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Hispanic link weekly report, November 23, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 23, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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NOV 24

[ Making The News This Week
Rep. Jim Wright, Speaker of the House, suggests that Richard j Peha be on a proposed U.S. team that would assist in the cease-fire ! talks between the Nicaraguan government and the opposition contras.. The Dade-Miami Criminal Justice Council selects Dade County j Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez as the chairman of its Juvenile Justice Committee... Washington, D.C., Public Health Commissioner Reed Tuckson names Rudy Arredondo as the commission’s Hispanic health advisor... The Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists honors Camilo Garcia, a professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, with its Praxis Award. The award is to recognize the practical application of anthro-
pological knowledge to everyday problems. . . Texas Executive Women and The Houston Post recognize Carmen Orta as one of Houston’s ten 1987 Women on the Move. Orta is president of Americom Tele-Resources... A federal grand jury indicts Armando Pav6n Reyes, Rafael Caro-Quinteroand InesCalderPn-Quintero in the slaying of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena in February 1985. The indictments have not been unsealed... A memorial fund raises enough money to ship the tombstone of Medal of Honor recipient Jos6 Jimenez from Phoenix, Ariz., to his gravesite in Mexico. The tombstone had been in Phoenix for 17 years... Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman Pedro Guerrero is named United Press International's National League comeback player of the year. Montreal Expos pitcher Dennis Martinez finished second...

Top 100 Firms Grow by 351%
‘Legalization’ Backlog i in L.A. Draws Lawsuit
Three attorneys filed a lawsuit Nov. 11 in a i federal court in California, charging that thou-| sands of registry applications at the Los I Angeles district office of the U.S. Immigration
i and Naturalization Service were backlogged t due to the agency assigning its most experi-\ enced officers to legalization applications
ii filed under the 1986 immigration act.
The three private attorneys filed the suit on behalf of 49 applicants for registry, an older jj and supposedly cheap and fast alternative to the legalization offered by the 1986 immigration ; law, are undocumented aliens who have lived j in the United States since Jan. 1,1972. Ap-j! plicants for the newer form of legalization j had to have been here since Jan. 1,1982. The application fee for registry is $50; it is $185 y for legalization under the 1986 law.
More than 17,000 of the 19,000 registry cases in the district office are still pending.
The attorneys said many plaintiffs are paying both application fees so that if their registry application is rejected they will still be able to r meet the May 5, 1988, cutoff date for the jj newer form of legalization.
Commissioner Harold Ezell of the INS Western Region said examiners will resolve welh | documented registry cases without interviews ) to cut into the backlog.
98-Year-Old Legalized
! A 98-year-old Brownsville, Texas, woman i.j. became the oldest person to receive legalization under the federal immigration law when she received her temporary residence card Nov. 17.
Clara Escobedo de Martinez, who first came to the United States from Mexico 60 years ago, said she worked at various jobs j in California and Texas. She worked here as a resident alien from 1927 until 1962.
De Martinez said immigration officials :i confiscated her resident alien card without j explanation upon her returning in 1962 J from a regular visit to relatives in Mexico.
She remained in Mexico for 17 years until ;j returning here as an undocumented alien I in 1979.
The nation’s 100 fastest-growing Hispanic-owned companies increased their sales 351 % from 1982 to 1986, according to the November issue of Hispanic Business.
The magazine reported that the total gross sales for the top 100 firms outdid the 295% increase last year, which covered the years 1981-1985. The magazine began tracking the fastest-growing companies in 1983. The
The Los Angeles County Chicano Employees Association called Nov. 10 for an investigation into hiring and promotion of Latinos in all county departments and for county cooperation in a discrimination probe of the county’s health services department.
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission investigators are examining allegations of discrimination against Hispanics in the Los Angeles Department of Health Services following an Oct 6 charge filed by EEOC Commissioner Tony Gallegos. The EEOC is not allowed to comment on ongoing investigations.
According to Alan Clayton, director of EEO for the employee association, Hispanics are 19% of the county government’s66,000 workers Hispanics make up32% of the area’s population.
vast majority of the firms serve general clienteles No. 1 wasGarcia-Serra& Blanco Advertising of Coral Gables, Fla The agency grew at a rate of 12,002%, from a $73,542 start-up company in 1982 to an $8.9 million agency, with a profit margin between 6% and 15% for last year.
All 100 companies increased their number
continued on page 2
Formal EEOC charges state that the department has violated Title VII of the U.S. Civil Rights Act since June 1,1983, “by unlawfully discriminating against Hispanics. . . with respect to recruitment, hiring, assignment, promotion and other terms of employment”
The county’s affirmative action compliance office, headed by Robert Arias, maintains it is making progress in the hiring of Hispanics.
“We will continue to put pressure on the Board of Supervisors basically to push for thorough review of affirmative action in all county departments, not just health services,” Clayton said. #
The employee association released statistics showing Latinos to be 60% of the patients at the County-USC Medical Center while only having an 18% Hispanic workforce.
TOP TEN FASTEST GROWING ENTERPRISES
1982 - 1986
Company Sales Sales* Empl.**
Increase 1986 Growth
Garcia-Serra& Blanco Adv., Coral Gables* Fla 12,002% $8,900 16
Artco Contracting, Auburn Hills, Mich. 8,033 24,400 198
Pacifica Services, Pasadena, Calif. 4,500 11,500 393
Golden Gate Air Freight, Hayward, Calif. 3,140 3,240 13
Computer Trade Development, Birmingham, Mich. 2,567 5,600 59
Interamerican Engineers/Constructbn, Miami 2,400 16,000 40
Universal Canvas, Corpus Christi, Texas 2,140 11,200 268
Business Men’s Insurance, Miami 1,679 36,300 48
Southeast Machine Co., Newport News, Va 1,497 23,800 241
Securiguard, McLean, Va. 1,274 3,160 208
* Dollars in thousands
* * Number increase in employees Source: Hispanic Business
L.A. County Workers Seek Job Probe


11 % of Eligible N.Y.C. Pupils Not Given Bilingual Courses
Almost 11% - nearly 11,000 - of all New York City public school students entitled to bilingual or special language courses last year did not receive the legally mandated services, found to a report released Nov. 17.
The Educational Priorities Panel, a coalition of civic groups and parents who monitor New York City’s public schools, reported that more than 92,000 students were entitled to bilingual or English-as-a-Second-Language services during the last school year.
The report, “Ten Years of Neglect The Failure to Serve Language-Minority Students in the New York City Public Schools,” found
that75,000 students were in bilingual or ESL classes last year, an increase of 5,662 over the previous two years.
The report indicated, however, that between 5,000 and 10,000 students were not included in the count because of late testing and failure to include students who enter school after surveys and exams are administered.
“While an important step forward, this is still a far cry from complete compliance with the law,” said Margaret Nuzum, EPPcoordinator.
The law requires that every child with limited English proficiency take classes in ESL Native-language classes are offered whenever there
are 25 students in two consecutive grades speaking a common language.
Approximately 70% of all New York City public school students eligible forthe special language courses are Latino.
Other areas criticized by the panel included:
• The failure to provide parents with information about available school services in their native language; and
• The lack of transitional programs to help students progress in English-speaking classes.
The report did say improvements were made by the school system but stressed that more work needs to be done. - Julio Laboy
Baytown Single-District Voting Mired
A Baytown, Texas, advocacy group filed a petition with 1,300 signatures Nov. 13 to bring about a referendum on whether the city should drop its appeal of a court ruling ordering the creation of single-member voting districts.
The petition, filed by Taxpayers Advocating Progress, seeks to halt the appeal because City Council elections cannot be held until it is resolved.
According to the Baytown city clerk, 1,050 signatures are needed to put a referendum on the ballot The city has ten days to validate the signatures. The city clerk did not know when the issue would be put before the voters if the signatures are valid.
In 1985 Hispanic and black voters sued the city, asserting that at-large election of council members was discriminatory. Hispanics are
Carollo Defeated in Miami
Miami City Commissioner Joe Carollo was overwhelmingly defeated by attorney Victor De Yurre in his bid for a third four-year term during the city’s Nov. 10 runoff elections.
De Yurre polled 29,264 votes (62.4%) to Carollo’s 17,659 votes (37.6%).
Deported U.& Girl Found
A 2 1/2-year-old El Paso, Texas, girl mistakenly deported to Mexico with her baby sitter, was found Nov. 12 as the undocumented baby sitter was seen on a Rio Grande levee with the child, apparently planning to re-enter the United States.
The toddler, Lysette Guadalupe G6mez, was reported missing Nov. 11. Her parents had left the child in the care of 17-year-old Maria de JesOs Gonzalez-Armendaris, who had befriended the mother, Maria Rosario G6mez, two days earlier.
A Border Patrol spokesman said GonzAlez-Armendaris had also been apprehended Nov. 11 trying to enter the United States with the child. She claimed the child belonged to a friend in Ju&rez, Mexico. Both were deported.
Gonzdlez-Armendaris was spotted the next day preparing to cross the river again. Authorities went to Judrez and brought back the child. No charges are being filed.
16% and blacks 9% of Baytown's 56,000 residents. No minority has ever been elected to the council.
“At-large elections violated the rights of minorities. They (council members) decided to appeal because if they don’t they’ll be removed from office,” Rolando Rios, attorney for the plantiffs, said.
A U.S. district judge ruled in favor of the plantiffs in January and approved a plan that would allow five of eight council members to be elected by district. - Julio Laboy
23% of Firms in California
continued from page 1
of employees from 1982 to 1986 except for one.
Of the 100 enterprises 23% were in California, 19% in Florida, 11 % in Texas, 8% in New York and 7% in Michigan.
One quarter of the firms that made the list, which measures growth by employment, overall sales and sales per employee, were construction firms 18% were manufacturing companies and 11% were retail agencies
The retail industry, with $1.5 billion in sales, accounted for 22.4% of all sales, followed by construction with 20.8%. The service and manufacturing industries were next with 20.1 % and 16.1 %, respectively.
In 1986,92 of the companies made a profit, a slight climb from 91 in 1985. The profits however, were higher for the most recent 100. Thirteen of the 100 had profit ranges of 16% or more compared with 8 in 1985.
- Julio Laboy
The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is becoming increasingly concerned about the number of fraudulent applications it has received under the agricultural worker provision of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act a high-ranking agency official commented recently.
INS Deputy Commissioner Mark Everson said the agency has uncovered “very high rates of fraud.”
In Florida more than 50% of the state’s 42,000 Special Agricultural Worker applications
Five U.& Senators Join Task Force on Latinos
Five more U.S. senators have signed on as members of the newly formed Republican Conference Task Force on Hispanic Affairs. The group is chaired by Sen. Orrin Hatch of Utah, who heads the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.
Task Force staff director Luben Montoya told Weekly Report Nov. 16 that the group’s formation is a response to requests for support from the Hispanic community and will address education, employment economic development health and youth leadership concerns. “It will bring awareness to the Senate on Hispanic issues,” he said.
Formed in late October by Sen. John Chafee of Rhode Island, the task force added Sens. Robert Dole of Kansas, Phil Gramm of Texas, John McCain of Arizona, Alan Simpson of Wyoming and Pete Wilson of California Chafee will be an ex officio member. Other senators are expected to join.
Each senator will detail one staff member to work on task force issuea
Montoya said the task force will help place Hispanic interns in Senate offices, recommend Hispanics for federal appointments, encourage Hispanic representation on witness rosters for committee hearings, recommend Hispanics to serve on federal commissions and committees and as liaison persons between policy makers and Hispanic leaders.
While the task force is a Republican initiative, Montoya added that bipartisan support of issues and policy recommendations will be encouraged. - Melinda Machado
have been fraudulent, he said, adding that a team of investigators has been dispatched there to report “any trends” to INS national headquarters.
Migrant farm worker representatives charged that Everson vastly overstated the problem and blamed the majority of application rejections under SAW on farmers who refuse to supply documents to applicants.
About 19% of the one million legalization applications overall have come under the agricultural worker program.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Fraud Charged in SAW Applications
2


Myrna Mendez Oliver, guest columnist
Speaking of Accents
To have a Spanish accent is to have a stigma I know. I am from Puerto Rico and I have a Spanish accent But now I have lived in Virginia for so long that I am not sure that my accent is singularly Spanish any more. Adding to the confusion is that I don’t look like what non-Hispanics expect Hispanics to look like.
I know my accent is a stigma because new relationships progress fine until I speak Then I see that bewildered, worried, sometimes frightened look come over the faces of my conversation partners.
Some respond to it by turning up their volume - speaking to me very loudly, as if I were deaf. They will punctuate their conversations with “Do you understand?”
Others will slow their speech to the pace of a baby's crawl. “ How do you like it here?” they like to ask, even though I do not have a babushka covering my head.
When I reported for my first job at the Pentagon, I was asked if I could spell. I suggested, “Try me.” My application showed clearly that I had graduated from a junior college in Virginia It takes time for me to gain others’ respect- to make them listen to what I am saying instead of listening for my accent They are surprised when I express common knowledge.
A SELF-FULFILLING PROPHECY Once I used the word “funner at a dinner party and the individual across from me inquired, “How do you know that word?”
One day I used the word “atrophy.” To my delight my conversation partner displayed genuine surprise and, with new respect, asked, “What does that mean?”
More recently, after a midterm college exam, I happened to comment, along with many other students, that the questions had been rather difficult A classmate told me, “Yes, they were, and probably more so for you.” I didn’t bother to mention to her later that I received an “A” both on the exam and in the course.
I could easily have said, “Yes, that’s it English is my second language. Maybe that’s why I found the questions hard.”
I try not to allow others^ reactions to my accent shake my confidence or encourage me to let it become part of a self-fulfilling prophecy.
A Spanish accent carries with it many labels: less intelligent poor, welfare cheat, new immigrant
ACCENTS BUILD WALLS
I have come to accept that my accent builds a wall between others and me. I know that I cannot establish a clear dialogue until I can demolish that wall.
Sometimes I withhold background information on myself, allowing others to wonder about my origin. It is interesting to watch as they strain to pick up a clue.
Other times I just say, “I’m from Puerto Rico.” That should resolve matters, but often it doesn’t. “You don’t look Puerto Rican,” I am told regularly. Or, “Your accent sounds German.” (That is supposed to be a compliment)
Occasionally, I try humor. “I’m really from Boston. Can’t you tell?” Depending on the attitude I perceive from my questioners and my own mood at the time, I am bothered by what my conversation partners project from my accent It can undermine my self-confidence.
Now, first I try to accept that some people may have led sheltered lives and not have been sufficiently exposed to persons from other cultures and backgrounds.
Second, I tell myself that they mean no harm. We are all naturally curious about anything or anybody different Third, I convince myself that I am the one who is really in charge. I know what they are thinking, but I also know that I have a good command of the English language. I can, in effect become a teacher. By the way, isn’t that a little accent I detect in your voice?
(Myrna M6ndez Oliver lives in Alexandria, VcL, and is working toward a degree in psychology.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pejos en la
BYTHE NUMBERS: I loved numbers even before Time magazine gave out hand calculators with subscriptions. You can do so many things with them.
You can put eyes, a nose and a mouth on an 8 and make a snowman. 0 Lay a 7 on its side and slide down it: N. Turn a 9 upside down and make it into a 6. Or, if you’re really whimsical (or thirsty), Iaya3 on its side and you’ve got a basin to catch raindrops: CO-
Numbers can be used to accomplish foul deeds. Alternate the number 1 with hyphens and you have a fence separating neighbors - or neighboring countries like the United States and Mexico:
1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1-1
Numbers can be used for good, too. Civil rights lawyers employ them regularly to win voting rights and affirmative action suits Some Latinos are currently parading them to show systemic discrimination by Los Angeles County. They say that only 19% of 66,000 county workers are Hispanic, while Latinos are 32% of the population.
My calculator tells me that the county should have 9,580 more of us on its payroll. Maybe that would help lower our unemployment and poverty numbers
Correspondent Rudy Hernandez sends me a news clip from Oakland, Calif., that claims the Oakland public schools’ 10-year effort to hire blacks, Hispanics and Asians has been too successful
The district’s affirmative action committee reported to Latino Superintendent Joe Coto last month that irva city that is one-third white (plus 46% black, 10% Hispanic and 8% Asian), there are no whites among its top five administrators and only 3 out of 14 persons at the next leadership level.
Coto, who has been superintendent for 16 months, promised that a couple of white appointments were coming up.
Two months ago, I commented on the fact that Latinas made up 18% of Hispanic elected officials while women in general held only 12% of the nation’s elective posts. And that the Latina percentage, according to the National Association of Elected and Appointed Officials, had increased 3% in just one year.
My column ran too long. Two interesting lines of numbers ended up in the trash. Almost. I saved them and waited for another opportunity to slip them into a column. Here, unless they are snipped once more, are the number of Latina elected officials NALEO counted in key states the past two years:
Ariz. Calif. Colo. Fla. N.M. N.Y. Texas
1986 49 67 34 6 85 29 192
1987 55 102 41 6 100 25 233
I have one more set of numbers. The U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., has among its 4,696 midshipmen (and women), 257 blacks, 256 Latinos, 209 Asian Americans and 28 Native Americans. That’s 5.5% Hispanics- a major leap in one generatioa Most middies are appointed by members of Congress.
If members of Congress would choose as many Hispanics for their own staffs as they appoint to the academy, that would be a number to talk about _ Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
STEVE ROSS, former Miami political kingmaker, quoted in the Oct 28 Miami Herald on that city's Anglo vote:
“They could still be the swing vote, but they will never be dominant I don't think we will ever see again another Anglo elected in Miami”
MANUELOLIVEREZ, national Image president, quoted in a Nov. 8 St Louis Post Dispatch interview:
“The goal of Image is to work toward creating an environment that is conducive to making America accept a Hispanic president by the year 2000”
Nov. 23,1987


COLLECTING
NEW YORK CITY BILINGUAL EDUCATION: The Educational Priorities Panel, a coalition of civic groups and parents who monitor New York City’s public schools, has available for$7.50 its monitoring report of the city’s bilingual school services and the report’s latest update. Order in writing from EPP Publications, 666 Broadway, Suite 800, New York, N.Y. 10012 (212)674-2121.
RISK-TAKING BEHAVIORS: The Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center has put together a report and bibliography examining available data on specific risk-taking behaviors among Hispanics, including cigarette smoking, teen-age pregnancy and violent behavior. For the full report and the bibliography, send $2.50 to: SSMHRC, A 352 Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif. 90024-1563.
HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SURVEY: The Hispanic Policy Development Projects fall Research Bulletin includes the results of a 1980 survey of Hispanic, black and white sophomores and seniors on their attitudes toward education, careers, family cohesiveness and marriage. To receive a free copy, write: The Research Bulletin, HPDP, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 350, Washington, D.C. 20036.
PREVENTING DROPOUTS: The Institute for Educational Leadership has made available a 69-page booklet titled “Dropouts in America Enough is Known for Action.” The booklet finds two types of dropouts- estranged and accessible, stresses early identification of at-risk youth and recommends strategies. For a copy, send $7.50 to: IEL, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 301, Washington, D.C. 20036.
PRISON OVERCROWDING: The National Council on Crime and Delinquency recently issued a 24-page report, “If s About Time: Solving America’s Prison Crowding Crisis,” which concludes that the only way to reduce prison overcrowding is by shortening sentences. For a free copy of the monograph (five or more are $1 each), write: NCCD, 77 Maiden Lane, Fourth Floor, San Francisco, Calif. 94108.
U.S. VOTER SURVEY: “The People, Press and Politics” is a free 23-page summary of findings from a survey commissioned by Times Mirror. The national poll finds 10 groups that make up the electorate and gives a brief demographic profile of each. For a copy, contact: Robert Erburu, Times Mirror, Times Mirror Square, Suite 100, Los Angeles, Calif. 90053 (213) 237-3956.
QUINCENTENARY RESEARCH PROJECTS: The National Endowment for the Humanities is seeking non-profit groups to apply for its planning grants competition on scholarly issues pertaining to the Columbian Quincentenary. The deadline is March 1988 and grants range up to $200,000. For more information and applications, contact Public Humanities Projects, Columbian Quincentenary Planning Grants, Division of General Programs, Room 426, NEH, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0271.
CONNECTING
(Late news on what’s occurring within the U. S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it)
D.C. STUDENTS TARGETED
The Washington, D.C., Mental Health Commission announced Nov. 9 that it has signed a one-year renewable contract for$190,000 with the city’s Children’s Hospital and FAMILIA Latino Family Resources to provide mental health services to Spanish-speaking students at four area schools.
The schools, two of which are more than 65% Latino, will have hospital and FAMILIA staff working with counselors, teachers and parents to respond to the needs of Spanish-speaking youth. The services are to begin by early December.
The youth to be targeted by the program are primarily from war-torn Central American countries.
The number of Spanish-speaking students enrolled in D.C. public schools between the 1980-81 and 1986-87 school years grew from 1,792 to 5,938 - an increase of 331 %.
ANTI-SMOKING CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED
The University of California at San Francisco’s Hispanic Smoking Cessation Research Project kicked off Nov. 9 its 1988 Community Program.
The program is geared to inform Bay Area Latino families of the hazards associated with smoking. Twenty-five to 40% of Latinos smoke, according to the organization.
“Guia para dejar de fumar. Por su salud y su familia’’- A Guide on How to Stop Smoking: For Your Health and Your Family - is the group’s new 36-page, Spanish-language manual. The organization also has Spanish-speaking support groups. For more information and a copy of the free manual write: The University of California, San Francisco, Hispanic Smoking Cessation Research Project,400 Parnassus Ave., A-405, San Francisco, Calif. 94143-0320.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
Armando Villareal, associate field director for the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, has been named director of the new office of voter participation at the Democratic National Committee. Part of Villareal’s job will be to get Latino communities to become a larger part of the electoral process... Margo Gutidrrez, chair of the American Library Association's Committee on Library Services to the Spanish Speaking, was appointed the Mexican American studies librarian of the renown Benson Latin American Collection at the University of Texas at Austin, it was announced Nov. 6...
- Julio Laboy
Calendar
As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in early January. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone in or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
COMING SOON
HACER RECEPTION
Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility, Coors
Washington, D.C. Deo 1 4
Laura De Herrera (202) 628-9600
MALDEF AWARDS DINNER
Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational
Fund
San Antonio Dec. 2 Barbara Aguirre (512) 224-5476
ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT DANCE Institute for Puerto Rican Policy New York Dec. 4 Gerson Borrero(212) 564-1075
FUND-RAISING CHRISTMAS PARTY
Mexican American Women’s National Association,
Hispanic Bar Association
Washington, D.C. Dec. 6
Linda Anguiano (703) 836-8747
MALDEF CORPORATE AWARD DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund
Los Angeles Dec. 8
Nov. 23,1987
Alicia Maldonado (213) 629-2512
POSADA CHRISTMAS FIESTA Mexico-United State Institute Washington, D.C. Deo 12 Daniel James (202) 429-6545
SPOTLIGHT
CHILDREN’S FUND-RAISING DINNER: The Hispanic Advisory Council for Orthopaedic Hospital, the largest treatment center for bone, joint, nerve and muscle disorders in the Western United States, and the Association of Friends of PIAcido Domingo will hostagala event Dec.3 in Los Angeles for needy children served by the International Children’s Program of the Hospital and for the Domingo assoc iatiorfs Children's Bright Horizons Program. Linda Ronstadt and Nati Canof nd Los Camperos will be the featured entertainment More than 51% of the hospitars patients are Latino. For more information call Rosemary Hutton at (213) 748-3958.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DEAN OF STUDENTS Borough of Manhattan Community College The City University of New York Search Extended
Borough of Manhattan Community College, a two-year college of the City University of New York invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of Students. The College offers associate degrees and enrolls over 12,000 matriculated students, 70% in career programs and 30% in the liberal arts. The Dean of Students reports directly to the President and is responsible for the development and overall management of the Department of Student Life, including Counseling, Student Activities, Financial Aid, Health Services, the Early Childhood Education Center, and College Discovery Program.
The successful candidate will have an advanced degree, preferably a doctorate, in an appropriate discipline; substantial administrative experience in the area of student affairs; a commitment to the mission of the urban community college; strong communication and interpersonal skills; and the ability to work effectively with all members of the college community.
Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Resumes, nominations and applications should be sent by February 29,1988 to:
Dean Richard Harris
Associate Dean for College and Community Relations Borough of Manhattan Community College 199 Chambers Street New York New York 10007
An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
FACULTY POSITION IN COMMUNICATION
The Department of Radio-Television-Film at The University of Texas at Austin is seeking applications for a tenured or tenure-track position beginning in September 1988. The person hired will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in mass communication theory/research and/or international communication. The position requires a Ph.D., an established record of or strong potential for research, scholarship, and teaching at the college or university level.
Applicants should send a letter of application describing academic training and experience, a resume, and the names and telephone numbers of three references to:
Horace M. Newcomb, Professor and Chair Department of Radio-Television-Film The University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas 78712-1091
Screening of applicants will begin immediately and will continue until an appointment is made.
The University of Texas at Austin is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications from women and minorities are strongly encouraged.
CLEANING HOUSE
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure-track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988.
Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program.
Ph.D. required by September 1988. Salary range for nine-month appointments: $ 31,500 -$33,900.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616.
Closing date for applications is January 15,1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
ATTORNEY
National Civil Rights Organization seeks staff attorney for San Antonio office to conduct a personal case load of litigation and advocacy. Requirements: Two years litigation and advocacy experience in civil rights or public interest law. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred Resume, writing sample, and three references to: MALDEF, The Commerce Bldg., LTD, 314 E Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio, Texas 78205. By 11/25/87.
JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP Washington, D.C.
The selected candidate will work starting in February, as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service, and as a writer for the National Puerto Rican Coalition’s publications. He or she will cover all branches of the federal government with emphasis on activities that affect the natiorfs 22 million Hispanics.
The one-year internship is open to an aspiring writer of Puerto Rican heritage who wants to pursue a career in print Journalism. It is funded through a grant by the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary.
Applicants will be judged on their basic writing skills (emphasis on the English language), journalistic potential and commitment to the pursuit of print journalism as a career.
Deadline to apply for the internship is Jan. 4, 1988. Applications may be obtained by contacting the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1700 K St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915 or Hispanic Link 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 234-0737.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington, D.C.,provides: • Design• Illustration#Typesetting • Layout # Silkscreen and # Stats. Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202)483-7755.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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Arts & Entertainment
GABY PREMIERES: A Mexico-U.S. film with Oscar potential continues in national release after premieres in four North American cities.
The Nov. 7 world premiere of Gaby: A True Story, in Acapulco, marked the return of that beach resort’s International Film Festival after a 19-year hiatus. The film tells the story of Gabriela Brimmer, a Mexican writer afflicted with cerebral palsy.
The film stars Argentine actress Norma Aleandro (in her English-speaking debut) as the Mexican maid who helped Brimmer overcome her handicap, along with Liv Ullman and newcomer Rachel Levine.
Gaby was written by Martin Salinas and directed by Luis Mandoki. It is a Pinchas Perry-Luis Mandoki Production, released in the U.S. by Tri-Star Pictures. The film has already opened in Toronto, New York and Los Angeles, (which qualifies it for consideration this year for Academy Award nominations). Chicago is the next city on the film’s national release schedule (no dates available at press time).
Acapulco’s Reseha Mundial del Cine was revived this year, under the sponsorship of Mexico’s entertainment conglomerate Televisa
and the Mexican government. Sixty movies from 17 countries were on the festival's roster, including the U.S.’ La Bamba
The Luis Valdez film (to be released in videocassette by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video Jan. 28), screened at San Antonitfs Guadalupe Theater Nov. 13, during the city’s 12th annual CineFestival.
Billed as North America’s “oldest and largest international Latino film and video exhibition," the event compiled 89 titles from the continental United States, Puerto Rico, six Latin American countries and West Germany for its Nov. 6-15 schedule.
ONE LINERS: Elektra Records has released Linda Ronstadfs Canciones de mi padre, with several family members joining in on the vocals... Cheech Marin performs at a Los Angeles benefit to aid the homeless, on Nov. 24... The Nov. 26 edition of Univisloits news series America reports on New York’s INTAR Hispanic Theatre... Jimmy Smits, of NBC's LA Law, has been cast as the third lead in Jane Fonda’s upcoming film Old Gringo. The film will be shot in Mexico... And Patrice Martinez and Val de Vargas are cast in the pilot of Zorro: The Legend Continues, to be shot in Spain (for New World Television’s Goodman and Rosen Productions) and due for syndication next fall... - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIP: The National Puerto Rican Coalition is seeking candidates for a one-year journalism internship with Hispanic Link News Service in Washington, D.C.
Applicants must be of Puerto Rican descent and want to pursue a career in print journalism. Candidates will be judged on their basic writing skills and journalistic potential.
The program is funded through a $27,000 grant from the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary.
The internship begins in February and applications must be received by Jan. 4,1988. Applications can be obtained by contacting the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1700 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915 or Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0737.
SPANISH-LANGUAGE DAILY: The first edition of El Nuevo Herald, the Miami Heralds redesigned Spanish-language daily, was introduced to South Florida Nov. 21.
The publication has added "Nuevo” to the masthead of the former Spanish-language daily, El Miami Herald.
El Nuevo Herald has expanded international, national and local news coverage, and added an “Inside Cuba” column. It has nation-bynation reports on Latin America, opinion pages, local Hispanic columnists, an immigration hotline and more community-oriented editorial pages.
Roberto Su&rez, former president of North Carolina's Charlotte Observer, was hired as publisher.
MEDIA CATALOG: The Standard Rate and Data Service has announced it will publish a comprehensive catalog of advertising rates and market data for the Spanish-language market
“Hispanic Media and Markets?’ is designed for media planners and buyers and will be
available by March 1988.
The publication will also include a directory of suppliers and service firms serving the Spanish-language market
For a free listing in the publication, call Susan Meier at (312) 441-2236.
SALUDOS HISPANOS: This national bilingual magazine is seeking freelance writers, Published five times a year, Saludo Hlspanos focuses on Latino role-model stories.
For writer’s guidelines and a copy of the magazine, contact Steve Solomon, 19510 Ventura Blvd, Suite 204, Tarzana, Calif. 91356
MEDIA MOVES: Carolyn Curiel of The Washington Posts national desk moves to The New York Times’ national desk. . . Alfredo Cruz, former studio engineer for National Public Radio and a news correspondent for Enfoqua Nacional, recently became En-toque Nacional's associate producer and assignments coordinator. Enfoque Nacional is a Spanish-language news-magazine produced for NPR by KPBS-FM, San Diego...
- Julio Laboy and Jonathan Higuera
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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NOV 2 4 'iS37 Making The News This Week pological knowledge to everyday problems. . . Texas Executive Women and The Houston Post recognize Carmen Orta as one of Houston's ten 1987 Women on the Move . Orta is president of Americom Tale-Resources ... A federal grand jury indicts Armando Pav6n Reyes, Rafael Caro-Quintero and lnes Calder6nQuintero in the slaying of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena in February 1985. The indictments have not been unsealed ... A memorial fund raises enough money to ship the tombstone of Medal of Honor recipient Jose Jimenez from Phoenix, Ariz., to his gravesite in Mexico. The tombstone had been in Phoenix for 17 years ... Los Angeles Dodgers first baseman Pedro Guerrero is named United Press International's National League comeback player of the year . Montreal Expos pitcher Dennis Martinez finished second ... Rep. Jim Wright, Speaker of the House, suggests that Richard Pel'la be on a proposed U.S. team that would assist in the cease-fire talks between the Nicaraguan government and the opposition contras .. , The Dade-Miami Criminal Justice Council selects Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez as the chairman of its Juvenile Justice Committee ... Washington, D.C., Public Health Commissioner Reed Tuckson names Rudy Arredondo as the commission's Hispanic health advisor ... The Washington Association of Professional Anthropologists honors Camllo Garcia, a professor at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, with its Praxis i Award. The award is to recognize the practical application of anthro-HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT IN••-23,1987 'Legalization' Backlog i in L.A. Draws Lawsuit Three attorneys filed a lawsuit Nov. 11 in a 1 federal court in California, charging that thou< sands of registry applications at the Los I Angeles district office of the U.S. Immigration 1 and Naturalization Service were backlogged t due to the agency assigning its most experi-5 -enced officers to legalization applications 1; filed under the 1986 immigration act. The three private attorneys filed the suit on 1. behalf of 49 applicants for registry, an older lfl and supposedly cheap and fast alternative to 1 l the legalization offered by the 1986 immigration r, law, are undocumented aliens who have lived rrl in the United States since Jan. 1, 1972. Ap!cl plicants for the newer form of legalization 11 had to have been here since Jan. 1, 1982. The application fee for registry is $50; it is $185 for legalization under the 1986 law. More than 17,000 of the 19,000 registry c cases in the district office are still pending. I The attorneys said many plaintiffs are paying both application fees so that if their registry 1'1 application is rejected they will still be able to 11 meet the May 5, 1988, cutoff date for the r l newer form of legalization. Commissioner Harold Ezell of the INS Wes r tern Region said examiners will resolve well-1! documented registry cases without interviews r to cut into the backlog. ! 98-Year-Oid Legalized 1 1 A 98yearold Brownsville, Texas, woman became the oldest person to receive legal ization under the federal immigration law 1 when she received her temporary residence card Nov. 17. Clara Escobedo de Martinez, who first , came to the United States from Mexico 60 years ago, said she worked at various jobs in California and Texas. She worked here as a resident alien from 1927 until 1962. , 1 De Martinez said immigration officials ' confiscated her resident alien card without I,J ' explanation upon her returning in 1962 from a regular visit to relatives in Mexico. She remained in Mexico for 17 years until returning here as an undocumented alien in 1979. Top 100 Firms Grow by351 /o The nation's 100 fastest-growing His panic owned companies increased their sales 351% from 1982 to 1986, according to the November issue of Hispanic Business. The magazine reported that the total gross sales for the top 100 firms outdid the 295% increase last year, which covered the years 1981. The magazine began tracking the fastest growing companies in 1983 . The vast majority of the firms serve general clienteles No.1 wasGarcia-Serra& Blanco Advertising of Coral Gables, Fla The agency grew at a rate of 12,002%, from a $73,542 start up company in 1982 to an $8.9 million agency, with a profit margin between 6% and 15% for last year. All 100 companies increased their number continued on page 2 TOP TEN FASTEST GROWING ENTERPRISES 1982-1986 Company Garcia-Serra& Blanco Adv., Coral Gables, Fla Artco Contracting, Auburn Hills, Mich. Pacifica Services, Pasadena, Calif . Sales Increase Sales* 1986 $8,900 24,400 11,500 Em pl.** Growth Golden Gate Air Freight, Hayward, Calif. Computer Trade Development Birmingham, Mich. lnteramerican Engineers/Construction, Miami Universal Canvas, Corpus Christi, Texas Business Men's Insurance, Miami 12,002% 8,033 4,500 3,140 2,567 2,400 2,140 1,679 1,497 1,274 3 ,240 5,600 16,000 11,200 36,300 23,800 16 198 393 13 59 40 268 48 241 208 Southeast Machine Co., Newport News, Va Securiguard, Mclean, Va. * Dollars in thousands * * Number increase in employees 3,160 Source: Hispanic Business L.A. County Workers Seek Job Probe The Los Angeles County Chicano Emp l oyees Association called Nov . 10 for an investigation into hiring and promotion of Latinos in all county departments and for county cooperation in a discrimination probe of the county's health services department. U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Com mission investigators are examining allegations of discrimination against Hispanics in the Los Angeles Department of Health Services following an Oct. 6 charge filed by EEOC Commissioner Tony Gallegos. The EEOC is not allowed to comment on ongoing investi gations According to Alan Clayton, director of EEO for the employee association, Hispanics are 19% of the county govemmenfs 66,000 workers. Hispanics make up32% of the area's population Formal EEOC charges state that the depart ment has violated Title VII of the U . S . Civil Rights Act since June 1, 1983, "by unlawfully discriminating against Hispanics. . . with respect to recruitment , hiring, assignment, promotion and other terms of employment." The county's affirmative action compliance office, headed by Robert Arias, maintains it is making progress in the hiring of Hispanics. "We will continue to put pressure on the Board of Supervisors basically to push fc ; thorough review of affirmative action in all county departments, not just health services," Clayton said . • The employee association released statistics showing Latinos to be 60% of the patients at the County-USC Medical Center while only having an 18% Hispanic workforce .

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11 /o of Eligible N. Y.C. Pupils Not Given Bilingual Courses Almost 11% nearly 11 ,000 -of all New York City public school students entitled to bilingual or special language courses last year did not receive the legally mandated services, found to a report released Nov. 17. The Educational Priorities a coalition of civic groups and parents who monitor New York City's public schools, reported that more than 92,000 students were entitled to bilingual or English-as-a-Second-Language services during the last school year. The report , "Ten Years of Neglect: The Failure to Serve Language-Minority Students in the New York City Public Schools," found that 7 5,000 students were in bilingual or ESL classes last year, an increase of 5,662 over the previous two years. The report indicated, however, that between 5 ,000 and 1 0,000 students were not included in the count because of late testing and failure to include students who enter school after surveys and exams are administered . "While an important step forward, this is still a far cry from complete compliance with the law," said Margaret Nuzum, EPP coordinator . The law requires that every child with limited English proficiency take classes in ESL. Native language classes are offered whenever there are 25 students in two consecutive grades speaking a common language. Approximately 70% of all New York City public school students eligible for the special language courses are Latino. Other areas criticized by the panel included: • The failure to provide parents with infor mation about available school services in their native language ; and • The lack of transitional programs to help students progress in English-speaking classes. The report did say improvements were made by the school system but stressed that more work needs to be done . -Julio Laboy Baytown Single-District Voting Mired Five U.S. Senators Join Task Force on Latinos A Baytown , Texas, advocacy group filed a petition with 1,300 signatures Nov. 13 to bring about a referendum on whether the city should drop its appeal of a court ruling ordering the creation of single-member voting districts. The petition, filed byTaxpayersAdvocating Progress, seeks to halt the appeal because City Council elections cannot be held until it is resolved . According to the Baytown city clerk, 1 ,050 signatures are needed to put a referendum on the ballot The city has ten days to validate the signatures. The city clerk did not know when the issue would be put before the voters if the signatures are valid. In 1985 Hispanic and blackvoterssuedthe city, asserting that at-large election of council members was discriminatory. Hispanics are Carollo Defeated in Miami Miami City Commissioner Joe Carollo was overwhelmingly defeated by attorney Victor De Yurre in his bid for a third four-year term during the city's Nov. 10 runoff elections. De Yurre polled 29,264 votes (62.4%) to Carollo's 17,659 votes (37 .6%). 2 Deported U.S. Girt Found A 2 1/2-year-old El Paso, Texas, girl mis takenly deported to Mexico with her baby sitter, was found Nov. 12 as the undocu mented baby sitter was seen on a Rio Grande levee with the child, apparently planning to re-enter the United States. The toddler, Lysette Guadalupe G6mez, was reported missing Nov. 11. Her parents had left the child in the care of 17-year-old Maria de Jesus Gonzalez-Armendaris, who had befriended the mother, Maria Rosario G6mez, two days earlier. A Border Patrol spokesman said Gonzalez Armendaris had also been apprehended Nov. 11 trying to enter the United States with the child She claimed the child belonged to a friend in Juarez, Mexico. Both were deported. Gonzalez-Armendaris was spotted the next day preparing to cross the river again. Authorities went to Juarez and brought back the child. No charges are being filed. 16% and blacks 9% of Baytown's 56,000 residents. No minority has ever been elected to the council. "At-large elections violated t he rights of minorities. They (council members) deci ded to appeal because if they don't they'll be removed from office, " Rolando Rios, attorney for the plantiffs , said. A U.S. district judge ruled i n favor of the plantiffs in January and approved a plan that would allow five of eight council members to be elected by district. -Julio Laboy 230/o of Finns in California continued from page 1 of employees from 1982 to 1986 except for one . Of the 100 enterprises, 23% were in California, 19% in Florida , 11% inTexas,8% in New York and 7% in Michigan . One quarter of the firms that made the list , which measures growth by employment , over all sales and sales per employee , were con struction firms, 18% were manufacturing com panies and 11% were retail agencies . The retail industry , with $1. 5 billion in sales , accounted for 22 . 4% of all sales, followed by construction with 20.8% . The service and manufacturing industries were next with 20 .1% and 16. 1 % , respectively . In 1986, 92 of the companies made a profit, a slight climb from 91 in 1985. The profits , however, were higher for the most recent 100. Thirteen of the 1 00 had profit ranges of 16% or more compared with 8 in 1985. -Julio Laboy Five more U . S . senators have signed on as members of the newly formed Republican Conference Tat.k Force on Hispanic Affairs. The group is chaired by Sen . Orri n Hatch of Utah , who heads the Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources. Task Force staff director Luben Montoya told Weekly Report Nov. 1 6 that the group's fo r mation is a response to requests for sup port from the Hispanic community a n d will address education , employment, economic development, health and youth leadership concerns. "It will bring awa r eness to the Senate on Hi sp anic issues, " he said . Formed i n late October by Sen . John Chafee of Rhod e I s land , the task force added Sens . Robert D ole of Kansas, Phil Gramm of Texas, Joh11 McCain of Arizona, Alan S i mpson of Wyoming and Pete Wilson of California Chafee will be an ex officio member . Other senators are expected to join . Each senator will detail one staff member to work on task force issues. Montoya said the task force will help place H i spanic interns in Senate offices, recommend Hispanics fo r federal appointments, encourage Hispan i c representation on witness rosters for comm i ttee hearings, recommend Hispanics to serve on federal commissions and commit tee s and as liaison persons between policy makers and H i spanic leaders. While the task force is a Republican initiative, Mon t oya added that bipartisan support of i ssues and policy recommendations wi ll be encouraged . -Melinda Machado Fraud Charged i n SAW Applications The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is becoming increasingly concerned about the number of fraudulent applications it has received under the agricultural worker provision of the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, a high-ranking agency official commented recently. INS Deputy Commissioner Mark Everson said the agency has uncovered "very high rates of fraud." In Florida more than 50% of the state ' s 42,000 Special Agricultural Worker applications have been fraudulent , he said, adding that a team of investigators has been dispatched there to report "any trends" to INS national headquarters. Migrant farm worker representatives charged that Eve r son vastly overstated the problem and blamed the majority of application re jections under SAW on farmers who refuse to supply documents to applicants . About 19% of the one million legalization applications overall have come under the agricultural worker program. Hispani c Link Weekly Report

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Myrna Mendez Oliver, 9uest columnist Speaking of Accents To have a Spanish accent is to have a stigma I know. I am from Puerto Rico and I have a Spanish accent. But now I have lived in Virginia for so long that 1 am not sure that my accent is singularly Spanish any more. Adding to the confusion is that I don't look like what nonHispanics expect Hispanics to look like. I know my accent is a stigma because new relationships progress fine until I speak. Then I see that bewildered, worried, sometimes frightened look come over the faces of my conversation partners. Some respond to it by turning up their volumespeaking to me very loudly, as if 1 were deaf. They will punctuate theirconver sations with "Do you understand?" Others will slow their speech to the pace of a baby's crawl. "How do you like it here?" they like to ask, even though I do not have a babushka covering my head. When I reported for my first job at the Pentagon, I was asked if I could spell . 1 suggested, "Try me." My application showed clearly that I had graduated from a junior college in Virginia It takes time for me to gain others' respect-to make them listen to what I am saying instead of listening for my accent. They are surprised when I express common knowledge. A SELF-FULFILLING PROPHECY Once I used the word "funner• at a dinner party and the individual across from me inquired, "How do you know that word?" One day I used the word "atrophy." To my delight, my conversation partner displayed genuine surprise and, with new respect, asked, "What does that mean?" More recently, after a midterm college exam, I happened to comment, along with many other students, that the questions had been rather difficult. A classmate told me, "Yes, they were, and probably more so for you." I didn't bother to mention to her later that I received an "A" both on the exam and in the course. I could easily have said, "Yes, thafs it. English is my second language . Maybe thafs why I found the questions hard." I try not to allow others' reactions to my accent shake my confidence or encourage me to let it become part of a self-fulfilling prophecy. A Spanish accent carries with it many labels: less intelligent, poor, welfare cheat, new immigrant. ACCENTS BUILD WALLS I have come to accept that my accent builds a wall between others and me. I know that I cannot establish a clear dialogue until I can demolish that wall . Sometimes I withhold background information on myself, allowing others to wonder about my origin. It is interesting to watch as they strain to pick up a clue. Other times I just say, "I'm from Puerto Rico." That should resolve matters, but often it doesn't. "You don't look Puerto Rican," I am told regularly . Or, "Your accent sounds German." (That is supposed to be a compliment) Occasionally, I try humor. "I'm really from Boston. Can't you tell?" Depending on the attitude I perceive from questioners and my own mood at the time, I am bothered by what my conversation partners project from my accent It can undermine my self-confidence. Now, first I try to accept that some people may have led sheltered lives and not have been sufficiently exposed to persons from other cultures and backgrounds . Second, 1 tell myself that they mean no harm. We are all naturally curious about anything or anybody different. Third, 1 convince myself that I am the one who is really in charge. I know what they are thinking, but I also know that I have a good command of the English language. I can, in effect, become a teacher. By the way, isn't that a little accent I detect in your voice? (Myrna Mendez Oliver lives in Alexandria, Va, and is working toward a degree in psychology.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua BY THE NUMBERS: I loved numbers even before Time magazine gave out hand calculators with subscriptions. You can do so many things with them. You can put eyes, a nose and a mouth on an 8 and make a snowman. 8 Lay a 7 on its side and slide down it: ,...._ Turn a 9 upside down and make it into a 6. Or, if you're really whimsical( or thirsty), lay a3 on its side and you've got a basin to catch raindrops: w. Numbers can be used to accomplish foul deeds. Alternate the number 1 with hyphens and you have a fence separating neighbors -or neighboring countries like the United States and Mexico: 11 Numbers can be used for good, too. Civil rights lawyers employ them regularly to win voting rights and affirmative action suits. Some Latinos are currently parading them to show systemic discrimination by Los Angeles County. They say that only 19% of 66,000 county workers are Hispanic, while Latinos are 32% of the population. My calculator tells me that the county should have 9,580 more of us on its payroll. Maybe that would help lower our unemployment and poverty numbers. Correspondent Rudy Hernandez sends me a news clip from Oakland, Calif, that claims the Oakland public schools' 1 Oyear effort to hire blacks, Hispanics and Asians has been too successful. The districfs affirmative action committee reported to Latino Superintendent Joe Coto last month that in-a city that is one-third white (plus 46% black, 10% Hispanic and 8% Asian), there are no whites among its top five administrators and only 3 out of 14 persons at the next leadership level. Coto, who has been superintendent for 16 months, promised that a couple of white appointments were coming up. Two months ago, I commented on the fact that Latinas made up 18% of Hispanic elected officials while women in general held only 12% of the nation's elective posts. And that the Latina percentage , according to the National Association of Elected and Appointed Officials, had increased 3% in just one year . My column ran too long . Two interesting lines of numbers ended up in the trash. Almost. I saved them and waited for another opportunity to slip them into a column . Here , unless they are snipped once more, are the number of Latina elected officials NALEO counted in key states the past two years: 1986 1987 Ariz. Calif. Colo. Fla. N. M. 49 67 34 6 85 55 102 41 6 100 N.Y. 29 25 Texas 192 233 I have one more set of numbers . The U .S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., has among its 4,696 midshipmen (and women), 257 blacks, 256 Latinos, 209 Asian Americans and 28 Native Americans. Thafs 5.5% Hispanics-a major leap in one generation. Most middies are appointed by members of Congress. If members of Congress would choose as many Hispanics for their own staffs as they appoint to the academy, that would be a number to talk about. . Kay Barbaro Quoting. • • STEVE ROSS, former Miami political kingmaker, quoted in the Oct. 28 Miami Herald on that city's Anglo vote: "They could still be the swing vote, but they will never be dominant . 1 don't think we will ever see again another Anglo elected in Miami." MANUELOLIVEREZ, national Image president, quoted in a Nov.8 St. Louis Post Dispatch interview: ,;The goal of Image is to work toward creating an environment that is conducive to making America accept a Hispanic president by the year 2000 . " Hispanic Link Weekly Report Nov . 23, 1987 3

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COLLECTING NEW YORK CITY BILINGUAL EDUCATION: The Educational CONNECTING Priorities Panel , a coalition of civic groups and parents who monitor New York City's public schools, has available for$7.50 its monitoring report of the city's bilingual school services and the reporfs latest update. Order in writing from EPP Publications , 666 Broadway , Suite 800, New York, N.Y. 10012 (212) 674-2121 . RISK-TAKING BEHAVIORS: The Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center has put together a report and bibliography examining available data on specific risk-taking behaviors among Hispanics, including cigarette smoking, teen-age pregnancy and violent behavior . For the full report and the bibliography, send $2.50 to: SSMHRC, A 352 Franz Hall, University of California, Los Angeles, Calif . 900241563. HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT SURVEY: The Hispanic Policy Develop ment Projecfs fall Research Bulletin includes the results of a 1980 survey of Hispanic, black and white sophomores and seniors on their attitudes toward education, careers, family cohesiveness and marriage . To receive a free copy, write : The Research Bulletin, HPDP , 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 350, Washington, D . C . 20036. PREVENTING DROPOUTS: The Institute for Educational Leader ship has made available a 69-page booklet titled "Dropouts in America: Enough is Known for Action." The booklet finds two types of dropouts-estranged and accessible, stresses early ident i ficat i on of at-risk youth and recommends strategies. For a copy, send $7 .50 to : IEL, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 301, Washington , D.C. 20036. PRISON OVERCROWDING: The National Council on Crime and Delinquency recently issued a24-page report, "lfsAboutTime: Solving America's Prison Crowding Crisis," which concludes that the only way to reduce prison overcrowding is by shortening sentences. For a free copy of the monograph (five or more are $1 each) , write : NCCD, 77 Maiden Lane, Fourth Floor , San Francisco , Calif . 941 08. U.S. VOTER SURVEY: " The People, Press and Politics " is a free 23-page summary of findings from a survey commissioned by Times Mirror. The national poll finds 1 0 groups that make up the electorate and gives a brief demographic profile of each. For a copy , contact: Robert Erburu , Times Mirror , Times Mirror Square , Suite 100, Los Angeles, Calif . 90053 (213) 237-3956. QUINCENTENARY RESEARCH PROJECTS: The National Endow ment for the Humanities is seeking non-profit groups to apply for its planning grants competition on scholarly issues pertaining to the Columbian Quincentenary. The deadline is March 1988 and grants range up to $200,000 . For more information and applications, contact Public Humanities . Projects, Columbian Quincentenary Planning Grants, Division of General Programs , Room 426, N EH, 1100 Penn sylvania Ave . . NW , Washington, D.C. 20506 (202) 786-0271 . (Late news on what's occurring within the U . S Hispanic community and those agencies and corporations that work with it) D.C. STUDENTS TARGETED The Washington, D . C., Mental Health Commission announced Nov . 9 that it has signed a one-year renewable contract for $190,000 with the city's Children ' s Hospital and FAMILIA Latino Family Resources to provide mental health services to Spanish-speaking students at four area schools. The schools, two of which are more than 65% Latino, will have hospital and FAMILIA staff working with counselors, teachers and parents to respond to the needs of Spanish-speaking youth. The services are to begin by early December . The youth to be targeted by the program are pri marily from war torn Central American countries. The number of Spanish-speaking students enrolled i n D.C. public schools between the 198Q-81 and 1986-87 school years grew from 1,792 to 5 ,938-an increase of 331%. ANTISMOKING CAMPAIGN LAUNCHED The University of California at San Francisco's Hispanic Smoking Cessation Research Project kicked off Nov . 9 its 1988 Community Program. The program is geared to inform Bay Area Latino families of the hazards associated with smoking . Twenty-five to 40% of Latinos smoke , according to the organization. " Guia para dejar de fumar: Por su salud y su familia"A Guide on How to Stop Smoking: For Your Health and Your Family-is the group ' s new 36-page , Spanish-language manual. The organizat ion also has Spanish-speaking support groups. For more information and a copy of the free manual write: The University of California, San Francisco , Hispanic Smoking Cessat i on Research Project,400 Parn assus Ave., A -405, San Francisco, Calif. 94143-0320. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES Armando Villareal , associate field director for the Southwest Vote r Reg i stration Education Project, has been named director of the new office of voter participation at the Democratic National Committee . Part of Villa rears job will be to get Latino communities to become a larger part of the electoral process. . . Margo Gutierrez, chair of the American Library Association's Committee on Library Services to the Spanish Speak i ng , was appointed the Mexican American studies librar i an of the renown Benson Latin American Collection at the University of Texas at Austin, it was announced Nov. 6 . . . -Julio Laboy Calendar Laura De Herrera (202) 6289600 MALDEF AWARDS DINNER Alic i a Maldonado (213) 629 POSADA CHRISTMAS FIESTA Mex i co-United State Institute Washington , D . C . Dec. 12 As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1988 conferences, sem i nars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in early January . Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone in or send the following information: date , place, brief descript i on of event and name and telephone number of contact person . Address all correspondence to Calendar editor , Hispan i c Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington , D . C . 20005 (202) 234 . COMING SOON HACER RECEPTION Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility, Coors Washington , D .C. Dec . 1 4 Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund San Antonio Dec. 2 Barbara Aguirre (512) 224 ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT DANCE Institute for Puerto Rican Policy New York Dec. 4 Gerson Borrero (21 2) 564 1 07 5 FUND-RAISING CHRISTMAS PARTY Mexican Ame r ican Women's Nat i onal Association , Hispan i c Bar A s sociation Washington, D . C . Dec . 6 Linda Anguiano (703) 836 MALDEF CORPORATE AWARD DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Los Angeles Dec . 8 Nov. 23 , 1987 Daniel James (202) 429 SPOTLIGHT CHILDREN'S FUND-RAISING DINNER: The Hispanic Advisory Council for Orthopaed i c the la r gest treatment center for bone , Joint, nerve and muscle disorders in the Western United States, and the Association of Friends of PlAcido Domingo will host a gala event Dec . 3 in Los Angeles for needy children served by the International Children ' s Pro gram of the Hospital and for the Domingo association's Children's Bright Horizons Program Linda Ronstadt and Nati Canofnd Los Camperos will be the featured entertainment. More than 51% of the hospitars patients are Latino . For more information call Rose mary Hutton at (213) 748-3958 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS . The Department of Sociology invites ap plications for an Assistant Professor, tenure track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1 988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required Areas of research might i nclude the comparative analysis of public or private sector zations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program . Ph. D . required by September 1988. Salary range for nine-month appointments:$ 31 ,500 -$33,900. Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae , and namesofthree references to : Chair , Organizational Studies Search Com mittee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis. California 9561 6 . Closing date for applications is January 15 , 1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer . Women and minorities are encouraged to apply . ATTORNEY National Civil Rights Organization seeks staff attorney for San Antonio office to conduct a personal case load of litigation and advocacy . Requirements: Two years litigation and advocacy . experience in civil rights or public interest law. Bilingual (English/Spanish) preferred Resume , writing sample, and three references to : MALDEF , The Commerce Bldg . , LTD, 314 E. Commerce St., Suite 200, San Antonio , Texas 78205. By 11/25/87. JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP Washington, D.C . The selected candidate will work, starting in February, as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service , and as a writer for the National Puerto Rican Coalition's publications . He or she will cover all branches of the federal government with emphasis on activities that affect the nation's 22 million Hispanics. The one-year internship is open to an aspiring writer of Puerto Rican heritage who wants to pursue a career in print journalism . It is funded through a grant by the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary. Applicants will be judged on their basic writing skills (emphasis on the English language) , jour nalistic potential and commitment to the pursuit of print journalism as a career. Deadline to apply for the internship is Jan. 4, 1988. Applications may be obtained by contact ing the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1 700 K St NW , Washington , D . C . 20006 (202) 223 3915 or Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW , Wash ington, D . C . (202) 2340737. GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, Washington , D.C., provides : • Design • Illustration • Type setting • Layout • Silkscreen and • Slats. Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St {'JW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483. Hi span ic Link W e ekly Rep ort DEAN OF STUDENTS Borough of Manhattan Community College The City University of New York Search Extended Borough of Manhattan Community College , a two-year college of the City University of New York, invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of Students. The College offers associate degrees and enrolls over 12,000 matriculated students. 70% in career programs and 30% in the liberal arts . The Dean of Students reports directly to the President and is responsible for the development and overall management of the Department of Student Life , including Counseling, Student Activities, Financial Aid, Health Services, the Early Childhood Education Center, and College Discovery Program . The successful candidate will have an advanced degree, preferably a doctorate, in an appropriate discipline ; substantial experience in the area of student affairs ; a commitment to the mission of the urban community college; strong communication and interpersonal skills ; and the ability to work effectively with all members of the college community . Salary and benefits are competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Resumes, nominations and applications should be sent by February 29, 1 988 to: Dean Richard Harris Associate Dean for College and Community Relations Borough of Manhattan Community College 199 Chambers Street New York, New York 10007 An Affirmative Action/ Equal Opportunity Employer FACUL TV POSITION IN COMMUNICATION The Department of RadioTelevision-Film at The University of Texas at Austin is seeking applications for a tenured or tenure-track position beginning in September 1988. The person hired will teach undergraduate and graduate courses in mass communication theory/research and/or international communication . The position requires a Ph . D . , an established record of or strong potential for research , scholarship, and teaching at the college or university level . Applicants should send a letter of application describing academic training and experience, a resume, and the names and telephone numbers of three references to: Horace M. Newcomb, Professor and Chair Department of RadioTelevision Film The University of Texas at Austin Austin, Texas 78712 Screening of applicants will begin immediately and will continue until an appointment is made . The University of Texas at Austin is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer . Applications from women and minorities are strongly encouraged. CLEANING HOUSE ----------Hispanic Link's editorial office has a few boxes of past editions of Weekly Report I f you'd like some for school or organization use , in quantities of 50 to 300, FREE , contact Hector EricksenMendoza . Available by featured subject(i.e . education, employment, politics, enter tainment, census reports) or assorted . You pay postage or pick up at Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. (202) 234. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace , please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city , state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by Organization Street-----------City, State & Zip---------Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment and the Mexican government. Sixty movies from 17 countries were on the festival's roster, including the U .S.' La Bamba GABY PREMIERES: A Mexico-U.S. film with Oscar potential continues in national release after premieres in four North American cities. The Luis Valdez film (to be released in videocassette by RCA/Columbia Pictures Home Video Jan. 28), screened at San Anton ids Guadalupe Theater Nov. 13, during the city's 12th annual CineFestival The Nov. 7 world premiere of Gaby: A True Story, in Acapulco, marked the return of that beach resorfs International Film Festival after a 19-year hiatus. The film tells the story of Gabriela Brimmer, a Mexican writer afflicted with cerebral palsy. Billed as North America's "oldest and largest international Latino film and video exhibition," the event compiled 89 titles from the continental United States, Puerto Rico, six Latin American countries and West Germany for its Nov. 6-15 schedule. The film stars Argentine actress Norma Aleandro (in her English speaking debut) as the Mexican maid who helped Brimmer overcome her handicap, along with Liv Ullman and newcomer Rachel Levine . ONE LINERS: Elektra Records has released Linda Ronstadfs Canciones de mi padre, with several family members joining in on the vocals . . . Cheech Marin performs at a Los Angeles benefit to aid the homeless, on Nov . 24. . . The Nov. 26 edition of Univislon's news series America reports on New York's INTAR Hispanic Theatre . . . Jimmy Smits, of NBC ' s LA Law, has been cast as the third lead in Jane Fonda's upcoming film Old Gringo. The film will be shot in Mexico ... And Patrice Martinez and Val de Vargas are cast in the pilot of Zorro : The Legend Continues, to be shot in Spain (for New World Television's Goodman and Rosen Productions) and due for syndication next fall . . . -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Gaby was written by Martin Salinas and directed by Luis Mandoki. It is a Plnchas Perry-Luis Mandokl Production, released in the U.S. by Tri-Star Pictures. The film has already opened in Toronto, New York and Los Angeles, (which qualifies it for consideration this year for Academy Award nominations). Chicago is the next city on the film's national release schedule (no dates available at press time). Acapulco's Resefla Mundial del Cine was revived this year, under the sponsorship of Mexic;o's entertainment conglomerate Televlsa Media Report HISPANIC LINK INTERNSHIP: The Na tional Puerto Rican Coalition is seeking can didates for a one-year journalism internship with Hispanic Link News Service in Wash ington, D . C . Applicants must be of Puerto Rican descent and want to pursue a career in print journalism. Candidates will be judged on their basic writing skills and journalistic potential. The program is funded through a $27,000 grant from the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary. The internship begins in February and ap plications must be received by Jan. 4, 1988. Applications can be obtained by contacting the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1700 K St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915 or Hispanic Link News Service, 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 2340737. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a nat i onal publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or 234-o737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy . Graphics/Production : Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission . Annual subscription (50 Issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 Issues) $26. SPANISH-LANGUAGE DAILY: The first edition of El Nuevo Herald, the Miami Heralds redesigned Spanish-language daily, was in troduced to South Florida Nov. 21. The publication has added "Nuevo " to the masthead of the former Spanish-language daily, El Miami Herald. El Nuevo Herald has expanded international , national and local news coverage, and added an "Inside Cuba" column. It has nation-by nation reports on Latin America, opinion pages, local Hispanic columnists, an immigration hotline and more community-oriented editorial pages . Roberto Suarez, former president of North Carolina's Charlotte Observer, was hired as publisher. MEDIA CATALOG: The Standard Rate and Data Service has announced it will publish a comprehensive catalog of advertising rates and market data for the Spanish-language market. "Hispanic Media and Markets' ' is designed for media planners and buyers and will be available by March 1 988. The publication will also include a directory of suppliers and service firms serving the Spanish-language market. For a free listing in the publication, call Susan Meier at (312) 441-2236. SALUDOS HISPANOS: This national bi lingual magazine is seeking freelance writers. Published five times a year, Saludo Hlspanos focuses on Latino role-model stories. For writer's guidelines and a copy of the magazine, contact Steve Solomon, 19510 Ventura Blvd, Suite 204, Tarzana, Calif. 91356 MEDIA MOVES: Carolyn Curiel of The Washington Posfs national desk moves to The New York Times' national desk. . . Alfr e d o Cruz, former studio engineer for National Public Radio and a news correspondent for Enfoque Naclonal, recently became En toque Nacional's associate producer and as signments coordinator. En toque Nacional is a Spanish-language news-magazine produced for NPR by KPBS.FM, San Diego . . . -Julio Laboy and Jonathan Higuera CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. "We guarai-ITee all our work.:' 6 Hispanic Link We"kly Report