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Hispanic link weekly report, November 2, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 2, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Myrna Zambrano, guest columnist
The Silent Scream
The neighbor wants to believe that the screams from the house next door are nothing more than “roughhousing” The parish priest wants to accept that the woman in the front pew is not a victim of domestic violence. The co-worker wants to believe that the woman at the next desk really did fall down the stairs.
When I started working with battered women, I, too, wanted to believe that I didn’t know of women who were beaten by their husbands or lovers. But as I got closer to the problem and the women themselves, I began to remember that when I was growing up the woman upstairs left just about every Friday night with a black eye and a weekend suitcase, and that my aunt suffered for years at the hands of an abusive husband, until her early death.
In the years since working at a shelter and now having written the first bilingual book for battered Latinas, Mejor Sola Que Mai Acompahada - Better Alone Than In Bad Company, I frequently speak to people whose first reaction is disbelief. Now I almost always expect a bad joke about women being beaten or raped when I walk into a television or radio studio for an interview. But reality stares me in the face. Shelters are overcrowded, women are displaced, children witness horrors in their homes.
EXPOSING 1DIRTY LAUNDRY9
Mejor Sola was written because there is so little bilingual information written for Latinas and counselors in Spanish. The manuscript circulated among Latinas and counselors who were familiar with the problem. Most said that it was good for us to come to terms with this situation on a national basis. Others felt that I was exposing our “dirty laundry” and I would be inviting the notion that Latinas are beaten more than other women.
Domestic violence is found in wealthy and poor homes, in Hispanic and non-Hispanic homes, in homes where there is the benefit of education and in homes where there is none. In the United States, approximately one in every six couples experiences violence, and at least 1.8 million wives are beaten each year by their husbands. Many more remain silent. It is an underreported crime.
The blame for this heinous offense is most often placed on the woman. “Women stay in an abusive home because they like it.” “She wouldn’t get beaten if she were a better housewife.” “She wouldn’t get beaten if she didn’t talk back.” “She wouldn’t get beaten if she fought back”
Women stay because of economic dependence, because they have no place to go, because they have been socialized to feel shame and accept the blame for a crime they have not committed. They stay because of their children.
THE ULTIMATE QUESTION - WHY?
The ultimate question is, “Why does a man beat the person he is the closest to, the mother of his children?”
One reason may be that the batterer cannot deal with emotional closeness, that he does not handle pressure and frustration well, that he does not have the verbal tools to work out a problem. Research has shown that 68% of men who beat their wives and 60% of battered women come from violent homes. We cannot afford to say it is none of our business; our children may marry into it.
We must be willing to acknowledge that this all-too-common problem exists in our own culture, in our society, in our own back yard. We can help by supporting the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, which has a Women of Color Task Force to coordinate efforts across the country. We can support our local shelter by donating money to support their bilingual services or give time volunteering on a crisis hot line.
Our first responsibility, however, is to call the police the next time we hear screams from the house next door.
(Myrna Zambrano is an author and social worker in San Diego)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
THE HIDDEN AGENDA: How much did you read in your city's newspaper about the historic National Hispanic Agenda ’88 meeting in Washington, D.C.?
How much did you hear on your radio about what was decided and accomplished by our eloquent big-city mayors Henry Cisneros and Federico Pefta and more than 100 other Hispanic leaders who came to the nation’s capital at their own expense?
How many of their faces did you see on TV?
From the sampling we have seen, read and heard about, it is obvious that mainstream media still consider Hispanics a special interest group unworthy of coverage they would automatically give to such an event staged by any other group representing 22 million U.S. residents.
The Washington Post did a story following the group’s last-day press conference. So did the Los Angeles Times
The New York Times? I saw one small item quoting Gov. Mario Cuomo - a featured speaker at the Latino summit - on an issue unrelated to his visit. It mentioned that the quote was extracted from him at a meeting of Hispanics he happened to be attending.
Eight New York reporters followed Cuomo to the meeting, and, according to summit coordinator Aida Alvarez, “We didn’t get one line out of it.”
The conference ended on a Wednesday. The Houston Chronicle ran a piece the following Sunday, datelined Washington and crediting Chronicle “news services” as its source.
As usual, the Spanish-language media did a good job- particularly those from New York
But what about The Miami Herald and its Spanish-language El Miami Herald? The Herald has at least two Latino correspondents in Washington, but relied on Associated Press for its coverage.
The wide-open, harmonious, historic Hispanic agenda conference gave new meaning to the phrase “hidden agenda.” Now it's the U.S. media that’s doing the hiding.
So what’s new? To twist an old phrase, “Good news is no news.”
DOUBLESPEAK OR DOUBLESLEEP? Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Alan Nelson drew much better press when he testified on INS’s legalization policy before a House committee the same morning the agenda was released.
The contradictory stories of The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times help explain why potential legalization candidates are so frustrated and confused.
Led The Los Angeles Times:
“WASHINGTON - In a ruling that could affect thousands of illegal aliens, it was announced Wednesday that children who do not qualify for amnesty under the nation’s new immigration law may be deported unless both their parents have received such protection.
“The announcement was made by Alan C. Nelson, commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, who disclosed also that adult aliens who do not receive amnesty may be deported ‘with no special protection,’ even if their spouses are eligible for legal residency in this country...” .
Led The New York Times:
“WASHINGTON - The Reagan Administration announced a policy today under which some illegal aliens may be allowed to stay in the United States if they have immediate relatives who qualify for amnesty under the new immigration law.
“Alan C. Nelson, the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization, said the Government would consider deferring deportation of such aliens in instances in which there were compelling humanitarian reasons to avoid splitting up families...”
Is Alan Nelson the national doublespeak champion, was one reporter picking his nose and looking out the window, or do reporters write what they want to hear?
Your wisdom is as good as mine.
-Kay Barbaro
Nov. 2,1987
3


COLLECTING
Following is a list of shelters and organizations that combat Hispanic domestic violence:
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE INFORMATION: The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence has a free list of state coalitions against domestic violence and a directory of more than 1,500 domestic violence shelters and programs nationwide. For the directory, send $2.50 to the group at 1000 16th St. NW, Suite 303,Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 293-8860, national bilingual hotline 1-800-333-7233.
LATINA DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SHELTER: Casa Myrna Vasquez, a domestic-violence shelter in Boston, has free bilingual brochures on domestic violence. Write: P.O. Box 18019, Boston, Mass. 02118 (617) 482-1735, hotline (617) 262-9581.
EAST HARLEM PROJECT: New York City’s Victim’s Intervention Project has bilingual literature, a miniresource center with books, films and articles on child abuse and domestic violence and bilingual support groups. Write: 2253 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10035(212)289-6650. Their bilingual hotline,(212) 360-5090, operates from 9 am. to 9 p.m.
SERVICIOS DE LA RAZA: This organization has free brochures and other Spanish-language literature on domestic violence. Write: 4055 N. Tejon, Denver, Colo. 80211 (303)458-5851. Their hotline number is(303) 458-7088.
MINNESOTA SHELTER: Casa de Esperanza has several free bilingual brochures on domestic violence and the services the shelter provides Write: P.O. Box75177, St. Paul, Minn. 55175 (612) 772-1723, hotline(612)772-1611 (TDD).
FASHION SCHOLARSHIPS: The Hispanic Designers Scholarships Program offers scholarships to Hispanic college students pursuing careers in fashion merchandising, fashion design, jewelry design and fashion illustration. Applicants must have a 3.4 grade-point average. For more information and applications, write to: Hispanic Designers Inc., Penny Harrison, 1201 16th St. NW, Suite 420, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7895.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE REPORT: For a copy of Murray Straus’ 34-page report, “Violence in Hispanic Families,” the first report on Hispanic domestic violence nationally, send$2.50 to: Family Research Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, Durham, N.H. 03824.
MINORITIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION: The American Council on Education’s Office of Minority Concerns will publish Nov. 5 its sixth annual status report on minorities in higher education. The 44-page document is available by sending a check or money order for $7.50 to: ACE, Office of Minority Concerns, 1 Dupont Circle NW, Washington, D.C. 20036.
CONNECTING
STANFORD SEEKS TEACHERS
Stanford University will receive $2 million in early 1988 from the California-based James Irvine Foundation fora multifaceted, six-year project to increase the number of Hispanic, black and other minorities in the teaching profession.
Developed in part by Cecilia Burciaga, Stanford’s associate dean of graduate studies, the project will build upon programs at the University to support young minority scholars. It will set up mentoring relationships, support students’ development through the doctoral level and encourage them to remain in the teaching profession.
One component of the grant will be used to attract outstanding minority students to Stanford’s teacher preparation program.
LATINO AIDS SPECIAL TO AIR
A two-hour Spanish-language television special on AIDS will air throughout California beginning Nov. 5.
Nuestra Familia FrentealSIDA- Between Us: Our Family Confronts AIDS- will include a 50-minute Spanish-language drama followed by a panel discussion with doctors and social workers.
The special, sponsored by Pacific Bell and produced by KDTV-14, San Francisco, will air from 7 to 9 p.m. on that station Nov. 8. It will air on KMEX-34, Los Angeles, in two parts. The first hour will air Nov. 5 from 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. and part two 11:00 p.m. to midnight Nov. 7. Air times in other California cities will vary.
The television special is also kicking off the implementation of a statewide Spanish-language AIDS hotline/education project. The project is funded by $125,000 in grants from the Pacific Telesis Foundation, the American Red Cross and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation. The hotline numbers, which will be activated after the shows air, are: Southern California, 1-800-222-7432, and Northern California, 1-800-367-2437.
HERITAGE MONTH CELEBRATION
In celebration of Puerto Rican Heritage Month, the New York Public Library is offering an array of free cultural programs at six Bronx branch libraries Nov. 2-19.
The events include lectures, arts and crafts for children, music and Hispanic children’s tales
For more information call the NYPL’s office of special services at (212) 340-0918.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP DINNER Washington, D.C. Nov. 3
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund issponsoring a dinner as part of its fund-raising effort to provide scholarships to undergraduate and graduate Latino students.
Judy Chapa (213) 551-1714
INNER-CITY YOUTH FORUM Washington, D.C. Nov. 4
A national forum concerning federal policyon inner-city poverty and youth is being sponsored by the Youth Policy Institute and the Eisenhower Foundation. Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza, will be one of the presenters.
John Bolz (202) 635-6087
MEDIA CONFERENCE Chicago Nov. 4
Creating Change in the Media is the theme of the second annual media conference sponsored by the Latino Committee on the Media Workshops include breaking into the media women in the media coverage 4
of Hispanic issues, advertising, public relations and marketing, and access to the media Kathleen Sueppel (312) 247-0707
LATIN AMERICA LECTURE New York Nov. 5
Mexican author Carlos Fuentes will speak on Latin American Culture in an Age of Crisis as part of the Charles E. Downer Lecture Series of the City University of New York.
Charles DeCicco (212) 690-4141
REFUGEE CONFERENCE Boston Nov. 5
The Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition will issue a report on legalization and a call for the resolution of family unity issues. The group will hold a press conference to mark the halfway point of the legalization program.
Muriel Heilberger(617) 357-6000 ext. 448
IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE Dallas Nov. 6, 7
Immigration and Reform Control Act: A Year Later is the theme of a conference sponsored by the Texas office of the National Immigration, Refugee and Citizenship Forum. The conference will discuss legalization issues, employers and the law, Special Agricultural Workers and the future impact of IRCA Mexico’s Counsel General Oliver Farris will speak Nov. 2,1987
on Mexico-Texas border issues.
Norma Plascencia (512) 474-1773
FILM FESTIVAL San Antonio Nov. 6-15
Sponsored by the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, the 12th annual San Antonio CineFestivat, an international Latino film and video exhibition, will screen movies and videos produced by or about Hispanics. Mesquite awards will be given for fiction, nonfiction, first film or video and special jury award. Eduardo Diaz (512) 271-9070
MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Chicago Nov. 7
The city of Chicago is sponsoring a dialogue between women and minority-owned business enterprises. The conference will discuss bidding procedures, contract procurement and compliance and interaction with the city’s buyers.
Angela Dutt (312) 744-4427
INTERNATIONAL BOOK FAIR Miami Nov. 8-15
The fourth annual Miami Book Fair International will feature writers, book publishers, displays of old, new and rare books and entertainment. Authors included in the fair are Carlos Fuentes and Jos6 Maria Gironella
Eduardo Padron (305) 347-3203
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


ARLINGTON COUNTY JOB OPPORTUNITIES
The following positions close November 12, 1987:
PUBLIC SERVICE WORKER I
Salary: $6,569 per hour Announcement #2160-8B-DPW
“Step Out of the Traditional Job Mold”
Do you enjoy physical activity and hate being confined indoors?
Do you like finishing a job and knowing that you’ve contributed?
Do you want to bring home good money and don’t mind getting dirty to do it?
Arlington County Department of Public Works is recruiting for the position of Public Service Worker I. Our benefits include health insurance, uniforms, transportation subsidy, tuition reimbursement, vacation and sick leave and a credit union.
The following position closes November 19, 1987:
EEO Recruitment-Outreach Specialist
(Personnel Department)
Salary; $25,883.52 - $28,512.65 Announcement #1805-8A-PER
Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit targeted populations, including minorities, women and disabled persons. Duties include identifying and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, school/college officials, community groups, etc.; developing outreach plans, ads, brochures, etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis.
Requires at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university in public, business or personnel administration or related field. Knowledge of outreach methods and recruitment sources. Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following: a) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system; b) language capabilities in one or more languages represented in the community.
PLANT MECHANIC I
(Water Pollution Control Plant, Dept of Public Works)
Salary: $10,027 - $10,880 per hour Announcement # 2325-8B-DPW
SUPPLEMENTAL QUESTIONNAIRE IS REQUIRED Installs, aligns, repairs, overhauls and maintains industrial equipment and machinery used in waste water treatment processes. Performs simple electrical tasks such as checking or replacing electrical wiring and connections. Requires high school diploma, vocational school or equivalent plus three years of industrial/mechanical experience of which a minimum of two years involved performing new installation and overhaul, maintenance, repair and diagnostic work on complex and varied industrial mechanical equipment systems and/or machinery.
The following positions closes December 18, 1987:
SHORT-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (June 1988 to September 1988)
Salary: $9.059/hr Announcement #1606-8E-CMG
LONG-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (Minimum of one year)
Salary: $9.412/hr Announcement #1606-8E-CMG VARIOUS POSITIONS COUNTYWIDE
Graduate Intern positions are designed to provide graduate students with learning experience while performing productive assignments and becoming oriented to the goals, organization, and operations of local government. Interns may be assigned to assist in the development and execution of projects concerning a single program area or may have primary responsibility for projects concerning a single program area or may have primary responsibility for projects involving issues impacting major program areas, multiple departments or policy considerations. Interns will work under the supervision and guidance of the senior manager in the organization to which they are assigned. Applicants must be . recent graduates from a Master's degree program and not previously employed in the field, or must have completed one semester of graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree and be currently enrolled in a program leading to a master’s degree in public or business administration, urban and regional planning or other field related to the needs of local government.
NO TE: Please request an official job announcement for special application instructions if you wish to apply for an Intern position.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5:00 PM on the closing date. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department
2100 14th Street, North, Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987-1988 may be offered in the following fields:
• Librarian/Library Technician
• Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant
• Economist/Economics Research Assistant
• Foreign Affairs Analyst Research Assistant
S Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician
• Attorney/Law Clerk
• Technical Information Specialist
• Administrative Officer
Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degree and full-time graduate students pursuing master's anchor doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered.
The program consists of 90 or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessionsfor1988 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the Jan.-April, 1988, session must submit their applications no later than Dec. 3,1987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment
For additional information, contact Carmen M6ndez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620.
ATTORNEY
National Civil Rights Organization seeks staff attorney for San Antonio office to conduct a personal case load of litigation and advocacy. Requirements: Two years litigation and advocacy experience in civil rights or public interest law. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred. Resume, writing sample, and three references toe MALDEF, The Commerce Bldg., LTD, 314 E Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205. By 11/25/87.
SECRETARY
The U.S. General Accounting Office has a permanent position for a Secretary (typing) in Washington, D.C. The position is a GS-5/6 ($16,304 - $17,623). Must show English proficiency and pass written and typing tests.
Si est& interesado(a), por favor llame a: Richard DeVore or Serena Elms at (202) 275-8688.
U.S. Citizenship Required An Equal Opportunity Employer
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C.,provides: • Designs Illustration• Typesetting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Stats. Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-7755.
PRINCE GEORGESCOUNTY, MD., government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.


Arts& Entertainment
DOING IT ON CABLE: The first organizational meeting of Southern California’s Latinos in Cable was held last month to introduce the organization’s goals and purposes and plan its initial activities.
The meeting, held Oct. 14, was presided over by Gloria Ruiz, general manager of the American Cablesystems’ franchise in the city of Bell. Ruiz was appointed chairman of the group’s steering committee, which will direct Latinos in Cable until formal elections are held next year.
The organization’s goals are to “promote the hiring and promotion of Hispanics in the industry” and “develop a better understanding of the Hispanic market within the cable industry.”
According to the 1986 Broadcast and Cable Industry Trend Reports, a study released in March by the Federal Communications Commission, Hispanic employment within the nation’s cable industry is only slightly higher than it is within the television broadcast industry.
Hispanic women hold 2.1% and Hispanic men 3.3% of all jobs
offered in broadcast The numbers for cable are 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively. In cable, Hispanic women are more likely to be employed in office/clerical jobs (6.5%) and less likely to be laborers (0.3%), while the trends for Hispanic men are the opposite. They are more likely to be employed as laborers (8.9%) than as office/clerical (1.2%).
The first meeting of Latinos in Cable was held at American Cablesystems’ facility in Culver City. The next meeting, to be held this month, will also take place there.
In other cable news, the nation’s only Spanish-language cable channel is moving ahead with programming changes, following the relocation of its corporate offices to the West Coast.
GalaVision, not unlike other Univisa companies, is now headquartered in West Hollywood, while offices in New York have been moved to the General Motors building in Manhattan.
GalaVision has continued the trend announced last year to convert the “pay channel” to “basic.” This means that cable customers receive the service as part of a subscription package.
- Antonio Mejlas-Rentas
Media Report
IXTAPA CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ first international conference Oct. 22-24 in Ixtapa, Mexico, attracted more than 300 U.S. Hispanic and Mexican journalists.
The purpose of the conference was to create better communications and understanding between the two groups.
The participants took part in daylong workshops and panels ranging from how the groups see each other to the practice of journalism in Central America.
A proposal to continue the international conference every two years, alternating sites in Mexico and the United States, will be addressed in January at the next NAHJ board meeting in Hartford, Conn.
In other conference business, NAHJ confirmed Patricia Diaz Dennis, Federal Communications Commissioner, and C6sar Ch&vez, president of the United Farm Workers, as two
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Felix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado. Julio Laboy
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias.
No portion of Hispanic Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.00 Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
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speakers for the 1988 NAHJ conference in Dallas. NAHJ’s 1989 conference will be in San Juan, Puerto Rico.
HERALD DENOUNCED: The Cuban American National Foundation, in an Oct 19 full-page advertisement in The Miami Herald, denounced the paper’s editorial policies as being “ignorant” and often portraying Cuban Americans as “extremists.” It also accused the paper of not being sufficiently anti-Com-munist.
CANF said the paper, which is No. 1 in South Florida, will not be accepted by Cubans until its editorial and news coverage policies become more “balanced.” The powerful lobbying organization asserted that the Herald’s only interest in Cuban Americans is economic.
“The Miami Herald may as well close its doors if it believes it can take advantage of us economically while it belittles our ideals and misrepresents our people and our purposes,” the advertisement said.
The Herald announced Oct. 26 that El Miami Herald, its sister publication, will be expanded and renamed El Nuevo Herald
Nov. 21.
NEW YORK MEDIA SYMPOSIUM: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists’ New York/New England Region sponsored a symposium at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism Oct. 17. Some 50-75 people participated.
It addressed such topics as AIDS, education, the homeless, immigration and the status of Puerto Ricans in the media.
FELLOWSHIPOPPORTUNITY: Printand broadcast journalism professionals with at least seven years’ experience are being sought for Stanford University's JohnS. Knight Fellowships program. Journalists interested in becoming one of twelve fellows chosen to pursue a year of study in the area of their choice have until Feb. 1,1988, to apply.
Fellows are awarded a $25,000 stipend, and ail academic benefits are open to spousea
For a brochure and application form, write John S. Knight Fellowships, Department of Communication, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif. 94305(415)723-4937.
- Julio Laboy
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text
Hispanic High School Grads Up, College Enrollees Down
While the Hispanic high school graduation rate^ga increas^c). considerably since the 197OS, the percentage of Latinos entering college declined from 19.9% in 1976 to 16.9% in 1985, according to a report to be released Nov. 5 by the American Council on Education’s Office of Minority Concerns. The rate is below that for white students- 28.7%- and blacks-19.8%.
The sixth annual report is based on 1985 data on 18-to-24-year-olds. Latinos had the lowest high school graduation rate-62.9%-compared to whites-83.6%, blacks -75.6%.
“The actual Hispanic rate is lower because the data includes Hispanics who have earned General Equivalency Diplomas,” said Sarah Melendez, associate director of the minority concerns office. The report attributes part of the decline in Hispanics entering college to the increase in the Latino population aged 18-24 from 1976 to 1985.
The percentage of Hispanic high school graduates who go on to college has dropped by nearly 10%. Figures for the three groups show:
1976 1985
Hispanics 35.8% 26.9%
Blacks 33.5 26.1
Whites 33.0 34.4
As their population has grown, Hispanics
have registered gains in college degrees earned- a 44% increase at the baccalaureate level between 1976 and 1985, a29.5% increase in the number of master's degrees and a 71.1 % jump in the doctorate degrees conferred.
Latinas made the largest gain in degrees earned at all levels. Yet, even though Latinas increased their number of professional degrees by 293.3%, the actual number was very low-645 in 1984-85. For Hispanic men, the number
was 1,239 - a 35.4% increase.
In the ten-year period covered by the report, Hispanic college graduates increased their concentration of degrees in business/management by 127.6%, decreased the number of education degrees by 10.5% and decreased the number in social science by 6.1%.
Hispanics earned 25,874 bachelor's degrees in 1985.
- Melinda Machado
High School Completion/College Entrance Rates
18-to-24 Year Olds*
1976 1981 1985
HISPANIC No. % No. % No. %
Total High School Graduates Attending College T.551 862 309 55.6 19.9 2,052 1,144 342 55.8 16.6 2,221 1,396 375 62.9 16.9
BLACK Total High School Graduates Attending College 3,315 2,239 749 67.5 22.6 3,778 2,678 750 70.9 19.9 3,716 2,810 734 75.6 19.8
WHITE Total High School Graduates Attending College 23,119 19,045 6,276 82.4 27.1 24,486 20,123 6,549 82.2 26.7 22,632 18,916 6,500 83.6 28.7
* Numbers in Thousands.
Source: U.S Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census.
Data Needed to Improve Intervention
continued from page 1
of 4.0% by white wives and 3.0% by white husbands.
Straus said that the severe violence rate of Hispanic and white women can be a misleading statistic.
When a women does retaliate orcommit an act of self- defense, it usually is a more severe act than her spouse’s initial assault, he said. She is then booked by police for the more severe offense, even though her injuries are
Broker Killed by Investor
A Social Security Administration employee, distraught over large losses he suffered during the recent stock market downfall, walked into a Miami Merrill Lynch office late morning Oct. 26 and shot to death Jos6 Argilagos, the manager.
Assailant Arthur Kane also critically wounded another employee, 39-year-old Lloyd Kolokoff, and killed himself.
Kane, 53, reportedly lost several million dollars during the Oct 19 market crash.
According to police, Kane had planned a meeting with Argilagos. Kane concealed the weapon, a 357-caliber handgun, in a briefcase he purchased less than half an hour before the shooting.
Argilagos, who had worked with Merrill Lynch since 1961, was from Puerto Rico. He was transferred from San Juan in 1977. The 52-year-old manager/vice president is survived by his wife and three children.
almost always more serious.
“Spousal abuse is the most unreported crime. It is hard to get statistics, especially on Hispanics,” said Diana Campos, director of outreach and bilingual services at The New York State Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
Campos correlated the lack of statistics on Hispanic spousal abuse with the general lack of domestic-violence services for Hispanics. She added that without the statistics, fundraising capabilities for service providers are hampered.
Delgado said that she will not utilize any of the reporf s findings “The prism through which researchers who are not Latino see us distorts what they see. We need more accurate data on the national level.”
Myrna Zambrano, author of the first bilingual book on domestic violence, “Mejor Sola Que Mai Acom panada"- Better AlonelThamlh Bad Company, disagreed. As a sociologist Straus may have a more objective viewpoint she said. “Latinos may be blind to certain things that he could see.” - jullo Laboy
Garza Up for Judgeship
Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Texas) sent a letter to the White House Oct 25 recommending that Texas state District Judge Emilio Garza fill the judgeship vacated by U.S. District Court Judge William Sessions.
Sessions resigned from his position as the judge for the Western District of Texas when he was named FBI director.
Dukakis and Kemp Win in LULAC Straw Polls
Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis led all Democrats and Rep. Jack Kemp (R-N.Y.) scored highest among Republican candidates in two presidential straw polls taken Oct. 23 in which League of United Latin American Citizens’ state directors were asked to rate the candidates from each party.
Dukakis was the leader among Democrat contenders with 44%, followed by Illinois Sen. Paul Simon with 20%. Kemp led Republicans with 39% to Vice President George Bush’s 37%.
Fifty LULAC state directors and national vice presidents attended the two-day executive committee meeting in Washington, D.C.
The LULAC meeting followed the National Hispanic Agenda ’88 unity task force meeting.
LULAC National President Oscar Morin i said the organization would be distributing ! the agenda among its more than 400 local councils in 40 states.
The organization’s executive committee also passed a resolution making Arizona its top priority in the battle against the English-only movement
Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.) was presented with the LULAC Recognition Award for Outstanding Contribution to Hispanic America during an Oct 22 dinner. “It took a lot of Courage to continue that battle,” Mor&n said of Biden’s leadership in the Senate to reject the nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) was given an award for combatting illiteracy.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report'
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Making The News This Week a member of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, to its board of . directors. NFIE is a branch of the National Education Association . . . The City of Los Angeles Board of Public Works elects Edward Avila, the first executive director of the National of Elected and Appointed Officials, as its presidf'UVv"i, wt"Ri1CN.td been the board vice president for the past year, is the board's first Hispanic president .. The League of United Latin American Citizens' Executive Committee names Norma Rivera as the executive director of the LULAC Foundation. She replaces Joe Trevino. . . Jesus L6pez Ramos, from San Patricio County, Texas, is one of the 24 names of casualties to be added to the Vietnam Memorial. Lopez was a sergeant in the army and was listed as a casualty in 1966 at the age of 23 ... Rep. Tony Coelho(D-Calif.), an epileptic, House Majority Whip and Congressional Hispanic Caucus member, and blind singer and guitarist Jose Feliciano are two of seven recipients to receive the second annual Victory Awards at a ceremony at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. The awards, sponsored by the National Rehabilitation Hospital, are given to people who have overcome or adapted to their physical limitations ... Sen. Alan Cranston (D-Calif.) calls for the dismissal of the Immigration and Naturalization Service's Western Region director Harold Ezell for"offensive statements" Ezell made against Latinos seeking legalization ... The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education names Blandina Cardenas Ramirez, VoiSNo. 43 3 23/o of Latino Families Report Spousal Abuse The rate of violent spousal abuse among Hispanic couples in 1985 was more than twice that for white couples, according to a recently released report, the first ever to focus on Hispanic domestic violence nationally. The report, "Violence in Hispanic Families in the United States," found that the severe violence rate for the Latino families surveyed was 11.0%, compared with 5.4% for whites. It also found that23.1% of the Latino families experienced one or more assaults against a spouse in 1985. This compared with 15.0% for white families. The report was based on an English-language telephone survey of 721 Hispanic families. The study estimated that 693,000 of the 2.8 million Hispanic couples experienced at least one violent incident in 1985. The figure included violence by men and women, married and unmarried. Almost half of the assaults-330,000were acts of severe violence . Severe violence is defined as an act that has a relatively high probability of causing an injury kicking, biting, punching, use of a knife or gun or striking with an object. According to the survey, by Murray Straus, director of the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire, more than seven Hispanic women out of every hundred were severely assaulted by their partners in 1985. Straus admitted that all respondents are not likely to be forthcoming in describing violent incidents. The true rates of violence may be as much as double the reported figures, he said. Jane Delgado, a recent appointee to the 15-member National Committee on Vital and Dennis Eyed for Labor Post Federal Communications Commissioner Patricia Diaz Dennis is reportedly one of the top contenders to fill the Secretary of Labor post vacated by William Brock last month. Dennis, a member of the National Labor Relations Board before she joined the FCC in 1986, is the second His panic to serve on the communications agency. The first was Henry Rivera, who resigned in 1985 . . Dennis, 41, is a native of New Mexico. Health Statistics and the president of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, disagreed with the use of a telephone survey as the primary data-gathering tool and objected to the interviews conducted solely in English . "I'm happy that an attempt was made to collect data but I disagree with the methodology, " she told Weekly Report. "As a clinical psychologist, I can say that families who experience anguishespecially Latino families feel more at ease talking about it in their native language and not over the phone," she said. The reporfs most challenged statistic was the rate of assaults by Latino wives their husbands. It found that in acts of spousal abuse , the severe violence rate by wives against their husba nds-7.8%-was slightly higher than the rate of violent assaults by husbands-7. 3%. This compared with a rate continued on page 2 HISPANIC SPOUSAL VIOLENCE1985 TYPE OF VIOLENCE* AMONG COUPLES** Any violence PER 100 COUPLES WHITE HIS P . HISPS. ASSAULTED PER YEAR . Severe violence BY HUSBAND Any violence Severe violence BY WIFE 15.0 5.4 10.8 3.0 23.1 11. 0 17 . 3 7 . 3 693,000 330,000 519,000 219,000 Any violence 11 .5 16.8 504,000 Severe violence 4.0 7 . 8 234,000 *Any violence: slapping, pushing, etc.; Severe violence: any a c t that has a relatively high probability of causing an injury-kicking, biting, punching and using a weapon. ** Incidence of violence among married and unmarried couples. Source: "Violence in Hispanic Families in the United States." New INS Family Unity Policy Sought Hispanic advocacy groups, frustrated and dissatisfied with an Oct. 21 announcement by the Immigration and Naturalization Service that ineligible family members of legalization applicants could be deported, will try to seek legislative initiatives for a national unity policy. INS Commissioner Alan Nelson stated that the agency would not issue a blanket policy on families, during testimony before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration, Refugees and International Law. Present law "does not give us room to extend the legalization benefits to them be cause, by statute, they are not eligible for it," said INS spokesman Verne Jervis. Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund staff attorney Mario Moreno said, "This is an issue of human rights here in the United Statesthe separation of families . I think there's ample justification for INS to expand its discretion and include spouses and minor children. " Under current INS policies, children who do not qualify could be deported unless both pa rents are eligible. An unqualified spouse may also be sent back. INS Commissioner Alan Nelson said the agency would consider deferring deportat io n for humanitarian reasons such as illness or physical handicap. Under INS guidelines: • Children in one-parent households can remain only if the parent they are living with qualifies for legalization. • Ineligible spouses would have to leave the country and apply for entry once their partners are granted permanent residency.

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Hispanic High School Grads Up, College Enrollees Down While the Hispanic high school graduation since the 197b"S, the perce'hfi!ge of Latinos entering college declined from 19.9% in 1976 to 16.9% in 1985, according to a report to be released Nov . 5 by the American Council on Education's Office of Minority Concerns. The rate i s below that for white students28.7%and blacks-19. 8%. The sixth annual report is based on 1985 data on 18-to-24-year-olds. Latinos had the lowest high school graduation rate-62.9%compared to whites83. 6%, blacks -75. 6% . "The actual Hispanic rate is lower beca_use the data includes Hispanics who have earned General Equivalency Diplomas," said Sarah Melendez, associate director of the minority concerns office. The report attributes part of the decline in Hispanics entering college to the increase in the Latino population aged 18-24. from 1976 to 1985. The percentage of Hispanic high school graduates who go on to college has dropped by nearly 10% . Figures for the three groups show: Hispanics Blacks Whites 1976 1985 35. 8% 33.5 33.0 26.9% 26.1 34.4 As their population has grown , Hispanics have registered gains in college degrees earned-a 44% increase at the baccalaureate level between 1976 and 1985, a 29.5% increase in the number of master's degrees and a 71.1% jump in the doctorate degrees conferred Latinas made the largest gain in degrees earned at all levels. Yet, even though Latinas increased their number of professional degrees by 293.3%, the actual number was very low645 in 1984-85. For Hispanic men, the number was 1 ,239 -a 35.4% increase. In the ten-year period covered by the report, Hispanic college graduates increased their concentration of degrees in business/manage ment by 127.6%, decreased the number of education degrees by 10. 5% and decreased the number in social science by 6.1 % . Hispanics earned 25,874 bachelor's degrees in 1985 . Melinda Machado High School Completion/College Entrance Rates 18-to-24 Year Olds* 1976 1981 1985 HISPANIC No. % No. % No. % Total 1",551 2,052 2,221 High School Graduates 862 55. 6 1 ,144 55.8 1 ,396 62.9 Attending College 309 19 . 9 342 16. 6 375 16.9 BLACK Total 3,315 3 ,778 3,716 High School Graduates 2,239 67. 5 2 ,678 70. 9 2,810 75. 6 Attending College 749 22.6 750 19.9 734 19.8 WHITE Total 23,119 24,486 22,632 High School Graduates 19 ,045 82.4 20,123 82.2 18,916 83.6 Attending College 6,276 27. 1 6 ,549 26. 7 6,500 28.7 * Numbers in Thousands. Source : U.S. Department of Commerce. Bureau of the Censu s . Data Needed to Improve Intervention Dukakis and Kemp Win in LULAC Straw Polls continued from page 1 of 4.0% by white wives and 3 . 0% by white husbands. Straus said that the severe violence rate of Hispanic and white women can be a misleading statistic. When a women does retaliate or commit an act of self-defense, it usually is a more severe act than her spouse's initial assault , he said . She is then booked by police for the more severe offense, even though her injuries are Broker Killed by Investor A Social Security Administration employee , distraught over large losses he suffered during the recent stock market downfall , walked into a Miami Merrill Lynch office late morning Oct. 26 and shot to death Jose Argilagos, the manager. Assailant Arthur Kane also critically wound ed another employee, 39year-old Lloyd Kolokoff, and killed himself. Kane, 53, reportedly lost several million dollars during the Oct 19 market crash . According to police, Kane had planned a meeting with Argilagos. Kane concealed the weapon, a .357-caliber handgun, in a briefcase he purchased less than half an hour before the shooting. Argilagos, who had worked with Merrill Lynch since 1961, was from Puerto Rico . He was transferred from San Juan in 1977. The 52-year-old manager/vice president is survived by his wife and three children. 2 almost always more serious . " Spousal abuse is the most unreported crime . I t is hard to get statistics, espec i ally Massachusetts Gov . Michael Dukakis led on Hispanics," said Diana Campos, director all Democrats and Rep. Jack Kemp (A-N .Y.) of outreach and bilingual services at The scored highest among Republican candidates New York State Coalition Against Domestic in two presidential straw polls taken Oct. 23 Violence . in which League of United Latin American Campos correlated the lack of statistics on Citizens' state directors were asked to rate Hispanicspousalabusewiththegenerallack the candidates from each party. of domestic-violence services for H i spanics. Dukakis was the leader among Democrat She added that without the statistics , fundcontenders with 44%, followed by Illinois raising capabilities for service providers are Sen . Paul Simon with 20%. Kemp led Republi hampered. cans with 39% to Vice President George Delgado said that she will not utilize any of Bush's 37%. the reporfs findings. " The prism through which Fifty LULAC state directors and national researchers who are not Latino see us distorts vice presidents attended the two-day executive what they see. We need more accurate data committee meeting in Washington, D.C. on the national level." The LULAC meeting followed the National Myrna Zambrano, author of the first bilingual Hispanic Agenda '88 unity task force meeting . book on domestic violence, "Mejor Sola Que LULAC National President Oscar Moran Mal Acompanada"-•Better Alone\Thanlf l n Bad \ said the organizatio_n would be distributing Company, disagreed. As a sociologist, Straus , the agenda among 1ts. more than 400 local may have a more objective viewpoint , she councils in 40 states. said . " Latinos may be blind to certain things The organization's executive committee also that he could see." _Julio Laboy passed a resolution making Arizona its top priority in the battle against the English-only Garza Up for Judgeship Biden(D-Del.) was presented Sen . Phil Gramm (A-Texas) sent a letter to the White House Oct. 25 recommending that Texas state District Judge Emilio Garza fill the judgeship vacated by U.S. District Court Judge William Sessions. Sessions resigned from his position as the judge for the Western District of Texas when he was named FBI director. with the LULAC Recognition Award for Out standing Contribution to Hispanic America during an Oct. 22 dinner. "It took a lot of ' courage to continue that battle , " Moran said of Biden ' s leadership in the Senate to reject the nomination of Robert Bork to the Supreme Court. Sen . Orrin Hatch (A-Utah) was given an award for combatting illiteracy . H1spanic Link Weekly Report

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Myrna Zambrano, guest columnist The Silent Scream The neighbor wants to believe that the screams from the house next door are nothing more than" roughhousing." The parish priest wants to accept that the woman in the front pew is not a victim of domestic violence. The co-worker wants to believe that the woman at the next desk really did fall down the sta irs. When I started working with battered women, I , too, wanted to believe that I didn't know of women who were beaten by their husbands or lovers . But as I got closer to the problem and the women themselves, I began to remember that when I was growing up the woman upstairs left just about every Friday nig ht with a black eye and a weekend suitcase, and that my aunt suffered for years at the hands of an abusive husband, until her early death. In the years since working at a shelter and now having written the first bilingual book for battered Latinas, Mejor Sola Que Mal Acompaftada -Better Alone Than In Bad Com pany, I frequently speak to people whose f irst reaction is disbelief. Now I almost always e xpect a bad joke about women being beaten or raped when I walk into a television or radio studio for an interview. But reality stares me in the face. Shelters are overcrowded, women are displaced, children witness horrors in their homes. EXPOSING 'DIRTY LAUNDRY' Mejor Sola was written because there is so little bilingual information written for Latinas and counselors in Spanish. The manuscript circulated among Latinas and counselors who were familiar with the problem. Most said that it was good for us to come to terms with this situation on a national basis. Others felt that I was exposing our "dirty laundry' ' and I would be inviting the notion that Latinas are beaten more than other women. Domestic violence is found in wealthy and poor homes, in Hispanic and non-Hispanic homes, in homes where there is the benefit of education and in homes where there is none. In the United States, approximately one in every six couples experiences violence, and at least 1.8 million wives are beaten each year by their husbands. Many more remain silent. It is an underreported crime. The blame for this heinous offense is most often placed on the woman. "Women stay in an abusive home because they like it." "She wouldn't get beaten if she were a better housewife." " She wouldn't get beaten if she didn' t talk back. " "She wouldn't get beaten if she fought back" Women stay because of economic dependence, because they hav e no place to go, because they have been socialized to feel shame and accept the blame for a crime they have not committed. They stay because of their children. THE ULTIMATE QUESTIONWHY? The ultimate question is, "Why does a man beat the person he is the closest to, the mother of his children?" One reason may be that the batterer cannot deal with emotional closeness, that he does not handle pressure and frustration well, that he does not have the verbal tools to work out a problem . Research has shown that 68% of men who beat their wives and 50% of battered women come from violent homes. We cannot afford to say it is none of our business; our children may marry into it. We must be willing to acknowledge that this all-too-common problem exists in our own culture, in our society, in our own back ya rd . We can help by supporting the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, which has a Women of Color Task Force to coordinate efforts across the country. We can support our local shelter by donating money to support their bilingual services or give time volunteering on a crisis hot line. Our first responsibility, however, is to call the police the next time we hear screams from the house next door. (Myrna Zambrano is an author and social worker in San Diega) Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE HIDDEN AGENDA: How much did you read in your city's newspaper about the historic National Hispanic Agenda '88 meeting in Washington, D .C.? How much did you hear on your radio about what was decided and accomplished by our eloquent bi!;rCity mayors Henry Cisneros and Federico Pel'la and more than 100 other Hispanic leaders who came to the nation' s capital at their own expense? How many of their faces did you see on TV? From the sampling we have seen, read and heard about, it is obvious that mainstream media still consider Hispanics a special interest group unworthy of coverage they would automatically give to such an event staged by any other group representing 22 million U.S . residents. The Washington Post did a story following the group's last-day press conference. So did the Los Angeles Times. The New York Times? I saw one small item quoting Gov. Mario Cuomo-a featured speaker at the Latino summit-on an issue unrelated to his visit. It mentioned that the quote was extracted from him at a meeting of Hispanics he happened to be attending. Eight New York reporters followed Cuomo to the meeting, and, according to summit coordinator Aida Alvarez, "We didn't get one line out of it." The conference ended on a Wednesday. The Houston Chronicle ran a piece the following Sunday, datelined Washington and crediting Chronicle "news services" as its source. As usual, the Spanish-language media did a good jobparticularly those from New York. But what about The Miami Herald and its Spanish-language El Miami Herald? The Herald has at least two Latino correspondents in Washington, but relied on Associated Press for its coverage. The wide-open, harmonious, historic Hispanic agenda conference gave new meaning to the phrase "hidden agenda." Now ifs the U.S . media thafs doing the hiding. So whafs neW? To twist an old phrase, "Good news is no news." DOUBLESPEAK OR DOUBLESLEEP? Immigration and Natu ralization Service Commissioner Alan Nelson drew much better press when he testified on INS's legalization policy before a House committee the same morning the agenda was released. The contradictory stories of The New York Times and The Los Angeles Times help explain why potential legalization candidates are so frustrated and confused. Led The Los Angeles Times: "WASHINGTON In a ruling that could affect thousands of illegal aliens, it was announced Wednesday that children who do not qualify for amnesty under the nation's new immigration law may be deported unless both their parents have received such protection. "The announcement was made by Alan C. Nelson, commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, who disclosed also that adult aliens who do not receive amnesty may be deported 'with no special protection,' even if their spouses are eligible for legal residency in this country . . . " Led The New York Times: "WASHINGTON The Reagan Administration announced a policy today under which some illegal aliens may be allowed to stay in the United States if they have immediate relatives who qualify for amnesty under the new immigration law. "Alan C. Nelson, the Commissioner of Immigration and Natu ralization, said the Government would consider deferring deportation of such aliens in instances in which there were compelling humanitarian reasons to avoid splitting up families ... " Is Alan Nelson the national doublespeak champion, was one reporter picking his nose and looking out the window, or do reporters write what they want to hear? Your wisdom is as good as mine. -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report Nov. 2 , 1987 3

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C OLLECTING Following is a list of shelters and organizations that combat Hi spanic domestic violence: DO MESTIC VIOLENCE INFORMATION: The National Coalition Against Domestic Violence has a free list of state coalitions against domestic violence and a directory of more than 1 ,500 domestic violence shelters and programs nationwide. For the directory, send $2.50 to the group at: 1000 16th St. NW, Suite 303,Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 293-8860, national bilingual hotline 1 -800-333-7233. LATIN A DOMESTIC VIOLENCE SHELTER: Casa Myrna Vasquez, a dom e stic-violence shelter in Boston , has free bilingual brochures on domestic violence. Write: P . O . Box 18019, Boston , Mass. 02118 (617) 482-1735, ho t lin e (617) 2629581 . EAST HARLEM PROJECT : New York City's Victim ' s Intervention Project has b ilin g ual literature, a miniresource center with books, films and articles on child abuse and domestic violence and bilingual support groups. Write: 2253 T hird Ave., New York, N .Y. 10035 (212) 289-6650. Their bilingual hotline, (212) 360-5090, operates from 9 a . m . to 9 p.m. SERV I CIOS DE LA RAZA: This organization has free brochures and other Spa n i s h -language literatu r e on domestic violence . Write : 4055 N . Tejon, Denver, Colo . 80211 (303) 4585851 . Their hotline number is(303) 458-7088. MINNESOTA SHELTER: Casa de Esperanza has several free bilingual brochures on domestic violence and the services the shelter provides. Write: P.O. Bo x75177, St. Paul, Minn. 55175 (612) 772-1723, hotline(612) 7721611 (TDD). FASH ION SCHOLARSHIPS: The Hispanic Designers Scholarships Pr o g r a m offers scholarships to Hispanic college students pursuing c a reers in fashion merchandising, fashion design, jewelry design a nd fa s hion illustration. Applicants must have a 3.4 grade-point average. For more information and applications, write to: Hispan i c D e sig ners Inc., Penny Harrison, 1201 16th St. NW, Suite 420, Wash i ngton, D . C . 20036 (202) 822-7895. DOMEST I C VIOLENCE REPORT: For a copy of Murray Straus ' 34-page report, "Violence in Hispanic Families ," the first report on H i spanic domestic violence nationally, send$2.50 to: Family Research Laboratory, University of New Hampshire, Durham, N . H . 03824. MINORITI ES IN HIGHER EDUCATION: The American Council on Education' s O ffice of Minority Concerns will publish Nov. 5 its sixth ann ual status report on minorities in higher education. The 44page document is available by sending a check or money order for $7.50 t o : ACE , Office of Minority Concerns, 1 Dupont Circle NW, Washington, D . C . 20036. CONNECTING STANFORD SEEKS TEACHERS Stanford University will receive $2 million in early 1988 from the California-based James Irvine Foundation fora multifaceted, six-year project to increase the number of Hispanic , black and other minorities in the teaching profession. Developed in part by Cecilia Burciaga , Stanford's associate dean of graduate studies, the project will build upon programs at the University to support young minority scholars. It will set up mentoring relation ships, support students' development through the doctoral level and encourage them to remain in the teaching profession. One component of the grant will be used to attract outstanding minority students to Stanford's teacher preparation program. LATINO AIDS SPECIAL TO AIR A two-hour Spanish-language television special on AIDS will air throughout California beginning Nov. 5 . Nuestra Familia Frente a/ S/DA-Between Us : Our Family Confronts AIDS-will include a 50-minute Spanish-language drama followed by a panel discussion with doctors and social workers. The special , sponsored by Pacific Bell and produced by KDTV-14, San Francisco , will air from 7 to9 p . m . on that station Nov . 8 . It will air on KMEX-34, Los Angeles, in two parts . The first hour will air Nov . 5 from 10:30 to 11:30 p.m. and part two 11:00 p.m . to midnight Nov. 7 . Air times in other California cities will vary. The television special is also kicking off the implementation of a 'statewide Spanish-language AIDS hotline/education project. The project i s funded by $125,000 in grants from the Pacific Telesis Foundation, the American Red Cross and the San Francisco AIDS Foundation . The hot line numbers, which will be activated after the shows air, are: Southern California, 1-800-222-7 432, and Northern California , 1-800-367-2437. HERITAGE MONTH CELEBRATION In celebration of Puerto R ican Heritage Month, the New York Public Library . is offering an array of free cultural programs at six Bronx branch libraries Nov . 2-19. The events include lectures, arts and crafts for children, music and Hispanic ch i ldren's tales. For more information call the NYPL ' s office of special se . rvices at (212) 340-0918. Calenda r of H i spanic issues , advertis i ng , public relations and marketing , and access to the media. on Me x i coTexas border issues. Norma Plascencia (512) 474-1773 THIS WEEK HISPANIC SC HOLARSHIP DINNER Washingto n , D.C. Nov . 3 The Na tional Hispanic Scholarship Fund is sponsoring a dinner as part of its fund raising effort to provide scho la r sh i ps to undergraduate and graduate Latino students . Judy C hapa (21 3) 551-1714 INNER-CITY YOUTH FORUM W ashington, D.C. Nov . 4 A national forum concerning federal policy on inner city poverty and youth is being sponsored by the Y ou t h Policy Institute and the Eisenhower Foundation. Raul Yzagu i rre , president of the National Council of La Raza, will be one of the presenters. John Bolz (202) 635-6087 MEDIA CONFERENCE Ch i cago Nov . 4 Creating Change i n the Media is the theme of the second annual media conference sponsored by the La t ino Committee on the Media Workshops include b r ea k ing into the media, women in the media, coverage 4 Kathleen Sueppel (31 2) 24 7-0707 LATIN AMERICA LECTURE New York Nov . 5 Mexican author Carlos Fuentes will speak on Latin American Culture in an Age of Crisis as part of the Charles E. Downer Lecture Series of the City versity of New York . Charles DeCicco (21 2) 690-4141 REFUGEE CONFERENCE Boston Nov . 5 The Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition will issue a report on legalization and a call for the resolution of family unity issues . The group will hold a press conference to mark the halfway point of the legalization program . Muriel Heilberger (617) 357-6000 ext. 448 IMMIGRATION CONFERENCE Dallas Nov . 6, 7 Immigration and Reform Control Act: A Year Later is the theme of a conference sponsored by the Texas office of the National Immigration , Refugee and Citizenship Forum . The conference will discuss legalization issues , employers and the law , Special Agricultural Workers and the future impact of I RCA Mexico' s Counsel General Oliver Farris will speak Nov . 2,1987 FILM FESTIVAL San Antonio Nov . 6-15 Sponsored by the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center, t he 12th annual San Antonio CineFestiva( an inter national Latino film and video e x hibition , will s c reen movies and videos produced by or about Hispanics . Mesquite awards will be given for fiction , non f i c tion , first film or video and sp e cial jury award . Eduardo Diaz (512) 271-9070 MINORITY BUSINESS CONFERENCE Chicago Nov . 7 The city of Chicago is sponsoring a dialogue between women and minority-owned business enterprises. The conference will discuss bidding procedures, contract procurement and compliance and interaction with the city's buyers . Angela Dutt (312) 7 44-4427 INTERNATIONAL BOOK FAIR Miami Nov . 8 -15 The fourth annual Miami Book Fair International will feature writers , book publishers , displays of old, new and rare books and entertainment. Authors included in 'the fair are Carlos Fuentes and Jose Maria G i ronella . Eduardo Padron (305) 347-3203 H i spanic Lin k Weekly Report

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I : ARLINGTON COUNTY JOB OPPORTUNITIES The following positions close November 12, 198 7: PUBLIC SERVICE WORKER I Salary: $6.569 per hour Announcement #2160-88-DPW "Step Out of the Traditional Job Mold'' Do you enjoy physical activity and hate being confined indoors? Do you like finishing a job and knowing that yolive contributed? Do you want to bring home good money and don't mind getting dirty to do it? Arlington County Department of Public Works is recruiting for the position of Public Service Worker I . Our benefits include health insurance, uniforms, transportation subsidy, tuition reimbursement , vacation and sick leave and a credit union. The following position closes November 19, 198 7: EEO Recruitment-Outreach Specialist (Personnel Department) Salary: $25,883.52-$28,512.65 Announcement #1805-8A-PER Professional personnel work planning and implementing outreach efforts to recruit targeted populations, including minorities, women and disabled persons. Duties include identifying and maintaining formal and informal network of applicants, schooVcollege officials, community groups , etc. ; developing outreach plans , ads, brochures, etc.; speaking before groups. Position involves traveling locally and on a state and nationwide basis. Requires at least two years experience in one or more technical areas of personnel work supplemented by a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or university in public, business or personnel administration or related field. Knowledge of outreach methods and recruitment sources. Preference may be given to candidate with one or more of the following : a) experience working in an organization operating under a merit system; b) language capabilities in one or more languages represented in the community . PLANT MECHANIC I (Water Pollution Control Plant, Dept of Public Works) Salary: $10.027-$10.880 per hour Announcement# 2325-88-DPW SUPPLEMENTAL QUESTIONNAIRE IS REQUIRED Installs, aligns, repairs, overhauls and maintains industrial equipment and machinery used in waste water treatment processes. Performs simple electrical tasks such as checking or replacing electrical wiring and connections . Requires high school diploma , vocational school or equivalent plus three years of industrial/mechanical experience of which a minimum of two years involved performing new installation and overhaul, maintenance, repair and diagnostic work on complex and varied industrial mechanical equipment, systems and/or machinery . The following positions closes December 18, 198 7: SHORT-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (June 1988 to September 1988) Salary: $9.059/hr Announcement #1606-8E-CMG LONG-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (Minimum of one year) Salary: $9.412/hr Announcement #1606-8 E-CMG VARIOUS POSITIONS COUNTYWIDE Graduate Intern positions are designed to provide graduate students with learning experience while performing productive assignments and becoming oriented to the goals, organization, and operations of local government. Interns may be assigned to assist In the development and execution of projects concerning a single program area or may have primary responsibility for projects concerning a single program area or may have primary responsibility for projects involving issues impacting major program areas, multiple departments or policy considerations. Interns will work under the supervision and guidance of the senior manager in the organization to which they are assigned. Applicants must be recent graduates from a Master's degree program and not previously employed in the field, or must have completed one semester of graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree and be currently enrolled in a program leading to a master's degree in public or business administration, urban and regional planning or other field relat•ed to the needs of local government. NOTE: Please request an official job announcement for special application instructions if you wish to apply for an Intern position . All applicants must submit an official Arlington County applicatic•n form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 :00 PM on the clo. sing date. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TOO (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North, Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE!MFH Hispanoc L1nk Weekly ,, GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education oppor tunities during 1987-1988 may be offered in the following fields: e Librarian/Library Technician • Social Science AnatysVResearch Assistant • Economist/Economics Research Assi& tant • Foreign Affairs Analyst Research Assistant .t Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician e Attorney/Law Clerk e Technical Information Specialist e Administrative Officer Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degree and full-time gra duate students pursuing master's and/or doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered . The program consists of 90 or 120-day appointments to professional work assign ments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, Its mission and operations. Sessions for 1988 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the Jan.-April, 1988, session must submit their applications no later than Dec . 3, 1987. Upon completion of the90 to 120-dayexperience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an ad ditional one-year temporary appointment For additional information, contact Carmen Mbndez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620. ATTORNEY National Civit Rights Organization seeks staff attorney for San Antonio office to conduct a personal case load of litigation and advocacy. Requirements: Two years litigation and advocacy experience in civil rights or public interest law. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred Resume, writing sample, and three references ta MALDEF, The Commerce Bldg., LTD, 314 E. Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205. By 11/25/87. SECRETARY The U.S. General Accounting Office has a permanent position for a Secretary (typing) In Washington , D .C. The position is a G8-5/6 ($16,304$17,623) . Must show English pro ficiency and pass written and typing tests. Sl est a interesado( a), por favor /lame a: Ri chard DeVore or Serena Elms at (202) 275-8688. U.S . Citizenship Required An Equal Opportunity Employer GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington , D . C., provides: e Design e Illustration e Type . setting • Layout e Silkscreen and e Slats. . Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483. PRINCE GEORGES COUNTY, MD., govem ment pffice of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.

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Arts & Entertainment offered in broadcast. The numbers for cable are 2.7% and 3.5%, respectively . In cable, Hispanic women are more likely to be employed in office/clerical jobs (6 . 5%) and less likely to be laborers (0.3%), while the trends for Hispanic men are the opposite. They are more likely to be employed as laborers (8.9%) than as office/clerical (1.2%). DOING IT ON CABLE: The first organizational meeting of Southern California's Latinos in Cable was held last month to introduce the organization's goals and purposes and plan its initial activities. The meeting, held Oct. 14, was presided over by Gloria Ruiz , general manager of the American Cablesystems' franchise in the city of Bell. Ruiz was appointed chairman of the steering committee, which will direct Latinos in Cable until formal elections The first meeting of Latinos in Cable was held at American Cablesystems' facility in Culver City. The next meeting, to be held this month, will also take place there. are held next year. , The organization' s goals d b y TuAsday w i ll run i n Weekly Reports mailed Friday o f same week. Multiple use rates on request. 6 speakers for the 1988 NAHJ conference in Dallas . NAHJ's 1989 conference will be in San Juan, Puerto Rico. HERALD DENOUNCED: The Cuban American National Foundation, in an Oct. 19 full-page advertisement in The Miami Herald, denounced the paper's editorial policies as being"ignorant," and often portraying Cuban Americans as "extremists." It also accused the paper of not being sufficiently anti-Com munist. CANF said the paper, which is No. 1 in . South Florida, will not be accepted by Cubans unti l its editorial and news coverage policies become more "balanced." The powerful lob bying organization asserted that the Herald' s only interest in Cuban Americans is economic . "The Miami Herald may as well close its doors if it believes it can take advantage of us economically while it belittles our ideals and misrepresents our people and our purposes," the advertisement said . The Herald announced Oct. 26 that El Miami Herald, its sister publication, will be expanded and renamed El Nuevo Herald Nov . 21. NEW YORK MEDIA SYMPOSIUM: The National Association of Hispani c Journalists' New York/New England Region sponsored a symposium at Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism Oct. 17. Some 50 people participated. I t addressed such topics as AIDS, education, the homeless, immigration and the status of Puerto Ricans in the media. FELLOWSHIPOPPORTUNITY: Printand broadcast journalism professionals with at leas t seven years' experience are being sought fo r Stanford University's JohnS. Knight Fellow ships program. Journalists interested in becoming one of twelve fellows chosen to pursue a year of study in the area of their choice have until Feb. 1 , 1988, to apply. Fellows are awarded a $25,000 stipend, and all academic benefits are open to spouses. For a brochure and application form, write John S. Knight Fellowships, Department of Communication, Stanford University , Stanford, Calif. 94305 (415) 723-4937. -Julio Laboy HISPANIC DOMESTIC VIOLENCETHE LEGACY Hispanic Link Weekly Report