Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, December 7, 1987

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, December 7, 1987
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
UtC 1 o 1987
Making The News This Week
Puerto Rico Commissioner Jaime Fuster and Mario Paredes, executive director of the North East Regional Pastoral Center for Hispanics, travel to Haiti as part of a delegation to observe elections there. The 15-member delegation was put together by President Reagan... Florida Commissioner of Education Betty Castor appoints Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez to the newly created Florida Forum for Youth at Risk, a state agency aimed at reducing the state’s dropout rate... The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development includes Jaime Moreno, manager of technical marketing for the Chicago-based Material Services Corp., as one of three U.S. engineers to visit the Soviet Union to study
the durability of concrete structures u nder severe weather conditions... The Corpus Christi, Texas, City Council votes out of office, 5-3, Councilman Frank M6ndez for voting in favor of a city purchase contract on which he received a $5,300 commission... The Washington, D.C. Mayor’s Office on Latino Affairs presents 911 emergency dispatcher Alberto Barnett with an Outstanding Service Award. Barnett, a Panamanian, is credited with saving the life of a 1 1 /2-year-old Salvadoran boy by giving his mother instructions over the phone on resuscitation in Spanish... Pl&cido Domingo Ferrer, a world-famous zarzuela' performer and the father of opera star PI6cido Domingo, dies at the age of 80 of a heart attack in Mexico City... Golfer Lee Trevifto wins $310,000 at the Skins Game in La Quinta, Calif., sinking a hole in one worth $175,000 at the 17th hole...
y°' *« (C^ISPANlc^N^WEEKLTWEP^Rf^ii) 7 ^
Latino Education Gains Slight
Pereira Regains Job, J udge Drops Charges
Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira was reinstated to his post during a special meeting Nov. 26 of the Metro-Dade County Commission after being suspended following an Oct. 16 indictment on three felony counts of theft.
A grand jury indicted Pereira, whose post is the county’s most powerful position, for buying stolen designer suits from an unlicensed vendor. The state said Pereira should have known the suits were stolen.
Dade Circuit Judge David Gersten dismissed all the charges Nov. 25 because it could not be proven the administrator visited the duplex three times. Defense attorneys argued that unless the three visits could be proven, Pereira could not be charged with three counts.
Two Prison Sieges End
Cuban detainees occupying an Atlanta federal penitentiary released Dec. 4 their remaining 89 hostages. The inmates overran the facility Nov. 23 to protest a renewed immigration agreement between the United States and Cuba that would allow the deportation of Marielitos held in federal detainment
The 1,100 inmates who seized the center accepted an agreement with government officials that promises no reprisals for the damage to the prison, review of individual cases, a moratorium on deportation of Marielitos who have completed their sentences and the freedom to seek asylum in any third country that will accept them.
A similar agreement was accepted by Cuban inmates at Oakdale, La., who had overrun a detention center there Nov. 21. The Oakdale inmates released the 26 hostages they held Nov. 29 after signing a less specific agreement Both were witnessed by Auxiliary Bishop Agustfn Roman of Miami’s Archdiocese.
The “excludable” Marielitos are being held for conviction of felony or misdemeanor crimes committed here or in Cuba or are being incarcerated for mental problems. Many of the detainees have completed their sentences and are awaiting deportation. U.S. immigration law holds that immigrants convicted of a series of misdemeanor crimes or a felony are deportable.
Nearly four of 10 Hispanics -37.8%-who were 25 years old or over in 1985 had less than a ninth grade education, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released Dec. 2. Despite gradual decreases from 1982 to
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 25 Years Old and Older (March 1985)
High School College-
Graduates 4 or More Yrs.
HISPANIC 47.9% 8.5%
Female 47.7 7.3
Male 48.5 9.7
BLACK 59.8 11.1
Female 60.7 11.0
Male 58.4 11.2
WHITE 75.5 20.0
Female 75.1 16.3
Male 76.0 24.0
Source: "Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1982 to March 1985"
1985 in the number of Hispanics 25 years of age and older who had eight years of educa-
Ed. Bill Passes in Senate
The Senate passed Dec. 1 an education bill that would reserve 25% of bilingual education funds for teaching methods, including English immersion, other than transitional instruction that includes some native-language instruction. Presently, only 4% of those funds are set aside for programs that do not include some native-language instruction.
tion or less, Latinos continued to trail blacks and whites by considerable margins.
The rate for blacks was 21.8% in 1985; for whites, 13.0%.
Overall, there were 8.5 million Hispanics 25 years and older in 1985, compared with 14.8 million blacks and 124.9 million whites.
Hispanics in this age group also had the lowest percentage of high school graduates-48%. Sixty percent of blacks 25 years and above were high school graduates, while 76%-oTwhites were.
The percentage of whites older than 24 who had four or more years of college was nearly 2 1/2 times greater than that of Hispanics. The Latino rate in 1985 was8.5%.
Among the 15 largest states, Florida had the highest percentage of Hispanics 25 years old and over who had graduated from high schooh59.3%. The next six states among the top 15 with the largest Hispanic populations had these Hispanic high school completion rates;
New Jersey 49.8% Illinois 42.7%
California 47.0% Texas 38.5%
New York 47.0% Mass. 27.8%
The Hispanic high school completion rate among the top 15 metropolitan areas was best in the San Francisco-Oakland, Calif., area. Hispanics there 25 years and older had a 65.5% completion rate. The rates for four other areas with sizable Hispanic populations, in descending order, were;
Chicago 47.0% New York 42.4%
Houston 44.6% L.A.-
Long Beach 41.4%
Educational Attainment Rates by Group
March 1982 to March 1985 25 Years Old and Older
HISPANICS BLACKS WHITES
8 Years H.S. 8 Years H.S. 8 Years H.S.
or Less Grads or Less Grads or Less Grads
1985 37.8% 47.9% 21.8% 59.8% 13.0% 75.5%
1984 38.4 47.0 22.5 58.5 13.3 75.0
1983 39.8 46.2 23.3 56.8 14.1 73.8
1982 40.5 45.9 24.7 55.0 14.7 72.8
Source: “Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1982 to March 1985"


Koch to Appoint Latino to N.Y.C. Board of Education
New York City Mayor Edward Koch will appoint a Hispanic to the city’s Board of Education by the end of the week, a spokesperson for the mayor said Dec. 1. The appointment comes after repeated demands from Hispanic community leaders that Latinos be represented on the body before the selection of a new schools chancellor.
Interviews began Dec. 1 fora replacement for board member Richard Beattie, who resigned Nov. 25 to make room for a Latino. Community leaders had urged that a replacement be made before Public Schools Chancellor Nathan Quiftones steps down Dec.31. The mayor’s commitment came after several
weeks of heated protests and criticism from Hispanics.
The mayor had asked Beattie to resign earlier but backed off after being urged to do so by two other board members. Beattie was a Koch appointee.
The city’s public schools are 34% Hispanic but the school board does not have a Latino member.
“ Richard Beattie acted with great courage in resigning in order that the mayor could name a Latino so that we would have representation on the board of education,” Luis Reyes, the director for educational research at the New York office of ASPIRA told Weekly
Report. Reyes and another supporter had threatened a hunger strike until Koch appointed a Latino.
Reyes also said that a proposal made by Koch to restructure the board is unnecessary. The proposal, to be presented to the state Legislature in January, calls for complete control of an 11 - member board by the mayor. The mayor would select all of its members • Currently, five members are appointed by: the borough presidents and two by the mayor.
“The mayor of the city does not have the track record for us to entrust to him full authority over the schools,” said Reyes
—Julio Laboy
Chi. Latino Aldermen Unite for Vote
Chicago’s four Hispanic aldermen bucked the city’s Democratic machine and voted as a bloc to support Ward 4 Alderman Timothy Evans in an unsuccessful move to install him as successor to the city’s late Mayor Harold Washington. Ward 6 Alderman Eugene Sawyer won the Dec. 2 vote, which came at 4 a.m., with 29 votes to Evans’ 19.
Following Washington’s death Nov. 25, Hispanic aldermen Jesus Garcia (Ward 25), Luis Gutierrez (Ward 26), Judn Soliz (Ward 22) and Raymond Figueroa (Ward 31) said they would unite behind a single candidate for the acting mayor position. Evans was
The New York State Board of Regents announced Nov. 20 the creation of a special three-member panel to study whether Hispanic and other minority students learn differently than whites due to cultural, social or biological factors.
The announcement came two months after the state issued a 110-page booklet,“Increasing High School Completion Rates: A Framework for State and Local Action,” that critics attacked as being racist The booklet first drew the ire of state educators and other officials by including such
The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility, inaugurated Oct. 29,1984, as a partnership between six major national Hispanic organizations and the Adolph Coors Co., commemorated three years of the cooperative relationship in Washington, D.C., Dec. 1.
National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre, who chairs HACER’s governing board, reported that the five-year, $350 million agreement is on track and gaining momentum.
The pact calls for Coors-and Pacific Bell, which joined in April-to aid the Hispanic community through procurement advertising, employment and philanthropic activities in return for positive support from member organizations.
Yzaguirre announced that the National As-
Washington’s floor leader on the council,
Washington supported a court mandated remap of the city’s aldermanic wards which resulted in four new Hispanic majority wards and the holding of special elections in 1986. Hispanic activists cited Sawyer's support of the original redistricting plan, which would have yielded only one Hispanic aldermanic seat
“To say that we’re a little leary of him is an understatement” said Roberto Caldero, a community activist and advisor to Gutierrez.
Sawyer will serve as acting mayor until April 1989. —Melinda Machado
statements about black students as they had a “tendency to approximate space, number and time instead of aiming for complete accuracy.”
The booklet was then revised and expanded to include observations on Hispanics and Asian Americans.
In the new version, it contended that Hispanics displayed “an acceptance of work in moderation.”
The booklet, distributed to 15,000 state educators, has since been pulled from circulation.
sociation of Hispanic Publishers had joined the agreement and that the National Puerto Rican Coalition, a charter member which left HACER in April of 1985, was back in the fold.
Shortly before the commemorative celebration, another charter member, the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, quit.
“They notified us that they were withdrawing because they felt they could do better by themselves,” Yzaguirre told Weekly Report. “It wasn’t a total surprise. The Hispanic chamber and civil rights organizations have very different styles of operation and very different goals.”
Other partnership participants are the League of United Latin American Citizens, National Image, the American G.l. Forum and the Cuban American National Council.
Reagan Selects Lozano
President Reagan Dec. 1 nominated attorney Rudy Lozano to the U.S. Federal District Court for the northern district of Indiana.
Lozano, 45, a senior partner with the Spangler, Jennings, Spangler and Dougherty law firm in Merrillville, Ind., received a personal phone call from the president advising him of his selection. The court is in Hammond, Ind.
“I’m very excited and anxious to take the position, if I can, and do a good job.” Lozano, who was born and raised in East Chicago, Ind., told Weekly Report.
English-Class Suit Fails
The Los Angeles Unified School District will not be required to provide English classes to all t )n-English speaking adults who request mem, a Superior Court judge ruled Dec. 1.
A law suit filed in October by several public interest groups sought to force the school district to provide more English classes.
NHBA to Testify at Kennedy Hearings
Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Mass.), the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, met with the president and president-elect of the National Hispanic Bar Association Dec. 1 and granted the organization a slot to testify at the Judiciary Committee’s hearings on the confirmation of Supreme Court nominee Anthony Kennedy.
Michael Martinez, NHBA’s president,and Mark Gallegos, the president-elect met with White House Chief of Staff Howard Baker Nov.30 inaWhite House effort to solicit the organization’s support for Kennedy. NHBA will announce its stance late this week.
Baltazar Baca, an attorney in private practice in Washington, D.C, and the Washington counsel to NHBA, said the organization was concerned with Kennedy’s membership in all-male clubs, from which he has since resigned, and his narrow rulings on comparable worth.
The Senate Judiciary Committee will begin confirmation hearings Dec. 14.
N.Y. Panel to Study‘Racist9 Booklet
HACER Commemorates Third Year
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Alan C. Nelson, guest columnist
INS and Family Unity
H6ctor and Maria Ortiz, who have been married for 12 years, apply for legalization under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The names are fictitious, but the case is not.
Marla has been here since 1981 and easily qualifies. Hector came later, after Jan. 1,1982-the cutoff date-and is not eligible.
INS takes no steps to deport Hector.
Maria gains permanent resident status and files a petition for her husband to gain permanent resident status also.
The law requires Hector to wait, in his native country, for a visa to become available. Though INS takes no action to find and deport him, he could be picked up during a check at a work place, i When Hector's visa becomes available, he must pick it up at a U.S. consulate in his own country. Then, he and Maria can enjoy the freedoms and opportunities in the U.S.
The uniting of families is at the core of the U.S. immigration system. Each year the overwhelming majority of this nation’s more than 600,000 legal immigrants are immediate family members of U.S. citizens or previous immigrants.
TWO DISTINCT PHILOSOPHIES Historically, however, Congress has followed two distinct philosophies in creating the family-related framework. At times legislation has granted “derivative benefits” to the spouses and children of those allowed to immigrate. At other times, the Congress has decreed that each alien has to be eligible.
The 1986 law is of the second type. Its primary purpose was to stop illegal immigration. The legalization provision is a one-time program to grant legal standing to aliens who had been here for a long time. It was part of a delicate balance carefully constructed to make passage of the bill possible. Even so, the margin in favor of the bill in the House was only seven votes.
Congress did not grant legal status to all undocumented aliens-just to those who had been here five years and met certain other requirements. Nor did it grant derivative benefits to family members of those qualifying. The Senate Judiciary Committee, in its report on the bill, said non-qualified family members of those legalized “will be required to wait in line in the same manner as immediate family members of other new resident aliens.”
INS cannot substitute the derivative benefit approach for the individual eligibility approach to the law. What can it do, in light of its history of trying to keep families together?
ALL ELIGIBLES SHOULD APPLY It can use the concepts of “administrative grace” and “compelling humanitarian reasons” in implementing the law.
For instance, minor children of two legalized parents may be allowed to stay under administrative grace and spouses looked at on an individual basis.
By legalizing their status, individuals can ensure future legal status for their spouses and children. Thus, it is to the benefit of ineligible aliens to have their relatives obtain legal status.
In any event, family members ineligible for legalization will be no worse off than they were prior to the enactment of the ’86 act. Under the law no information from the application can be used against applicants or their families unless they knowingly submit afraudulent application. And even then, humanitarian reasons may defer such deportation indefinitely.
Even if they have family members who do not qualify, people who may be eligible should apply at an INS legalization office or at a church or other organization. This will ensure that their situation is resolved through the lawful immigration process and their family can live without fear of discovery or deportation.
(Alan C. Nelson is Commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.)
Dec. 7,
Sin pelos en la lengua
SHORT ITEM: I wouldn’t even mention the matter, except that Jerry Apodaca, the 6’ 7” former governor of New Mexico, brought it up at HACERs third-year birthday party in Washington, D.C., Dec. 1 *
HACER is the partnership among several major national Hispanic organizations and the Adolph Coors Company.
National Image President Manny OlivArez interrupted the eating and drinking to introduce host Peter Coors, who would have towered over the crowd in stocking-feet.
Then, pulling the microphone way down, came Latino organization presidents Rafil Yzaguirre, of the National Council of La Raza; Oscar Mordn, League of United Latin American Citizens; Mario Diaz, the American G.I. Forum; Zeke Montes, National Association of Hispanic Publishers; and finally Apodaca.
“One good thing about following the distinguished leaders of this coalition,” Apodaca told an appreciative audience,“I don’t have to adjust the microphone.”
After the speeches, Sin Pelos tactfully polled the leaders to provide you with these heretofore unpublished statistics:
Yzaguirre said he’s 5’ 7”.
“Almost,” he added quickly when a few nearby jaws dropped.
Moran, whom Apodaca referred to as “the little giant,” said he is 5’ 6”. (“If he stretches, he’s 5’ 6”,” someone whispered in my ear.)
Zeke Montes, whose publishers group supports official circulation audits for all Hispanic publications, said he’s5’ 6”, and nobody batted an eye.
Diaz and Oliverez both responded 6’ 8 1/2”-and then stared at each other in disbelief. Oliverez pivoted and they went heel-to-heel. When Diaz removed his red-white-and-blue Forumeercap, it appeared to give Olivarez about a half inch edge.
Oliv&rez replaced Annabelle Jaramil'o as Image’s HACER rep when he succeeded her as that organization’s president this summer. “We were glad to see her go,” one member confided to Sin Pelos later. “She was talle<* than all of us.”
Peter Coors left before we could ask him for his measurement, but even he couldn’t escape the debate. We checked with one of his aides. “Six-foot-four,” was the response. “He may think he’s taller, but he’s 6’ 4”.”
CONFESSION BOOTH: A couple of weeks ago, Sin Pelos invited its illustrious readers to join the confession line started by U.S. Supreme Court nominee Douglas Ginsburg, whose admission that he hooted a doobie led to his downfall
We got a taker in A.Baltazar Baca, a founder of the Hispanic Bar Association on Ginsburg’s Washington, D.C. turf.
“Kay, I hooted a doobie or two,” he admitted in his deposition, “but I put a lid on my pot long before Judge Ginsburg. And I also tried more cases than the honorable Supreme Court nominee.”
—Kay Barbaro
Quoting.. .
VERNON WALTERS, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, commenting to a Cable News Network reporter on what to do with the rebellious Cuban inmates in Florida and Louisiana:
"We take lots of Mexicans. The Mexicans might be willing to take them.”
JERRY APODACA president of the Coors-Hispanic community partnership HACER:
“ When somebody comes to me and says, ‘You’re in bed with Coors,’ / say, 'You’re damn right we are and I wish we had more like them.’”
CARLOS CORTES, University of California at Riverside history professor, quoted in the Nov. 11 New York Times on the Hollywood image of Hispanics:
“We’ve gone from being Western bandits to urban bandits.
1987
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
3


COLLECTING
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: “Educational Attainment in the United States: March 1982 to March 1985” is a 123-page report which examines years of education completed using several variables, including age, gender and occupation. For a copy (specify Series P-20, No. 415), contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price was available at press time.)
ENGLISH ONLY: The Cuban American National Council will release this week a 10-page position paper on the English-Only language movement. For a copy send $2 to: CANC, 300 S.W. 12th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33130 (305) 642-3484.
HISPANIC FAMILY NEWSLETTER: The National Hispanic Council on Aging publishes a Spanish-language quarterly newsletter, Proyecto Amor, which includes articles on health, education and history. To subscribe, send $15 to: NHCoA, 2713 Ontario Road, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 226-3375.
LITERATURE AND HISTORY SURVEY: “Literature & U.S. History: The Instructional Experience and Factual Knowledge of High School Juniors” is a 60-page book by the Educational Testing Service which gauges the knowledge of Hispanics, blacks and whites. For a copy send $8.50, plus $1.50 shipping and handling to: NAEP, CN 6710, Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710 1-800-223-0267.
SURGEON GENERAL ON AIDS: The Spanish translation of the U.S. Surgeon General’s report on AIDS is available. To obtain a free copy, contact Centers for Disease Control, Shelley Lengel, Parklawn Building Room 9-24, Rockville, Md. 20857 (301) 443-0292.
UNDOCUMENTED ALIENS AND FEDERAL BENEFITS: “Immigration Reform: Verifying the Status of Aliens Applying for Federal Benefits^ is a report released recently by the U.S. General Accounting Office on the verification data used by the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. For a free copy (specify Acc. No. 134206), write: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
QUINCENTENARY RESEARCH PROPOSALS: The National Endowment for the Humanities seeks scholarship proposals on the 500th anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ voyage to the New World. For more information, write: NEH, Division of Fellowships and Seminars, Room 316,1100 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20505 (202) 786-0466.
COLLEGE PLANNER: The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute Inc. publishes quarterly a College Cost Planner which gives advice on how to finance a college education and on the latest developments in the area For a free subscription, write: CHCI, 504 C St NE, Washington, D.C. 20002(202)543-1771.
CONNECTING
STUDENTS MANAGE CARD BUSINESS The Cuban American National Council’s Little Havana Institute, an alternative school for students at risk of dropping out, recently established a program designed to provide teen-age students with business experience in a multiethnic environment The Saludos program, funded by a $5,000 one-year Dade Foundation grant under the Miamians Working Together Initiative, is a greeting card production and selling enterprise. A student team, which attends three training sessions at Florida International University, designs, markets and sells the English- and Spanish-language cards.
The cards went on sale Nov. 15 and will be available year-round. Series of cards are being produced for Christmas, Valentine’s Day and Mother’s Day. All packages include English-and Spanish-language cards and bilingual cards.
A package of 12 cards is $7.45 and a package of 20 cards $11.90. Make checks payable to CANC and indicate Saludos. Send checks and inquiries to: CANCc/o Little Havana Institute,300 S.W. 12th Ave., Miami, Fla 33130 (305) 642-3484. Ask for Saludos.
NHSF RAISES $56,000
The Nov. 3 Washington, D.C., “Join the Partnership” fund-raiser for the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, which attracted more than 300 people, raised $56,000.
The fund-raiser was one of more than 30 similar“Join the Partnership^ events supported by a $1 million grant from Anheuser-Busch.
The 14-city series of fund-raisers featured prominent Hispanics, including Marta Istomin, The Kennedy Center's artistic director, Luis Nogales, president of the Univision television network, playwright Luis Valdez and Rita Rodriguez, a member of the board of directors of the Export-Import Bank of the United States.
NHSF has provided $3.6 million in scholarships to more than 6,000 scholars since the organization was founded in 1975.
OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES
Former Mexican Ambassador to France and Harvard University professor Carlos Fuentes was awarded the$88,500 Miguel Cervantes prize by Spain’s Ministry of Culture Nov. 25 for his novels, which examine the psychology and culture of his native Mexico . . . Chicago’s Latin United Community Association was honored Dec. 3 with the TRUST 1987 Neighborhood Award for excellence in community organizing. TRUST is a Chicago-based organization concerned with battling urban problems... Loretta Guti6rrez N6stor, marketing specialist for the American Red Cross, has been promoted to executive assistant to the national chairman of volunteers for the American Red Cross in Washington, D.C.... —Julio Laboy
Calendar
As it has in the past Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in early January. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or mail in the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
THIS WEEK
MALDEF CORPORATE AWARD DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 8
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will honor La Opinidn Publisher Jos6 Lozano with its Corporate and Social Responsibility Award during a dinner celebrating 20 years of 4
MALDEF existence.
Alicia Maldonado (213)629-2512
FEDERAL EXECUTIVES LUNCHEON Washington, D.C. Dec. 10
The Association of Hispanic Federal Executives is hosting an installation luncheon for its new officers, including President Gil Sandate of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and Vice President Alex de la Garza of the State Department. U.S. Rep Esteban Torres (D. Calif.) will be the keynote speaker.
Gil Ch4vez (202) 732-3653
AWARDS LUNCHEON San Diego Dec 11
Rudy Beserra, associate director of the White House’s Office of Public Liaison, will be featured speaker at an awards luncheon sponsored by the Mexican and American Foundation. Two of the awards to be handed out are the Caballero and Dama de Distincion.
Ron Valles (619) 232-2244
BRAZILIAN CULTURAL SHOW Washington, D.C. Dec. 11
Dec. 7,1987
The Brasilian-American Cultural Institute will present a cultural show representing a cross section of Brazilian music and dance. Among the artists appearing are composer Sergio Sa, singer Miramar and the Rio Samba Band.
Joao Sobriho (202) 293-3885
POSADA CHRISTMAS FIESTA Washington, D.C. Dec. 12
The enactment of Maria and Jose’s search for lodging will be part of a posada celebration to benefit the Mexico-United States Institute. There will bea Mexican buffet music, pihatas anddancing. The League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of La Raza and the Pan American Development Foundation are among the sponsoring organizations.
Daniel James (202) 429-6545
COMING SOON
IMMIGRATION LAW FORUM Office of Minority and Multicultural Affairs, Montgomery County Silver Spring, Md. Dec 16 Marlene Arrieta Weiss (703) 493-2555
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


ARLINGTON COUNTY JOB OPPORTUNITIES
The following positions close December 18, 1987:
SHORT-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (June 1988 to September 1986)
Salary: $9.059/hr. Announcement #1606-8E-CMG
LONG-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (Minimum of one year)
Salary: $9.421/hr. Announcement #1606-8E-CMG VARIOUS POSITIONS COUNTYWIDE
Graduate Intern positions are designed to provide graduate students with learning experience while performing productive assignments and becoming oriented to the goals, organization, and operations of local government. Interns may be assigned to assist in the development and execution of projects concerning a single program area or may have primary responsibility for projects involving issues impacting major program areas, multiple departments or policy considerations. Interns will work under the supervision and guidance of the senior manager in the organization to which they are assigned. Applicants must be recent graduates from a Master's degree program and not previously employed in the field, or must have completed one semester of graduate study beyond the Bachelor's degree and be currently enrolled in a program leading to a Master's degree in public or business administration, urban and regional planning or other field related to the needs of local government
Note: Please request an official job announcement for special application instructions if you wish to apply for an Intern position.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for. Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 PM on the closing date. To request application material please call (703) 558-2167 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street, North Arlington, Va. 22201 EOE/MFH
Dean
School of Business & Public Administration California State College9 Bakersfield
California State College, Bakersfield (CSB) invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of the School of Business & Public Administration. CSB is the youngest of 19 campuses in the California State University System. The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of 700,000 people located primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. CSB enrolls about 4700 students In baccalaureate and masters degree programs.
The School offers undergraduate and masters degrees in business and in public administration. The degree programs are accredited by AACSB and NASPAA. The School is organized into the departments of Accounting, Finance, Management, Marketing, and Public Policy and Administration.
The Dean is expected to provide leadership for the School of Business & Public Administration in the areas of teaching, academic planning, research, and community relations and support. Responsible to the Vice President for Academic Affairs, the Dean represents the School to the College; external professional constituencies; local, state, and national agencies; and the community.
Qualifications include: (1) an earned doctorate, a record of teaching excellence, and scholarly achievement or creative productivity sufficient to merit an advanced rank appointment; (2) appropriate admnistrative experience leading to the dean's level of responsibility; (3) demonstrated experience in the acquisition of external funding; (4) proven ability to work with faculty, students, other administrators, and members of the community; and (5) competence to assume a leadership role in a public institution of higher education that serves an ethnically and culturally diverse population like that of the Southern San Joaquin Valley; and (6) appropriate experience in the public or private sector desirable.
The position is expected to be filled by August 1, 1988. Salary and benefits are competitive, and commensurate with experience and qualifications. Nominations, or letters of application with resume and names of at least four references should be sent to:
Chair, Search Committee, Dean of Business & Public Administration cfo Vice President for Academic Affairs California State College, Bakersfield 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
For maximum consideration, Deadline for receipt of application materials is January 15,1988. CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer actively seeking qualified candidates from under represented groups.
DOCUMENTARY
FILMS/VIDEOTAPES
International distributorof films and videotapes invites independent producers to submit materials for distribution consideration. Interested in topics dealing with Hispanic issues: Cultural, political and artistic
Send screening tapes to: Ranny Levy, OneWest Media, PO Box 5766, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502-5766.
ASSISTANT
DIRECTOR/TRANSLATOR Experienced, organized and energetic individual with knowledge of word processing, writing and community interface to assist The National Coalition of Hispanic Health & Human Services Organizations (COSSMHO) with multisite alcoholism prevention programs. Proficient English to Spanish translation ability a must Salary to mid twenties.
Contact Paul C&rdenas, COSSMHO, 1030 15th St. NW, Suite 1053, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 371-2100.
SECRETARY
BILINGUAL SECRETARY: $18-$20,000 a year. Contact Manny Olivarez, National Image Inc., 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 695-0105.
JOURNALISM INTERNSHIP Washington, D.C.
The selected candidate will work, starting in February, as a reporter with Hispanic Link News Service, and as a writer for the National Puerto Rican Coalition’s publications. He or she will cover all branches of the federal government, with emphasis on activities that affect the natiorf s 22 million Hispanics.
The one-year internship is open to an aspiring writer of Puerto Rican heritage who wants to pursue a career in print journalism. It is funded through a grant by the Gannett Foundation and provides a $15,000 annual salary.
Applicants will be judged on their basic writing â–  skills (emphasis on the English language), jour-1 nalistic potential and commitment to the pursuit of print journalism as a career.
Deadline to apply for the internship is Jan. 4,
1988. Applications may be obtained by contacting the National Puerto Rican Coalition, 1700 K St NW, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915 or Hispanic Link, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 234-0737.
GRAPHICS: Barrio Graphics, provides: • Design • Typesetting and Layout Barrio Graphics, 1470 Irving St NW, Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755.
SITUATIONS WANTED
RECENT GRADUATE from University of California, Berkeley-B.S. in international relations-wants to relocate to Washington, D.C. Desires entry-level position with international, legal or Hispanic organization. Leticia Sotelo, 950 Pine #302, San Francisco, CA 94108 (415) 771-9747.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts& Entertainment
ART FOR DOLLARS: The trend by U.S. corporations to sponsor Hispanic art shows will continue next year with Expresiones Hispanas, the newly announced 1988-89 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour.
A total of 50 works by the same number of artists will be included in the show, which will open in San Antonio in May and will travel to Los Angeles in July and Denver in Octoberfothercities and dates are not scheduled yet). Some 3,000 works of art are juried for the show, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Company.
The show’s first-place winner was Rafael Soriano, a Miami-based painter. Chicago’s Bibiana Suarez took second place and Seattle’s Alfredo Mendoza Arreguin third. Award monies exceeding $15,000 will be shared by the artists and non-profit Hispanic art organizations of their choice.
An acrylic watercolor by Jose Luis Rodriguez, of Boise, Idaho, was chosen for the Expresiones Hispanas commemorative poster. A color
catalog of the 50 artists and their works will be published by next year.
Another corporate-backed artwork was recently unveiled in California The Los Angeles County/University of California Women’s Hospital received the mural titled Gift of Creativity, from Procter & Gamble.
The Gift of Creativity was designed by muralist Judith Baca and painted by more than 100 children.
In other news: The first major U.S. retrospective of the works of, 15th century Spanish painter Francisco de Zurbaran remains on view at New York’s Metropolitan Museum through Dec. 13 ... The Austin, Texas, Galeria Sin Fronteras has the show LA Prints: Graphics from East Los Angeles through Dec. 31 ... New York’s Americanos collective has the group show Art of the Americas, with wqfks by 18 artists, through Jan. 29 at the Washington, D.C., International Monetary Fund Gallery... And Michigan’s Muskegon Museum of Art has two Hispanic exhibitions— Amo: Paintings by JosS Narezo, through Jan. 17, and Ei Arte Popular 20th Century Mexican Folk Art from the ColleOtion of Linda and Michael Margolin, through Jan. 31 ...
—Antonio Mejias Rentas
Media Report
EDUCATIONAL CHANNEL NEARS: The Hispanic Educational Channel, reportedly the nation’s first Latino oriented public educational channel, will go on the air Jan. 6 in the New York metropolitan area.
Educational and cultural programming will be aired 8 am. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Programs can be viewed on channel 74, for English-language programming, and channel 75 for Spanish-language programming.
“This is a gift from Los Tres Reyes to the city’s Hispanic community,” said Jos& Luis Rodriguez, president of the Hispanic Information and Telecommunications Network and the channel’s president and general director, referring to the Jan. 6 observance of Three Kings Day.
The New York State Legislature approved April 1 $966,500 in start-up funding for the channel.
HARVARD JOURNALISM FELLOWSHIPS: Applications for Harvard University’s Nieman fellowships, awarded annually to approximately 12 journalists, are being solicited.
The fellowships provide an opportunity for media professionals to enroll in nine months of study at Harvard’s undergraduate or graduate schools. Fellows are provided a stipend for living expenses and tuition. Study begins in September.
Application deadline is Jan. 31. Selections will be announced in May. For further information and applications write: Program Officer, Nieman Foundation, Walter Lippman House, 1 Francis Ave, Cambridge, Mass. 02138.
WASHINGTON POST TO DO IMMIGRANT SERIES: The Washington Post has set Dec. 13 as the date it will release its first report of a six-day descriptive series focusing on Washington area immigrants.
The series will look at the special problems and encounters of immigrants-most of whom are Salvadoran-who have arrived here since the late 1970’s.
The series, to which the Post assigned six
of its reporters, will include a poll on the attitudes and acceptance of the immigrants by Washington residents, discussion on the immigrants’ impact on schools, business and the job market.
One of the six reporters, Carlos S&nchez, is Latino.
HNMA RECEIVES GANNETT AWARD: The Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C., was awarded Nov. 30 a $9,700 Gannett Foundation stock certificate.
The certificate will assist in the establishment of a staffed HNMA office.
MEDIA MOVES: Norma Sosa, copy editor at the New York Times, is now the managing editor of the Corpus Christ! Caller-Times... Dioni io Flores, managing editor of The New Mex.jan in Santa Fe, was recently named managing editor of California’s Visalia Times-Delta... Alejandro Garcia- Ramon, an advertising salesman for Spanish-language television stations in New York and Los Angeles, is now in chargeof Caballero Spanish Media’s Miami office...
—Julio Laboy
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher HActor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting; Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Participants at Nov.29 board of directors meeting of National Hispanic Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C., are, seated left to right: Oscar Morftn, League of United Latin American Citizens president; RaOl Yzaguirre, National Council of La Raza president; Noemi Santana, National Conference of Puerto Rican Women president; Jane Delgado, National Coalition of Health and Human Services Organizations executive director; Rita Jaramillo, Mexican American Women’s National Association president; Louis Nuhez, National Puerto Rican Coalition president; and Guarionfe Diaz, Cuban American National Council president
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

UtC 1 0 1987 Making The News This Week the durability of concrete structures under severe weather conditions. .. The Corpus Christi , Texas, City Council votes out of office, 5-3, Councilman Frank Mendez for voting in favor of a city purchase contract on which he received a $5,300 commission ... The Wash ington, D.C. Mayor's Office on Latino Affairs presents 911 emer gency dispatcher Alberto Barnett with an Outstanding Service Award . Barnett , a Panamanian, is credited with saving the life of a 1 1 /2-year-old Salvadoran boy by giving his mother instructions over the phone on resuscitation in Spanish . . . Placido Domingo Ferrer, a world-famous zarzuetaperformer and the father of opera star Placido Domingo, dies at the age of 80 of a heart attack in Mexico City ... Golfer Lee Trevino wins $310,000 at the Skins Game in La Quinta, Calif., sinking a hole in one worth $175,000 at the 17th hole ... Puerto Rico Commissioner Jaime Fuster and Mario Paredes, executive director of the North East Regional Pastoral Center for Hispanics, travel to Haiti as part of a delegation to observe elections there . The 15-member delegation was put together by President Reagan. . . Florida Commissioner of Education Betty Castor appoints Dade County Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Fernandez to the newly created Florida Forum for Youth at Risk, a state agency aimed at reducing the state's dropout rate . . . The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development includes Jaime Moreno, manager of technical marketing for the Chicago-based Material Services Corp. , as one of three U.S . engineers to visit the Soviet Union to study Voi.SNo.•sl HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT ll Dec. 7,1987 Pereira Regains Job, Judge Drops Charges Dade County Manager Sergio Pereira was reinstated to his post during a special meeting Nov. 26 of the Metro-Dade County Commis sion after being suspended following an Oct. 16 indictment on three felony counts of theft. A grand jury indicted Pereira, whose post is the county's most powerful position, for buying stolen designer suits from an unlicensed vendor . The state said Pereira should have known the suits were stolen. Dade Circuit Judge David Gersten dismis sed all the charges Nov . 25 because it could not be proven the administrator visited the duplex three times. Defense attorneys argued that unless the three visits could be proven, Pereira could not be charged with three counts. Two Prison Sieges End Cuban detainees occupying an Atlanta fed eral penitentiary released Dec. 4 their re maining 89 hostages . The inmates overran the facility Nov. 23 to protest a renewed immigration agreement between the United States and Cuba that would allow the depor tation of Marielitos held in federal detainment. The 1,1 00 inmates who seized the center accepted an agreement with government officials that promises no reprisals for the damage to the prison, review of individual cases, a moratorium on deportation of Mariel itos who have completed their sentences , and the freedom to seek asylum in any third country that will accept them. A similar agreement was accepted by Cuban inmates at Oakdale, La., who had overrun a detention center there Nov. 21. The Oakdale inmates released the 26 hostages they held Nov. 29 after signing a less specific agree ment. Both were witnessed by Auxiliary Bishop , Agustin Roman of Miami's Archdiocese . The "excludable" Marielitos are being held for conviction of felony or misdemeanor crimes committed here or in Cuba or are being incarcerated for mental problems. Many i of the detainees have completed their sen tences and are awaiting deportation. U.S . immigration law holds that immigrants con victed of a series of misdemeanor crimes or a felony are deportable. Latino Education Gains Slight Nearly four of 10 Hispanics -37.8%-who were 25 years old or over in 1985 had less than a ninth grade education , according to a U . S . Census Bureau report released Dec . 2 . Despite gradual decreases from 1982 to EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT 25 Years Old and Older (March 1985) High School Collegetion or less, Latinos continued to trail blacks and whites by considerable margins . The rate for blacks was 21.8% in 1985; for whites, 13. 0%. Overall, there were 8 . 5 million Hispanics 25 years and older in 1985, compared with 14. 8 million blacks and 124.9 million whites. Hispanics in this age group also had the lowest percentage of high school graduates48% . Sixty percent of blacks 25 years and above were high school graduates, while 76%.-orwhites were. HISPANIC Female Male BLACK Female Male WHITE Graduates 47 . 9% 47.7 48.5 59. 8 60. 7 58.4 75. 5 75. 1 76. 0 4 or More Yrs . 8 . 5% 7 . 3 9.7 11. 1 11.0 11. 2 20.0 16.3 24.0 The percentage of whites older than 24 who had four or more years of college was nearly 2 1/2 times greater than that of His panics. The Latino rate in 1985 was8.5%. Female Male Source: ""Educational Attainment in the United States : . March 1982 to March 1985"" 1985 in the number of Hispan ics 25 years of age and older who had eight years of educa-Ed. Bill Passes in Senate The Senate passed Dec. 1 an education bill that would reserve 25% of bilingual education funds for teaching methods, including English immersion, other than transitional instruction that includes some native-language inst ruc tion. Presently, only 4% of those funds are set aside for programs that do not include some native-language instruction. Among the 1 5 largest states, Florida had the highest percentage of Hispanics25 years old and over who had graduated from high school-59.3% . The next six states among the top 15 with the largest Hispanic populations had these Hispanic high school completion rates: New Jersey California New York 49.8% 47.0% 47.0% Illinois Texas Mass. 42.7% 38.5% 27.8% The Hispanic high school completion rate among the top 15 metropolitan areas was best in the San Francisco-Oakland, Calif , area. Hispanics there 25 years and older had a 65.5% completion rate. The rates for four other areas with sizable Hispanic populations, in descending order, were : Chicago 47.0% New York 42.4% Houston 4 4. 6% L.A.-Long Beach 41. 4% Educational Attainment Rates by Group March 1982 to March 1985 1985 1984 1983 1982 25 Years Old and Older HISPANICS BLACKS 8 Years H . S . 8 Years H.S. or Less Grads or Less Grads 37. 8% 47. 9% 21.8% 59.8% 38.4 47.0 22.5 58. 5 39.8 46. 2 23.3 56.8 40.5 45.9 24.7 55. 0 Source : ""Educational Attainment in the United States : March 198 2 t o Marc h 1985"" WHITES 8 Years or Less 13.0% 13.3 14.1 14. 7 H . S . Grads 75.5% 75.0 73.8 72.8

PAGE 2

Koch to Appoint Latino to N. Y.C. Board of Education l i New York City Mayor Edward Koch will 'appoint a Hispanic to the city's Board of Education by the end of the week, a spokes person for the mayor said Dec . 1 . The ap . pointment comes after repeated demands : from Hispanic community leaders that Lati • nos be represented on the body before the ! selection of a new schools chancellor. Interviews began Dec. 1 for a replacement for board member Richard Beattie , who re signed Nov . 25 to make room for a Latino . Community leaders had urged that a replace ment be made before Public Schools Chan cellor Nathan Quinones steps down Dec . 31. The mayor's commitment came after several weeks of heated protests and criticism from Hispanics . The mayor had asked Beattie to resign earlier but backed off after being urged to do so by two other board members. Beattie was a Koch appointee. The city's public schools are 34% Hispanic but the school board does not have a Latino member. "Richard Beattie acted with great courage in resigning in order that the mayor could name a Latino so that we would have repre sentation on the board of education," Luis Reyes, the director for educational research at the New York office of ASP IRA, told Weekly Chi. La ti no Aldermen Unite for Vote Chicagds four Hispanic aldermen bucked the city's Democratic machine and voted as a bloc to support Ward 4 Alderman Timothy Evans in an unsuccessful move to install him as successor to the city's late Mayor Harold Washington. Wa r d 6 Alderman Eugene Sawyer won the Dec . 2 vote, which came at 4 a. m . , with 29 votes to Evans' 19. Following Washington's death Nov . 25, Hispanic aldermen Jesus Garcia (Ward 25) , Luis Gutierrez (Ward 26), Juan Soliz (Ward 22) and Raymond Figueroa (Ward 31) said they would unite behind a single candidate for the acting mayor position. Evans was Washington's floor leader on the council. Washington supported a court mandated remap of the city's aldermanic wards which resulted in four new Hispanic majority wards and the holding of special elections in 1986. Hispanic activists cited Sawyer's support of the original redistricting plan, which would have yielded only one Hispanic aldermanic seat "To say that we're a little leary of him is an understatement," said Roberto Caldero, a community activist and advisor to Gutierrez . Sawyer will serve as acting mayor until April 1989. -Melinda Machado N.Y. Panel to Study' Racist' Booklet statements about black students as they had a "tendency to approximate space, number and time instead of aiming for complete ac curacy." booklet was then revised and expanded Report. Reyes and another supporter had 1 i threatened a hunger strike until Koch ap-1 i pointed a Latino. i ' Reyes also said that a proposal made by I• Koch to restructure the board is unnecessary. u The proposal, to be presented to the state Legislature in January, calls for complete control of an 11-memberboard by the mayor. The mayor would select all of its members. Currently, five members are appointed by : the borough presidents and two by the mayor. ,. "The mayor of the city does not have the track record for us to entrust to him full i authority over the schools, " said Reyes. i 1 -Julio Laboy I t Reagan Selects Lozano President Reagan Dec. 1 nominated attor ney Rudy Lozano to the U .S. Federal District Court for the northern d i strict of Indiana . Lozano,45, a senio r partner with the Spangler, Jennings , Spangler and Dougherty law firm in Merrillville, Ind., received a personal phone call from the president advising him of his selection . The court is in Hammond , Ind . • " I'm very excited and anxious to take the position, if I can , and do a good job. " Lozano , who was born and raised in East Chicago, Ind., told Weekly Report . English-Class Suit Fails The Los Angeles Unified School District will not be required to provide English classes to all 1 > n-English speaking adults who re ques ' , nem , a Superior Court judge ruled Dec . 1 . A law suit filed in October by several public interest groups sought to force the school district to provide more English classes. The New York State Board of Regents announced Nov . 20 the crea t ion of a special three-member panel to study whether His panic and other minor ity students learn differently than whites due to cultural , social or biological factors . to include observations on Hispanics and r-----------------, The announcemen t came two months after the state issued a 11 0 -p age booklet , " I ncreas ing High School Com pletion Rates : A Frame work for State and Local A c t ion, " that critics attacked as being racist The booklet fi rs t d rew the ire oi' state edu cators and other offi ci als b y including such Asian Americans. In the new version, it contended that His panics displayed "an acceptance of work in moderation . " The booklet, distributed to 15,000 state educators, has since been pulled from circu lation . HACE R C o m memorates Third Year The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility, inaugu rated Oct. 29, 1984, as a partnership between si x major national His panic organiza t ion s an d the Adolph Coors Co., commemora ted t hree years of the co operative relationshi p in W a shington, D.C. , Dec. 1. National Council of La Raza President Raul Yzaguirre , who chairs HAGER ' s governing board, reported that the five-year, $350 million agreement is on track and gaining momentum . The pact calls for Pacific Bell , which joined in April-to aid the Hispanic community through procurement, advertising, employment and philanthropic activities in re turn for positive s u p port from member organ izations. Yzaguirre announced that the National As-2 sociation of Hispanic Publishers had joined the agreement and that the National Puerto Rican Coalition , a charter member which left HAGER in April of 1985, was back in the fold . Shortly before the commemorative cele bration, another charter member, the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce , quit. "They notified us that they were withdrawing because they felt they could do better by themselves," Yzaguirre told Weekly Report. " It wasn't a total surprise . The Hispanic chamber and civil rights organizations have very different styles of operation and very different goals." Other partnership participants are the League of United Latin American Citizens, National Image, the American G. I. Forum and the Cuban American National Council. NHBA to Testify at Kennedy Hearings Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Mass.), the chair man of the Senate Judiciary Committee, met with the president and p r esident elect of the National Hispanic Bar Assoc i ation Dec . 1 and granted the organization a slot to testify at the Judiciary Committee's hear ings on the confirmat i on of Supreme Court nominee Anthony Kennedy . Michael Martinez , NHBA's president , and Mark Gallegos, the president elect, met with White House Chief of Staff Howard Baker Nov .30 in a White House effort to solicit the organization's support for Kennedy . NHBA will announce its s t ance late this week. Baltazar Baca, an attorney in private prac tice in Washington , D .C, and the Washington counsel to NHBA, said the organization was concerned with Kennedy's membership in all-male clubs , from which he has since resigned , and his narrow rulings on compa rable worth. The Senate Judiciary Committee will begin confirmation hearings Dec . 14. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

C. Nelson, guest columnist INS and Family Unity Hector and Maria Ortiz, who have been married for 12 years, apply for legalization under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986. The names are fictitious, but the case is not. Maria has been here since 1981 and easily qualifies. Hector came later, after Jan . 1, 1982-the cutoff date--and is not eligible. JNS t;ikes no steps to deport Hector. Maria gains permanent resident status and files a petition for her husband to gain permanent resident status also . . The law requires Hector to wait, in his native country, for a visa to be .come available . Though INS takes no ac tion to find and deport him, he could be picked up during a check at a work place . _ When Hector's visa becomes available, he must pick it up at a U .S. consulate in his own country. Then, he and Maria can enjoy the freedoms and opportunities in the U.S. The uniting of families is at the core of the U.S. immigration system . Each year the over whelming majority of this nation's more than 600,000 legal immigrants are immediate family members of U.S. citizens or previous immigrants . TWO DISTINCT PHILOSOPHIES Sin pelos en Ia lengua SHORT ITEM: I wouldn't even mention the matter, except that Jerry Apodaca, the 5 ' 7" former governor of New Mexico, brought it up at HAGER's third-year birthday party in Washington , D . C . , Dec . 1 . HAGER is the partnership among several major national Hispanic organizations and the Adolph Coors Company. National Image President Manny Ollverez interrupted the eating and drinking to introduce host Peter Coors, who would have towered over the crowd in stocking-feet. Then, pulling the microphone way down, came Latino organization presidents Raul Yzaguirre, of the National Council of La Raza ; Oscar Moran, League of United Latin American Citizens; Mario Dlaz, the American G . I. Forum; Zeke Montes, National Association of Hispanic Publishers ; and finally Apodaca . "One good thing about following the distinguished leaders of this coalition," Apodaca told an appreciative audience, "I don't have to adjust the microphone. " After the speeches, Sin Pelos tactfully polled the leaders to provide you with these heretofore unpublished statistics : Yzaguirre said he's 5' 7". "Almost," he added quickly when a few nearby jaws dropped. Moran, whom Apodaca referred to as "the little giant, " said he is 5 ' 6". ("If he stretches, he's 5 ' 5"," someone whispered in my ear . ) Zeke Montes, whose publishers group supports official circulaHistorically, however, Congress has followed two distinct phi loser tion audits for all Hispanic publications, said he's5' 6", and nobody phies in creating the family-related framework. At times legislation batted an eye . has granted "derivative benefits" to the spouses and children of Diaz and Oliverez both responded 5' 8 1 /2"-and then stared at those allowed to immigrate. At other times, the Congress has each other in disbelief. Oliverez pivoted and they went heel-todecreed that each alien has to be eligible . heel . When Diaz removed his red-white-and-blue Forumeercap, it The 1986 law is of the second type. Its primary purpose was to stop appeared to give Oliverez about a half inch edge. illegal immigration. The legalization provision is a one-time program Oliverez replaced Annabelle Jarammo as Image's HAGER rep to grant legal standing to aliens who had been here for a long time. It when he succeeded her as that organization's president this was part of a delicate balance carefully constructed to make passage summer. "We were glad to see her go," one member confided to of the bill possible. Even so, the margin in favor of the bill in the House Sin Pelos later . "She was tall e • than all of us . " was only seven votes . Peter Coors left before we c.ould ask him for his measurement, Congress did not grant legal status to all undocumented aliens-just but even he couldn't escape the debate. We checked with one of to those who had been here five years and met certain other his aides . " Six-foot four," was the response . "He may think he' s requirements. Nor did it grant derivative benefits to family members taller, but he's 6' 4"." of those qualifying. The Senate Judiciary Committee, in its report on the bill, said non-qualified family members of those legalized "will be CONFESSION BOOTH: A couple of weeks ago, Sin Pelos invited d t 't 1 • • th anner as mmedl'ate fam 1 1y its illustrious readers to join the confession line started by U.S . requ1re o wa1 m me m e same m 1 members of other new resident aliens." Supreme Court nominee Douglas Ginsburg, whose admission INS cannot substitute the derivative benefit approach for the that he hooted a doobie led to his downfall. individual eligibility approach to the law . What can it do, in light of its We got a taker in A. Baltazar Baca, a founder of the Hispanic Bar h . t f t t k f 'l'es togethe"" Association on Ginsburg's Washington, D.C. turf. IS ory o rymg o eep am1 1 '' "Kay, I hooted a doobie or two, " he admitted in his deposition, ALL ELIGIBLES SHOULD APPLY "but I putalidon my pot long before Judge Ginsburg. And I also It can use the concepts of "administrative grace" and " compelling tried more cases than the honorable Supreme Court nominee." humanitarian reasons" in implementing the law . -Kay Barbaro For instance, minor children oftVJo legalized parents may be allowed •••••••••••••••••••••••••• to stay under administrative grace and spouses looked at on an individual basis. By legalizing their status, individuals can ensure future legal status for their spouses and children. Thus, it is to the benefit of ineligible aliens to have their relatives obtain legal status. In any event, family members ineligible for legalization will be no worse off than they were prior to the enactment of the '86 act. Under the law no information from the application can be used against , applicants or their families unless they knowingly submit a fraudulent . application. And even then, humanitarian reasons may defer such deportation indefinitely. Even if they have family members who do not qualify, people who may be eligible should apply at an INS legalization office or at a church or other organization. This will ensure that their situation is resolved through the lawful immigration process and their family can live without fear of discovery or deportation. (Alan C. Nelson is Commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service.) Quoting. • • VERNON WALTERS, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, commenting to a Cable News Network reporter on what to do with the rebellious Cuban inmates in Florida and Louisiana : "We take lots of Mexicans. The Mexicans might be willing to take them" JERRY APODACA, president of the Coors-Hispanic community partnership HAGER : " When somebody comes to me and says, ' You're in bed with Coors,' 1 say, ' You're damn right we are and I wish we had more like them"' CARLOS CORTES, University of California at Riverside history professor , quoted in the Nov. 11 New York Times on the Hollywood image of Hispanics : "We've gone from being Western bandits to urban bandits. " Hispanic Link Weekly Report Dec . 7, 1987 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT: "Educational Attainment in the t------C ....... .... United States: March 1982 to March 1985" is a 123-page report . STUDENTS MANAGE CARD BUSINESS which examines years of education completed using several variables, The Cuban American National councirs Little Havana Institute, an including age, gender and occupation. For a copy (specify Series P-20, alternative school for students at risk of dropping out, recentlyestabNo . 415), contact: Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government lished a program designed to provide teen-age students with business Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238. (No price experience in a multiethnic environment was available at press time.) The Saludos program, funded by a$5,000 one-year Dade Foundation ENGLISH ONLY: The Cuban American National Council will grant under the Miamians Working Together Initiative, is a greeting release this week a 1 0-page position paper on the English-Only card production and selling enterprise. A student team, which attends language movement. For a copy send $2 to: CANC, 300 S.W. 12th three training sessions at Florida International University, designs, Ave., Miami, Fla 33130 (305) 642-3484. markets and sells the Englishand Spanish-language cards . HISPANIC FAMILY NEWSLETTER: The National Hispanic Council The cards went on sale Nov. 15 and will be available year-round. on Aging publishes a Spanish-language quarterly newsletter, Proyecto Series of cards are being produced for Christmas, Valentine's Day Amor, which includes articles on health, education and history. To and Mother's Day . All packages include Englishand Spanish-Jansubscribe, send $15 to: NHCoA, 2713 Ontario Road, Washington, guage cards and bilingual cards . D.C. 20009 (202) 226-3375. A package of 12 cards is$7.45 and a package of20 cards $11 . 90. LITERATURE AND HISTORY SURVEY: "Literature & U . S . History: Make checks payable to CANC and indicate Saludos. Send checks The Instructional Experience and Factual Knowledge of High School and inquiries to: CANC c/o Little Havana lnstitute,300 S.W. 12th Ave., Juniors" is a 60-page book by the Educational Testing Service which Miami, Fla . 33130 (305) 642-3484. Ask for Sa/udos. gauges the knowledge of Hispanics, blacks and whites. For a copy NHSF RAISES $56,000 send $8.50, plus $1.50 shipping and handling to: NAEP, CN 6710, The Nov. 3 Washington, D.C.," Join the Partnership" fund-raiser for Princeton, N.J. 08541-6710 1-800-223-0267. the National Hispanic Scholarship Fund, which attracted more than SURGEON GENERAL ON AIDS: The Spanish translation of the 300 people, raised $56,000. U.S. Surgeon General's report on AIDS is available. To obtain a free The fund-raiser was one of more than 30 similar" Join the Partnership" copy, contact Centers for Disease Shelley Parklawn events supported by a $1 million grant from Anheuser-Busch. Building Room 9-24, Rockville, Md. 20857 (301) 443-0292. The 14-city series of fund-raisers featured prominent Hispanics, UNDOCUMENTED ALIENS AND FEDERAL BENEFITS: "lmincluding Marta lstomin, The Kennedy Center's artistic director, Luis migration Reform: Verifying the Status of Aliens Applying for Federal Nogales, president of the Univision television network, playwright Benefits" is a report released recently by the U.S. General Accounting Luis Valdez and Rita Rodriguez, a member of the board of directors of Office on the verification data used by the U .S. Immigration and the Export Import Bank of the United States. Naturalization Service. For a free copy (specify Ace . No. 134206), NHSF has provided $3.6 million in scholarships to more than 6,000 write: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. scholars since the organization was founded in 1975. QUINCENTENARY RESEARCH PROPOSALS: The National OTHER PLACES, OTHER FACES Endowment for the Humanities seeks scholarship proposals on the Former Mexican Ambassador to France and Harvard University SOOth anniversary of Christopher Columbus' voyage to the New professor Carlos Fuentes was awarded the$88,500 Miguel Cervantes World. For more information, write: NEH, Division of Fellowships prize by Spain's Ministry of Culture Nov. 25 for his novels, which and Seminars, Room 316, 1100 Pennsylvania Ave . NW, Washington, examine the psychology and culture of his native Mexico ... D.C. 20505 (202) 786-0466. Chicago's Latin United Community Association was honored Dec. 3 with the TRUST 1987 Neighborhood Award for excellence in comCOLLEGE PLANNER: The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute munity organizing. TRUST is a Chicago-based organization concerned Inc. publishes quarterly a College Cost Planner which gives advice on with battling urban problems ... Loretta Gutierrez Nestor, marketing howtofinanceacollegeeducationandonthelatestdevelopmentsin specialist for the American Red Cross , has been promoted to the area For a free subscription, write: CHCI, 504 C St NE, Washington, executive assistant to the national chairman of volunteers for the D.C. 20002 (202) 543-1771. American Red Cross in Washington, D .C.... -Julio Laboy Calendar As it has in the Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1988 conferences, seminars and ban quets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will be published in early January . Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or mail in the following information : date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone num ber of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 2340280. THIS WEEK MALDEF CORPORATE AWARD DINNER Los Angeles Dec. 8 . The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educa tional Fund will honor La Opini6n Publisher Jose Lozano with its Corporate and Social Responsibility Award during a dinner celebrating 20 years of 4 MALDEF existence . Alicia Maldonado (213) 629-2512 FEDERAL EXECUTIVES LUNCHEON Washington, D . C . Dec . 1 0 The Association of Hispanic Federal Executives is hosting an installation luncheon for its new officers, including President Gil Sandate of the Equal Em ployment Opportunity Commission and Vice Presi dent Alex de Ia Garza of the State Department. U . S . Rep. Esteban Torres (D. Calif.) will be the keynote speaker . Gil Chavez (202) 732 AWARDS LUNCHEON San Diego Dec. 11 Rudy Beserra, associate director of the White House's Office of Public Liaison, will be featured speaker at an awards luncheon sponsored by the Mexican and American Foundation. Two of the awards to be handed out are the Caballero and Dama de Distinci6n. Ron Valles (619) 232 BRAZILIAN CULTURAL SHOW Washington, D.C. Dec . 11 Dec . 7 , 1987 The Brasi/ian-American Cultural Institute will pr& sent a cultural show representing a cross section of Brazilian music and dance . Among the artists pearing are composer Sergio Sa, singer Miramar and the Rio Samba Band. Joao Sobrii'lo (202) 293 POSADA CHRISTMAS FIESTA Washington, D . C . Dec . 12 The enactment of Maria and Jose's search for lodging will be part of a posada celebration to benefit the Mexico-United States Institute . There will be a Mexican buffet, music, piiiatas and dancing. The League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of La Raza and the Pan American Development Foundation are among the sponsoring organizations. Daniel James (202) 429 COMING SOON IMMIGRATION LAW FORUM Office of Minority and Multicultural Affairs, Mont gomery County Silver Spring, Md . Dec. 16 Marlene Arrieta Weiss (703) 493 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ARLINGTON COUNTY JOB OPPORTUNITIES The following positions close December 18, 1987: SHORT-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (June 1988 to September 198S) Salary: $9.059/hr. Announcement #1606-8E-CMG LONG-TERM GRADUATE INTERN (Minimum of one year) Salary: $9.421/hr. Announcement #1606-8E-CMG VARIOUS POSITIONS COUNTYWIDE Graduate Intern positions are designed to provide graduate students with learning experience while performing productive assignments and becoming oriented to the goals, organization , and operations of local government. Interns may be assigned to assist in the development and execution of projects concerning a single program area or may have primary responsibility for projects involving issues impacting major program areas, multiple departments or policy considerations. Interns will work under the supervision and guidance of the senior manager in the organization to which they are assigned. Applicants must be recent graduates from a Master's degree program and not previously employed in the field, or must have completed one semester of graduate study beyond the Bachelor's degree and be currently enrolled in a program leading to a Master's degree in public or business administration , urban and regional planning or other field related to the needs of local government. Note: Please request an official job announcement for special application instructions if you wish to apply for an Intern position. All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. A separate form must be completed for each position applied for . Resumes submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted . Applications must be received into the Personnel Department no later than 5 PM on the closing date . To request application material please call (703) 558-21 67 or TOO (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only). ARLINGTON COUNTY Personnel Department 2100 14th Street , North Arlington , Va. 22201 EOE/MFH Dean School of Business & Public Administration California State College, Bakersfield California State College, Bakersfield (CSB) Invites applications and nominations for the position of Dean of the School of Business & Public Administration. CSB is the youngest of 19 campuses In the California State University System. The campus serves the metropolitan Bakersfield population of 250,000 and a growing and diverse population of 700,00
PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment catalog of the 50 artists and their works will be published by next year. ART FOR DOLLARS: The trend by U.S. corporations to sponsor Hispanic art shows will continue next year with Expresiones Hispanas, the newly announced 1988-89 Coors National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour. Another corporate-backed artwork was recently unveiled in Califor nia The Los Angeles County/University of California Women's Hospital received the mural titled Gift of Creativity, from Procter & Gamble. The Gift of Creativity was designed by muralist Judith saca and painted by more than 100 children. A total of 50 works by the same number of artists will be included in the show, which will open in San Antonio in May and will travel to Los Angeles in July and Denver in October(other cities and dates are not scheduled yet). Some 3,000 works of art are juried for the show, sponsored by the Adolph Coors Company. In other news: The first major U.S. retrospective of the works of. 15th century Spanish painter Francisco de Zurbaran remains on view at New York's Metropolitan Museum through Dec. 13 ... The Austin, Texas, Galeria Sin Fronteras has the show LA Prints: Graphics from East Los Angeles through Dec. 31 ... New York's Americanos collective has the group show Art of the Americas, with WOJkS by 18 artists, through Jan. 29 at the Washington, D.C., International Mone tary Fund Gallery ... And Michigan's Muskegon Museum of Art has two Hispanic exhibitions-Amo: Paintings by Jose Narezo, through Jan. 17, and El Arte Popular: 20th Century Mexican Folk Art from the Collection of Linda and Michael Margolin, through Jan. 31 ... The show's first-place winner was Rafael Soriano, a Miami-based painter. Chicago's Bibiana Suarez took second place and Seattle's Alfredo Mendoza Arreguin third. Award monies exceeding $15,000 will be shared by the artists and non-profit Hispanic art organizations of their choice. An acrylic watercolor by Jose Luis Rodriguez, of Boise, Idaho, was chosen for the Expresiones Hispanas commemorative poster. A color -Antonio Mejias Rentas Media Report EDUCATIONAL CHANNEL NEARS: The Hispanic Educational Channel, reportedly the nation's first Latino oriented public edu cational channel, will go on the air Jan. 6 in the New York metropolitan area. Educational and cultural programming will be aired 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Programs can be viewed on channel 74, for English-language p rogramming, and channel 75 for Spanish-language program ming. "This is a gift from Los Tres Reyes to the city's Hispanic community," said Jose Luis Rodriguez, president of the Hispanic Infor mation and Telecommun ications Network and the channel's president and general director, referring to the Jan. 6 observance of Three Kings Day. The New York State Legislature approved April 1 $966,500 in start-up funding for the channel. HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-Q737 6 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy. Graphics/Production: Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues) $96. Trial subscription (13 issues) $26. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. HARVARD JOURNALISM FELLOWSHIPS: Applications for Harvard University's Nieman fellowships, awarded annually to appro xi mately 12 journalists, are being solicited. The fellowships provide an opportunity for media professionals to enroll in nine months of study at Harvard's undergraduate or grad uate schools. Fellows are provided a stipend for living expenses and tuition. Study begins in September. Application deadline is Jan. 31. Selections will be announced in May. For further informa tion and applications write: Program Officer, Nieman Foundation, Walter Lippman House , 1 Francis Ave., Cambridge, Mass . 02138. WASHINGTON POST TO DO IMMI GRANT SERIES: The Washington Post has set Dec. 13 as the date it will release its first report of a six-day descriptive series focusing on Washington area immigrants. The series will look at the special problems and encounters of immigrants-most of whom are Salvadoran-who have arrived here since the late 1970's. The series, to which the Post assigned six of its reporters, will include a poll on the attitudes and acceptance of the immigrants by Washington residents, discussion on the immigrants' impact on schools, business and t he job market. One of the six reporters, Carlos Sanchez, is Latino. HNMA RECEIVES GANNETT AWARD: The Hispanic News Media Association of Wash ington, D.C., was awarded Nov. 30 a $9,700 Gannett Foundation stock certificate. The certificate will assist in the establish ment of a staffed HNMA office. MEDIA MOV!:S: Norma Sosa, copy editor at the New York Times, is now the managing editor of tl'le Corpus Christi CallerTimes. .. Dion i 1 0 Flores, managing editor of The New Me;... . .;an in Santa Fe, was recently named managing editor of California's Visalia Times-Delta ... Alejandro GarciaRamon, an advertising salesman for Spanish-language television stations in New York and Los Angeles, is now in charge of Caballero Spanish Media's Miami office ... -Julio Laboy Participants at Nov.29 board of directors meeting of National Hispanic Leadership Conference In Washington, D.C., are, seated left to right: Oscar Moran, League of United Latin American Citizens president; Raul Yzaguirre, National Council of La Raza president; Noeml Santana, National Conference of Puerto Rican Women president; Jane Delgado, National Coalition of Health and Human Services Organizations executive director; Rita Jaramillo, Mexican American Women's National Association president; Louis Nul\ez, National Puerto Rican Coalition president; and Guarione Diaz, Cuban American National Council president. Hispanic Link Weekly Report