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Hispanic link weekly report, November 16, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 16, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News
Michigan First Lady Paula Blanchard honors Nora Chapa Mendoza, Marfa Alice DeLeary, Juanita Hernandez, Guadalupe Lara, Alicia Sanchez and Zoralda Sanchez as winners of the Michigan 150 First Lady Award. The six were honored for their contributions to Michigan community^service organizations. . . Mexican essayist and poet Octavio Paz wins the T.S. Eliot Award for Creative Writing given by the Ingersoll Foundation in Chicago. . . Texas Sen. Hactor Uribe announces that he will not seek a seat on the state Supreme Court Voters in that state recently rejected a constitutional
amendment that would have allowed legislators in the middle of their terms to seek other state offices. .. The Rev. Orlando Enrique Costas, dean of the Andover Newton Theological School and a prominent Protestant theologian, dies of stomach cancer at the age 45 in Newton Centre, Mass... The Baseball Writers Association of America names Benito Santiago, catcher with the San Diego Padres, as their unanimous choice for National League Rookie of the Year. A 22-year-old native of Isabela, Puerto Rico, Santiago became the fifth unanimous choice in NL history... Todd Santos, the San Diego State quarterback, becomes the National Collegiate Athletic Association’s Division I career passing yardage leader by amassing 10,661 yards. He reached the mark with a 248-yard game Nov. 7...
K WEEKLY^EPOF^^Ii)
Student Loan Default Policy Called Misdir&dted
Many trade schools, community colleges and universities with high Hispanic enrollment that have default rates of more than 20% on Guaranteed Student Loans will lose their federal financial aid if they do not improve their students’ repayment record.
U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett announced Nov. 4 a plan to take action against the institutions beginning in 1990.
Of the 58 member institutions of the His-panic Association of Colleges and Universities, less than one-third had default rates above 20%. HACU members have 25% or greater Hispanic student populations HACU Chairman Gilbert Sanchez, president of New Mexico Highlands University in Las
• Vegas, N.M., said his school’s rate was 6.7%. “Our students have a strong commitment to paying back their loans,’’ Sanchez said.
GSLs are federally insured, low-interest loans from banks guaranteed by the government to help students defray education costa A defaulter was defined as one who was to have begun paying student loans in fiscal 1985
TWo Latino Heroes Cited
Two Latinos were among the 17 people from Canada and the United States honored Nov. 5 by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission for risking their lives attempting to save others.
On Dec- 19, 1985, in Redlands, Calif., tetter carrier Alejandro Verdejo noticed a car swerving down the street with a lone child standing in the front seat crying. Chasing behind the car was the boy's mother. Verdejo, 27, dropped his mail satchel, gave chase and stopped the car 25 feet before a fourway intersection.
Another Californian, Stephen Esparza, was honored for saving a partially paralyzed man from a motor home Oct 28, 1986, moments before it exploded. (Esparza, 39, from Corona, pulled over when he saw the motor home overturned and burning on a freeway. He and another passerby, Timothy Kusler, kicked in the windshield and pulled the man out
Verdejo, Esparza, Kusler and the 14 other heroes each received a medal and $2,500 cash from the fund.
and had failed to do so by Sept. 30,1986.
The GSL is a need-based program that serves families who earn less than $30,000 a year.
Rafael Magall&n, director of the Tom&s Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif., called Bennett’s proposal “an attack on community colleges, which tend to have a higher default rate than four-year institutions. A disproportionate share of Hispanic enrollment is in community colleges.” Many two-year institutions are not adequately prepared for financial aid management, he said.
“You are going to have a higher default rate if you serve the needy student,” said George Torres, a policy analyst with the Texas Guaranteed Student Loan Corp.
Bennett released a list of default rates for the 7,295 institutions in the program for fiscal 1985. He said one-half of the program’s fiscal 1987 budget - $1.6 billion - went to default payments. Those institutions above 20% in 1990 will be subject to limitation, suspension and termination from the program.
More than 30% of the institutions- 2,190 -had default rates above 20%. Beauty colleges and other trade schools dominated the list, followed by historically black universities and
Latino Joblessness Stable
The Hispanic unemployment rate remained relatively unchanged last month, edging up to 8.3% from 8.2% in September, according to figures released Nov. 6 by the Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics.
A survey of 62 Hispanic-owned businesses in the Chicago area revealed that all but two of the top 15 firms on which data were given for 1985 and 1986 showed an increase in sales for the one-year period. Only one of the top 15 concerns remained at the same sales level both years, according to the November issue of The Chicago Reporter.
The combined sales for the 59 companies that provided such data was $239 million. Sales jumped an average of 12.5% between 1985 and 1986 for the 52 companies that gave sales information for those two years.
The top 15 companies accounted for 61% of the sales reported at the 59 firms. The No.
junior colleges.
Dallas Martin, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators, said, “It is not so much an unwillingness to repay. They simply don’t have the means
LATINO INSTITUTION DEFAULT RATES
INSTITUTION* * DEFAULT RATE
Palo Verde CoL, Blythe, Calif. 82%
Florida Memorial Col., Opa-locka, Fla 57 South Mountain Com. Col., Phoenix, Ariz. 56 Boricua Col., New York 49
CUNY, Borough of Manhattan, New York 36 CUNY, Bronx Com. Col., New York 34
Texas Southmost CoL, Brownsville, Tex. 33 Los Angeles City Col., Los Angeles 31 Hudson County Com. Col., Jersey City, N.J. 30 Passaic County Com. CoL Paterson, N.J. 29 Arizona Western CoL, Yuma 28
Western New Mexico Univ., Silver City 28 Del Mar CoL, Corpus Christi, Tex 27
Southwestern CoL, Chula Vista, Calif. 27 Pueblo Com. CoL, Pueblo, CoL 24
Rio Hondo CoL, Whittier, Calif. 24
El Paso Com. CoL, El Paso, Tex. 21
* Institutions with 25% or more Hispanic enrollment
We are not providing sufficient support in terms of grants and other assistance.” Another HACU member school, Texas South-most College, where 90% of the students are Hispanic, had a default rate of 33.3%. Financial Aid Director Albert Barreda said the Rio Grande Valley's depressed economy and recent state tuition hikes have forced more students to
continued on page 2
1 business in terms of sales, Nortown Old-smobile, an auto dealership, registered $20 million in sales for 1986. The mark was a decrease from its $23.4 million in 1985.
The 62 firms included in the Reporter survey employed 2,279 workers. The top 15 firms accounted for 45%-or1,029- of the employees
The bulk of the firms surveyed were relatively young, with 85% having started since the 1970s.
Seventy-nine percent of the companies described their businesses as providing a non-Hispanic product or service to non-Hispanic customers.
Chicago Latino Firms Increase Sales


Hispanic Poverty Climbs to Historic High-5.2 Million
Despite an overall decline in the national poverty rate, the number of Hispanics living in poverty - 5.2 million - reached a historic high in 1985, according to a report released Nov. 9 by the U.S. Census Bureau.
The Latino poverty rate was 29%, compared with 31% for blacks and 11% for whites. In 1984,4.8 million Latinos were poor.
According to the report, “Poverty in the
HISPANIC POVERTY-1985 (In Thousands)
Age Mex. P. PL Other Hisps
No. % No. % No. %
15-24 101 38 37 58 26 33
25-34 234 28 96 48 81 28
35-44 139 23 59 37 59 22
45-54 56 16 28 28 25 12
55-61 29 14 13 34 7 7
62-64 20 33 6 43 3 7
65 + 29 16 2 9 23 19
Total 608 24 241 41 225 20
Source: “Poverty in the United States: 1985"
United States: 1985,” about 16% of the 33.1 million persons living in poverty in 1985 were Hispanic. That is also a record high, up from 11% in 1979.
Overall for 1985,14% of the nation’s population was poorcompared with 14.4% in 1984 and 15.2% in 1983. The 1985 poverty line for a family of four was $10,989.
The report found that Puerto Ricans were the poorest of ail Hispanic subgroups, with a poverty rate of 43.3%. The rate for Mexican Americans was 28.8%; other Latinos, 22.1%.
“The numbers show the diversity of the Latino experience in this country. The Puerto Rican population is in many ways out of step
with the rest of the Latino population,” Angelo : Falc6n, president of the New York-based ;i Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, told Weekly j Report.
He said that Puerto Ricans are in need of -l more progressive social policies and more | private- and federal-sector help.
Although the black poverty rate is higher, I percentage point differences for Hispanics 1 and blacks narrowed from a 9.2% gap in 1979m to 2.3% in 1985. The study also found that | 55.7% of Hispanic households with a female j head lived below the poverty level. Black t female-headed households were at 53.2% !: and whites, 29.8%. - Julio Laboy i
LATINO, BLACK AND WHITE POVERTY RATES
1973-1985
1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985
HISPS.* 21.9% 26.9% 22.4% 21.8% 26.5% 28.0% 29.0%
BLACK 31.4 31.3 31.3 31.0 34.2 35.7 31.3
WHITE 8.4 9.7 8.9 9.0 11.1 12.1 11.4
* Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Source: “Poverty in the United States- 1985."
Options Needed for Education Finance
continued from page 1
borrow money. Students there average$2,100 in GSL money yearly.
Texas A&l University in Kingsville, with a 53% Hispanic student population, had a default rate of 9.8%. In Edinburgh, approximately 81 % of Pan American University’s 6,000 enrol-lees are Hispanic and the default rate was 7.6%.
“It would be devastating if our default rate was above the threshold level he (Bennett) cites,” said Texas A&l President Steve Altman. He said the university will increase the amount of time spent with students to be sure they are aware of their responsibilities and the implications of borrowing money.
According to a California study released in August, Hispanic community-college and private-vocational school students repay loans at a rate comparable to whites. The study found an 18% default rate for Hispanics, a 16% rate
Bilingualism Saves Life
The ability of a Washington, D.C., 911 emergency dispatcher to give instructions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Spanish saved the life of a 1 1 /2-year-old Salvadoran boy, said fire officials there.
Panamanian Alberto Barnett, the department’s only Spanish-speaking dispatcher, answered a call late morning Nov. 4 from Sophia G6mez, saying that her son, Dem&s Romero, had stopped breathing and was turning blue. Barnett coached G6mez on mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while an ambulance was in route.
Washington, D.C., hasa Hispanic population of approximately 80,000. Many are recent arrivals from Central America.
for whites and a 36% rate for blacks.
“Loans, while they may be helpful, tend to make students feel financially trapped and may even be the cause for students dropping out or not continuing on to graduate school,” Magalldn said.
Pan AmericarVs Financial Aid Director Arnold Trejo said his office attempts to find other options for students, such as scholarships, grants and employment.
Texas student loan official Torres explained that one danger in Bennetf s proposal is that students who are eligible for Pell Grants or other federal financial assistance will lose out because they are attending a school which has been thrown out of the program.
Students can take their aid and study at responsible institutions, Bennett said. Ma-galldn countered that Latino students often attend schools near their homes due to econo-
Legislation Introduced for Permanent MBDA
mic reasons.
Previous GSL provisions this year require colleges to provide loan counseling to student borrowers before they leave school, require that checks be sent to the institution and not directly to the student and authorize guarantee agencies and lenders to provide institutions with lists of former students in default, so that schools can follow up. _ Melinda Machado
Legislation to make the federal Minority Business Development Agency permanent r was introduced Nov. 4 by Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.). Wilson’s bill counters a Reagan administration proposal to transfer the responsibilities of MBDA to the Small Business Administration.
“MBDA has been living year-by-year under threat of closure,” Wilson said, adding that placing MBDA under SBA would “effectively shut the door to job opportunities for many minority businessmen and women.”
Hector de Le6n, MBDA spokesman, said Wilson’s bill would give the agency more authorityandimproveservices. In 1986, MBDA provided financial assistance to more than 5,000 minority businessmen and women, primarily black and Hispanic.
According to Wilson, SBA programs are not geared for minorities, do not offer specialized assistance programs to expand minority enterprises and do not provide assistance in develop-ing or expanding exports.
There are more than 100 Minority Business Development Centers in the United States which provide counseling on banking, finance, marketing, accounting, planning and construction.
Sudrez Defeats Ferr6 for Mayoralty
Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez was easily reelected to his second term over businessman and former mayor Maurice Ferre in a Nov. 10 runoff.
With all precincts counted in the non-partisan race, Suarez received 29,826 votes (62%) to FerrS’s 18,173 votes (38%).
Suarez, 38, Miami’s first Cuba-born mayor,
polled 42% of the votes during the Nov. 3 > primary, compared with 32% for FerrS, 52, a native of Puerto Rico.
The candidates had been competing for the black community’s support, which previously went to black Republican attorney Arthur Teele. Teele gained 23% of the Nov. 3 vote.
Teele did not endorse either candidate
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


{Gregory Montoya, guest columnist
The Unwelcomed Vet
j In 1968 Carlos made his military commitment. For most (young Latinos then, it was an obligatory rite of transition, a vehicle to transcend the boundaries of the barrio. j He didn’t wait to be drafted. He enlisted in the Marines. He left the world of California concrete for the jungle of Vietnam.
Eight months, a Purple Heart and a Navy Cross (for gallantry) later, he was back, honorably but medically discharged.
Carlos had come home proud. But as he istepped off the bus at his hometown depot,
|he was greeted by self-proclaimed peace '(activists. He was spat on and physically 5 abused. The expectations he associated with
1 meeting what once was considered an hon-j orable commitment were all but betrayed,
2 save for his own family’s pride.
For the next 14 years, Carlos went from job I to job, relationship to relationship, haunted J by the sense that something was wrong.
It wasn’t until 1984 that his distress led him into a “Vet Center,” a z community-based Veterans Administration facility with a program b designed to deal with Vietnam veterans and a disorder often associated *|with combat - Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD.
INVISIBLE WOUNDS DRESSED
Counseling at the center helped dress some of his invisible v? wounds. He began to look ahead.
I Posted at the center were several job announcements offered by tithe Department of Defense. One seemed made for him. He filled out t(the application and waited.
| A few weeks later, it came back rejected. Carlos, a legal US. i( resident, was born in Mexico. The government which welcomed him tj-to fight as a Marine told him he was ineligible for other jobs it )[ offered. A requirement for federal employment was citizenship.
Raised in California, Carlos had always felt like a citizen. He had tj thought that his Vietnam service had made it official. No matter. He’d i! make it official now.
He initiated the process to obtain citizenship. Sorry, he was told, ij but the Immigration and Naturalization Service “process” - a relatively il simple one- would take 12 to 18 months. And there were no special )l considerations for Marines who came home wounded.
The words “Welcome Home” are particularly salient for veterans of (I the Vietnam era They should imply acknowledgement of a responsi-\ \ bility shared by soldier and country.
DEALING WITH WAR’S IMPACT j Until recently, that crucial relationship was denied the Vietnam | veteran.
For Carlos and an emerging number of others like him who only j now are dealing with the war’s impact, rejection by the nation’s j second-largest employer is another sign that they’re still not welcome.
| The issue transcends the Hispanic community. It affects many other j legal resident veterans.
Citizenship may be a logical criterion for employment with the | federal government Loyalty certainly should be a job requirement.
With Carlos and others who repeatedly risked their lives in Southeast f Asia, loyalty is hardly the question. Nor is a general rule calling for I citizenship as a requisite for federal employment.
But should a veteran who served his country honorably be told to I stand in line for another year or so to receive equal consideration? | Couldn’t the government make allowance for those non-citizen ( vets who have legitimate citizenship applications pending? Would it f hurt to offer them provisional employment?
, As we come to terms with the Vietnam War, our national reconciliation ! must be translated down to each individual touched by it “Welcome | Home” should be a message without restrictions written in fine print.
(Gregory Montoya is deputy regional manager for the Western ‘ Region Readjustment Counseling Service that oversees the Veterans Administration's uVet Centerr program. Carlos is a composite of veterans he has worked with.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
CONFESSION TIME: Weekly Report is read by some of the most illustrious Latinas and Latinos in the nation.
Many are up-and-coming lideres - folks I expect will be called upon to take on major national leadership responsibilities by the year2000-future senators, possibly a president, maybe a robe on the Supreme Court.
As they are measured for their responsibilities, they will naturally be pressed by the degenerate press to prove their moral fitness to lead - and to reveal personal secrets like whether they've ever hooted on a doobie.
If you plan to be one of tomorrow’s leaders, confess now. To me. Drop me a note and say, “Kay, I hooted on a doobie.”
I’ll run a list of all confessed offenders so if they’re challenged a decade down the road, they can smile and tell their tormentor, “Thaf s old news. I confessed to Kay B&rbaro back in the ’80s.”
If you don’t know what hootin’ on a doobie is, chances are the FBI will pass you with flying colors.
BRUSHING UPON HISTORY: Muralist/writer Jos6 Antonio Burclaga has found another bare walj- this one 12 feet by 60 feet in the dining room of Stanford University’s Casa Zapata.
Aided by students there, he plans to enrich it with a mural revealing the mythology and history of maiz One section will depict a Chicano version of The Last Supper, and Burciaga sent out a call to 100 friends, mostly artists and writers, to help him choose the 13 figures he should portray.
I received one of those letters. In a subsequent phone conversation, he said he’d be pleased to receive and include in his tally the votes of any Sin Pelos readers.
The rules: Write down the names of 13 individuals who served to inspire or influence Chicanos in their struggles. Nominees may be living or dead, Chicano or non-Chicano.
Send your names to Jos6 Antonio Burciaga, Sterns-Zapata Hal), Stanford, Calif. 94305.
One student there already cast early votes for Juan Valdez and Jos6 Cuervo. Shrugged Jos6 Antonio: “I planned to have Cuervo on the table anyway.”
JOSE, CAN YOU SEE? Newsday sports columnist Stan Isaacs is an expert on renditions of “The Star Spangled Banner” as if s sung at sporting events.
A Boy Scout at a Mets game long ago holds the record for singing it the fastest, he says. And the record for drawing the most boos with his version was Jos6 Feliciano, the first performer to give it a “souP’ treatment, at the 1968 Detroit-St. Louis World Series.
Since then, such arrangements have come into vogue and Feliciano is now credited with initiating the tradition.
San Francisco Chronicle sports writers gave their vote as the Most Aesthetic singer of the anthem to Linda Ronstadt for her 1974 performance at the series between the Oakland A’sand Los Angeles Dodgers. “She wore hot pants,” they noted.
- Kay Bbrbaro
Quoting. . .
MIGUEL PEREZ, New York Daily News columnist, commenting or. the failure of Latino elected leaders there to get involved in the Nov. 19 community demonstration over Mayor Koch’s failure to appoint a Latino to the city board of education:
“Even City Council President Andrew Stein, who understands the travesty of leaving Latinos without proper inf luence over the future of their children and their community, has endorsed the demonstration and vowed to be there. Yes, his name is Stein. It is not Ruiz, Serrano, Mendez, Garcia, Ferrer, Rivera, Castaheira-Coldn, Robles, Diaz or Del Toro. These are not statues in Central Park, but sometimes they play that role, with Koch playing the part of a pigeon."
Nov. 16,1987
3


COLLECTING
POVERTY IN THE U.S.: "Povertyin the United States 1985" isa 182-page report with the latest data on poverty rates for Hispanics, blacks and whites for the past several years. Information on femaleheaded households is also included. For a copy (specify Series P-60, No. 154) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.)
CHICAGO HISPANIC BUSINESSES: For a copy of The Chicago Reporters November issue, with a three-page story on 62 Hispanic-owned businesses in the area, send $2.50 to: Carol Williams, The Chicago Reporter, 332 S. Michigan, Chicago, III. 60603 (312) 427-4830.
CARNEGIE HEROES: The Carnegie Hero Fund Commission always seeks nominations for its awards to individuals who risk their lives to save others. For further information, contact the commission at 606 Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 (412) 281-1302.
HISPANIC TEEN-AGERS: The Center for Population Options just released a 27-page booklet in Spanish and English that gives advice to teens on planning for the future. “Como Planear Mi Vida-' Make A Life for Yourself’ is available by sending 800 to: CPO, 1012 14th St NW, Suite 1200, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 347-5700.
COLORADO HISPANIC AGENDA: Key Hispanic community representatives, leaders and experts from Colorado have put together a report, “Hispanic Agenda: 1990 and Beyond,” covering areas such as education, employment, housing, health, political participation and economic development. For a copy send $5 to: Latin American Research and Service Agency, 303 W. Colfax Ave. Suite950, Denver, Colo. 80204 (303) 623-1465.
HISPANIC STATISTICS: “Online Information on Hispanics and Other Ethnic Groups: A Survey of State Agency Databases” isa325-page reference book with information from a variety of state agencies The book also lists the names, addresses and phone numbers of the agency administrators. To order send $45 to: COPAS/IAD Inc., 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436.
CONNECTING
UNIVERSITY GIVEN ENDOWMENT
Predominantly Hispanic Pan American University in Texas received a $250,000 endowment for educational assistance programs as an extension of a 1983 settlement between the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission and General Motors Corporation, It was announced.
General Motors voluntarily extended its endowment program, the result of a 1983 job discrimination agreement with EEOC, to include Pan American University and two other universities which will be named later. Pan American University is about 81% Hispanic
TRAINING PROJECT FUNDED The W.K Kellogg Foundation granted the University of Wisconsin-Extension $349,000 recently to provide minorities in Wisconsin with leadership development training.
The Wisconsin Community Leadership Development Program will help minorities and their communities address unemployment, educational achievement and business development About 150 community leaders, 30 of whom are Hispanic, will participate.
SCIENCE CENTERS FUNDED The Department of Energy awarded slightly more than $200,000 to two universities with sizable Hispanic student populations to promote the development of energy-related science and technology centers at the schools, it was announced Nov. 2.
The $201,327 award is part of DOEs Minority Educational Institutions Assistance Program. It will encourage private sector support for the schools and increase the pool of Hispanics and blacks studying science and technology by initiating energy research programs, communication networks, data bases and the development of self-sustaining energy research centers at the universities.
Grant recipients are: University of Puerto Rico, $148,755; and the University of Texas at El Paso, which is47.3% Hispanic,$52,572.
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
THIS WEEK
PUERTO RICANS IN N.Y.C. SCHOOLS New York Nov. 18
Teachers College at Columbia University will sponsor a symposium examining the experiences of Puerto Ricans in New York City schools for the past 40 years.
Roy Campbell (212) 678-3771
CAREER CONFERENCE Chicago Nov. 18-19
The Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement is sponsoring a career conference. Speakers include Jos6 Matos-Real, executive directorof the Chicago-based Latino Institute.
Elena Fuhrman (312) 372-4865
PSYCHOLOGICALSERVICES FOR MINORITIES Tucson, Ariz. Nov. 18-20
Ernesto Bernal, a professor at Northern Arizona University, will be among the speakers at the Third Biennial Conference on Minority Assessment and the 18 th Annual Conference of the Rocky Mountain Educational Research Association. The conferences will discuss the assessment and delivery of psychological services to individuals from various minority populations.
Karen Gendron (602) 621-7825
HISPANIC AGING CONFERENCE 4
Washington, D.C. Nov. 18-22 The National Hispanic Council on Aging will hold its conference, Empowerment Sharing Knowledge and Wisdom, to enhance the leadership abilities of Hispanic elderly. The conference will address the legislative process, advocacy for nursing home residents, increasing the pool of Hispanic gerontologists and the Central American elderly in the United States
Javier Sierra (202) 265-1288
EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION New York Nov. 19
The EmergencyCoalition for Latino Representation on the Board of Education is sponsoring a march to demonstrate the absence of Latinos on the New York City Board of Education. Among members of the coalition are ASPIRA, the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund and the Puerto Rican Council for Higher Education.
Luis Reyes (212) 292-2690
PUERTO RICAN AUTHORS LECTURE Flushing, N.Y. Nov. 19
Eleven of the leading authors of the Nuyorican Literature movement - writings by Puerto Rican authors living in New York City - will speak at Queens College. Speakers will discuss the development of Nuyorican literature, poetry and theater. Ron Cannava(718) 670-4170
FUND-RAISING DANCE New York Nov. 20
The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights is sponsoring its sixth annual gala reception and dance, Nov. 16,1987
featuring Ray Barreto and Orchestra Juan Gonzalez (215) 634-4443
REPUBLICAN HISPANIC ASSEMBLY ELECTION Arlington, Va. Nov. 20-21
The Republican National Hispanic Assembly will hold general elections during its Victory'88 convention. There will be an installation banquet for the new office rs.
Mark Vallente (202) 863-8500
HISPANIC STARS AWARDS Washington, D.C. NOv. 22 The Hispanic Institute for the Performing Arts will present Stars Awards to the most promising young Hispanic performer, best Hispanic theater producer, most promising folklore interpreter, most outstanding promoter of Latin American popular music/dance and the most outstanding Latin American popular music band in the area. The awards will be made at a reception and dance featuring the orchestras Canela y Cesar Donald y Su Conjunto.
Myrna Torres (202) 289-8541
SPOTLIGHT
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION CONFERENCE: The National Puerto Rican Coalition is sponsoring its seventh annual conference and membership meeting Nov. 19-20 in Philadelphia The conference, titled “The Puerto Rican Family: Building Block of our Community’s Development,” will examine the role of community organizations, parents and religious institutions in the socioeconomic advancement of the Puerto Rican family. For information call Ram6n Daub6n at (202) 223-3915.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


La Televisidn por Cable necesita profesionales de primera para presentaciones f uera de camara
El mundo glamoroso, emocionante y reluclente de la televl8l6n por cable no camina solo.
Requiere lo mejor en cuanto a profesionales administrativos y con ese ffn la Fundacldn Walter Kaltz estd buscando cierto tipo de personas:
El graduado universitarioqueactualmente est6triunfandoen su prof ©si6 n actual y que est6 genuinamente interesado en encauzar su carrera hacla la TV por cable.
Le ofreceremos a esa persona una experiencia de trabajo de nueve meses la cual le proveerA una base para la TV por cable que no conseguirfa en ningOn otro lugar.
Ud. aprenderA los aspectos econ6micos, ttenicos, sociales y politicos de la industria
Se le asignar&n tareas concretas para analizarsusconocimientos
y habilidades.
Y al final de los nueve meses Ud. estarla completamente capacitado para una carrera administrative en la TV por cable.
Esta beca est& orientada hacla todos los candidatos de las mlnorfas y alienta particularmente a los candidatos Hispanos.
Para mayores informes por favor mande su resume a Alvertha Penny, Recruitment Specialist, The Walter Kaltz Foundation, P.O. Box 11080, Oakland, CA 94611. Somos un empleadorqueofrece igualdad en las oportunidades.
La Fundacibn Walter Kaltz practica ecuanimldad de oportunidades y reel uta selecciona y coloca a hombre y mujeres sobresalientes de minorlas en asociaciones profesionales bajo becas para admlnistracibn en la industria de televisibn por cable.
ATTORNEY
National Civil Rights Organization seeks staff attorney for San Antonio office to conduct a personal case load of litigation and advocacy. Requirements: Two years litigation and advocacy experience in civil rights or public interest law. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred Resume, writing sample, and three references toe MALDEF, The Commerce Bldg., LTD, 314 E Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205. By 11/25/87.
ASSISTANT TO DEAN UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT
Individual needed to provide expertise and ' insure continuity of administration and support for the part-time Dean of the School of Allied Health Sciences. Bachelors degree and 3 to4 years related experience in an academic setting required Knowledge of accounting and excellent written and verbal skills desirable.
Apply with resume, cover letter, references and social security number by December 15 to UVM, Employment Office, 237 Waterman Bldg., Burlington, Vermont 05405.
AA/EOE
DIRECTOR OF FIELD SERVICES
NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING, INC.
This is a unique opportunity to play an important role in developing, assessing and improving programs designed to increase the number of minority students who study and graduate with BS degrees in engineering.
Responsibilities: Serve as expert consultant to existing pre-college and college programs; coordinate development of new programs with local school systems, universities, community agencies and local industry sponsors; analyze needs, prepare and evaluate proposals, evaluate progress and participate in encouraging growth, support and institutionalization of minority engineering programs.
Qualifications: The successful candidate will be sensitive to the educational needs of minority students; possess strong analytical & interpersonal skills as well as outstanding written and oral communications ability. He or she will be cognizant of the findings in developmental education, acquired through education beyond the bachelor's degree or through equivalent experience, and will be able to workeffectively both independently and as a member of a team.
Compensation: Excellent benefits and salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.
General: This position is located in New York City and involves travel throughout the country approximately 25% of the time. Please send your resume with salary history and three references to: Hispanic Link Weekly Report, Box NY, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
NEWSCAST PRODUCER
Newscast producer will be responsible for producing newscasts, news specials, series, elections and other projects. Prefer applicants with conversational TV news copywriting ability, sharp news judgment and understanding of the in’s and out’s of production. The ability to manage people and be a team player is essential
Candidates should have a minimum 3 years experience as a producer in a commercial TV newsroom, and should have a degree in Journalism.
Please send resume ta Sharon Buchanan, WPLG/TV,3900 BiscayneBlvd,Miami,Fl33137.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
CLEANING HOUSE Hispanic Link’s editorial office has a few boxes of past editions of Weekly Report If you’d like some for school or organization use, in quantities of 50 to 300, FREE, contact H6ctor Ericksen- Mendoza. Available by featured sub* ject (i.e. education, employment, politics, enter* tainment, census reports) or assorted. You pay postage or pick up at Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 234-0737.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, BAKERSFIELD
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
The School of Education invites applications for tenure track faculty appointments in the following areas:
Educational Administration: Full Professor, Educational Administration in Elementary and Secondary Schools.
Elementary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Education with emphasis in Language Arts, Student Teacher Supervision.
Elementary Educatlon/Chlld Development Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Education, Child Development and Early Childhood Education, Student Teacher Supervision.
Elementary Educatlon/Readlng: Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Education and Reading, Student Teacher Supervision.
Secondary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Secondary Education and Curriculum and Instruction, General Methods, Learning Process, Student Teacher Supervision.
Contact: Dr. Rodolfo G. Serrano, Dean (Interim). Deadline for applications January 4, 1988.
. CSB is the youngest of the nineteen campuses of the California State University System. The campus is located in the City of Bakersfield, which has a metropolitan population of roughly250,000, and it serves a diverse population of about700,000, located primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley.
CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.
Nov. 16,1987


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FACULTY POSITION IN COMMUNICATION ‘
The Department of Radio-Television-Film at The University of Texas at Austin is seeking applications for a tenured or tenure-track position beginning in^ September T988. The person hired will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in mass communication theory/research and/or international communication. The position requires a Ph.D., an established record of or strong potential for research, scholarship, and teaching at the college or university level.
Applicants should send a letter of application describing academic training and experience, a resume, and the names and telephone numbers of three references to:
Horace M. Newcomb, Professor and Chair Department of Radio-Television-Film The University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas 78712-1091
Screening of applicants will begin immediately and will continue until an appointment is made.
The University of Texas at Austin is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications from women and minorities are strongly encouraged.
SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY
ANTICIPATED FACULTY POSITIONS
Chair, Department of Agriculture: Associate/Full Professor, Tenure Track. Closing date: February 15,1988.
Chair, Department of English: Associate/Full Professor, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 15,1988.
Allied Health Sciences: Instructor/Assistant/Associate Professor, Physical Therapy, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 15,1988.
Biology: Instructor/Assistant Professor, Freshman Botany/Biology, one semester only. Closing date: December 1,1987.
Biology: Instructor/Assistant Professor,General Biology/Botany, one year only. Closing, date: March 1,1988.
Biology: Assistant Professor, Genetics, Tenure Track. Closing date: January,25,1988.
Computer Information Systems/Administrative Sciences: Assistant Professor, MIS/ Statistics, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 15,1988.
Curriculum A Instruction: Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, Secondary/Content Reading, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 29,1988.
Curriculum A Instruction: Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, Elementary Reading/ Language Arts, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 29,1988.
Educational Administration and Psychological Services: Assistant/Associate Professor, Educational Administration, Tenure Track. Closing date: January.29,1988. -
Educational Administration and Psychological Services: Assistant Professor, Counseling, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 29,1988.
Finance and Economics: Instructor/Assistant Professor, Economics, Three-year term. Closing date: March 1,1988.
Finance A Economics: Assistant/Associate Professor, Finance, Tenure Track. Closing date: December 1,1987.
Health, Physical Education and Recreation: Assistant Professor, Recreational Adminis-tration, Tenure Track. Closing date: December 1,1987.
History: Instructor, One year only, Western Civilization. Closing date: March 1,1988.
History: Instructor, Three-year term, U.S. History. Closing date: March 1,1988.
Home Economics: Two Assistant Professor positions, Fashion Merchandising, Tenure Track. Closing date: February 1,1988.
Home Economics: Assistant Professor, Clpthing/Textiles and General Home Economics, Closing date: February 15,1988.
Mathematics: Two Assistant Professor positions, Tenure Track. Closing dates: December
15.1987, and February 15,1988.
Mathematics: Assistants Associate Professor, Mathematics Education, Tenure Track. Closing date: February 15,1988.
Music: Assistant Professor, Associate Band Director, Tenure Track. Closing date: February
15.1988.
Music: Instructor/Assistant Professor, Orchestra/Strings, Tenure Track. Closing date: February 15,1988.
Philosophy: Instructor, Three-year term. Closing date: December 1,1987.
Soclology/Anthropology: Assistant Professor, Three-year term, Quantitative methods and selected subject areas. Closing date: January 31,1988.
Speech Communication, and Theatie Arts: Assistant Professor, Small Group/Organizational Communication, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 1,1988.
For more information please contact the appropriate department, Southwest Texas State
University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. Positions are contingent on budget approval. The
University reserves the right not to proceed with any appointments for financial or
programmatic reasons.
An Equal Opportunity/
Affirmative Action Employer
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION
OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities during 1987-1988 may be offered in the following fields:
JP Librarian/Library Technician
• Social Science Analyst/ Research Assistant
• Economist/Economics Research Assistant
• Foreign Affairs Analyst Research Assistant
• Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician
• Attorney/Law Clerk
• Technical Information Specialist
• Administrative Officer
Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degree and full-time graduate students pursuing master's and/or doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form *171, Personal Qualifications Statement indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered.
The program consists of 90 or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessionsfor 1988 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the Jan.-April, 1988, session must^submit their applications no later than Dec. 3,1987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120*day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional one-year temporary appointment For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at (202) 287-5620.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, Md., govern* ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3406.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure-track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988.
Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required. Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and acourse in the International Agricultural Development program.
Ph.D. required by September1988. Salary range for nine-month appointments: $ 31,500 -$33,900.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and namesof three references to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616.
Closing date for applications is January 15,1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
6
Nov. 16,1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


ANNOUNCEMENT OF AN EXECUTIVE-LEVEL VACANCY AT THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA)
The National Education Association, an equal opportunity affirmative action employer, is seeking applications for the position of Director of Research.
Minorities, women, and handicapped individuals are encouraged to apply.
NEA is a voluntary membership organization with over 1.8 million members. NEA has a state affiliate in each of the SO states, Puerto Rico, and the Department of Defense schools. In addition, NEA has more than 12,000 local affiliates. The annual budget of the Association exceeds $100 million, and the Association’s staff numbers nearly 600.
Research. The Research Division is responsible for collecting and coordinating the data necessary for NEA to advance its goals and objectives relative to education generally and member welfare particularly. The Division also solicits, analyzes, and integrates information necessary for NEA long-range planning.
NEA’s Research Division helps direct the Association’s education reform efforts by providing insights into educational trends. NEA Research also provides local and state NEA affiliates, the media, public policy-makers, and other organizations with quality data, reports, and publications.
The Director or Research is responsible for NEA’s Research Computer Network, Collective Bargaining and Information services, Surveys and Polling, Economics, School Finance, Tax Analysis, and, finally, technical support to state and local affiliates. There are approximately SO Research staff.
Requirements
• Demonstrated experience and effectiveness as a manager, supervisor, mediator, and problem-solver.
• Academic credentials and experience which warrants standing within the research community.
• Minimum of a master’s degree in either research, statistics, finance, economics, or a related specialty field. There is a strong preference for a doctorate.
• Practical knowledge and understanding of research, including methodology, terminology, and operations.
• Understanding of the role of an advocacy organization.
• Familiarity with computers and computer technology.
Special Factors. The position is based at NEA headquarters in Washington, D.C., but requires some travel throughout the United States. The Research Director may be required to work extended and irregular hours, and represent the Association in diverse circumstances and situations. The Director will attend various meetings with governance, research counterparts, and others, as necessary, to implement the Association’s agenda.
Deadline. Letter and application should be sent as soon as possible. Screening will begin no later than February 28, 1988.
Effective Date. The Association seeks a person who will be available for employment no later than June 1, 1988.
Compensation, The salary level for this position is in the low to mid-seventies, with liberal fringe benefits.
Nomination and Application Procedures. A letter of application (or letter of nomination by interested third party) should be sent to:
Ms. Malinda Miles, Employment Manager National Education Association 1201 16th Street, N.W., Room 221 Washington, D.C. 20036
The letter should, to the extent possible, describe the candidate’s academic experience, work experience, and any other personal experience or achievements in the particular field of each position.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
LATINO VEGAS: Boxing fans attending this week’s match between Edwin Rosario and Julio C6sarCh£vez in Las Vegas will find a variety of Hispanic entertainers among the desert resorts offerings.
Latino acts regularly appearing in Las Vegas shows include:
• The Footlockers, a synchronized dance trio that headlines the Star Shop show at the Sands Hotel & Casino. On the same bill is magician Ed Alonzo.
• Mario and Daniel Celario, the Argentine brothers that make up the Two Funny Guys act, part of the City Lites “stage and ice spectacular” at the Flamingo Hilton.
• The Esqueda Family and Los Alejandros are two Circus Circus acts that feature the talents of Mexican “daredevir Alex Esqueda With his own family, he performs as a unicyclist and does a slack-wire balancing act. He is also an accomplished guitarist.
Many Latino stars regularly headline shows in Las Vegas. Shows this year have featured the talents of Julio Iglesias, Emmanuel,
Amanda Miguel, Jose Jos$ and Lupita D’Alessio. Early this year, comedian Paul Rodriguez performed at CeasaTs Palace.
Puerto Ricofs Rosario defends Nov. 21 his World Boxing Association lightweight title against Mexico’s Chdvez, a former World Boxing Council super featherweight champ from Mexico. The bout will be carried on the Home Box Office pay channel.
VINYL BRIEFS: News from the nation’s Latino record industry: Mexico’s Emmanuel has recorded in Miami an English-language version of his hit Toda la vida... The BMG Ariola Latin division will release 33 of its titles in compact disc by year's end... Four-time Grammy winner Jose Feliciano has just released the Tu Inmenso Amor album for EMI... Twenty-nine newly released albums mark the beginning of the Christmas season in Puerto Rico...
In other industry news: Julio Iglesias, Manuel Alejandro and Juan Gabriel will be the judges of” Latin” entries in the TDK/Billboard Song Contest The contest, which will accept entries through February, will award cash prizes and publishing contracts in seven categories...
r Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
MARTI INTERVIEWS QUESTIONED: In a Nov. 3 letterto top government officials, the chairman of the U.S. House of Foreign Affairs Cqmmittee questioned whether Radio Marti illegally scooped private U.S. news media by interviewing Cuban defectors while they were held in federal custody.
U.S. Rep. Dante Fascell (D-Fla.) charged the government controlled access to information. He said the government permitted Radio Marti, the U.S. government-operated radio station that broadcasts to Cuba, to interview Cuban defectors Maj. Florentino Azpiilaga and Gen. Rafael del Pino, but that domestic news outlets were denied access.
Del Pino, who escaped with his family in May, was held for several weeks by the CIA but gave three one-hour interviews to Radio Marti. Other news media were not able to interview him until weeks later.
“Radio Marti was designed not to compete with our private media but to reach solely a
foreign audience,” Fascell wrote to Secretary of State George Shultz, outgoing National Security Advisor Frank Carlucci and CIA Director William Webster.
A spokesperson for Radio Marti denied charges of favoritism. The defectors asked to speak to Radio Marti in order to address home audiences, she said.
MEDIA MOVES: Philadelphia Daily News City Hall reporter Juan Gonzdlez, who also writes a weekly column on Hispanic issues, will begin working with the New York Daily News Dec. 14.
Gonzdiez will be a full-time columnist and expects to devote frequent time to Hispanic issues. Starting in January he will produce two columns a week. The New York Dally News has a circulation of about 1.3 million.
Gonz&lez will be joining Miguel Perez, who writes a weekly Hispanic column.
CONFERENCE REGISTRATION STARTS: The California Chicano News Media Association is sponsoring its ninth annual Journalism Opportunities Conference for Minorities Feb. 5-6 at the University of Southern California.
The conference brings together personnel
recruiters representing print and broadcast news companies from across the country. New emphasis will be on hiring in non-news divisions.
To request a registration packet, contact Leticia Cdrdova at the California Chicano News Media Association, School of Journalism, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1695 (213) 743-7158. The registration cost is $20. H
LITERARY CONTEST: The Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of California at Irvine and the International Chicano Studies Program is soliciting entries for its 14th annual Chicano Literary Contest The contest is open to published and unpublished writers of poetry, short stories and theater. It is designed to'include U.S. writers who identify strongly with the Chicano community.
Nine cash prizes totaling $2,400 will be awarded. The deadline is Jan. 8. For more information write the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, Calif. 92717 (714) 856-5702.
- Julio Laboy
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix PSrez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Amen, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


Full Text

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, The News This Week amendment that would have allowed legislators in the middle oft heir terms to seek other state off i ces . . . The Rev. Orlando Enrique Costas, dean of the Andover Newton Theological School and a prominent Protestant theologian, dies of stomach cancer at the age 45 in Newton Centre, Mass ... The Baseball Writers Association of America names Benito Santiago, catcher with the San Diego Padres, as their unanimous choice for National League Rookie of the Year . A 22-year-old native of I sa bela, Puerto Rico, Santiago became the fifth unanimous choice in NL history ... Todd Santos, the San Diego State quarterback, becpmes the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I career ' passing yardage leader by amassing 10,661 yards . He reached the mark with a248yard game Nov . 7 ... Michigan First Lady Pliula Blanchard honors Nora Chapa Mendoza, Marla Allee Deleary, Juanita Hernandez, Guadalupe Lara , Alicia and Zoralda Sanchez as winners of the Michigan 150 First Lady Award. The six were honored for their contributions to Michigan community-service organizations. . . Mexican essayist and poet Octavlo Paz wins the T .S. Eliot Award for Creative Writ ing given by the Ingersoll Foundation in Chicago . . . Texas Sen. Hitctor Uribe announces that he will not seek a seat on the state . Supreme Court Voters in that state recently rejected a const i tutional Student Loan Default POlicy Called MisllfniCfed , Many trade schools, community colleges and universities with high Hispanic enrollment that have default rates of more than 20% on Gu!lranteed Student Loans will lose their federal financial aid if they do not improve their students ' repayment record . U.S. Secretary of Education William Bennett announced Nov . 4 a p l an to take action against the institutions beginning in 1990. Of the 58 member institutions of the His-;ipan .ic Association of Colleges and Universities, les{l.than one-third had default rates above 20% . . HACU members have 25% or greater Hispanic student populations. HACU Chairman Gilbert Sanchez, president of New Mexico Highlands University in Las ' Vegas, N .M, said his school ' s rate was 6 .7%. "Our students have a strong commitment to paying back their loans," Sanchez said . GSLs are federally insured, low-interest loans from banks guaranteed by the government to tlefp students defray education costs. A de faulter was defined as one who was to have begun paying student loans in fiscal 1985 TWo Latino Heroes Cited Two Latinos were among the 17 people . from Canada and the United States honored Nov . 5 by the Carnegie Hero Fund Commission for risking their lives attempting to save others. On .Dec, 19, 1985, in Redlands, Calif., letter carrier Alejandro Verdejo noticed a car swerving down the st . reet with a lone child standing in the front seat crying. Chasing behind the car was the boys mother . Verdejo, 27, his mail satchel, chase and sto pped the car 25 feet before a four way intersection. ' Another Californian, Stephen Esparza, was honored for saving a partially paralyzed man from a motor home Oct 28, 1986, moments before it exploded. !=sparza, 39, from Corona, pulled over when he saw the motor home overturned and burning on a freeway . He and another passerby, Timothy Kusler , kicked in the windshield and pulled the man out. Verdejo, Esparza, Kusler and the 14 other ' heroes each received a medal and $2,500 cash from the fund. and had failed to do so by Sept. 30, 1986 . The GSL is a need-based program that serves families who earn less than $30,000 a year. Rafael Magallan, director of the Tomas Rivera Center in Claremont, Calif. , called Ben netrs proposal"an attack on community co f. leges , which tend to have a higher default rate than fou r -year institutions. A dispropor tionate share of Hispan i c enrollment is in community colleges. " Many two-year institu tions are not adequately prepared for financial aid management , he said. " You are going to have a higher default rate if you serve the needy student," said George Torres, a policy analyst with the Texas Guaran teed Student Loan Corp. Bennett released a list of default rates for the 7,295 institutions in the program for fiscal 1985 . He said one-half of the program's fiscal 1987 budget-$1. 6 billionwent to default payments. Those institutions above 20% in 1990 will be subject to limitation, suspension and termination from the program. More than 30% of the institutions2,190had default rates above 20% . Beauty colleges and other trade schools dominated the list, followed by historically black universities and . Latino Joblessness Stable The Hispanic un . employment rate remained relatively unchanged last month, edging up to 8.3% from 8 .2% in September, acco r ding to figures released Nov. 6 by the Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics . junior colleges . Dallas Martin, president of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Adminis trators, said, " It is not so much an unwillingness to repay. They simply don't have the means. LATINO INSTITUTION DEFAULT RATES INSTITUTION* DEFAULT RATE Palo Verde Col., Blythe , Calif. 82% Florida Memorial Col., Opa-locka, Fla 57 South Mountain Com . Col . , Phoenix, Ar i z . 56 Boricua Col., New York 49 CUNY, Borough of Manhattan, New York 36 CUNY, Bronx Com. Col., New York 34 Texas Southmost Col, Brownsville, Tex. 33 Los Angeles City Col., Los Angeles 31 Hudson County Com. Col. , Jersey City , N . J . 30 Passaic County Com. Col., Paterson, N . J . 29 Arizona Western Col., Yuma 28 Western New Mexico Univ . , Silver City 28 Del Mar Col. , Corpus Christi, Tex. 27 Southwestern Col., Chula Vista, Calif. 27 Pueblo Com. Col., Pueblo , Col. 24 Rio Hondo Col., Whittier, Calif. 24 El Paso Com. Col. , E l Paso, Tex. 21 • Institutions with 25 % or more Hispanic enrollment We are not providing sufficient support in terms of grants and other assistance." Another HACU member school , Texas South most College, where 90% of the students are Hispanic, had a default rate of 33.3%. Financial Aid Direetor Albert Barreda said the Rio Grande ; Valley's depressed economy and recent sta t e tuition hikes have forced more students to conti nued on page 2 Chicago Latino Firms Increase Sales A survey of 62 Hispanic-owned businesses in the Chicago area revealed that all but two of the top 15 firms on which data were given for 1985 and 1986 showed an increase in sales for the one-year period. Only one of the top 15 concerns remained at the same sales level both years, according to the November issue of The Chicago Reporter. The combined sales for the 59 companies that provided such data was $239 million . Sales jumped an average of 12.5% be t ween 1985 and 1986 for the 52 companies that gave sales information for those two years. The top 1 5 companies accounted for 61% of the sales reported at the 59 firms . The No. 1 business in terms of sales, Nortown Old smobile, an auto dealership, registered $20 million in sales for 1986. The mark was a decrease from its $23. 4 million in 1985. The 62 firms included in the Reporter survey employed 2,279 workers. The top 15 firms accounted for 45%-or1,029of the employees. The bulk of the firms surveyed were relatively young, with 85% having started since the 1970s. Seventy-nine percent of the companies described their businesses as providing a non Hispanic product or service to non-Hispanic customers.

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Hispanic Poverty Climbs to Historif: High5.2 Million Despite an overall decline in the national poverty rate, the number of Hispanics living in poverty-5 . 2 million reached a historic high in 1985, according to a report released Nov. 9 by the U.S. Census Bureau. The Latino poverty rate was 29%, compared with 31% for blacks and 11% for whites. In 1984, 4.8 million Latinos were poor. According to the report, "Poverty in the HISPANIC POVERTY -1985 (In Thousands) Age Mex . P.R. OtherHisps No. % No. % No. % 15-24 101 38 37 58 26 33 25-34 234 28 96 48 81 28 35-44 139 23 59 37 59 22 45-54 56 16 28 28 25 12 55-61 29 14 13 34 7 7 62-64 20 33 6 43 3 7 65+ 29 16 2 9 23 19 Total 608 24 241 41 225 20 Source: "Poverty in the United States: 1985" United States: 1985," about 16% of the 33.1 million persons living in poverty in 1985 were Hispanic . That is also a record high, up from 11% in 1979. Overall for 1985, 14% of the nation's popu lation was poor compared with 14.4% ir\ 1984 and 15.2% in 1983. The 1985 poverty line for a family of four was $10,989. The report found that Puerto Ricans were . the poorest of all Hispanic subgroups, with a poverty rate of 43. 3% . The rate for Mexican Americans was 28.8%; other Latinos, 22 .1 % . "The numbers show the diversity of the Latino experience in this country. The Puerto Rican population is in many ways out of step with the rest qfthe Latino population , " Angelo;! Falc;6n, president of the New York-based I I Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, told Weekly 11 Report. : He said that Puerto Ricans are in need of ' I more progressive social policies and more privata. and help. Although the black poverty rate is higher, percentage point differences for Hispanics 1 and blacks narrowed from a 9.2% gap in 1979 to 2.3% in 1985. The study also found that 55.7% of Hispanic households with a female -head lived below the poverty level. Black ' female-headed households were at 53.2% and 29.8%. Julio Laboy .l LATINO, BLACK AND WHITE POVERTY RATES 1973-1985 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 HISPS.* 21. 9% 26.9% 22.4% 21.8% 26.5% 28.0% 29.0% BLACK 31.4 31.3 31.3 31.0 34. 2 35.7 31.3 WHITE 8.4 9.7 8.9 9.0 11. 1 12.1 11.4 * Persons of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Source: "Poverty in the United States: 1985." Options Needed for Education Finance_ Legislation Introduced continued from page, -for whites and a 36% rate for blacks. for Permanent MBDA borrow money . Studentsthereaverage$2,100 "Loans, while they may be helpful, tend to Legislation to make the federal Minority in GSL money yearly. make students feel financially trapped and Business Development Agency permanent Texas A& I University in Kingsville, with a may even be the cause for students dropping was introduced Nov. 4 by Sen. Pete Wilson 53% Hispanic student population1 had a deout or not continuing on to graduate school," (A-Calif.) . Wilson's bill counters a Reagan ? fault rate of9.8%. In Edinburgh, approximately Magallan said . administration proposal to transfer the re! 81% of Pan American University's 6,000 enrolPan American's Financial Aid Director Arnold sponsibilities of MBDA to the Small Business \ lees are Hispanic and the default rate was Trejo said his office attempts to find other Administration. 1 7.6%. options for students, such as scholarships, "MBDA has been living yearby-year under l "It would be devastating if our default rate grants and employment. _ threat of closure," Wilson said, adding that l was above the threshold ' level he (Bennett) Texas student loan official Torres explained placing MBDA under SBA would "effectively l cites," said Texas A& I President Steve Altman. that one danger in Bennetfs proposal is that h h d l' He said the university will increase the amount students who are eligible for Pell Grants or many i Of tl me spent wt'th students to be sure they other federal financial assistance will lose HA d L 6 A .. ctor e e n, MBD spokesman, said are aware of their responsibilities and the out because they are attending a school Wilson's bill would give the agency more implications of borrowing money. which has been thrown out of the program. authority and improve services. In 1986, MBDA According to a California study released in Students can take their aid and study at provided finanCial assistance to more than August, Hispanic community-college and privateresponsible institutions, Bennett said. Ma5,000 minority businessmen and women, vocational school students repay loans at a gallan countered that Latino students often primarily black and Hispanic. rate comparable to whites. The study found attend schools near their homes due to econoAccording to Wilson, SBA programs are not an 18% default rate for His panics, a 16% rate mic reasons. geared for minorities : do not offer specialized Bilingualism Saves Life The ability of a Washington, D.C., 911 emergency dispatcher to give instructions on cardiopulmonary resuscitation in Spanish saved the life of a 1 1 /2-year-old Salvadoran boy, said fire officials there. Panamanian Alberto Barnett, the departmenfs only Spanish-speaking dispatcher, answered a call late morning Nov. 4 from Sophia G6mez, saying that her son, Demas Romero, had stopped breathing and was turning blue. Barnett coached G6mez on mouth-to-mouth resuscitation while an ambulance was in route. Washington, D .C., has a Hispanic population of approximately 80,000. Many are recent arrivals from Central America. 2 Previous GSL provisions this year require assistance programs to expand minority enter colleges to provide loan counseling to student prises and do not provide assistance in develop borrowers before they leave school, require ing or expanding exports. that checks be sent to the institution and not There are more than 100 Minority Business directly to the student and authorize guarantee Development Centers in the United States agencies and lenders to provide institutions which provide counselingon banking, finance, with lists of former students in default, so that marketing, accounting, planning and con schools can follow up. Melinda Machado struction. Suarez Defeats Ferre for Mayoralty Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez was easily re elected to his second term over businessman and former mayor Maurice Ferre in a Nov. 1 0 runoff . With all precincts counted in the non-partisan race, Suarez received 29,826 votes (62%) to Ferre's 18,173 votes (38%). Suarez, 38, Miami's first Cuba-born mayor, polled 42% of the votes during the Nov. 3 primary, compared with 32% for Ferre, 52, a native of Puerto Rico . The candidates had been competing for the black community's support, which previously went to black Republican attorney Arthur Teele. Teele gained 23% of the Nov. 3 vote. Teele did not endorse either candidate Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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i I i l Gregory Montoya, guest columnist : I I The Unwelcomed Vet l ' In 1968 Carlos made his military commitment. For most i Latinos then, it was an rite of t _ ransition, a 1 vehtcle to transcend the boundanes of the bamo. ( He didn't wait to be drafted . He enlisted in the Marines. He left the (world of California concrete for the jungle of Vietnam. 1 Eight months, a Purple Heart and a Navy Cross(for gallantry) later, jhe was back, honorably but medically discharged . Carlos had come home proud. But as he ilstepped off the bus at his hometown depot, he was greeted by self-proclaimed peace : activists. He was spat on and physically : abused The expectations he associated with I meeting what once was considered an honJjorable commitment were all but betrayed, for his own family's pride . For the next 14 years, Carlos went from job ''I to job, relationship to relationship, haunted I by the sense that something was wrong . It wasn't until 1984 that his distress led him into a "Vet Center," a : community-based Veterans Administration facility with a program to deal with Vietnam veterans and a disorder often associated with combatPost Traumatic Stress Disorder, or PTSD. INVISIBLE WOUNDS DRESSED Counseling at the center helped dress some of his invisible wounds . He began to look ahead . I Posted at the center were several job announcements offered by it the Department of Defense . One seemed made for him . He filled out ''I the application and waited . 1 A few weeks later, it came back rejected . Carlos, a legal U . S . ,j resident, was born in Mexico. The government which welcomed him ,fl to fight as a Marine told him he was ineligible for other jobs it >!offered. A requirement for federal employment was citizenship. J Raised in California, Carlos had always felt like a citizen. He had that his Vietnam service had made it official. No matter . He'd 11 make it official now. I , He initiated the process to obtain citizenship. Sorry, he was told, I but the Immigration and Naturalizati . on Service • process"-a relatively ! simple one-would take 12 to 18 months. And there were no special J considerations for Marines who came home wounded. The words"Welcome Home" are particularly salient for veterans of the Vietnam era They should imply acknowledgement of a responsi bility shared by soldier and country. DEALING WITH WAR'S IMPACT ! Until recently, that crucial relationship was denied the Vietnam ' veteran. 1 For Carlos and an emerging number of others like him who only now are dealing with the war's impact, rejection by the nation's second-largest employer is another sign that they're still not welcome. The issue transcends the Hispanic community . It affects many other legal resident veterans. Citizenship may be a logical criterion for employment with the I federal government. Loyalty certainly should be a job requirement. I With Carlos and others who repeatedly risked their lives in Southeast 1 Asia, loyalty is hardly the question. Nor is a general rule calling for I . citizenship as a requisite for federal employment. But should a veteran who served his country honorably be told to stand in line for another year or so to receive equal consideration? I Couldn ' t the government make allowance for those non-citizen l vets who have legitimate citizenship applications pending? Would it I hurt to offer them provisional employment? . / As we come to terms with the VIetnam War, our national reconciliation 1 must be translated down to each individual touched by it. "Welcome ! Home" should be a message without restrictions written in fine print. (Gregory Montoya is deputy regional manager for the Western 1 Region Readjustment Counseling Service that oversees the Veterans 1 Administration's "Vet Center" program . Carlos is a composite of Sin pelos en Ia lengu a CONFESSION TIME: Weekly Report is read by s om e of t he most illustriou s Latinas and Latinos in the nation . Many are u p-and-coming lideres-folks I expect will be called upon to take on m ajo r national leadership responsi b ilitie s by the year2000future senators, possibly a president, may be a robe on the Supreme Co urt . As they are mea sured for their responsibi lities , t h e y w ill natu r ally be pressed by the d e g e n erate press to prove thei r mo ral f itn ess to lead and to rev ea l personal secrets like whether t h e y've ever hooted on a d o obie. If you plan t o be o ne of tomorrow's leaders, confess now. To me. Drop me a note and say, "Kay, I hooted on a do o b ie." I'll run a list of all confessed offenders so if they're cha ll e nged a decade down th e road, they can smile and tell the i r t o r mentor, "Thafs old news. I confessed to Kay Barbaro back in the '80s." If you don't kno w what hootin' on a doobie is, chance s a r e th e FBI will pass you wi th f lying colors . BRUSHING UP ON HISTORY: MuralisVwrite r Jose Antonio Burciaga has f o und another ba r e wallthis one 12 feet by60 feet in the dining roo m of Stanfor d Uni versity's Casa Zapata Aided by s tudents there , he plans to enrich it with a mural revealing the m ytho l ogy and history of maiz. One section will depict a Chica n o ver sion of The Last Supper, and Burciag a sen t out a call to 1 00 fr i ends, mostly artists and writers , to help him choose the 13 fi gures he should portray . I received one o f those letters. In a subsequent pho n e conver sation, he sa i d he'd be pleased to receive and inclu d e in h is tally the votes of a n y S i n Pelos readers . The rules : W r ite down the names of 13 individ u als w ho served to inspire or influ ence Chicanos in their struggles. Nom inees may be living or dead , Chicano or non-Chicano. Send your nam es to Jose Antonio Burciaga, Sterns Zap a t a Hall ; Stanford, Calif . 94305. One studen t there already cast early votes for Juan Valdez and Jose Cuervo. Shr u gged Jose Antonio: "I planned to h ave Cuervo on the table anyway." JOSE, CAN YOU SEE? Newsday sports col umnist Sta n l aaacs is an expert o n renditions of "The Star Spangled Ban n er'' as ifs sung at sporting events. A Boy Scou t at a Mets game long ago holds the recor d for singing it the f as test , he says. And the record for drawing th e mos t boos with hi s v e rsio n was Jose Feliciano, the first perfor mer to, give it a "sour' treatment, at the 1968 Detroit-St. Loui s World Series . Since then , su c h arrangements have come into vog ue and Feliciano is now credited with initiating the tradition . San Francisco Chronicle sports writers gave their vote as the Most Aesthetic s i nger of the anthem to Linda Ronstadt for her 197 4 perfor m a nce at the series between the Oakland Ns and Los Angeles Dodge rs. "She wore hot pants," they noted. Kay B arbaro I Q t uo 1ng . IIJ • MIGUEL P EREZ, New York Daily News columnist, commeoh:n g or : the failure of Lat i n o elected leaders there to get i nvo l ved i n t he Nov . 19 community de monstration over Mayor Koch's fai lu re to appoint a Latino to th e ci ty board of education : "Even City C o un c i l President Andrew Stein, wh o u n derst ands th e travesty of le a vin g Latinos without proper influence over t he future of their children and t h eir community, has endorsed the de monstration and vowed t o b e there. Yes, his name is Stein. It is no t Ruiz, Serrano, Mendez, Garcia, F errer , Rivera, Castafleira-Col6n, R o b l es, Diaz or Del Toro. These are not statues in Central Park, but sometimes t h e y play that role, with K och playing the part of a pigeon." 1 veterans he has worked with.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report Nov . 16, 1987 3

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COLLECTING POVERTY IN THE U.S.: "Poverty in the United States: 1985" is a 182-page report with the latest data on poverty rates for Hispanics, blacks and whites for the past several years. Information on femal& headed households is also inc l uded . For a copy(specity Series P.60, No. 154) contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.) CHICAGO HISPANIC BUSINESSES: For a copy of The Chicago Reporter's November is sue, with a three-page story on 62 Hispanic owned businesses in the area, send $2.50 to: Carol Williams, The Chicago Reporter, 332 S. Michigan, Chicago, Ill. 60603 (312) 4274830. CARNEGIE HEROES: The Carnegie Hero Fund Commissi on always seeks nominations for its awards to individuals who risk their lives to save others. For further information, contact the commission at 606 Oliver Building, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15222 (412) 281-1302. HISPANIC TEEN-AGERS: The Center for Population Options just released a 27-page booklet in Spanish and English that gives advice to teens on planning for the future. "Como Pia near Mi Vida, Make A Life for Yourself' is available by sending 80 to: CPO, 1012 14th St. NW , Suite 1200, Washi ngton , D.C. 20005 (202) 347-5700. COLORADO HISPANIC AGENDA: Key Hispanic commu nity re presentatives, leaders and exp e rts from Colorado have put together a report, "Hispanic Agenda: 199 0 and Beyond," covering areas such as education, employment, housing, health, political participation and economic development. For a copy send $5 to: Latin American Research and Service Agency, 303 W. Col f ax A v e . Suite950, Denver, colo. 80204 (303) 623-1465. HISPANIC STATISTICS: "Online Information on Hispani cs and Other Ethnic Groups: A Survey of State Agency Databases" is a 325page reference book with information from a variety of sta te agencies. The book also lists the names, addresses and phone numbers of the agency administrators. To order send $45 to: COPA S/lAD Inc., 16161 Ventura Blvd., Suite 830, Encino, Calif. 91436 . ____ UNIVERSITY GIVEN ENDOWMENT Predominantly Hispanic Pan American University in Texas received a 1 . $250,000 endowment for educational assistance programs as an extension of a 1983 settlement between the U.S. Equal Opportunity Commission and General Motors Corporation, it was announced . \ . General Motors voluntarily exte . nded Its endowment program, the . result of a 1983 Job discrimination agreement with EEOC, to include Pan American University and two other universities which will be !lamed later . .E_an American University is about 81% Hispanic . TRAINING PROJECT FUNDED The W.K Kellogg Foundation granted the University of Wisconsin Extension $349,000 recently to provide minorities in Wisconsin with leadership development training. The Wisconsin Community Leadership Development Program will help minorities and their communities address unemployment, edu cational achievement and business development About 150 comm _ unity leaders, 30 of whom are Hispanic, will participate . SCIENCE CENTERS FUNDED The Department of Energy awarded slightly more than $200,000 to _ two universities with sizable Hispanic student populations to promote the development of energy-related science and technology centers at the schools, it was announced Nov. 2. The $201,327 award is part of DOE's Minority Educational Insti tutions Assistance Program. It will encourage private sector support for the schools and increase the pool of Hispanics and blacks studying science and technology by initiating energy research programs, communication networks, data bases and the development of self sustaining energy research centers at the universities . Grant recipients are: University of Puerto Rico, $ 148,755; and the UniversityofTexas at El Paso, which is47.3% Hispanic,$52,572 . Julio Laboy . Calendar Washington, D.C. Nov . 18-22 featuring Ray Barreto and Orchestra Juan Gonzalez (215) 634-4443 THIS WEEK PUERTO RICANS IN N. Y.C. SCHOOLS New York Nov. 18 Teachers College at Columbia University will sponsor a symposium examining the experiences of Puerto Ricans in New York City schools for the past 40 years. Roy Campbell (212) 678-3771 CAREER CONFERENCE Chicago Nov. 18-19 The Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement is sponsoring a career conference . Speakers include Jose MatosReal, executive director oft he Chicago based Latino Institute. Elena Fuhrman (312) 372-4865 PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES FOR MINORITIES Tucson, Ariz. Nov. 18 Ernesto Bernal, a professor at Northern Arizona University, will be among the speakers at the Third Biennial Conference on Minority Assessment and the 18th Annual Conference of the Rocky Mountain Educational Research Association . The conferences will discuss the assessment and delivery of psycho logical services to individuals from various minority populations. Karen Gendron (602) 621 HISPANIC AGING CONFERENCE 4 The Nationa l Hispanic Council Aging will hold its conference, Empowerment Sharing Knowledge and Wisdom, to enhance the leadership abilities of Hispanic elderly. The conference will address the legislative process, advocacy for nursing home re sidents, increasing the pool of Hispanic gerontologists and the Central American elderly in the United States. Javier Sierra (202) 265-1288 EDUCATION DEMONSTRATION New York Nov. 19 The Emergency Coalition for Latino Representation on the Board of Education is sponsoring a march to demonstrate the absence of Latinos on the New York City Board of Education. Among members of the coalition are ASPIRA, the National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund and the Puerto Rican Council for Higher Education. Luis Reyes (212) 292-2690 PUERTO RICAN AUTHORS LECTURE Flushing, N.Y. Nov. 19 Eleven of the leading authors of the Nuyorican Literature movement writings by Puerto Rican authors living in New York City wili speak at Queens College. Speakers will discuss the develop ment of Nuyorican literature, poetry and theater. Ron Cannava(718) 670-4170 FUND-RAISING DANCE New York Nov. 20 The National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights is sponsor ing its sixth annual gala reception and dance, Nov. 16, 1987 REPUBLICAN HISPANIC ASSEMBLY EL,ECTION Arlington, Va. Nov. 20-21 The Republican National Hispanic Assembiy will hold general elections during its Victory'88 convention There will be an installation banquet for the new officers. M _ ark Valiente (202) 863-8500 HISPANIC STARS AWARDS Washington, D . C . Nov. 22 The Hispanic Institute for the Performing Arts will present Stars Awards to the most promising young Hispanic performer, best Hispanic theater producer, most promising folklore interpreter, most outstanding promoter of Latin American popular music/dance and the most outstanding Latin American popular music band in the area. The awards will be made at a reception and dance featuring the orchestras Cane/a y Cesar Donald y Su Conjunto. Myrna Torres (202) 289 8541 SPOTLIGHT NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN COALITION CONFERENCE: The National Puerto Rican Coalition is spo'nsoring its seventh annual conference and membership meeting Nov. 19 in Philadelphia The conference, titled "The Puerto Rican Family: Building Block of our Community's Development," will examine the role of community organizations, parents and religious institutions in the socioeconomic advance.1 ment of the Puerto Rican family . For information call Ram6n Daub6n at (202) 223. Hispanic link Weekly Report

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La Televisi6n por Cabl e necesita profesionales de primera para presentaciones fuera de camara El mundo glamoroso, emoclonante y reluclente de Ia televlsl6n por cable no camina solo. y habilidades. Y al final de los nueva mases Ud. estarla completamente capacltado para una carrara admlnlstrativa en Ia 1V por cable. Requiere lo major en cuanto a profesionales sdministratlvos y con ese fin Ia Fundaci6n Walter Kaltz est6 buscsndo cierto tipo de personas: Esta baca est6 orientada hacia todos los candidates 'de las minorlas y altenta partlcularmente a los candidates Hispanos. El graduado universitario que actualmente est6 trlunfandoen au profesi6n actual yque est6genuinamente lntereaadoen encauzar su carrara hacia Ia 1V por cable. Para mayores Inform as por favor mande su resum6 a Alvertha Penny, Recruitment Specialist, The Walter Kaltz Foundation, P .O. Box 11080, Oakland , CA 94611. Somosunempleadorqueofrece Le ofreceremos a esa persona una experiencia de trabajo de nueva mesas Ia cualle proveer6 una base para Ia 1V per cable que no conseguirla en ningun otro Iugar. igualdad en las oportunidades. La Fundaci6n Walter Kaitz practice ecuanlmidad de oportunidades y recluta selecciona y coloca a hombre y mujeres sobresalientes Ud. aprender6 los aspectos econ6micos, t6cnicos, soclales y politicos de Ia Industria. de minorias en asociaciones profesionales bajo becas para administraci6n en Ia industria de televisi6n por cable. Se le asignar6ri !areas concretes para analizar sus conocimientos ATTORNEY National Civil Rights Organization seeks staff attorney for San Antonio office to conduct a personal case load of litigation and advocacy. Requirements: Two years litigation and advocacy experience i n civil rights or public interest law . Bilingual (English/Spanilih f preferr8d. Resume, writing sample, and three references to: MALDEF , The Commerce Bldg., LTD, 314 E. Commerce St, Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205. By 11/25/87. ASSISTANT TO DEAN UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT Individual needed to provide expertise and insure continuity of administration and support for the part time Dean of the School of Allied . Health Sciences. degree and 3 to4 years related experience in an academic setting required Knowledge of accounting and excellent written and verbal skills desirable. Apply w . ith resume, cover letter, references and social security number by December 15 to UVM, Employment Office, 237 Waterman Bldg., Burlington, Vermont 05405. AA/EOE NEWSCAST PRODUCER Newscast producer will be responsible for producing newscasts, news specials, series, elections and other projects. Prefer applicants with conversational TV news copywriting ability, sharp news judgment and understanding of the in's and oufsof production The ability to manage people and be a team player is essential . Candidates should have a minimum 3 years e xperience as a producer in a commercial TV newsroom, and should have a degree inJoumalism Please send resume to: Sharon Buchanan, WPLG/TV, 3900 Biscayne Blvd, Miami, FL 33137. ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. CLEANING HOUSE Hispanic Link's editorial office has a few boxes of past editions of Weekly Report If you'd like some for school or organization use, In quantities of 50 to 300, FREE, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza. Available by featured sub ject(i. e . education, employment, politics, enter tainment, census reports) or assorted You pay postage or pick up at Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . (202) 234. Hi s panic Link Weekly Report DIRECTOR OF FIELD SERVICES NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING, INC. This is a unique opportunity to play an important role in developing, assessing and improving programs designed to increase the number of minority students who study and graduate with BS degrees in engi neering . Reaponalbllltlee: Serve as expert consultant to existing pre-college and college programs; coordinate development of new programs with local school systems, universities, community agencies and local industry sponsors; analyze needs, prepare and evaluate proposals, evaluate progress and participate in encouraging growth, support and Institution alization of minority engineering programs. Quallflcatlona: The successful candidate wllll:le sensitive to ttie educational needs of minority students; possess strong analYtical & interpersonal skills as welt as outstanding written and oral communications ability. He or she will be cognizant of the findings in developmental education, acquired through education beyond the degree or through equivalent experience, and will be able to work' effectively both Independently and as a member of a team. Compenaatlon: Excellent benefits and salary commensurate with qualifications and experience. General: This position is located in New York City and involves travel throughout the country approximlltely 25% of the time. Please send your resume with salary history and three references to: Hispanic Link Weekly Report, Box NY, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. . CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, BAKERSFIELD SCHOOL OF EDUCATION . 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield,'' Califoi'nia 93311-1 099 The School of Education invites applications for tenure track faculty appointments in the following areas: Educational Admlnlatratlon: Full Professor, Educational Administration in Elementary and Secondary Schools. Elementary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor , Elementary Education with emphasis in Language Arts, Student Teacher Supervision . Elementary Education/Child Development Assistant or Associate Professor, Ele mentary Education, Child Development and Early Childhood Education, Student Teacher Supervision. Elementary Education/Reading: Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Education and Reading, Student Teacher Supervision. Secondary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Secondary Education and Curriculum and Instruction, Methods, Learning Process, Student Teacher Supervision . Contact: Or. Rodolfo G . Serrano, Dean (Interim). Deadline for applications January 4, 1988. . CSB is the youngest of the nineteen campuses of the California State University System . The campus i s located in the City of Bakersfield, which has a metropolitan population of roughly250,000, and it serves a diverse population of about700,000, located primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. CSB Is an Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer . Nov. 16, 1 987

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6 FACULTYPOSITION IN The Department of Television-Film at The University of Te)(al! . . •-c applications for a tenured or position beginning 1'988. The , person hired will teach undergraduate and graduate couraes in mass communication theory/research and/or international communication. The position requires a Ph.D., an established record of or strong potential for research, scholarship, and teaching at the college or university level. Applicants should send a letter of application describing academic training and experience, a resume, and the names and telephone numbers of three references to: Horace M. Newc0mb, Professor and Chair Department of Television-Film The University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas 78712 Screening of applicants will begin immediately and will continue until an appointment is made. The University of Texas at Austin is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications from women and minorities are strongly encouraged. SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE UNIVERSITY ANTICfPATED FACUL TV Chair, Department of Agriculture: Associate/Full Professor, Tenure Track. Closing date: February 15, 1988. Chair, Department of English: Associate/Full Professor, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 15, 1988. Allied Health Sciences: Instructor/Assistant/Associate Professor, ' Physical Therapy, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 15, 1988. _,. Biology: Instructor/Assistant Professor, Freshman Botany/Biology, one semester only. Closing date: December 1, 1987. Biology: Instructor/Assistant Professor, General Biology/Botany; one year onl,y. Closing_ date: March 1, 1988. Biology: Assistant Professor, Genetics, Tenure Track. Closing date: January .25, 1988. Computer Information Syatema/Admlnlstretlve Sciences: Assistant Professor, MIS/ Statistics, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 15, 1988. . , Currtculum & Instruction: Assistant/Asl!ociate/Full Professor, Secondary/CoJ:llent Reading . Tenure Track. Closing date: January 29, 1988. . Curriculum & Instruction: Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, Reading/ Language Arts, Tenure Track. CIQslng date: January 29, 1988. .., , . Educational Admlnlstretlon and Psychological Servtcea: Assistant/ AssociateProfessar, Educational Administration, Tenure Track. Closing date: January_ 29, . 1988. .. c Educational Administration and Paychologlcallervlcea: Assistant . Protessor, Counselii'IQ, . Tenure Track. Closing date: January 29, 1988. . . Finance and Economics: Instructor/Assistant Professor, Economics, Thre8-year term. Closing date: March 1, 1988. Finance & Economics: Assistant/Associate Professor, Finance, Tenure Track. Closing date: December 1, 1987. Health, Physical Education and Recreation: Assistant Professor, tration, Tenure Track. Closing date: December 1, 1987. History: Instructor, One year only, Western Civilization. Closing date: March 1, 1988. History: Instructor, term, U.S. History. Closing date: March 1, 1988. Home Economics: Two Assistant Professor positions, Fashion Merchandising, Tenure Track. Closing date: February 1, 1988. Home Economics: Assistant Professor, Clpthing/Textiles and General Home Economics, Closing date: February 15, 1988. Mathematics: Two Assistant Professor positions, Tenure Track. Closing dates: December 15,1987, and February 15,1988. Mathematics: Assistant/ Associate Professor, Mathematics Education, Tenure Track. ' Closing date: February 15, 1988. Music: Assistant Professor, Associate Band Director, Tenure Track. Closing date : February 15,1988. Music: Instructor/Assistant Professor, Orchestra/Strings, Tenure Track. Closing ' date: February 15, 1988. .. Philosophy: Instructor, term. Closing date: December 1, 1987. Sociology/Anthropology: Assistant Professor, term, Quantitative methods and selected subject areaS. Closing date: January 31, 1988. Speech Communication, and Theatre Arta: Assistant Professor, Small GrouJ:VOrganizational Communication, Tenure Track. Closing date: January 1 , 1988. For more information please contact the appropriate department, Southwest Texal! . State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. Positions are contingent on budget approval. The University reserves the right not tQ proceed with any appointments for financial or programmatic reasons. An Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer Nov. 16, 1987 GRADUATE COOPERATIVE : .. ' .. EDUCATION ,_ . OPPORTUNITIES AT THE , , . ',-liBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education oppor tunities during 1987 may be offered in the following fields: . • Librarian/Library Technician • Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant • Economist/Economics Research Assistant • Foreign Affairs Analyst Research Assis . tant • Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician • Attorney/Law Clerk _ e Technical Information Specialist • Administrative Officer Eligibility includes persons with master's and/or doctorate degree and full-time gra duate students pursuing master's and/or doctorate degrees in the above fields. Persons interested in competing for those opportunities should complete and submit a Standard Form ' 171, Personal Qualifications Statement, indicating for which of the above fields they wish to be considered. The program consists of 90 or 120day appointments to professional work assign ments punctuated with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission and operations. Sessions for 1988 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in .the Jan. April, 1988, session must ; submit their applications no later than Dec. 3, 1987. Upon completion of the 90 to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an ad ditional year temporary appointment For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, Hispanic Employment Coordinator at(202) 287. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, Md., govern' ment office on personnel has a JOB llotline (301) 952. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites ap plications for an Assistant Professor, track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of : public or private sector organi zations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program. Ph.D. required bySeptember1988. Salary range for nine-month appointments:$ 31,500 '-'$33,900. Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and namesofthree references to; Organizational Studies Search Com mittee, Department of Sociology, University of Galifprnja, Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is January 15, 1988 . . The University of California is an , Affir:mative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Wome _ n and minorities are encouraged to apply. Hispanic LinK Weekly R!!POrt

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ANNOUNCEMENT OF AN EXECUTIVE-LEVEL VACANCY AT THE NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) ..J o:;..,.. ... .,, "' .... ... c.;.!<,....., ... 10,uo .J .. t; -, : -• • The National Education Association, an equal opportunity affirmative action employer, is seeking applications for the position of Director of Research. Minorities, women, and handicapped individuals are encouraged to apply. NEA is a voluntary membership organization with over 1.8 million members. NEA has a state affiliate in each of the 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Department of Defense schools. In addition, NEA has more than 12,000 local afftliates. The annual budget of the Association exceeds $100 million, and the Association's staff numbers nearly 600. Research. The Research Division is responsible for collecting and coordinating the data necessary for NEA to advance its goals and objectives relative to education generally and member welfare particularly. The Division also solicits, analyzes, and integrates information necessary for NEA long-range planning. NEA's Research Division helps direct the Association's education reform efforts by providing insights into educational trends. NEA Research also provides local and state NEA afftliates, the media, public policy-makers, and other organizations with quality data, reports, and publications. The Director or Research is responsible for NEA's Research Computer Network, Collective Bargaining and Information services, Surveys and Polling, Economics, School Finance, Tax Analysis, and, finally, technical support to state and local affiliates. There are approximately 50 Research staff. Requirements • Demonstrated experience and effectiveness as a manager, supervisor, mediator, and problem-solver. • Academic credentials and experience which warrants standing within the research community. • Minimum of a master's degree in either research, statistics, finance, economics, or a related specialty field. There is a strong preference for a doctorate. • Practical knowledge and understanding of research, including methodology, terminology, and operations. • Understanding of the role of an advocacy organization. • Familiarity with computers and computer technology. Special The position is based at NEA headquarters in Washington, D.C., but requires some travel throughout the United States. The Research Director may be required to work extended and irregular hours, and represent the Association in diverse circumstances and situations. The Director will attend various meetings with governance, research counterparts, and others, as necessary, to implement the Association's agenda. Detulline. Letter and application should be sent as soon as possible. Screening will begin no later than February 28, 1988. Effective Date. The Association seeks a person who will be available for employment no later than June 1, 1988. Compensation. The salary level for this position is in the low to mid-seventies, with liberal fringe benefits. Nomination and ApplicQtion Procedures. A letter of application (or letter of nomination by interested third party) should be sent to: Ms. Malinda Miles, Employment Manager National Education Association 1201 16th Street, N.W., Room 221 Washington, D.C. 20036 The letter should, to the extent possible, describe the candidate's academic experience, work experience, and any other personal experience or achievements in the particular field of each position. Hispanic Link Weekly Report 7

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Art s & . En te rta in men t .. t his' _____________________ .......,. _.;.. -,...--comedian Paul Rodriguez perfo (roed at Pal .acf:!. , LATINO VEGAS: Boxing fans atten di ng this week's . ma t ch . : , Pl!,ertoRicdsRosariodef$ndsNoy ... between Edw in Rosario and Julio Cesar Cha vez i n Las Vegas will find lightweight title against Mexico ' s Chavez, a former World Boxing a variety of His panic entertainers amo ng t he desert resorfs offerings. Council super ct)arnP from . . Mexi co: The !,)out will be Latino acts regularly appearing in Las V egas shows include : carried on the Home Box Office pay channel: 0 • • The Footlockers, a synchronized dan ce t r io t hat headlines the VINYL BRIEFS: News from the nation ' s Latino record industry: Star Shop show at the Sands Hotel & Casino. On the same bill is Mexico's Emmanuel has recorded in Miami an English-language magicia n Ed Alonzo . version of his hit Toda Ia vida ... The BMG Ariola Latin division will e Mario and Daniel Celario, the Ar g entine b r others that make up release 33 of its titles in compac t disc by end . . . Fourtime the Two Funny Guys act , part o f th e City Lit es " stage and ice Gram my winner Jose Feliciano tias just released the Tu lnmenso specta cular" at the Flamingo Hilton. Amoralbum for EM I ... Twenty-nine newly released albums mark the e The Esqueda Fami l y and Los A lejandros a re t wo Circus Circus beginning of the Christmas season in Puerto Rico . . . acts tha t feature the ta lents of Mexican "da redev i r Alex Esqueda With . lri other industry news : . Julio Iglesias , Manuel Alejandro and Juan his ow n family, h e performs as a uni c y cli st and does a slackwire Gabriel will be the judges of " Latin " entries in the TDK/Billboard Song balanci ng act. He is a lso an accomplished gu i tarist. Contest The contest, which wiil accept entries through February , Ma ny Latino stars regularly headline shows i n Las Vegas. Shows will award cash prizes and publishing con f racts in seven categories ... th.is yea r have featured the talents of Ju li o Iglesias, Emmanuel, 7 Antonio Mejias-Rentas . ";. .. . Media Report MARTI INTERVIEWS QUESTIONED: In .a Nov. 3 letter to top government officials, t h e chairm an of the U.S. House of Fo rei gn Aff ai r s Cqmm ittee questioned whether Radio M a rti 0 illegall y scooped private U .S. news media by intervie wing Cuban defectors while they were ' held in federal custody. U.S. Rep . Dante Fascell (DFia . ) charg ed the government controlled access to i n f or mation . He sa id th e government permitte d Radio Marti, the U .S. government-operated radio station that b road c asts to Cuba, t o interview Cuban defectors Maj . Flore n tin o Azpilla ga a nd Gen. del Pino, but t ha t domes tic news outlets were denied ac ce ss. Del Pino , who escaped with h i s fa mily in May , was held for several weeks by t h e CIA but ga ve three one-hour interviews to R adio Marti. Other news media were not ab le to intervi ew him un t il weeks later . "Radio Marti was designed not to co mp e te with our private media but to reach sol e l y a 8 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic L ink News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Ren t as, Meli n da Mac h ado, Ju l io L abo y . Graph ics/ Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoi la Elias No port i on of Hispanic Link Weekly R eport may be r ep r oduced or broadcas t in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates75 ce nts per wor d Disp lay ads are $35 per co l umn i n ch. Ads p laced b y T uesday w ill run in Weekl y Reports mailed F riday of same week. Mul tipl e us e rates on re q uest. f oreign audience," Fascell wrote to Secretary recruiters representing print and broadcast of State George Shultz, outgoing Natfonal news companies from across the country . Security Advisor Frarik Carlucci and . CIA DiNew emphasis will be on hir i ng in non-news rector William Webster. , divisions. A spokesperson for Radio Martf denied To request ' a registration packet, contact charges of favoritism. The defectors asked Letic i a C6rdova at the California Ch i cano to speak to Radio Martf i n p rder to address News Media Association, School of Journalism, home audiences , she said . University of Southern California, Los Angeles, MEDIA MOVES: Philadelphia bally News Calif . 90089-1695 (213) 743. There-City Hall reporter Juan Gonzalez, who also gistration cost is $20. . . ., writes a weekly column on Hispanic LITERARY CONTESt: The Depa rtment will begin working with the New York Dally of Spanish and Portuguese at the Un i versity News Dec. 14 . of California , at Irvine and the International Gonzalez will be a full-time columnist and Chicano Studies Program is soliciting entries expects to devote frequent time to Hispanic for its 14th annual Chicano Literary Contest issues . Starting in January he will produce The contest is open to published and un two columns a week. The New York Deily . published writers of poetry, short stories and News has a circulation of about 1.3 million . tHeater . It is designed to include U.S. writers Gonzalez will be joining Miguel Perez, who who identify strongly with the Chicano comwrites a weekly Hispal')ic column . munity. . . CONFERENCE REGISTRATION STARTS : Nine cash prizes totaling $2,400 will be The California Chicano News Media AsSociation'' awarded . The deadline is Jan . 8 . For more is sponsoring its ninth annual Journalism informat i on write the Department of Spanish Opportunities Conference for Minorities Feb. and "Portuguese , " University Of California at 5 at the University of SouthernCalifornia. Irvine , . Irvine, Calif . 927. 17 (714) 856. The conference brings together personnel -Julio Laboy THE NON-CITIZEN LATINO VIETNAM VET 1987 Hispani c l:ink Wee kly Report