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Hispanic link weekly report, November 30, 1987

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 30, 1987
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Former League of United Latin American Citizens’ presidents Mario Obledo and Tony Bonilla send letters to Democratic Sens. Alan Cranston and Joseph Blden, members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, opposing the nomination of California federal appeals court judge Anthony Kennedy to the Supreme Court... Herculano Ferr6lez wins the mayoralty of Las Cruces, N.M.. .. Hialeah, Fla, Mayor RaOl Martinez appoints Rolando Bolaftos, head of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, as the provisional chief of the city’s police department. If ratified by the City Council, Bolanos would be the city's first Hispanic chief... Jos6 Rodrlguez-Calderdn,
86, an admiral in the Cuban navy prior to the Castro regime, dies in Miami from gunshot wounds. Rodrfguez-Calderdn and-his great-niece, Martha P6rez, were killed by Perez’s husband... Toronto Blue Jays outfielder George Bell wins the American League’s most valuable player award. Bell, the first Dominican ever to win the award, was voted MVP by the Baseball Writers Association of America .. Golf magazine names Chi Chi Rodriguez its first Senior Player of the Year. Rodriguez won seven times and earned more than $460,000 on the senior tour this year... The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service gives 30-year-old Mexican Martin Hernandez of Chicago a replica of the Statue of Liberty for being the 1 millionth person to have a legalization application processed by INS...
"’^"-^(I^ISPANI^nNK^EE^LyREPORT
804,000 Hispanic Kids Abused
Embroiled RNHA Gets New Chair- Villalpando
The Republican National Hispanic Assembly elected Cathi Villalpando, a San Marcos, Texas, native who served as an assistant to President Reagan in 1983-85, as RNHA chairwoman Nov. 21 in Arlington, Va. The election followed a walkout by 27 of the 171 delegates attending the two-day RNHA convention.
The convention arose out of alleged election irregularities within the Republican National Committee affiliate. An investigative blue ribbon committee was named in April to look into the legality of February elections held in Nashua, N.H., in which Fernando de Baca was re-elected chairman.
“We haven’t brought unity within the organization and that is what we were charged to do,” said Bill Wallace, a member of the committee and Arkansas state chairman. Wallace and two other members of the committee, Maria Garda of New York and George Adams of California, held a small caucus of their respective groups while other RNHA delegates were participating in the elections.
“When the blue ribbon committee... was formed, it was very clear that if anyone walked out of this whole new effort, they would not be recognized as the official body,” said Villalpando, 47, who also participated in the seven-member committee. Villalpando currently serves as a senior vice president for the Washington, D.C., office of Communications International Inc.
New Mexico Republican Party Chairman Edward Luj&n, who headed the blue ribbon committee, said he regretted the walkout but declared a quorum and announced the new officers were duly elected.
Other newly elected officials are co-chairmen Alicia Casanova of Florida and Antonio Mon-roig of Puerto Rico, Secretary George Martinez of New Mexico and Treasurer Rafael Franchi of Washington, D.C.
The delegates who walked out issued a list of grievances, including charges that the new constitution was ratified illegally and that several state chairs did not receive information on Nov. 20 regional caucuses.
The RNC will not respond to those grievances, said spokeswoman Carol Vernon. “RNC Chair Frank Fahrenkopf welcomes Cathi Villalpando as RNHA chair.” - Melinda Machado
The rate of extremely severe abuse suffered by Hispanic children in 1985 was 2.7 times greater than the rate for white children, according to a recent study on domestic violence.
The report, “Violence in Hispanic Families in the United States,” found that the “very severe violence? rate of child abuse for Latinos 17 years and younger was 4.8% per 100 children compared with 1.8% for whites.
Very severe violence was defined as acts by parents which are universally regarded as abusive: kicking, biting, punching, scalding or attacks with weapons.
The report also found that the less severe child abuse rate, the rate which includes hitting with a belt or stick - an accepted societal “norm” - was 13.4% for Latinos compared with 9.8% for whites. The report was based on an English-language survey of 721 Hispanic families. (Weekly Report covered its findings related to spousal abuse Nov. 2.)
Nearly 2,600 “excludable” Marielitos held in federal detention centers will be deported to Cuba as a result of the reinstatement of a four-year-old pact between the United States and the island nation, the U.S. Senate Department revealed Nov. 20. The pact will also allow the entry of perhaps as many as27,000 Cubans into the United States every year.
The affected Marielitos have been indefinitely detained since Cuba President Fidel Castro broke off the immigration agreement in 1985 over the start-up of Radio Marti.
The vast majority of the “excludable” Marielitos are being held in federal centers in Atlanta and Oakdale, La Some were convicted of felonies and misdemeanors while here, others are incarcerated for crimes they committed in Cuba orfor mental problems. Some of the detainees have served their time but continue to be held in accordance with U.S. immigration law, which holds that immigrants convicted of a series of misdemeanors or a felony are deportable.
The announcement of the immigration pact’s renewal spurred riots and the taking of approximately 120 hostages at the Louisiana and Atlanta centers.
“The administration is undoing with the
The study estimated that 288,000 of the 6.1 million Hispanic children living in the United States in 1985 were assaulted, according to the definition of very severe child abuse. It also estimated that 804,000 Hispanic children were assaulted by a parent in a way which is regarded as abuse. >
Although Hispanic children were 9.7% of the number of children in the United Statesin 1984, they were 12% of all reported cases of physically abused children, found the study.
The number of fatal child abuse cases across the country increased by more than 23% in 1986. There are an estimated 2,000 to 5,000 deaths that result each year from child abuse.
The survey is the first ever to focus on Hispanic domestic violence nationally. It was written by Murray Strauss, director of the Family Research Laboratory at the University
continued on page 2
right hand what it is doing with the left,” said Mignon Medrano, referring to the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service’s decision last month that it would expedite the release of Cuban detainees into halfway houses. Medrano is a special assistant to Jos6 Antonio Font,, the executive director of the Cqban American National Foundation. She served as a translator at a Nov. 24 meeting between an assistant U.S. attorney general and 80 relatives of rioting detainees Attorney General Edwin Meese had promised earlier to provide a temporary moratorium on deportations and review of each detainee’s case.
Price Increase Planned
Hispanic Link Weekly Report will increase its annual subscription rate to $108 for individuals and $118 for institutions effective Jan. 1, 1988. The increase is its first since Weekly Report began publication as a four-page newsletter in September 1983.
Present subscribers may extend their subscriptions in December at the current $96-a-year rate no matter when their subscriptions expire.
Renewed Cuba-U.S. Pact Spurs Riots


Pastoral Plan Highlights Latinas, Migrant Farm Workers
The National Conference of Catholic Bishops unanimously approved the first-ever national Hispanic pastoral plan Nov. 18 in Washington, D.C.
The 79-page document pays particular attention to the role of Hispanic women in the dissemination of religion to their families and their limited decision-making power within the church. The pastoral paper also gives prominence to the status of migrant farm workers and the church’s outreach effort to them.
“This(the approval of the pastoral plan) is a tremendously important historical moment” said Father Vicente L6pez, associate director of the U.S. Catholic Conference's Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs.
The urgent need to address Hispanics, said the plan, is evidenced by the fact that 83% of Latinos consider religion to be important while 88% do not participate actively in their parishes.
The plan, one of several voted on by 300 bishops during their Nov. 16-19 meeting,
said Hispanas suffered discrimination on three levels: social, economic and religious. It called forforums throughout the country to study Hispanic women’s history in the church and their current status and to “reflect their gifts of intelligence and compassion...” Also argued for in the document was a fulltime person at the national level to better reach the migrant farm worker. The report pointed to this population’s poor health, living conditions and limited educational opportunities
- Felix Perez
Reported Abuse Up 278% - ’76-’84
continued from page 1
of New Hampshire.
Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations, told Weekly Report that in order to assess child abuse in Hispanic families more accurate national data are needed. She said other reports that collect data exclusively on Latinos must be developed.
Strauss said that the reported incidence rate of abuse among all children climbed by 278% from 1976 to 1984- The report suggests that the dramatic climb is reflective of an increase in the child abuse intervention rate and notan increase in the number of children at risk.
“Yes its true There is more public awareness better reporting and better data collection but the bottom line is that there is also an increase in child abuse,” said Terry Smith, acting director of the clearinghouse branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services? National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect
Strauss admits in the report that all respondents are not likely to be forthcoming in describing violent incidents and that all child abuse rates should be regarded as underestimates
Child abuse data on the national level in general are limited, and finding H ispanic data is even more difficult, according to many health and human service professionals
Kate Bond, an information specialist at the American Humane Association, the acknowledged leader in the collection of child abuse
NPRC Sharpens Agenda
The National Puerto Rican Coalition conducted its seventh annual conference in Philadelphia Nov. 19-20 and drafted a public policy agenda to present to presidential candidates at its next meeting in June.
The agenda will be finalized then, after further input from the coalition’s 62 member-organizations and presented to those White House aspirants who accept its invitation to participate in the Washington, D.C., summer meeting.
The conference attracted more than 250 participants At it, New York business executive Amalia Betanzos was re-elected chairwoman of N PRC’s board of directors 2
data told Weekly Report that the AHA has not developed any reports on Hispanic child abuse exclusively. “Child abuse is no bigger problem among Hispanics than any other group," she said.
Bond said that a reason why the apparent child abuse rates for Latinos appears high is because those who make up large portionsof the nation’s poor are going to be overrepresented in the reporting of cases.
Bond suggested prevention education and better treatment services as other ways to counter child abuse. She said that from 1980-1985 there was a 55% increase in the number of reports of child abuse but only a 2% increase in the resources to treat the children.
- Julio Laboy
Hallmark to Buy Univision
Hallmark Cards is negotiating to acquire Los Angeles-based Univision, the nation’s largest supplier of Spanish-language television programming, it was announced Nov. 19.
Hallmark and Univisa Univision’s parent corporation, have agreed to the acquisition and an agreement is expected next week. Univisa’s asking price was not disclosed.
New Democratic Body Sets$1.5 Million Goal
The National Hispanic Democrata a political organization that debuted Nov. 18 in Washington, D.C., has pledged to raise at least$1.5 million to increase Hispanic participation in the 1988 presidential elections.
U.S. Rep. EstebanTorres(D-Calif), a Mexican American, Marif6 Hernandez, president of The Cultural Communications Group in New York, a Puerto Rican, and Miami Savings Bank Senior Vice President Luis Lauredo, a Cuban American, chair the body.
The U.S. Census Bureau estimated 3.8 million Hispanics were registered to vote in the 1984 presidential election, with slightly more than 3 million turning out The Southwest Voter Registration Education Project reported that 1984 marked the reversal of a decline in Hispanic voter participation, with 48% of those eligible to vote doing so.
NHL) will be governed by a 70-member board of directors Torres said the new organization’s agenda includes asking Democrat presidential candidates to appoint a Hispanic to a cabinet position and having Hispanics impact foreign policy through federal agency and ambassadorial appointments.
Quinones Replacement Battle Grows
New York City Mayor Edward Koch, under mounting pressure from the city’s Hispanic community, said Nov. 23 that he would ask the state legislature to allow him to appoint two more people - one of whom would be Hispanic- to the city’s seven-member Board of Education for the next two years.
An estimated 800 people demonstrated in City Hall Park Nov. 19 to call for the appointment of a Hispanic to the board before the replacement for Chancellor Nathan Quihones is selected. Quinones, who will step down from his post Dec. 31, resigned in August under tremendous criticism primarily centered on the city’s dropout problem.
New Yorks public schools are34% Hispanic. The school board does not have a Latino member. Five members are appointed by the borough presidents and two by the mayor.
State legislative leaders have indicated that the body would not consider Koch’s
proposal until January, when it is back in session Quihones? replacement is expected to be named in December. No Hispanics are considered front-runners for the post. Hispanics want a Latino on the board when the selection is made.
“There's no connection to his (Koch’s) position logically,” said Luis Reyes, the director for educational research at the New York office of ASPIRA.
Koch had asked one of his appointees, Richard Beattie, to resign but rescinded the request after criticism from his other appointee, board President Robert Wagner, and another board member.
Reyes and Luis Gordon Acosta executive officer of El Puente de Williamsburg, a youth agency, pledged to go on a hunger strike starting Nov. 30 until the mayor appoints a Hispanic to the board. Reyes said the mayor must demand the resignation of Beattie.
- Felix Perez
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Ana Veciana-Sudrez, guest columnist
King of the Kitchen
You can’t imagine how disconcerting it was to visit my older brother the other day and find him helping his wife in the kitchen.
I was amazed. Shocked. Flabbergasted. As a matter of fact, I haven’t been the same since.
Was he picking up the plates from the dinner table? Indeed, he was. And, bless his heart, scraping them clean and - oh, my! - putting them in the sink. Then (be still, my heart) he washed them.
Lo and behold, ye unbelievers, my brother - the man who was raised to be king of the castle - washed the dinner dishes.
He knew where the kitchen sink was! He could maneuver the faucet and squirt the Ivory bottle! And what’s more, I saw him hard at work on a pot!
Strike me dead if what I say is not true, but he was doing what I would never have imagined he could.
For hours after this scene, I had heart palpitations. Everything I had been brought up to believe about the sanctity and inability of the Latin male, particularly my brothers, was going down the drain. Literally.
TRAINING FOR WIFEHOOD
Noticing my pallor and disbelief, my sister-in-law kindly explained that her husband not only helps with the dishes but does a myriad of household chores as well: groceries, laundry, tidying up the house and, on occasion, child care.
Well, well, well. He never did any of that when we lived under the same roof. In my family, as in other Latin families, the girls waited on their brothers and father hand and foot
I set the table. He ate from it. I dusted and swept and mopped. He played. I helped make the beds. He slept on them.
It was excellent training for wifehood, especially if you were to marry a Latin man. Actually, if you were marrying any kind of man. I used to believe that non-Hispanics made for more considerate husbands, but my friends’ spouses proved me wrong. They have given machismo a Southern twang. After all, mothers pamper their sons regardless of nationality.
A NECESSARY METAMORPHOSIS
Yet marriage transforms many of those spoiled men, my brother and husband among them. Who would have told me on my wedding day that the man I married is the same man who now irons his shirts and washes his socks and fries his own palomilla steak?
His mother wouldn’t have given him up so willingly, thaf s for sure.
Necessity has a lot to do with this metamorphosis As wives left home for the job market, men had to step in.
In some cases, they were pushed. Acculturation and change don’t happen without effort or resistance.
There are, of course, the holdouts My father has never fried an egg. He has no idea how to turn on the stove, let alone shop for a cut of meat He is, in a few words, useless around the house. And my mother keeps it that way. Very happily.
MOM: THE ENTIRE WORK FORCE
You know the old joke that Cuban American women share: The husband, who is sitting in the kitchen, asks his wife, who is in the bedroom, for a glass of water.
My parents don’t see the humor in it. For them, it is a fact of everyday life. He is the provider, she the homemaker. He is the chief executive officer, she the entire work force.
They've been married for almost 35 years. So when his daughters try to incite her to mutiny, she challenges: “Lef s see if you can beat that”
(Ana Veciana-Suarez, is a reporter and columnist with The Miami Herald, Miami, Fla.) Reprinted with permission of The Miami Herald.
Sin pelos en la lengua
HALL MARK,OR JUST HALLMARK? As the year ’87 began, Sin Pelos looked over the Latino ledger for 1986 and concluded that the biggest moment for U.S. Hispanics that year came when Luis Nogales changed jobs.
He moved from his CEO post at this nation’s No. 2 wire service, United Press International, to head ECO, the news network serving more than400 television affiliates of SIN - now Univision.
Swapping a print medium for a broadcast one, the 43-year-old Nogales, born into a farm-working family in Calexico, Calif., shifted with style from a predominantly English-speaking corporate environment to a predominantly Spanish-speaking one.
In a year when nativism and xenophobia were coming back into vogue, he provided walking, talking proof that knowing more than one language and understanding more than one culture were attributes to be nurtured, not scorned.
Interestingly, those who gave Nogales his opportunities were not U.S. media magnates. Both UPI owner Mario VAzquez Rafta and SIN godfather Emilio AzcArraga Jr. were Mexican nationals.
This September, a few weeks after Hallmark Cards finalized its purchase of 10 U.S. Spanish-language stations owned by Azc&rraga interests, Nogales was promoted by Azc4rraga from his news post to president of Univision itself. Then, this month, Hallmark-which had promised to use Univision properties for at least two years at the Spanish-language stations it had purchased- announced that it had now agreed to buy Univision, too.
Thus* Hallmark has assured itself a ready source of programming.
As Hallmark moves boldly into the U.S. Latino market, it has promised that its intentions are the purest. It wants to continue serving the Spanish-language community, with a greater sensitivity to the information and programming needs of U.S. Hispanics than the stations or the network have shown in the past, it says.
To date, it has done little to support or disprove its claims.
Hallmark’s purchase of the stations is still being challenged by the Hispanic-owned TVL Corp., headed by Washington, D.C., communications lawyer RaOl Tapia. TVL offered $320 million for the stations, more than the reported $301 million which a Los Angeles judge decided Azc4rraga should accept. TVL is taking its case to the U.S. Supreme Court
Who and where are the U.S. Hispanics in the Hallmark hierarchy?
It formed an advisory committee of some respected Latinos and Latinas last year, but we all know how much power advisory committees have.
Assuming its purchase of Univision is completed, it is under no apparent obligation to keep Nogales or any members of the news team he assembled.
We would like to believe “the white man’s promises.”
At present the only yardstick we have to measure Hallmark by is its venture into the Spanish-language greeting card business in the ’60s. It dropped the line in 1974 because of poor sales and waited nearly a decade - when the dollar signs were big enough-to try the market again.
The question lingers: What’s going to happen to Hallmark’s commitment to Spanish-language television when the dollars are greener in the English pasture?
The words “hall mark” are defined as “evidence of sterling quality or genuineness.” I hope, rubbed together, they mean the same thing._________- Kay Bdrbaro
Quoting...
LINDA CHAVEZ, executive director of U.S. English, explaining in the Nov. 8 Los Angeles Herald-Examiner why she was selected for the position:
"/f makes absolute sense that they chose me. They wanted someone who could deal well with conflict, and I have been doing that since I was 2.”
Nov. 30,1987 r-
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
CHI LD ABUSE CATALOG: For a free copy of the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse’s catalog of publications, contact Publishing Department 332 S. Michigan Ave., Suite950, Chicago, IIL 60604 (312) 663-3520.
ABUSE FACT SHEETS: The National Council on Child Abuse provides various fact sheets on the sexual, physical and emotional abuse of children. Contact the group at: 1050 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-6695.
ABUSE HANDBOOKS: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ National Center on Missing and Exploited Children has several free handbooks and guides on what to do about and signs of child abuse. The books include “Just in Case: Sexual Exploitation” and “Just in Case: Babysitter.” Write: The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 1835 K St. NW, Suite 700, 20006 (202) 634-9821.
ABUSE BIBLIOGRAPHY: The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations has a 97-page bibliography on physical and sexual abuse, which includes information on how to gain access to films, slides, videocassettes, books, magazines and reports on child abuse. Send $7.00 to: COSSMHO, 1030 15th Si NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
DROPOUTS: The U.S. Education Department has released 8 75-page report, titled “Dealing With Dropouts: The Urban Superintendents? Call to Action,” which identifies six strategies for keeping at-risk students in school. For a copy of the report (Stock No. 065-000-00321-0), contact Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.)
AIDS NEWSLETTER: The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations publishes a monthly newsletter, COSSMHO AIDS Update, which provides current information on the epidemic and Hispanics. Subscriptions are $30 formembers,$40 for non-members. To receive a free copy of the October newsletter, contact COSSMHO, Elsa Ericksen, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
PUERTO RICO CALENDAR: The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy has issued a pocket calendar with important dates for mainland and island Puerto Ricans. Send a $3.50 prepaid order to: IPRP,286 Fifth Ave, Room 805, New York, N.Y. 10001-4512.
CONNECTING
$50,000 RAISED FOR SCHOLARSHIPS
The Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit, held in Washington, D.C, and Los Angeles during National Hispanic Heritage Week in September, raised approximately $50,000 in scholarships for Hispanic students, it was announced recently.
The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles, the International School of Fine Arts in Miami and Altos de Chavdn in the Dominican Republic were the recipients of the award money. They will disburse the scholarships.
Prior to both fund-raising dinners, a silent auction sponsored by the Mexican American Women’s National Association raised roughly $12,000 in scholarship monies for Latinas in fashion.
CHICANO CONSORTIUM GROWS
California State University at Fullerton became the fourth member of the Chicano Information Management Consortium of California, joining the effort to gather Chicano studies collections.
Chicano collection librarians at UC campuses at Berkeley, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara have been developing a network among established collections of Chicano reference sources, journals, monographs and published studies for more than a year.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
Seton Hall Professor David Abalos will be honored by New Jersey Gov. Thomas Keane Dec. 4 for being named New Jersey Professor of the Year for 1987. It is the first time in New Jersey that a Latino has received the award, sponsored by the Washington, D.C.-based Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. Abalos, who teaches religious studies and sociology, was also named by CASE as one of the top ten professors in the nation for 1987... Julio Barreto, former director of the National Puerto Rican Forum’s Washington, D.C, office, is now a policy analyst for the National League of Cities... Colonel J. George Cisneros, former chief of staff of the90th U.S. Army Reserve command at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio and father of San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, was named the National Easter Seal Society Representative Nov. 19 at the convention of the National Easter Seal Society in Boston. Cisneros will serve as the national volunteer spokesman foradults with disabilities who receive rehabilitation services from Easter Seal. _ ju/io Laboy
Calendar
As it has in the past Weekly Report will compile a list of major1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in early January. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendareditor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
THIS WEEK
MALDEF AWARDS DINNER San Antonio Dec. 2
The third annual Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund San Antonio awards dinner will honor Ernesto Ancira of Ancira Enterprises with the Corporate Responsibility Award, Archbishop Patricio Flores with the Civic Leadership Award and Jos6 CArdenas, executive director of the Intereultural Development Research Association, with the Matt Garcia Public Service Award.
Barbara Aguirre (512) 224-5476 4
CHILDREN’S FUND-RAISING DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 3
The Hispanic Advisory Council for Orthopaedic Hospital, the largest treatment center for bone, joint, nerve and muscle disorders in the Western U.S, and the Association of Friends of Pl&cido Domingo will host an event for needy children served by the International Children's Program of the Hospital and for the association’s Childrens Bright Horizons Program. Linda Ronstadt and Nati Cano and Los Camparos will be the featured entertainment Rosemary Hutton (213) 748-3958
MINORITY FILM GROUP RECEPTION Long Island, N.Y. Dec. 3
Black& Hispanic Images, an organization aimed at increasing the number of black and Hispanic film projects in New York state, is sponsoring a reception. Jocelyn Cordice (718) 729-3232
ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT DANCE New York Dec. 4
The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy is sponsoring its fifth anniversary benefit reception and dance with the music of Cheo Feliciano and his orchestra Gerson Borrero (212) 564-1075
FUND-RAISING CHRISTMAS PARTY Washington, D.C. Dec 6
Nov. 30,1987
The Mexican American Women's National Association and the Hispanic Bar Association are sponsoring a fund-raising party with a silent auction and entertainment
Linda Anguiano (703) 836-8747
COMING SOON
MALDEF CORPORATE AWARD DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund
Los Angeles Dec. 8
Alicia Maldonado (213) 629-2512
BRAZILIAN CULTURAL SHOW Brasilian-American Cultural Institute Washington, D.C. Dec. 11 Joao SobriAo (202) 293-3885
POSADA CHRISTMAS FIESTA Mexico-United States Institute Washington, D.C. Dec. 12 Daniel James (202) 429-6545
IMMIGRATION LAW FORUM
Office of Minority and Multicultural Affairs, Mont
gomery County
Silver Spring, Md. Dec. 16
Marlene Arrleta Weiss (703) 493-2555
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DIRECTOR PUERTO RICAN INSTITUTE SETON HALL UNIVERSITY
The successful candidate will havethefollowing qualifications: Ph.D. preferred; Spanish/ English, bilingual/bicultural skills; proposal-writing skills with evidence of successful acquisition of grants; ability to communicate effectively with students, faculty and administrators; evidence of ongoing community involvement and commitment Teaching experience at the university level with documentation of excellent teaching skills. Possibility of joint administrator/facility tenure track position depending upon academic credentials. Salary negotiable. All responses must be received by December 18,1987. We are seeking to fill the position by January 15,1988. Send all applications and letters of nominations to:
Mr. Francisco Morales
Executive Director of Special Academic Programs Seton Hall University 400 South Orange Ave.
South Orange, New Jersey 07079 Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer
LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS
FOR 1988
The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announce three competitions for Latinos.
• Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the I UP Centers or a public policy institution. One year stipend Deadline: April 15,1988.
• Summer Workshop in Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Transportation and living expenses for four-week summer program. Eligibility: Faculty, researchers, and advanced graduate students. Deadline: April 24,1988.
• Graduate Student Training Seminar. Transportation and living expenses for two-week summer program. Deadline: April 15,1988.
For more information contact Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158,(212) 661-0280, or Harriett Romo, IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Bldg., 4.120, Austin, Tx. 78712, (512) 471 -1817.
JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP Washington, D.C.
The selected candidate will work, starting in February, as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service, and as a writer for the National Puerto Rican Coalition's publications. He or she will cover all branches of the federal government with emphasis on activities that affect the natiorf s 22 million Hispanics.
The one-year internship isopen to an aspiring writer of Puerto Rican heritage who wants to pursue a career in print journalism. It is funded through a grant by the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary.
Applicants will be judged on their basic writing skills (emphasis on the English language), journalistic potential and commitment to the pursuit of print journalism as a career.
Deadline to apply for the internship is Jan. 4, 1988. Applications may be obtained by contacting the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1700 K St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915 or Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 234-0737.
CLEANING HOUSE
Hispanic Link’s editorial office has a few boxes of past editions of Weekly Report If you’d like some for school or organization use, in quantities of 50 to 300, FREE, contact H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza. Available by featured subject (i.e. education, employment, politics, entertainment, census reports) or assorted. You pay postage or pick up at Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 234-0737.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO
CONFERENCE COORDINATOR
Administrative Assistant to Conference Coordinator sought by National Council of La Raza Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience, excellent secretarial skills(type60 wpm), knowledge of computers and word processing, strong coordinating skills and initiative needed. Bilingual (Spanish/English) preferred.
Salary range $14,000 - $16,000. Send resumes to Eileen Torres, 20 F St NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 628-9600 Ext 104. Closing date is December 4,1987.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites applications for an Assistant Professor, tenure-track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988.
Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector organizations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program.
Ph.D. required by September1988. Salary range for nine-month appointments: $ 31,500 -$33,900.
Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Chair, Organizational Studies Search Committee, Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616.
Closing date for applications is January 15,1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Arizona
MANAGEMENT INTERNS, Phoenix, Art-zona. Starting salary $20,000. The City of Phoenix seeks qualified persons who have completed, or will complete, a Master's Degree in Public Administration or a closely related field by June 1988 for its one-year Intern Program. Positions start July 1,1988.
All information and documents required for the application must be received by January 29, 1988.
Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E. Hill, Management and Budget Director, 251 West Washington, Phoenix, Arizona 85003 (602) 262-4800.
AA/EEO/H Employer
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, provides: • Design • Typesetting and Layout Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010(202) 483-7755.
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Arts & Entertainment
MORE ON STAGE: One of the nation’s most prestigious theater organizations stages the world premiere of a play by a U.S. Latino this week.
The play is The Boiler Room, by New York playwright Reuben Gonzdlez, staged by San Diego's Old Globe Theatre. It is directed by Craig Noel, the Globe’s executive producer and founder of its bilingual component, Teatro Meta.
The Boiler Room, a semi-autobiographical drama, was featured in a workshop at the Globe’s 1986 Play Discovery Festival. Thedramawill be staged Dec. 5 to Jan. 17 at the Cassius Carter Center Stage of the Simon Edison Centre for the Performing Arts.
Gonzdlez has written, taught and directed for Theater for the Forgotten in New York, and his short stories and articles have appeared in various publications. He wrote the screenplay for an episode of The Cosby Show, intended as a spinoff for a TV series starringTonyOrlandoacoupleofyearsago. Heisa1987 recipient of
a National Endowment for the Arts playwrighting grant.
For The Boiler Room, actress Karmin Murcelo reprises herworkshop role as the family matriarch, Olga, who struggles to cope with two children and an absent husband.
Back in the Big Apple, performances of Reinaldo Povocfs trilogy of one-act plays La Puta Vida-This Bitch of a Life-continue on stage at the Public Theatre with Rosana de Soto (La Bamba) in a lead role. Povod, a Puerto Rican, is the author of Cuba and His Teddy Bear, a play that was staged successfully last year at the Public and on Broadway. Robert DeNiro, Ralph Maccio and Burt Young starred in the Broadway staging of the play.
ONE LINERS: Writers, editors and researchers from both sides of the border will meet in Guadalajara, Mexico, Dec. 1-3 fora Seminario Mexico-Estados Unidos being staged as part of that city’s Feria Internacional del Libro, through Dec. 6. . . Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead will be featured at the 19th annual Grateful Dead’s New Year Celebration, to be carried live from Oakland, Calif., on the Viewer’s Choice pay-per-view cable channel...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TELEVISION VIEWING REPORT: His-panics view more television - English and Spanish-language - than non-Hispanics, according to a survey released Nov. 19.
Commissioned by Univision and conducted by Information and Analysis Inc., the survey found that Hispanics view32% more television than non-Hispanics, spending an average of 41 hours a week watching TV. Two-thirds of this time is spent watching Spanish-language television.
Non-Hispanics average 31 hours per week.
The study also found that Hispanics aged 18-34 dedicated 58% of their total television viewing time to Spanish-language television.
The study, conducted during November and December 1986, measured 1,571 Hispanics between 18 and 64 years of age in 21 bilingual U.S. markets. In-home interviews were conducted in English or Spanish, depending on the respondents preferences Only
12.2% of the interviews were in English.
RECRUITMENT AWARD: Nominations of persons or organizations that have significantly contributed to the recruitment and retention of Hispanic and black students in high school journalism programs are being sought for the second annual Minority Recruitment Award.
The award, sponsored by the Secondary Education Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, will be presented at the groups annual convention in Portland, Ore., in July.
Nominations must be submitted by Feb. 1. They should include the name and address of the nominee and a supporting letter, and be directed to Mary K. Sparks, Dept of Journalism and Broadcasting, Texas WomePs University, P.O. Box 23866, Denton, Texas 76204.
BENEFIT CONCERT: Rub6n Blades and the comedy troupe Culture Clash will headline a Jan. 3 benefit concert in Los Angeles to promote Americas 2001, a bilingual monthly magazine launched this year by Los Angeles publisher Roberto Rodriguez.
Tickets are $15, $20 and $25. For infor-
mation, contact AMERICAS 2001 at 5315 E. Beverly Blvd., Suite 2, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 727-2046.
OTHER INTERNSHIPS: Hispanic Link News Service anticipates having additional paid internship opportunities beginning early next year. Individuals interested in receiving information on them as they become available should send their names and addresses to Media Report, Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
IN AND AROUND THE MEDIA: Ignacio Lozano, chairman of Lozano Enterprises, the publisher of Los Angeles’ Spanish-language newspaper La Opinion, was elected president of the Inter-American Press Association during the grr ups recent four-day meeting in Chile... Yolan a Nava, reporter and moderator for KCBS-TV in Los Angeles, was honored Nov. 21 with the Panamerican Theatrical Association’s Cesar Award. The award is presented to entertainment literary, business, cultural and media leaders who have made contributions through their work to the Hispanic community...
- Julio Laboy
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OF COURSE vjAe N /ter before, xfa ycuR)
son, mami y
THE MATRIMONIAL‘MACHO MELT’
(see guest column)

6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week 86 an admiral in the Cuban navy prior to the Castro dies in from gunshot wounds. Rodriguez-Calder6n andhis great niece, Martha Perez, were killed by Perez ' s husband . . . Toronto Blue Jays outfielder George Bell wins the American League's most valuable playe r award. Bell, the first Dominican ever to win . the award, was voted MVP by the Baseball Writers Association of America .. Golf magazine names ChiC hi Rodriguez i ts first Senior Player of the Year. Rodriguez won seven times and earned more than $450,000 on the senior tour this year ... The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service gives 30-year-old Mexican Martin Hernandez of Chicago a replica of the Statue of Liberty for being the 1 millionth person to have a legalization application processed by INS ... Former League of United Latin American Citizens' presidents Mario Obledo and Tony Bonilla send letters to Democratic Sens . Alan Cranston and Joseph Bid en, members of the Senate Judiciary Committee , opposing the nomination of California federal appeals court judge Anthony Kennedy to the Supreme Court ... Herculano Ferrlllez wins the mayoralty of Las Cruces, N . M .... Hialeah, Fla . , Mayor Raul Martinez appoints Rolando Bolai'los, head of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, as the provisional chief of the city's police department. If ratified by the City Council, Bolanos would be the city's first Hispanic chief . .. Jose Rodriguez-Calder6n, vot•••-•71 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Embroiled RNHA Gets New ChairVillalpando The Republican National Hispanic Assembl y elected Cat hi Villalpando , a San Marcos, Texas, native who served as an assistant to President Reagan in 1983-85, as RNHA chairwoman Nov . 21 in Arlington , Va. The election followed a walkout by 27 of the 171 delegates attending the two-day RNHA convention. The convention arose out of alleged election irregularities with in the Republ i can National Committee affiliate . An investigative blue ribbon committee was named in April to look into the legality of February elections held in Nashua, N.H., in which Fernando de Baca was re-elected chairman. "We haven't brought unity within the or ganization and that is what we were charged to do," said Bill Wallace, a member of the comm i ttee and Arkansas state chairman . Wal lace and two other members of the committee, Maria Garcia of New York and George Adams of California, held a small caucus of their respective groups while other RNHA delegates were participating in the elections . "When the blue ribbon committee ... was formed, it was very clear that if anyone walked out of this whole new effort, they would not be recognized as the official body," said Villal pando , 4 7 , who also participated in the seven member committee. Villalpando currently serves as a senior vice presiden t for the Washington, D.C., office of Communications International Inc. New Mexico Republican Party Chairman Edward Lujan, who headed the blue ribbon committee, said he regretted the walkout but declared a quor um and announced the new officers were duly elected. Other newly elected officials are co-chairmen Alicia Casanova of Florida and Antonio Mon roig of Puerto Rico , Secretary George Martinez of New Mexico and Treasurer Rafael Franchi of Washington, D . C . The delegates who walked out issued a list of grievances , including charges that the new constitution was ratified illegally and that several state chairs did not receive information on Nov . 20 regional caucuses. The RNC will not respond to those grievances, said spokeswoman Carol Vernon. "RNC Chair Frank Fahrenkopf welcomes Cathi Villalpando as RNHA chair." -Melinda Machado 804,000 Hispanic Kids Abused The rate of extremely severe abuse suffered by Hispanic children in 1985 was 2 . 7 times greater than the rate for white children, accord ing to a recent study on domestic violen ce. The report, "Vi ole nce in Hispanic Families in the United States," found tha t the "very severe violence" rate of child abuse for Latinos 17 years and younge r was 4.8% per 100 children compared with 1.8% for whites. Very severe v iolence was defined as acts by parents which are universally regarded as abusive: kicking, biting, punching, scalding or attacks with weapons. The report also found that the less severe child abuse rate, the rate whi c h includes hitting with a belt or stick an accepted soci eta l "norm"was 13.4% for Latinos corn pared with 9.8% for whites. The report was based on an English-language surv ey of 721 Hispanic families. (Weekly Report covered its findings related to spousal abuse Nov. 2.) The study estimated that 288,000 of. the 6.1 million Hispanic children living in the United States in 1985 were assaulted, ac cording t o the definition of very severe child abuse . It also estimated that 804,000 His panic children were assaulted by a parent in a way which is regarded as abuse. , Although Hispanic children were 9.7% . of the number of children in the United States in 1984, they were 12% of all reported cases pf phys i cally abused children, found the study. The number of fatal child abuse cases across the country increased by more than 23% in 1986. There are an estimated .2,000 to 5,000 deaths that result each year from child abuse. The survey is the first e ver to focus on Hispanic domestic violence nationally. It Vo(as w ritten by Murray Strauss, director o . f the Family Researc h Laboratory at the University continued on page 2 Renewed Cuba-U.S. Pact Spurs Riots Nearly 2 ,600 "excludable" Marielitos held in federal detention centers will be deported to Cuba as a result of the reinstatement of a four-year-old pact between the United States and t he island nation, the U . S . Senate Depart ment revealed Nov. 20. The pact will also allow the entry of perhaps as many as 27,000 Cubans into the United States every year. The affected Marielitos have been indefinitely detained since Cuba President Fidel Castro broke off the immigration agreement in 1985 ove r the start-up of Radio Marti The vast majority of the "excludab le " Marie litos are being held in federa l centers in Atlanta and Oakdale, La Some were convicted of felonies and misdemeanors while here, others are incarcerated for crimes they com mitted in Cuba or for mental problems . Some of the detainees have served their time but continue to be held in accordance with U.S. immigration law, which holds that immigrants convicted of a series of misdemeanors or a felony are deportable. The announcement of the immigration pacfs renewal spurred ri ots and the taking of ap proximately 120 hostages at the Louisiana and Atlanta centers. "The administration is undoing with the right hand what i t is doing with the left,;' said Mignon Medrano, referri ng to the U.S. Im migra t ion and Naturalization Service'sdeeision last month that it would expedite thE! release of Cuban detainees into halfway houses. Medrano is a special assistant to Jose Antonio Font, the executive director of the Cuban American National Foundation. She ser:v,ed as a translator at a Nov. 24 meeting between an assistant U.S. attorney general and 80 relatives o f r ioting detainees. Attorney General Edwin Meese had promised earlier'to provide a temporary morato rium on deportations and re_view of each detainee's case. Price Increase Planned Hispanic Link Weekly Report will increase its annual subscription rate to $108 for indiv iduals and $118 for institutions effective Jan. 1, 1988. The increase is its first since Weekly Repo rt began publication as a four page newsletter in September 1983 . Present subscribers may extend their sub scriptions in December at the current $96rate no matter when their subscriptions expire.

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Pastoral Plan Highlights Latinas, Migrant Farm Workers The National Conference of Catholic Bishops unanimously approved the first-ever national Hispanic pastoral plan Nov. 18 in Washington, D.C. The 79-page document pays particular attention to the role of Hispanic women in the dissemination of religion to their families and their limited decision-making power within the church. The pastoral paper also gives prominence to the status of migrant farm workers and the church's outreach effort to them. "This(the approval of the pastoral plan) is a tremendously important historical moment," said Father Vicente L6pez, associate director of the U.S. Catholic Conference's Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs. The urgent need to address Hispanics, said the plan, is evidenced by the fact that 83% of Latinos consider religion to be impor tant, while 88% do not participate actively in their parishes. The plan, one of several voted on by 300 bishops during their Nov. 16-19 meeting, Reported Abuse Up 278o/o'76...;'84 continued from page 1 of New Hampshire. Jane Delgado, president of the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Ser vices Organizations, told Weekly Report that in order to assess child abuse . in Hispanic families, more accurate national data are needed. She said other reports that collect data exclusively on Latinos must be developed Strauss said that the reported incidence rate of abuse among all children climbed by 278% from 1976 to 1984. The report suggests that the dramatic climb is reflective of an increase in the child abuse intervention rate and not an increase in the number of children at risk. "Yes, ifs true. There is more public awareness, better reporting and better data collection but the bottom line is that there is also an increase in child abuse," said Terry Smith, acting director of the clearinghouse branch of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. Strauss admits in the report that all re spondents are not likely to be forthcoming in describing violent incidents and that all child abuse rates should be regarded as under estimates. data, told Weekly Report that the AHA has not developed any reports on Hispanic child abuse exclusively. "Child abuse is no bigger problem among Hispanics than any other group," she said. Bond said that a reason why the apparent child abuse rates for Latinos appears high is because those who make up large portions of the nation's poor are going to be over represented in the reporting of cases. Bond suggested prevention education and better treatment services as other ways to counter child abuse. She said that from 19801985 there was a 55% increase in the number of reports of child abuse but only a 2% increase in the resources to treat the children. -Julio Laboy Hallmark to Buy Univision Hallmark Cards is negotiating to acquire Los Angeles-based Univision, the nation's largest supplier of Spanish-language television programming, it was announced Nov. 19. Hallmark and Univisa, Univision's parent corporation, have agreed to the acquisition and 'an agreement is expected next week. Univisa's asking price was not disclosed. said Hispanas suffered discrimination on three levels: social, economic and religious. It called for forums throughout the country to study Hispanic women's history in the church and their current status and to" reflect their gifts of intelligence and compassion . . . " Also argued for in the document was a full time person at the national level to better reach the migrant farm worker . The report pointed to this population's poor health, living conditions and limited educational opportunities. Felix Perez New Democratic Body Sets $1.5 Million Goal The National Hispanic Democrats, a political organization that debuted Nov. 18 in Wash ington, D.C., has pledged to raise at least$1.5 million to increase Hispanic participation in the 1988 presidential elections . U .S. Rep. Esteban Torres(D-Calif .), a Mexican American, Marife Hernandez, president of The Cultural Communications Group in New York, a Puerto Rican, and Miami Savings Bank Senior Vice President Luis Lauredo, a Cuban American, chair the body . The U.S. Census Bureau estimated 3 . 8 million Hispanics were registered to vote in the 1 984 presidential election, with slightly more than 3 million turning out The Southwest Voter Registration Education Project re ported that 1984 marked the reversal of a decline in Hispanic voter participation, with 48% o f those eligible to vote doing so. NHL> will be governed by a 70-member board of directors. Torres said the new organi zation's agenda includes asking Democrat presidential candidates to appoint a Hispanic to a cabinet position and having Hispanics impact foreign policy through federal agency and ambassadorial appointments. Child abuse data on the national level in general are limited, and finding Hispanic data is even more difficult, according to many health and human service professionals. Quinones Replacement Battle Grows Kate Bond, an information specialist at the American Humane Association, the acknow ledged leader in the collection of child abuse NPRC Sharpens Agenda The National Puerto Rican Coalition con ducted its seventh annual conference in Phila delphia Nov. 19-20 and drafted a public policy agenda to present to presidential candidates at its next meeting in June. The agenda will be finalized then, after further input from the coalition's 62 member organizations, and presented to those White House aj!pirants who accept its invitation to participate in the Washington, D.C., summer meeting. The conference attracted more than 250 participants. At it, New York business executive Amalia Betanzos was re-elected chairwoman of NPRC's board of directors. 2 New York City Mayor Edward Koch, under mounting pressure from the city's Hispanic community, said Nov. 23 that he would ask the state legislature to allow him to appoint two more people-one of whom would be Hispanicto the city's seven-member Board of Education for the next two years. An estimated 800 people demonstrated in City Hall Park Nov. 19 to call for the appointment of a Hispanic to the board before the replacement for Chancellor Nathan Quinones is selected. Quinones, who will step down from his post Dec. 31, resigned in August under tremendous criticism prima rily centered on the city's dropout problem. New York's public schoolsare34% Hispanic. The school board does not have a Latino member. Five members are appointed by the borough presidents and two by the mayor. State legislative leaders have indicated that the body would not consider Koch's proposal until January, when it is back in session. Quinones' replacement is expected to be named in December. No Hispanics are considered front-runners for the post. Hispanics want a Latino on the board when the selection is made . "There's no connection to his (Koch's) position logically," said Luis Reyes, the di rector for educational research at the New York office of ASPJRA. Koch had asked one of his appointees, Richard Beattie, to resign but rescinded the request after criticism from his other appointee, board President Robert Wagner, and another board member. Reyes and Luis Gordon Acosta, executive officer of El Puente de Williamsburg, a youth agency, pledged to go on a hunger strike starting Nov. 30 until the mayor appoints a Hispanic to the board. Reyes said the mayor must demand the resignation of Beattie. Felix Perez Htspanoc Lmk Weekly Report

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Ana VecianaSuarez, guest columnist King of the Kitchen You can ' t imagine how disconcerting it was to visit my older brother the other day and find him helping his wife in the kitchen. I was amazed . Shocked. Flabbergasted . As a matter of fact , I haven ' t been the same since. Was he picking up the plates from the dinner table? Indeed, he was. And, bless his heart , scraping them clean and-oh, my! putting them in the s ink. Then (be still, my heart) he washed them . Lo and behold, ye unbelievers, my brother -the man who was raised to be king of the castle-washed the dinner dishes . He knew where the kitchen sink was! He could maneuver the faucet and squirt the Ivory bottle! Andwhafs more , I saw him hard at work on a pot! Strike me dead if what I say is not true, but he was doing what I would never have imagined he could. For hours after this scene, I had heart palpitations. Everything I had been brought up to believe about the sanctity and inability of the Latin male , particularly my brothers, was going down the drain . Literally. Sin pelos en Ia lengua HALL MARK, OR JUST HALLMARK? As the year '87 began , Sin Pelos looked over the Latino ledger for 1986 and concluded that the biggest moment for U .S. Hispanics .that year came when Luis Nogales changed jobs. , He moved from his CEO post at this nation ' s No.2 wire service , United Press International , to head ECO, the news network serving more t han 400 television affiliates of Sl N-now Univision. Swapping a print medium for a broadcast one, the 43-yearold Nogales, born into a working family in Calexico, Calif. , shifted with style from a predominantly English-speaking corporate environ ment to a predominantly Spanish-speaking one. In a year when nat i vism and xenophobia were coming back into vogue , he provided walking , talking proof that knowing more than one language and understanding more than one culture were attributes to be nurtured , not scorned . Interestingly, those who gave Nogales his opportunities were not U . S . media magnates. Both UPI owner Mario Vazquez Ral'ta and SIN godfather Emilio Azcarraga Jr. were Mexi can nationals. This September, a few weeks after Hallmark Cards finalized its purchase of 10 U.S. Spanish-language sta t ions o w ned by Azcarraga interests , Nogales was p romoted by Azcarraga from his news post to president of Univision itself . Then , this month, Ha llmark-which had promised t o use Univision properties for at least two years at the Spanish-language stations it had purchased-announced that TRA INING FOR WIFEHOOD it had now agreed to buy Univision, too. Noticing my pallor and disbelief, my sisterin-law kindly explained Thus, Hallmark has assu r ed itself a ready source of programming . that her husband not only helps with the dishes but does a myriad of As Hallmark moves boldly into t he U.S . Latino market , it has household chores as well : groceries, laundry, tidyi ng up the house promised tha t its intentions are the purest. It wants to continue and, on occasion, child care. serving the Spanish-language community, with a greater sensitivity Well, well , well. He never did any of that when we lived under the to the information and programming needs of U.S. Hispanics than same roof. In my family, as in other Latin families, the girls waited on the stations or the network have shown in the past , i t says . thei r brothers and father hand and foot To date, it has done little to support or disprove its claims. I set the table. He ate from it. I dusted and swept and mopped. He Hallmark's purchase of the stations is still being challenged by played . I helped make the beds. He slept on them. t he Hispan i c-owned lVL Corp . , headed by Washington , D . C . , It was excellent training for wifehood, especially if you were to communications lawyer Raul Tapia. lVL offered $320 million for marry a Latin man. Actually, if you were marrying any kind of man . I the stations, more than the reported $301 mill i on wh ich a Los used to believe that non Hispanics made for more considerate Angeles judge decided Azcarraga should accept. lVL is taking its husbands, but my friends' spouses proved me wrong. They have case to the U .S. Supreme Court given machismo a Southern twang . After all , mothers pamper their Who and where are the U.S. Hispanics in t h e Hallmark hierarchy? sons regardless of nationality. It formed an advisory committee of some respected Latinos and A NECESSARY METAMORPHOSIS Latinas last year , but we all know how much power advisory committees have . Yet marriage transforms many of those spoiled men , my brother d h b d th Wh ld h e told me On my dd. Assuming i t s purchase of Univision is completed, it is under no an Us an among em. o wou av we mg apparent obligation to keep Nogales or any members of the news day that the man I married is the same man who now irons his shirts team he assemble d . and washes his socks and fries his own palomilla steak? His mother wouldn't have given him up so willingly, thafs for sure. We would like to believe "the white man's promises." At present, the only yardstick we have to measure Hallmark by is Necessity has a lot to do with t his metamo r phosis. As wives left its venture into the Spanish-language greeting card business in home for the job market, men had to step in. In some cases, they were pushed . Acculturation and change don't the eos. It dropped the line in 197 4 because of poor sales and waited nearly a decadewhen the dollar signs were b i g enough-happen without effort or resistance . to try the market again. There are, of cour se , the holdouts. My father has never fried an The question l ingers: Whafs going to happen to Hallmark's egg. He has no idea how to turn on the stove , let alone shop for a cut commitment to Span i sh-language television when the dollars are of meat. He is , in a few words, useless around the house. And my greener in the English pasture? mother keeps it that way. Very happily . The words " hall mark'' are defined as "evidence of sterling MOM: THE ENT. IRE WORK FORCE quality or genuineness. " I hope, rubbed together, they mean the You know the old joke that Cuban American women share : The same thing. -Kay Barbaro husband, who is si tting in the kitchen, asks his wife, who is in the ••••lllliillll•••• ••••••••••liiiiiliiiiilii bedroom, for a glass of water. My parents don't see the humor in it. For them; it is a fact of everyday life. He is the provider, she the homemaker. He is the chief executive officer, she the entire work force. They've been married for almost 35 years. So when his daughters try to incite her to mutiny, she challenges: "Lefs see if you can beat that" (Ana Veciana-Suarez, is a reporter and columnist with The Miami Herald, Miami, Fla.) R e p r i n t ed wi t h p e rm ission o f T he M i a m i H e r al d . Quoting. • • LINDA CHAVEZ , executive d irector of U . S . English , explaining in the Nov. 8 La's Angeles Herald-Examiner why she was selected for the position: "It makes absolute sense that they chose me. They wanted someone who could deal well with conflict, and I have been doing that since 1 was2. " His p a n i c Link Weekl y Report Nf1v . 30, 1987 3

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COLLECTING CHILD ABUSE CATALOG: For a free copy of the National Committee for Prevention of Child Abuse's catalog of publications, contact: Publishing Department,332 S. Michigan Ave., Suite950, Chicago, IlL 60604 (31 2) 663-3520. ABUSE FACT SHEETS: The National Council on Child Abuse provides various fact sheets on the sexual, physical and emotional abuse of children. Contactthe group at: 1050 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429. ABUSE HANDBOOKS: The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' National Center on Missing and Exploited Children has several free handbooks and guides on what to do about and signs of child abuse. The books include. "Just in Case: Sexual Exploitation" and" Just in Case: Babysitter." Write: The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 1835 K St. NW, Suite 700, 20006 (202) 634-9821. ABUSE BIBLIOGRAPHY: The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations has a 97-page bibliography on physical and sexual abuse, which includes information on how to gain access to films, slides, videocassettes, books, magazines and reports on child abuse. Send $7.00 to: COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 371-2100. DROPOUTS: The U.S. Education Department has released a 75page report, titled" Dealing With Dropouts: The Urban Superintendents' Call to Action," which identifies six strategies for keeping at-risk students in school. For a copy of the report (Stock No. 065-000-00321-0), contact Superintendent of Documents , U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.) AIDS NEWSLETTER: The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations publishes a monthly newsletter, COSSMHO AIDS Update, which provides current information on the epidemic and Hispanics. Subscriptionsare$30 formembers,$40 for non-members. To receive a free copy of the October newsletter, contact COSSMHO, Elsa Ericksen, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100. PUERTO RICO CALENDAR: The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy has issued a pocket calendar with important dates for mainland and island Puerto Ricans. Send a $3.50 prepaid order to: I PRP, 286 Fifth Ave, Room 805, New York, N.Y. 10001. CONNECTING $50,000 RAISED FOR SCHOLARSHIPS The Hispanic Designers Fashion Show and Benefit, held in Wash ington, D .C., and Los Angeles during National Hispanic Heritage Week in September, raised approximately $50,000 in scholarships for Hispanic students, it was announced recently . The Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandising in Los Angeles , the International School of Fine Arts in Miami and Altos de Chav6n in the Dominican Republic were the recipients of the award money . They will disburse the scholarships. Prior to both fundraising dinners, a silent auction sponsored by the Mexican American Women's National Association raised roughly $12,000 in scholarship monies for Latinas in fashion . CHICANO CONSORTIUM GROWS California State University at Fullerton became the fourth member of the Chicano Information Management Consortium of California, joining the effort to gather Chicano studies collections. Chicano collection librarians at UC campuses at Berkeley, Los Angeles and Santa Barbara have been developing a network among established collections of Chicano reference sources, journals, monographs and published studies for more than a year. OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES Seton Hall Professor David Abalos will be honored by New Jersey Gov. Thomas Keane Dec. 4 for being named New Jersey Professor of the Year for 1987. It is the first time in New Jersey that a Latino has received the award, sponsored by the Washington , Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. Abalos, who teaches religious studies and sociology, was also named by CASE as one of the top ten professors in the nation for 1987 ... Julio Barreto , former director of the National Puerto Rican Forum's Washington, D.C., office, is now a policy analyst for the National League of Cities ... Colonel J. George Cisneros, former chief of staffofthe90th U.S . Army Reserve command at Fort Sam Houston in San Antonio and father of San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, was named the National Easter Seal Society Representative Nov. 19 at the convention of the National Easter Seal Society in Boston. Cisneros will serve as the national volunteer spokesman for adults with disabilities who receive rehabilitation services from Easter Seal. _ Julio Laboy Calendar CHILDREN'S FUND-RAISING DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 3 The Mexican American Women's National Association and the Hispanic Bar Association are sponsoring a fund-raising party with a silent auction and entertain ment As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in early January. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234. THIS WEEK MALDEF AWARDS DINNER San Antonio Dec. 2 The third annual Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund San Antonio awards dinner will honor Ernesto Ancira of Ancira Enterprises with the Corporate Responsibility Award, Archbishop Patricio Flores with the Civic Leadership Award and . Jose Cardenas, executive director of the Intercultural Development Research Association, with the Matt Garcia Public Service Award . Barbara Aguirre (512) 224 4 ' The Hispanic Advisory Council for Orthopaedic Ho& pital, the largest treatment center for bone, joint, nerve and muscle disorders in the Western U.S., and the Association of Friends of Placido Domingo will host an event for needy children served by the International Children's Program of the Hospital and for the association's Children's Bright Horizons Program. Linda Ronstadt and Nati Cano and Los Camperos will be the featured entertainment Rosemary Hutton (213) 148 MINORITY FILM GROUP RECEPTION Long Island, N.Y. Dec. 3 Black& Hispanic Images, an organization aimed at increasing the number of black and Hispanic film projects in New York state, is sponsoring a reception Jocelyn Cordice (718) 729 ANNIVERSARY BENEFIT DANCE New York Dec. 4 The Institute for Puerto Rican Policy is sponsoring its fifth anniversary benefit reception and dance with the music of Cheo Feliciano and his orchestra Gerson Borrero (212) 564 075 FUND-RAISING CHRISTMAS PARTY Washington, D.C. Dec. 6 Nov. 30, 1987 Linda Anguiano (703) 836 COMING SOON MALDEF CORPORATE AWARD DINNER Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Los Angeles Dec. 8 t\licia Maldonado(213) 629 BRAZILIAN CULTURAL SHOW Brasilian-American Cultural Institute Washington, D.C. Dec . 11 Joao Sobrillo (202) 293 POSADA CHRISTMAS FIESTA Mexico-United States Institute Washington, D.C. Dec. 1 2 Daniel James (202) 429 IMMIGRATION LAW FORUM Office of Minority and Multicultural Affairs, Mont gomery County Silver Spring, Md. Dec. 16 Marlene Arrieta Weiss (703) 493-2555 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DIRECTOR PUERTO RICAN INSTITUTE SETON HALL UNIVERSITY The successful candidate will have the following qualificat i ons: Ph.D. preferred ; Spanish/ English, bilingual/bicultural skills; proposal-writing skills with evidence of successful acquisition of grants; ability to communicate effectively with students, faculty and admini& trators; evidence of ongoing community involvement and commitment Teaching experience at the university level with documentation of excellent teaching skills. Possibility of joint admin i strator/facility tenure track posit i on depend i ng upon academic credentials. Salary negotiable. AllresponsesmustbereceivedbyDecember 18,1987. We are seekingtofill the position by January 15, 1988. Send all applicat i ons and letters of nominations to: Mr. Francisco Morales Executive Director of Special Academic Programs Seton Hall University 400 South Orange Ave . South Orange , New Jersey 07079 Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer LATINO PUBLIC POLICY FELLOWSHIPS FOR 1988 The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council announce three competitions for Latinos. e Postdoctoral Fellowships working with one of the IUP Centers or a public policy institution. One year stipend. Deadline : April 15, 1988. • Summer Workshop In Statistical Methods at the University of Michigan , Ann Arbor . Transportation and living expenses for four-week summer program. Eligibility: Faculty, researchers, and advanced graduate students . Deadline : April 24, 1988. • Graduate Student Training Seminar. Transportation and living expenses for two week summer program . Deadline : April 15, 1988. For more Information contact: Raquel Ovryn Rivera, Social Science Research Council, 605 Third Ave . , New York, N.Y. 1 0158, (212) 661-0280, or Harriett Romo , IUP/SSRC, Center for Mexican American Studies, Student Services Bldg.,4 .120, Austin , Tx. 78712, (512) 471-1817. JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP Washington, D.C . The selected candidate will work, starting in February , as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service , and as a writer for the National Puerto Rican Coalition's publications . He or she will cover all branches of the federal govern with emphasis on activities that affectthe nation's 22 million Hispanics. The one-year internship is open to an aspiring wnter of Puerto R t can hentage who wants to pursue a career in print journalism . It is funded through a grant by the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary . ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TO CONFERENCE COORDINATOR Administrative Assistant to Conference Co ordinator sought by National Council of La Raza Bachelo(s degree or equivalent experience, excellent secretarial skills(type60 wpm) , know ledge of computers and word processing, strong coordinating skills and initiative needed Bilingual (Span i sh/English) preferred . Salary range $14,000-$16,000. Send re sumesto Eileen Torres , 20 F St NW, 2nd Floor, Washington, D . C . 20001 (202) 628-9600 Ext 104. Closing date is December4, 1987. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR SOCIOLOGY OF ORGANIZATIONS UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS. The Department of Sociology invites ap . plications for an Assistant Professor, tenure track position in sociology of organizations beginning September 1988. Some expertise in international organizations or international development is required Areas of research might include the comparative analysis of public or private sector zations or the organization of development agencies. Teaching responsibilities include courses in complex organizations and a course in the International Agricultural Development program . Ph.D. required by September 1988. Salary range for nine-month appo i ntments:$ 31,500 -$33,90Q. Applicants should send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and names of three references to: Chair , Organizational Studies Search Com . mittee , Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Closing date for applications is January 15, 1988. The University of California is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer . Women and minorities are encouraged to apply . MANAGEMENT INTERNS Phoenix, Arizona MANAGEMENT INTERNS, Phoenix, zona . Starting salary $20,000. The City of Phoenix seeks qualified persons who have completed, or will complete, a Maste(s Degree in Public Administration or a closely related field by June 1988 for its one-year Intern Program. Positions start July 1, 1988. All information and documents required for the application must be received by Janu ary 29, 1988. Applications and further information can be obtained from Charles E. Management and Budget Director , 251 West Wash i ngton , Phoenix, Arizona 85003 (602) 262-4800. AA!EEO/H Employer GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, provides: e Design • Typesetting and Layout. Barrio Gra phics, 1470 Irv i ng St NW, Washington, D . C . 20010 (202) 483-7755. Applicants will be judged on their basic writing skills (emphasis on the English language), jour nalistic potential and commitment to the pursuit of print journalism as a career . Deadline to apply for the internship is Jan. 4, 1988. Applicat i ons maybe obtained by contact ing the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1700 K S t NW , Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915 or Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Wash ington , D .C. (202) 234-0737. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLEANING HOUSE Hispanic Link's editorial office has a few boxes of past editions of Weekly Report If yoU'd like some for school or organization use , in quantities of 50 to 300, FREE, contact Hector Ericksen-Mendoza. Available by featured sub ject(i. e . education, employment , politics, enter tainment, census reports) or assorted. You pay postage or pick up at Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. (202) 234-0737. Hisp a nic Link W e e k ly Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES 75 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $35 per column inch . Ordered by Organization Street------------C ity, State & Zip--'--------Area Code & Phone ---------5

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Arts & Entertainment a National Endowment for the Arts piaywrighting grant. For The Boiler Room, actress Karmin Murcelo reprises her workshop role as the family matriarch, Olga, who struggles to cope with two children and an absent husband . MORE ON STAGE: One of the nation's most prestigious theater organizations stages the world premiere of a play by a U.S. Latino this week. Back in the Big Apple, performances of Reinaldo Povod's trilogy of one-act plays La Puta Vida-This Bitch of a Life-continue on stage at the Public Theatre with Rosana de Soto (La Bamba) in a lead role. Povod, a Puerto Rican, is the'author of Cuba and His Teddy Bear, a play that was staged successfully last year at the Public and on Broadway. Robert DeNiro, Ralph Maccio and Burt Young starred in the Broadway staging of the play. The play is The Boiler Room, by New York playwright Reuben Gonzalez, staged by San Diego's Old Globe Theatre. It is directed by Craig Noel, the Globe' s executive producer and founder of its bilingual component, Teatro Meta The Boiler Room, a semi-autobiographical drama, was featured in a workshop at the Globe's 1986 Play Discovery Festival. The drama will be staged Dec. 5 to Jan. 17 at the Cassius Carter Center Stage of the Simon Edison Centre for the Performing Arts . Gonzalez has written, taught and directed for Theater for the Forgotten in New York, and his short stories and articles have appeared in various publications. He wrote the screenplay for an episode of The Cosby Show, intended as a spinoff for a TV series starring Tony Orlando a couple of years ago. He is a 1987 recipient of ONE LINERS: Writers, editors and researchers from both sides of the border will meet in Guadalajara, Mexico, Dec. 1-3 for a Seminario Mexico-Estados Unidos being staged as part of that city's Feria lnternacional del Libro, through Dec. 6. . . Jerry Garcia and the Grateful Dead will be featured at the 19th annual Grateful Dead's New Year Celebration, to be carried live from Oakland, Calif., on the Viewer's Choice pay-per-view cable channel ... Media Report TELEVISION VIEWING REPORT: Hispanics view more t elevision English and Spanish-languagethan non-Hispanics , according to a survey released Nov. 19. Commissioned by Unlvision and conducted by Information and Analysis Inc . , the survey found that Hispanics view32% more television than nonHispanics, spending an average of 41 hours a week watching TV. Two-thirds of this time is spent watching Spanish-language television. Non-Hispanics average 31 hours per week. The study also found that Hispanics aged 18-34 dedicated 58% of their total television viewing time to Spanish-language television. The study, conducted during November and December 1986, measured 1,571 Hispanics between 18 and 64 years of age in 21 bilingual U.S. markets. In-home interviews were conducted in English or Spanish, de pending on the respondenfs preferences. Only 6 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D .C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy. GraphicS/Production: Carlos Arrion , Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 12.2% of the interviews were in English. RECRUITMENT AWARD: Nominations of persons or organizations that have signif ican tly contributed to the recruitment and reten t ion of Hispanic and black students in high school journalism prog r ams are being sought for the second annual Minority Recruitment Award . The award, sponsored by the Secondary Education Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Com munication, will be presented at the group's annual convention in Portland, Ore., in July. Nominations must be submitted by Feb . 1. They shou ld include the name and address of the nominee and a supporting letter, and be directed to Mary K Sparks, Dept of Journalism and Broadcasting, Texas Women's University , P.O. Box 23866, Denton, Texas 76204. BENEFIT CONCERT: Ruben Blades and the comedy troupe Culture Clash will headline a Jan. 3 benefit concert in Los Angeles to promote Americas 2001, a bilingual mo nth ly magazine launched this year by Los Angeles publisher Roberto Rodriguez. Tickets are $15, $20 and $25. For infor--Antonio Mejias-Rentas mation, contact AMERICAS 2001 at 5315 E. Beverly Blvd., Suite 2, Los Angeles, Calif. 90022 (213) 727-2046. OTHER INTERNSHIPS: Hispanic Link Ne ws Service anticipates having additional paid internship opportunities beginning early next year . Individuals interested in receiving information on them as they become available should send their names and addresses to Media Report, Hispan i c Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20005. IN AND AROUND THE MEDIA: Ignacio Lozano , chairman of Lozano Enterprises, the publisher of Los Angeles' Spanish-language newspaper La Cipinion, was elected president of the InterAmerican Press Association during the grc up's recent four-day meeting in Chile . . . Yola n a Nava, reporter and moderator for KCB&TV in Los Angeles, was honored Nov. 21 with the Panamerican Theatrical Associa tion's Cesar Award. The award is presented to entertainment, literary, business, cultural and media leaders who have made contributions through their work to the Hispanic community ... -Julio Laboy OF COJRSE wivE MET BEFORE:. TM 'foUR 50N1 MA/11. THE MATRIMONIAL 'MACHO MELT' (see guest column) Hispani c Link Weekly Report