino communities. " We have dispelled the myth that it is not possible to bring together Cubans, Puerto Ric ans and Mexican Americans from all areas of the country and put aside our differences, " said San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, who cha i red the unity task force of National His panic Agenda 1988. The 22-page agenda was approved unani mously after daylong d i scussions on issues ranging from strong opposition to the Englishonly movement to a compromise statement on peace in Latin America In order for the Cuban representat i ves to accept the document, an earlier approved statement supporting the Arias Peace Plan was changed to a state-continued o n page 2 LULAC to Battle Ariz. English-Only About 50 members of the League of United Latin American C i tizens' Executive Committee discussed LULACs role in pursuing the National .Hispanic Agenda 1988 and counteracting the English-only movement in Arizona during the group's annual r:neeting in Washington , D . C., Oct. 23-24. Two statewide petition drives recently got underway i n Arizona concerning the English only movement there. One seeks an initiative that would make Engl ish the offi ci a l language . The other, spearheaded by a coalition of Corky Gonzales 'Stable' Hispanic state representatives and community organizations called Ar i zona English , seeks an initiative that recognizes English as the dominant language but opposes any law stating so . Both drives must gather 134 , 048 signatures by July 1988 to be placed on the November 1988 ballot. Composed of LULAC national v i ce presidents and state directors , the committee will also release a presidential straw poll. Commenting on the National H i spanic Agenda '88 meeting , LULAC National President Oscar Moran said, " The summit i s very key to many of the issues LULAC has been articu lating." House Bill Addresses Population Undercount Rep. Mervyn Dymally(D-Calif.) , chairman o . f the House Subcommittee on Census and Population, introduced legislation Oct. 20 that would require the U . S . Census Bureau to adjust its 1990 population count to account for the undercount of Hispanics, blacks and TerriAnn Lowenthal , staff subcommittee, the was undercounted by 1\f\1-' in 1980.Theundercount was 5 . 9% for blacks and slightly lower for Hispanics, she said. Dymally's bill would have the Census Bureau adjust its figures before it reports them to the pres ident and Congress Dec. 31 , 1990. The legislation does not specify the methodology to be used for arri ving at the recalculated figures . Lowenthal said there are available accurate adjustment methods but that the Census Bureau has declined to use them o r comment on their validity. " The problem is that the Census is reluctant because the Department of Com merce puts reins on it for political reasons , " Lowenthal told Weekly Report. The Census Bureau is a branch of the Commerce Department. Pioneer Chicano activ i st Rodolfo " Corky " Gonzales remains in serious but stable condition following an Oct. 9 accident in Denver in wh i ch he punctured a lung after suffering cardiac arrhythmia while driving . Ruling Aids Nev., Ariz. Farm Workers Gonzales , 59, felt ill while jogging and decided to drive home , according to his family . He blacked out in the car, swerved , hit a house and suffered head lacerations and lung damage . Following emergency surgery, he developed pneumonia Arrhythm i a is an irregular beating of the heart. Gonzales suffered no heart muscle damage. A professional prize fighter in his youth, Gonzales founded the Crusade for Justice in 1963 and led it and other Chicano em powerment groups in the '60s and '70s. Gonzales was the first Hispanic district captai n of the Denver Democrati c Party . Imm i gration offi cers in Arizona and Nevada who detain farm workers must assure that workers eligible to remain in the United States under the new immigration law do not un knowingly accept deportation , according to an Oct. 15 ruling by a federal d i strict judge in Phoenix. The Special Agriculture Workers provision of the i mmigration law says that farm workers who have worked in agriculture for 90 days between May 1 , 1 985, and May 1 , 1 986, are eligible for legalization . When detained by immigration officials, however , workers often are not asked of their eligibility status, charged the plantiffs . The injunction by Judge Robert Broomfield holds that government officials in the two states must now ask undocumented persons whether they are eligible for legalizatio n as agricultural workers. If they are eligible , they must be allowed to remain in the United States. " When asked by offic i als what date they entered the country , many farm workers would say yesterday or the day before and therefore be asked to leave, " Nadine Wettstein, the Arizona Farm Workers Union attorney re presenting the plantiffs , told Weekly Report . Wettstein said that the workers would be asked to leave the country but not interviewed to see if they were eligible to stay under the SAW program . Wettstein told Weekly Report that she hopes the case will be used as an example in other states, thereby broadening the ruling' s ap plication .

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Proposed Census Changes Said to Hurt Latino Elderly The National Council of La Raza criticized proposed changes in the 1990 census at an Oct 20 hearing of the House Select Committee on Aging, charging that the changes can harm Hispanic elderly. Emily McKay, NCLR executive vice president, said that if changes proposed by the U . S . Office of Management and Budget are ac cepted, Hispanic elderly will not be allocated their "share" of special programs and funds that are based on census figures. OMB proposed that the Census Bureau delete three form questions regarding utility usage and asked that seven other questions, including inquiries about rent, the number of rooms per family household and telephone ownership, be moved to a less-used long form . She said the changes would limit the amount of accurate data on the elderly and contribute to the lack of data on Hispanics. Latinos are about 3% of the total elderl y but are the fastest growing segment among the 65-and over group. TOP LATINO ELDERLY STATES California Texas New York New Mexico 1980 Number 169,787 145,333 93,815 72,075 29,788 *%of Hispanic elderly in nation Percent* 25.3% 21.6 14.0 10. 7 4.4 McKay criticized the lack of regional and subgroup data on Hispanic elderly. "That Presidential Forum Sought for Agenda continued from page 1 ment reading, "We as an essential step toward a of the present crisis in "We must articulate a agenda . tis overdue," Cisneros said conference announcing the was joined by Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Her nandez Colon , Rep. Esteban Torres(D-Calif.), Florida state Rep . Arnhilda Badia Gonzalez Quevedo (RCoral Gables), Denver Mayor Federico Peiia, Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.), Los Angeles City Councilman Richard Alatorre , New York Sen . Olga Mendez (D Bronx) and leaders of key national organizations. League of United Latin American Citizens National President Oscar Moran said that while leaders of Latino organizations have come together in the past, this is the first broad-based agenda to be outlined by leaders and elected officials from all regions. Pablo Sedillo, one of the organizers of the National Hispanic Leadership Conference, said dialogue and refinement of the document would be continued at his group's conference in April . Participants will also seek itsadoption by their local communities and state parties . In a dinner address to agenda participants, New York Gov . Mario Cuomo said that the "Hispanic community represents a vast un tapped potential now denied to the country. " Among some of the key points were : • Substituting a section titled "The U .S. and Latin America: Developing a New Partner ship for Peace and Economic Stability in Latin America" for the previously titled "The Hispanic Family Across Borders." The new section calls on the president to include Hispanics in Latin American policy develop ment, calls for a summit of the presidents of the Americas, and seeks reform of the political asylum process in the United States . • Cisneros cited the section on Empower menVPolitical Participation as the most crucial That section calls for Hispanics to be appointed to cabinet-level positions, opposition to the English-only movement, reform of the citizen ship naturalization process and establishment of national voter registration standards, in cluding mail-in registration and election day registration. • Willie Velasquez, director of the South west Voter Registration Education Project , expressed a more cynical view . "Frankly, I am not sure there is a coherent Hispanic agenda . There is not one Hispanic vote. It's futile for such disparate opinions to be boiled down into one." Presidential candidates will be asked for a written response to these issues and will be invited to participate in a national forum. Melinda Machado Indictment of Pereira Termed Biased Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira was suspended Oct. 20 with payfollowinr -:t. 16 indictment on three third-degre._ . ..,ny theft charges for purchasing seven stolen designer-label suits from clothier Emeterio Marino Pjjeira . Pereira was the only customer out of hundreds who bought suits from the unlicensed duplex . to be indicted by the Dade County grand jury raising cries from the local Cuban community that he is being singled out because he is Cuban and because he held the county's most powerful position. "I have done nothing in violation of the 2 law . I am innocent of all charges included in the grand jury indictment I cannot comprehend why I have been singled out for prosecution," said Pereira. According to the special prosecutor's office, there was insufficient evidence to indict other promiment purchasers of clothing. The clothier, Pijeira, was charged with racketeering, grand theft, dealing in stolen property and failure to pay sales taxes . County manager Pereira was appointed in January 1986 to the $114,000-a-year job. He was responsible for managing a $1.5 billion budget and 23,000 employees . (national data) is not sufficientto plan programs and it is not sufficient to make policy," she said . "If you can't document a problem with statistics, there is too often the assumption that there is no problem," McKay told the committee. According to a La Raza report, Hispanic elderly are: • more likely to live in multigenerational families than other elderly and far less likely than white elderly to live in homes for the aged ; • the least educated elderly subgroup ; and • less likely than blacks or whites to re ceive social security. -Julio Laboy Gov. Dukakis Favored in MVREP Straw Poll Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis was the top choice in a presidential straw poll taken at the Midwest Voter Registration Edu cation Project's fifth annual leadership con ference in Chicago Oct. 16. The conference also was the launching site of a voter r& gistration drive . With more than 1,000 Hispanic leaders present at the conference, including mayors, former governors and other elected and ap pointed officials, Dukakis polled 37% of the 344 returned questionnaires . The Rev. Jesse Jackson followed Dukakis with 25% of the vote and Sen. Paul Simon(D111.) came in third with 7%. Vice President George Bush led Republicans with 3%. Juan Andrade, MVREP executive director, told Weekly Report that his organization kicked off its drive to register voters for the 1988 presidential election. Latino organizations are seeking to register 1 million more voters nationwide . Andrade said the group also put together at the conferenc'e a preliminary agenda on His panic issues that was sent to Washington, D .C., where the National HispanicAgenda'88 was drafted Oct. 19 . Immigrant Ed. Rider Gains The U.S. Senate approved Oct. 14 a rider providing $1.3 million in immigrant education funds to 29 Texas school districts which had missed a filing deadline for the federal Emer gency Immigrant Education program . Sen . Lloyd Bentsen (DTexas) attached the rider to the Labor, Health and Human Services appropriations bill which is now scheduled for a House-Senate conference committee. The $30 million federal program is adminis tered by the U.S. Education Department. It had a May 22 deadline for school districts to report the number of children qualified. Texas had expected$3.3 million for47,400 immigrant students and was notified Oct. 1 that it would not receive the entire amount. The rider makes up the $1.3 million deficit. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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L. Houle Gutierrez, guest columnist BorderHopping Goblins In most U.S. towns and cities, Halloween is an orderly procession of tiny, chaperoned children dressed in elaborate costumes and toting trendy candy bags. In Nogales and other communities along our border with Mexico, it is something different. Very different. Actually, there are two Nogaleses. There is Nogales, Ariz., with its population of 20,000. And there is its Mexican sister Sonora , with 12 times that population. The two communities are separated by a huge "cut-proof' chain-link fence, which re mained uncut for nearly four days after its installation long ago. Beyond our city limits, the fence gives way to a barbed-wire model, smaller and even more easily transgressed. At Halloween's nightfall, our streets are filled with more children than a Disney movie. Driving along the border, down International Street, one detects hundreds of tiny shadows squeezing through holes in the fence at an incredible rate. The normally quiet (local teen-agers use the word "boring") streets teem w i th activity. lfs more like New York City at rush hour. But you can tell you're in a border town when your doorbell rings and , instead of two or three plump little She-Ras or ETs, you're greeted by about 1 0 or 12 thin children without costumes except for some random paint smears on their faces. SHOUTS OF 'TRIQUITRI' "TriquiTri!'' Their shouts are accompanied by the world's happiest expressions. Unlike their norteamericano counterparts, these children don't complain about the type of candy you're handing out. You will not hear " Ohhhhh, gross-more Dum-Dums . That makes 16 already'' from the children from Mexico . But they do say "thank you" in English, just like the Arizona kids. Actually, here on the border, we vary the holiday's booty, including such Mexican treats as chupaletas de cajeta or cola-fruit-or cola flavored suckers-or Tomies-rich caramels made with goafs milk . On an average Halloween, we host about 150 trick-or-treaters between 6 and 9 p . m . After that, ifs groups of what appear to be young men auditioning for the part of Stanley Kowalski in "A Streetcar Named Desire . " They don't say anything. They just hold out a grocery bag or a pillowcase or their hats. The appearance of these older teen-agers causes some concerned residents to call the Border Patrol office. If the teen-agers are picked up, they are taken to the station, where they sit and eat their candy until driven back to the border and released. BORDER PATROL OVERWHELMED There is a popular belief that the U.S. Border Patrol looks the other way as Mexican youngsters surge in on Halloween. Officials here deny that. Vandalism and theft increase on that night, but they also do so in most U.S. communities. Because of the potential for illegal activity , the patrol staffs up more than on normal nights. Sin pelos en Ia lengua DAY OF THE DEAD: In this week's guest column, L Houle Gutierrez describes Halloween along the northern edge of the U.S. -Mexico border. Two days later, when Mexicans celebrate /a noche de los muertos, those same Sonoran children she writes about will be enjoying candy skulls instead of grinning at jacko' lanterns. How the United States and Mexico celebrate the two holidaysseparated by All Soul's Day says much about our different attitudes toward death. And no one captured those differences better than Mexican philosopher Octavlo Paz in his book "The Labyrinth of Solitude." Paz observed: "The word death is not pronounced in New York, in Paris, in London, because it burns the lips. The Mexican, in contrast, is familiar with death, jokes about it, caresses it, sleeps with it, celebrates it; it is one of his favorite toys and his steadfast love ... "We decorate our houses with death's heads, we eat bread in the shape of bones on the Day of the Dead, we love songs and stories in which death laughs and cracks jokes. .. " The Mexican, Paz explained, is indifferent toward death because he is indifferent toward life. "He views not only death but also life as nontranscendent." Norteamericano "laws, customs and public and private ethics all tend to preserve human life," he wrote, but after describing the fascination exhibited by the U.S. press and public with murderers and our" recognized inefficiency of the systems of prevention," he suggested that "the respect for life of which Western civilization is so proud is either incomplete or hypocritical." His conclusion? "The cult of life, if it is truly profound and total, is also the cu It of death, because the two are inseparable. A civilization that denies death ends by denying life." VOICE IN THE GRAVEYARD: There's also a nice Mexican dicho to remind us that death is the great equalizer: Llegando a/ campo santo no hay calaveras plateadas. On reaching the grave yard, there are no gold-plated skulls. CUOMO WEARS CHAPS: On to more cheery subjects, New York Gov. Mario Cuomo brought his greatest applause at the Hispanic National Agenda conference in Washington, D.C, Oct 20 when he did an imitation of Clint Eastwood/Ronald Reagan. Recalling his early education, he recounted that he missed 39 days in his first year of school . "I didn't speak the language. I was embarrassed to go to school. They didn't have a teacher to talk to me in Italian . I was lost and disoriented. I became hysterical and stayed home . "I will not forget how difficult it is," he told the blue-ribbon gathering of national Latino leaders . "The movement in New York to make English the official language of the United States denies our history. It is a repugnant proposal. I have already opposed it. I will continue to oppose it. "I don't believe it will make it past our Senate and Assembly but1 hesitate to say this-if ever a bill gets through our legislature and it reaches my desk, then I say for the benefit of all you Republicans, it will make my day . " -Kay Barbaro Still, it is overwhelmed. One border officer recounted to me a Halloween night when he ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• parked his patrol car near the international fence to question a group of people walking in the street. As he was talking to them, he glanced back to see dozens more, large and small, climbing across the fence and using the hood of his vehicle as a springboard. Patrol personnel don't seek out residential areas to go around peeking under masks. They concentrate on the border itself . And most local families, merchants and governme11t officials take pleasure in sharing the U.S. version of a Celtic celebration with their neighbors from the "other" Nogales. Our young visitors have the energy. We have the candy. Partnersh i ps have been built on less than that. (L Houle Gutierrez is a reporter with Nogales International news paper, in Nogales, Ariz.) Quoting. • • ARNHILDA BADIA GONZALEZ QUEVEDO, Republican Florida state representative from Coral Gables, at the National Hispanic Agenda 1988 meeting: "This is a non-partisan process. Whether Republican or Democrat issues of Hispanics in the United States transcend party affiliation. We have a united agenda." Corrections: San Antonio's ranking among U.S. cities was incorrect in last week's guest column . It is the ninth largest city. The Sept 28 Sin Palos gave the wrong number of Latino congress men. There are 14. Eleven are voting members. Hispanic Link Weekly Report Oct. 26,1987 3

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:.:S .TATUS; Council of La Raza's 31A Demographic Profile," includes on :the socioeconomi c status of the Hispanic elderly and the F.or. a cqpy send $3 to: NCLR, c/o Rosemary Aguilar, 20 F St. NW, Second Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) .:. ., MVREP " POL:L: of the Midwest Voter Registration Edueation Project's Ott: 16-18 leadership conference poll will be available forfte-e by thEfentl of the month. Send requests to: MVREP, 43r S; oearborn; Sui'fEn 1'03 ; Chicago, 111. 60605. . , ,--or. -.\ --._ The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute is seeking college graduates and graduate students as applicant!? , for nine-lllonth tiispanic Leadership Opportunity . . 1he 12 indivtduals se .lected will work with congressional W,Jd subCommittees; other government-related institutions the mec;lia . Tiif! deadline for applications is Nov. 13. For information and aP,pliq_a, tion ,s, Hispanic Leadership Opportunity Program, 9J:i.CI,504 D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771. DROPOUT SOI-UJIONS: ''What To Do About Dropouts? A Sum mary .of Solutipns" .is; a 327page . digest of 14 dropout programs ' throughout the United . States, Specific program characteristics, such as costs, targets and outcomes, are discussed. For a copy, send $5 to: Hispani<;: . Project, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-8414. CONTEMPORARY MEXICO RESEARCH FELLOWSHIPS: The Center fot'I:J iS. -"Mexican Studies at the University of California, San -Diego, is seel
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The Following Positions Close November 5, 1987 at 5 :00PM: Senior Employee Development Specialist Salary: $32,115.20 $45,1 02.72 Announcement #1807-8A-PER This is highly specialized work developing, coordinating and implementing a comprehensive training and career development program for Arlington County employees. Directly responsible for management training programs and supervising one other professional in implementing training programs for other employees. Consults with management to assess needs, develops curricula, conducts training programs and arranges organizational development programs or interventions. Requires BS in related area and four years experience in training, employee/organizational development or closely related field. See official announcement for preferred qualifications. EEO Recruitment-Outreach Specialist (Personnel Department) Salary: $25,883.52-$28,512.65 Announcement #1805-8A-PER Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit targeted populations, including minorities, women and disabled persons . Duties include identifying and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials , community groups, etc.; developing outreach plans, ads, brochures, etc. ; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis . Requires at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university in public, bus i ness or personnel admin i stration or related field . Knowledge ofo•.Jtreach methods and recruitment sources. Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following : a) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system ; b) language capabilities in one or more languages represented in the community. All applicants must submit an official Arl i ngton County application form . A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be receiv ed into the Personnel Department no later than 5 :00 PM on the closing date . To reque s t application material please call (703) 5582167 or TDD (703) 284 (hearing impa i r e d only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North, Arlington , Va. 22201 EOE/MFH INVEST IN YOUR COMMUNITY, SUPPORT NHSF This year the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will be listed in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) literature, and all federal employees will be able to designate NHSF as their grantee. To make a pledge, federal employees need to write #505 (NHSF) on the CFC designated pledge form . Forthose individuals that are non-federal employees, they can send their check directly to NHSF . Checks are to be made payable to the National Hispan i c Scholarship Fund . NHSF is a 501(c) tax e xempt organization and all pledges are tax-deductible . P.O. Box 748, San Francis c o , California 94101. ASSISTANT CHIEF, CATALOG DEPARTMENT Stanford University Libraries Responsibilities: principal cataloger and over sees NACO work for Dept. ; supervises, including general oversight of budget four cataloging units with staff of 23; assists in planning, goal and policy setting; writes documentation; parti cipates in committees in and outside the Dept. Required are MLS from ALA accredited grad uate library school or equivalent degree ; minimum 5 years original cataloging experience with automated cataloging system , AACR2 , LC etas sification and subject headings; knowledge of authority control concepts; demonstrated capability of managing large unit; significant super visory experience, including of librarians ; ability to train staff; sound reading knowledge of one major Western European language . Desirable are experience with NACO& RLIN ; experience in research library; knowledge of other tan guages; experience working with professional groups at national level. Salary range $32,60o-48,100 (Librarian rank) or $38,000-55,400 (Senior Librarian rank) de pending on qualifications. Send letter, resume, supporting documentation & list of professional references by November 30, 1987 (extended date) , to Irene Yeh , Employment Coordinator, Stanford University Libraries , Stanford, Calif. 94305--6004 . Cite #303/HL on correspondence . COMPUTER PROGRAMER Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred, also knowledge of wordstar , SPS&PC, Lotus, DBase. Duties include: research and technical assis tance . Call or write John Attinasi, Latino Institute, 228 S . Wabash, Room 600, Chicago, Ill. 60604 (312) 663. TEACHING POSITIONS Two positions. Doctorates required . Assistant or Associate rank , tenure track, fall 1988. Rhe toric or composition emphasis with English Education or LinguisticS/TESOL secondary emphasis. Send application, vita, three letters of reference and a self addressed post card to: Robert J . Ward, Ph. D., Head, English Depart ment, University of Northern Iowa , Cedar Falls , Iowa 50614. Postmark deadline: December 15, 1987. (319) 273 for interview appoint ment at NCTE and M LA conferences. UN I is an ANEEO Employer. G _ RAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D . C., provides : • Design • Illustration • Type setting • Layout • Silkscreen and e Stats. Barrio Graphics, 14 70 Irving St NW , Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483. CIVIL ENGINEER Ill $35,027-$47,216 App l ies professional supervised engineering knowledge and skills to difficult civil engineering functions. Duties include supervision of staff in: evaluation and materials testing; construction inspection; plans preparation and review; preliminary and construction layout; and writing specs. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Requires 4 years experience in civil engineer ing, including 1 year supervisory experience and a Bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering or related field. To request application, call (602) 262 or write City of Phoenix, Personnel Departmt>nt, 300 W . Washington, Phoenix , Arizona 85003. ANEEO/H Employer. Hispanic Link W ee kl y Rep o rt CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street------------City, State & Zip----------Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment Oct. 17, four months after doing the same with Head to Toe . Puerto Rican singer Lisa Velez and her band have been named the spokesgroup of the Youth Suicide National Center, and their song Someone to Love Me for Me has been named the organization' s theme ... ONE LINERS: An assortment of news items involving Hispan i c artists and entertainers in various fields : THEATER: New York Hispanic companies have a variety of offerings this week: Edwin Sanchez' s new play , Floorshow: Dona Sol & Her Trained Dog, opened at Brooklyn Playworks Oct. 22. . . INTAR Hispan i c Ame r ican Theater premieres Apasionado, a "dance-musictheater" collaboration based on the writings of Jorge Luis Borges, with previews beginning Oct. 28 ... Thalia Spanish Theatre presents Miguel M ihura' s Maribel y Ia familia extrafla Oct. 30 to Dec. 13 .. . And Vina, a tri logy of one-acts by Sergio Vodanovic , is presented by the Latin American Theatre Ensemble through Nov. 1 ... FILM: Puerto Rico's Resident Commissioner in Washington, D . C., Jaime Fuster, entered i nto the Congressional Record his commendation for the Puerto Rican film La gran fiesta, which screened at the nation ' s capital Oct. 23 and 24 as part of the Latin American Film Festival of the American Film Institute. . . TELEVISION: Juarez, a new drama about a Mexican American police officer whose brother across the Mexico border is in trouble with the law , is scheduled to begin shooting in El Paso Nov. 19. The pilot , yet to be cast , is for ABC from Columbia/ Embassy Television and Tri-Star Television ... The Puerto Rican Travelling Theater's Miriam Colon plays the title role in Federico Garcia Lorca ' s La cas a de Bernarda Alba, which plays through Nov. 22 at the Sir Tyrone Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis ... And i n Washington, D .C., Gala Hispanic Theater continues its run of Matatangos, a comedy by Marco Antonio de Ia Parra, through Nov . 1 .. . ART: From the Center, a video installati on by Eugenia Balcells, continues at New York ' s El Museo del Barrio through Dec . 6 . . . Outside Cuba/Fuera de Cuba can be seen at the Miami Unive rsity Art Museum in Oxford, Ohio , th r ough Dec . 20 . . . Art of the Fantastic : Latin America, 1920-1987 is at the Queens Museum in New York through Jan . 6 . . . RECORDS: Lisa Lisa & The Cult Jam ' s s i ngle Lost in Emotion reached the No . 1 spot on the Bi llboard Hot 100 charts the week of Media Report MARKET STUDY BEGINS: The Tele mundo Group, a Spanish-language television company with broadcast s tations in Puerto Rico, Los Angeles , New York, Miam i and San Francisco-San Jose, commissioned a com prehensive study of the Hispanic American market to assist the group and advert i sers in reaching the Latino market, it was announced Oct.8. The study, to be conducted by the Detroit based Market Opi nion Research, will examine Hispanic attitudes toward television and ad vertising , as well as language preference, buying habits, product usage and demograph ics. " This may be the most comprehensive market r esearch on Hispanic America ever undertaken by a Spanish television network," said Donald Raider, Telemundo' s chief operating officer. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N ' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisner H ec t o r Erickser>Mendoza Editor F e l i x Pe r e z Repor ti n g : Anto nio Meji as Rentas. M elinda M ac h a d o . J ulio L a boy Graph ics/P r oduction: C a r los Arrie n , Z o ila Elias. N o p o rt ion o f Hispanic Week l y Repor t may be reprodu ced o r broadc a s t i n any f o rm w i thout a d v ance permiss ion. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. C ORPORATE C LA S SI F I ED : Ad rates 75 cents pe r w o rd . Dis play ads a re $35 per colum n inch. Ads pla cP d by T uAsday wtll run in Weekl y R e port s mai led F r iday o f same week. Multipl e use ra t es o n reque st. 6 Initial findings of the $250,000 project will be ready for release by the end of the yea r . NEW JOURNAL: The Center for Mexican American Stud i es at the University of Texas at Austin has begun publishing . a biannual journal, titled Ethnic Affairs, that focuses on current research and issues on Hispanic affairs. The inaugural issue is 115 pages and is available for$5 by writing: CMAS Publicat i ons, Center for Mexican American Studies, SSB 4.120, The University of Texas at Austin , Austin , Texas 78712. EDITOR RETURNS AS COUNSEL: Angel Castillo , former editor of El Herald, announced that he will become the outside legal counsel to the Miami Heralds Spanish-language daily . He quit abruptly Sept. 30, charging The Miami Herald with censorship. Castillo, a lawyer , had accused The Miami Herald of not print i ng a column about a controversy involv i ng Radio Martl Miami Herald o f ficials told Castillo , who was also an assistant editor of The Miami -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Herald and one of its top Hispanic executives, that the column by Tomas Regalado did not run because of a factual error. Miami Herald officials said that they tried to consult with Cast illo but could not reac h him . DISTRIBUTION COMPANY STARTED: Rene Enriquez, featured in NBCs now-defunct " Hill Street Blues" for seven years, has formed PAD Enterprises, a distribution company that will release Spanish-language films to theaters and television stations in the United States that air Hispanic products. Yolanda Moctezuma, a long-t i me figure in the Mexican film and telev i sion industry and an art dealer, is Enriquez ' s business partner. NEW ADDRESS: Hispanic , a new general interest photo-feature magaz i ne published by former New Mexico Gov . Jerry Apodaca , has moved its office to 111 Massachusetts Ave . NW , Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 682-9023. H i spanic ' s prototype will be ready early next month . -Julio Laboy Hispanic Link Weekly Report