Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, December 21, 1987

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, December 21, 1987
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.) requests an independent probe by the Office of Special Investigations of the U.S. General Accounting Office into the 1985 slaying of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Camarena was killed in Guadalajara, Mexico. . . New York City Mayor Edward Koch appoints Sally Hem&ndez-Piftoro as commissioner of Financial Services and chairman of the city’s Financial Services Corporation. Hernandez-Pifiero, 34, currently serves as the deputy borough president of Manhattan... The California Postsecondary Education Committee announces that former state Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will head its advisory panel to assess California schools? commitmentto providing
equal opportunity for Hispanics, blacks and other minorities... Denver Mayor Federico Pefta appoints RuMn Valdez, former speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives and former director of the state's Department of Labor and Employment, to the city’s Career Service Board... Dr. HacibAoun, a 32-year-old Venezuela-born cardiologist, agrees to drop his $35 million lawsuit agMhSt Johns Hopkins Hospital. Aoun sued the Maryland hospital for libef Zander and breach of confidentiality for revealing he had AIDS. Aoun contracted the disease while working as a medical resident at the hospital and piercing his finger with a broken tube of tainted blood. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed... Amoldo Aragones, a therapist at Southwest Detroit Community Health Services, receives the Michigan Hispanic Mental Health Association’s 1987 Outstanding Health Therapist of the Year Award...

New Study Redefines U.S. Salvadoran Immigrant
The percentage of Salvadoran immigrants who came to the United States since 1980 and consider themselves political refugees has risen to 49%, up from 19% for those who arrived between 1941*1979, according to a Salvadoran university study which will be formally released to U.S. media next year.
The finding contradicts the belief upon which the Reagan administration bases its asylum policy toward Salvadorans. The administration claims nearly all came for economic reasons.
The Spanish-language study, “El Salvador 1987: Salvadoran Refugees in the United States," reported respondents living here gave these reasons for immigrating:
1941-1979 1980-1987
Economic 58.0% 36.1%
Political 7.8 28.5
Both 10.8 20.6
Study 4.2 2 3
Declined/Other 19.2 12.5
Directed by Segundo Montes, a professor at Central American University in San Salvador and director of the university’s Human Rights Institute, the study showed that 50% of those who arrived in 1980 and after are urbanites and 48% do not plan to return despite leaving immediate family behind.
The study also found that 10% of the recent immigrants are here legally, 17% are in the process of obtaining legal residence, 73% are undocumented, 56% are employed and speak“passable/good” English, 41% work at jobs requiring skilled labor and 8% are professionals. Those immigrants who came from Salvadoran urban areas average 12% more years Of education than their urban peers
New York state’s recently established Puerto Rican/Hispanic Task Force will meet at Manhattan’s Museo del Barrio Dec 21 to announce the group's goals and directives and to seek general support According to Roberto Calderln, the task force’s executive director, the group is the first in the nation formed specifically to address Hispanic concerns through legislation.
who remained and 30% more than rural Salvadorans.
Forty nine percent of the males and 40% of the females work in skilled occupations. The next largest category of male occupations is unskilled labor - 40%. Domestic work was the second most prevalent occupation among females - 35%.
Montes' study was funded partially by Georgetown University of Washington, D.C, and assisted in its data collection by Salvadoran consulates and U.S. refugee organizations As part of the study, 2,121 Salvadorans residing in El Salvador with relatives in the United States and 1,330 immigrants in the United States were surveyed.
Montes also conducted 27 in-depth interviews with relatives- in El Salvador- of Salvadoran immigrants and performed case studies of two Salvadoran towns, IntipucA and Casitas both known to have lost 60-80% of their populations to migration.
The surveys and interviews also found that
Junfpero Serra Beatified
Pope John Paul II approved Dec. 11 the beatification of Junfpero Serra, the 18th century, Spain-born missionary who founded a line of missions along the California coast
Beatification is the second step toward sainthood. The papal approval endorsed a finding by Vatican investigators that Serra interceded in the miraculous cure in 1960 of a nun suffering from lupus, a chronic disease of the connective tissue. To grant canonization, the Vatican must conclude that a second miracle occurred because of Serra’s intervention.
The task force is composed of 30 assembly men who have Hispanic constituencies of 15% or greater. Twentyfive of its members are non-Hispanic.
The task force will sponsor its first conference, Somos Uno- We Are One - March 13-15 in Albany. Housing, health and education will be among several topics addressed at the Albany gathering, Calderln said.
the recent immigrant averages a little less than nine years education and sends roughly $115 a month to relatives in El Salvador. The money sent back to El Salvador, which the study estimated at $113 million monthly, represents 46% of the recipients’ incomes.
Salvadorans in this country, estimated to number between 900,000 and 1 million, constitute the fourth largest U.S. Hispanic group behind Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans. The report said an additional 250,000 reside in other Central American countries and Mexico. In 1986 El j Salvador counted 5.7 million residents.
“If our nation loses almost 20% of its popu-continued on page 2
Cities Support Roybal Bill
The Laredo,Tex.,City Council unanimously passed a resolution Dec. in support of Congressman Edward Roybal's (D-Calif.) Family Unification Act.
The resolution was sponsored by Councilman Jos6 Valdez and supported by the Texas Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights and the League of United Latin American Citizens.
The act prohibits the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service from utilizing funds to deport undocumented individuals whose family members have been legalized. It was attached to the House appropriations bill, which was approved Dec. 4. The bill is now in a congressional joint conference committee.
El Paso and Chicago recently passed resolutions in favor of Roybaf s legislation and a similar resolution was to be presented to the Houston City Council Dec. 16.
HLWR Resumes Jan. 4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report will not publish the week of Dec 28. It will resume Jan. 4.
The subscription rate tor Weekly Report will increase to $108 for individuals and $118 for institutions effective Jan 1. Current subscribers may extend their subscriptions at the present $96-a-year rate in December regardless of when their subscriptions expire:
N.Y. Latino Legislative Body to Meet


Mariel Detainee Review Process Called Inadequate
The U.S. Justice Department established Dec 11a process to re-examine the status of more than 7,600 Mariel detainees con-sidered“excludable” Cuban American leaders, advocacy groups and lawyers forthe imprisoned Cubans called the procedures inadequate.
The process is based on the pacts that ended the prison sieges in Oakdale, La, and Atlanta
“ It (the procedure) has some positive points and it has some elements that are missing. Ifs a plan that we have to work upon and build upon in order to see that justice is done,” Rafael PeAalver, attorney for Miamf s Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Romdn, told Weekly Report Romdn played a key role in settling
both prison uprisings.
PeAalver said that on the positive side, a review mechanism has been established and the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will not be on the appeal panel. The Justice Department has said that INS would be stripped of the power to decide which detainees could be paroled, according to Rep Pat Swindail(R-Ga).
The panels are composed of three Justice Department officials
Advocates for the detainees are wary of the review process, which does not allow the detainees to present evidence The procedure also does not permit detainees to rebut testimony on file against them, utilize full
assistance of counsel, make oral presentations or cross-examine witnesses.
“It falls short of due process,” said PeAalver. A document issued Dec. 11 by the Justice Department says: “The decision to repatriate is final and subject to no further review or appeal.”
Some are satisfied with the plan. Aida Betancourt, spokesperson for families of detainees who met with officials during the prison disturbances, said, “We believe the U.S officials will be very human.”
According to PeAalver, he and Roman were to meet with Justice Department officials in Washington Dec. 18 in an attempt to review the departmenf s plan. - Julio Laboy
Chi. Latino Political Clout Projected
An estimated46% increase among Chicago's Latino population from 1980 to 1990 could result in at least three more Latino aldermanic wards and one additional seat in the state legislature, according to a report released Dec. 15 by the Latino Institute.
The report, “Latino Perspectives for 1990: New Numbers, New Leverage,” analyzes the population changes in Chicago’s Hispanic communities and possible political implications “The report shows the Latino population is not only growing but in what specific areas of Chicago,” said Latino Institute Research Director John Attinasi.
Prior to 1986, Chicago had one Hispanic alderman out of 50. A special election in 1986, following a court-mandated redistricting plan, resulted in four Latino aldermen.
“Because Latinos will comprise one-fifth of all Chicagoans in 1990, an equitable goal
lation to migration and if most of that group is young, educated, skilled and so productive as to contribute 46% of the income of relatives they left behind, El Salvador will have suffered an irreparable damage,” Montes told Weekly Report “I see it as a hemorrhage,” he added.
The cities where the vast majority of Salvadorans have settled are Los Angeles(350,000), Washington, D.C., (150,000), New York and San Francisco (100,000 each).
Forty-eight percent of U.S. Salvadorans arrived since 1982, the report said.
The U.S. Senate is expected to vote next month on a bill that would provide a two-year moratorium on the deportation of Salvadorans until the General Accounting Office completes 2,
should be to have ten of the 50 aldermen in the City Council representing Latinos,” the study says The Chicago Department of Planning projects there will be615,513 Hispanics jn 1990, or 20% of the city’s population.
According to Attinasi, a new Latino ward could be created in Chicago’s Southside and two others on the Northside. “Whoever is the alderman will have to pay attention to Latinos and the economic sector will have to realize the growth and potential for services,” he said.
The Latino Institute points to other key electoral implications:
• Redistricting the 21st and 22nd state representative districts to include greater concentrations of Latinos should result in another Latino state legislator.
• At least 18 wards will have5,000 or more
Hispanics. - Melinda Machado
a study on the extent of human rights abuses in El Salvador. The House passed the legislation, the Moakley-DeConcini bill, in July.
The Reagan administration’s belief that Salvadoran immigrants came here for economic reasons shapes its asylum policy toward the group, say refugee advocates. The latest figures show that 5% of the Salvadorans who apply for asylum are accepted. The acceptance rate for Nicaraguans is86%.
Duke Austin, a spokesman for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, said some of the statements in Montes’ study are “arguable at best." He said“evidence of persecution of deported Salvadorans is nonexistent in the 10,000 cases I am aware of.”
- Robert Riccio
Hispanic Bar Endorses Kenned^ s Nomination
the Hispanic National Bar Association endorsed Supreme Court nominee Anthony Kennedy in testimony presented Dec. 16 before the Senate Judiciary Committee.
According to Baltazar Baca, HNBA’s Washington, D.C., counsel, Kennedy was not endorsed unanimously. Serious concerns were aired during HNBA’s testimony regarding Kennedy’s past decisions on civil rights.
The organization has never presented oral testimony in the selection of a Supreme Court judge. HNBA has more than 4,000 members.
Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, also testified before the committee. MALDEF did not take a position by press time.
Obledo Elected Chairman
Mario Obledo, a former League of United Latin American Citizens president, was elected Dec 13 to chair the National RainbowCoalitioiYs 100-member national board of directors.
Obledo, a Sacramento attorney, will serve a two-year term for the political advocacy group, which was founded by the Rev. Jesse Jackson in 1984. It has 50,000 members nationwide.
Jury Convicts Policemen
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury Dec. 10 found two Huntington Park, Calif., police officers guilty of torturing a handcuffed, 17-year-old Salvadoran to elicit a confession.
William Lustig and Robert Rodriguez were convicted of felony assault under the color of authority and misdemeanor inhumane treatment of a prisoner.
Jaime Ramirez, now 18 years old, was arrested by a third officer in November 1986 on suspicion of stealing car stereo I equipment. Lustig and Rodriguez arrived at the arrest scene, where Ramirez said the two took turns applying several shocks to his inner thighs with an unauthorized stun gun.
Chicago Population Trends and Projections
GROUP 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010
Latino 3.4% 7.3% 14.1% 20.3% 25.4% 30.2%
Black 22.9 32.7 39.5 40.8 39.7 36.7
White 76.4 65.5 43.8 37.0 29.4 26.4
Total* 3.55 3.37 3.01 3.03 3.01 3.04
*ln millions
Source: “Latino Perspectives for 1990: New Numbers*. New Leverage!’
Half of Salvadorans Arrive Since ’82
continued from page 1
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Armando Mena, guest columnist
Visiting Sinta Claes
Barbara, my 4-year-old, is on Santa's lap, whispering in his ear.
Francisco, 1 1/2, has already accepted the red and white candy cane and is tongue-testing it. His big brown eyes evaluate the red and white man who bounces his sister. In Francisco’s mind, he has in no way compromised himself by accepting the gift. If impulse dictates, it would be his legal and moral right to cry or go back and pull Santa’s beard.
the
Julia, 10, and Laura, 9, observe. Pensive Julia. Inscrutable Laura.
On the way to see Santa, Julia and I had been discussing the Hispanic influence in California. A school assignment prompted her interest (My reward for voting Yes on School Bonds, I thought.)
We talked about foods and street names and what Easterners call the “casual California manner.” We touched on pihatas, tile roofs, art and clothing styles. I even confessed mi envidia- my envy- that her tias Antonia and Maria were the Virgin Mary in the annual posadas, while the most I ever rated was fourth candle in procession.
FROM LOS ANGELES TO MEXICO CITY
Our conversation traveled from Olvera Street in Los Angeles to Mexico City, with its magnificent Christmas light displays. The latter image apparently took time to settle in.
Now, watching her sister animate her long list of desires to the red and white man, Julia demands:
“Daddy, what did Hispanics contribute to our American Christmas?”
“Mena, Mena, Mena,” I encourage myself. I rack my brain. How is this descendant of Montezuma, Geronimo, Garza and Cortez going to answer that question? If s worse than being on both sides of the Alamo. Maybe I should have voted No on School Bonds.
Then it comes to me - the vision of Dutch children and adults waving and cheering as a swarthy man dressed in bright red approaches them in a tiny boat He calls out in Spanish and waves.
SINTA CLAES - THE HISPANIC LINK “Mija,” I announce, “our Hispanic link is Santa Claus himself.” Every Dec. 6,1 relate to her, Santa Claus and his original elf, Black Peter, a small Moor, leave Spain in their boat and head for Amsterdam. When Sinta Claes- as the Dutch call him- reaches shore, he asks the parents if their children have been good or bad.
Sinta is wearing an ornate bishop’s miter. He walks aided by a golden crook Sinta Claes, as honored by the Dutch, is Saint Nicolas of Bari, Turkey. He is the patron saint of merchants, women of marriageable age, pawn brokers and, most important, sailors.
He has survived a Protestant reformation, church schisms and Madison Avenue advertising with only a couple of letters changed in his name. Undoubtedly, he will outlive this column, too.
CHEATING THE DEVIL
Around 300 A.D. he was cheating the Devil out of sailor’s lives and providing bags of gold for the dowries of destitute maidens and ransomed generals.
It was the Spanish sailors who first brought St. Nicolas to America. They named a port in his honor on Columbus’ first voyage to Haiti. Later they established a small town in Florida, St. Nicolas Ferry, now known as Jacksonville.
“Mija,” I conclude, “Hispanics cannot claim Santa Claus entirely, but we did contribute something, just as the Dutch, Germans, Italians and Americans did.”
My recitation pleases her. I can read it in her soft, watery eyes. As her younger sister dismounts Santa Claus, J ulia walks over and takes her by the hand.
“Did you know,” I hear her whisper, “that Santa Claus is Chicano?” (Armando Mena works as a marketing consultant in Vienna, Va. This column first ran in Hispanic Link News Service in 1980.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelosen la lengua
‘TIS THE SEASON: As Christmas approaches, fellowship and good will sweep across the land. Well, almost..
UNWELCOME WAGON: My holiday holly corsage goes to the folks who live in and around our nation’s capital.
As part of its six-part series, “The New Immigrants,” which concluded this weekend, The Washington Post asked 1,319 randomly chosen area residents how newly arrived members of certain national-origin groups affected the community.
Coming in next to last in the Posts ethnic popularity contest were Salvadorans, who are without doubt the area’s most exploited residents: 13% of the respondents said Salvadorans made the area a better place to live; 18% said they made it a worse place to live.
Most unwelcome of all were Iranians, with an 11% better, 28% worse rating.
All the other groups received more “better” votes than “worse” ones: Koreans 33%- 8%, Vietnamese 37%-13%, Filipinos 28% -6%, Africans 21 % - 11 %, and West Indians 20% - 10%.
ANOTHER REBUFF: As is its custom, Englancfs Oxford University picked 32 U.S. students to become Rhodes Scholars this month-but, alas, as happens far more often than not, it couldn’t find a single U.S. Latino or Latina who met its high standards
AND A WELCOME: I’ve always stood in awe of merchants and demographers who could count with such precision that they could determine exactly who ate a fast-food chain’s 10 billionth hamburger or who was the 240 millionth baby born in this country.
It also struck me as odd coincidence that the honorees were always such pleasant, personable, photogenic people.
When pleasant personable, photogenic Martin HemAndez, a 30-year-old Mexican residing in Chicago, was recently identified to the press as the one-millionth person to apply for legalization, I immediately called Immigration & Naturalization Service spokesman Verne Jervis to find out how I NS (which was a wee bit off on some of its other estimates this year) could count across thousands of square miles with such instant precision.
But to no avail “Scientific,” is all he would tell me. “Very scientific.”
He probably doesn’t want the Russians to learn our high-tech free-world marketing techniques.
CATCH OF THE YEAR: The New York cops arrested a lady bank robber suspect this month who is believed to have pulled off a string of six heists since September. She was described in the New York Post as having an “attractive reddish-brown leonine mane” which, it reported, she snipped short just before her capture. “She” turned out to be 32-year-old Frank HernAndez.
Quote the Post: “Investigators did not recover HernAndez* s gun, the $11,000, his wardrobe - or his electric curlers.”
POLITICAL HIGHLIGHT OF THE YEAR: The Florida weekly newspaper El Sol de Hialeah, owned by that city's Mayor Raul Martinez, charged while he was running for re-election that his opponent Nilo Juri dyes his moustache.
Gary Hart no doubt wishes that The Miami Herald had stayed home and checked that one out instead of following him to Washington.
YEAR-END MYSTERY: With so many new Latino magazines coming onto the scene this year hoping to tap that elusive national Hispanic market, I’m wondering what ever happened to Nuestro-the magazine that raised the hopes and spirits of so many of us when it debuted a dozen years ago.
The last issue we saw was months ago. It shut down its editorial office in Washington, D.C., this fall and moved to New York But when we dial the telephone number that we had for it there, an operator tells us that the phone has been disconnected.
Any subscribers left out there Who can offer me a clue?
- Kay B&rbaro
Dec. 21,1987


COLLECTING
CHICAGO HEALTH SURVEY: The Latino Institute has released a 110-page health survey of 307 households on Chicago’s Southside. For a copy of “Tocar El Corazdn: Needs Assessment for Project Alivio," send $5 with your request to: Project Alivio, c/o The Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, Sixth Floor, Chicago, III. 60604.
CHICAGO LATINO POPULATION ESTIMATES: The Latino Institute has published a study on the city’s projected Latino population growth and its political implications. Copies of the 16-page report, “Latino Perspectives for 1990: New Numbers, New Leverage,” are available for $5. Address requests to: Graciela Kenig, director of communications, The Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, Sixth Floor, Chicago, III. 60604.
BILINGUAL EDUCATION NEWSLETTER: FORUM, a bimonthly English-language newsletter published by the National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, is available free of charge. To be put on the mailing list, write: FORUM, NCBE, 11501 Georgia Ave., Wheaton, Md. 20902.
POSADA RE-ENACTMENT SCRIPT: "La Posada/Vne Posada” is a 32-page booklet, with songs, on the story of Marla and Josd’s search for lodging in Bethlehem and how it is re-enacted by Hispanic groups. For a copy in Spanish or English (indicate which), send $1 to: Augsburg Publishing House, 426 S. Fifth St, Box 1209, Minneapolis Minn. 55440.
HIGHER EDUCATION TRENDS: “Trends in Higher Education: Participation and Success” is a 39-page booklet that examines the actual and projected supply of Hispanic and other minority students, their participation and enrollment, retention and success and representation in professions To obtain a copy of the report, send $12 to: Education Commission of the States, 1860 Lincoln St., Suite300, Denver, Colo. 80295.
MIGRANT EDUCATION: The Migrant Education Council of the Education Commission of the States has issued a report, “Migrant Education: A Consolidated View,” which cites the need for additional resources for migrant farm-worker students and looks at their history. For a free copy of the report, write: Migrant Education Council, Education Commission of the States 1860 Lincoln St, Suite 300, Denver, Colo. 80295.
UNDOCUMENTED ALIEN HOSPITAL CARE: The U.S. General Accounting Office recently released a report titled “Undocumented Aliens Estimating the Costs of Their Uncompensated Hospital Care.” For a free copy (specify GAO/PEMD-87-24 BR, Sept 16), write: GAO, P.O.Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877.
CONNECTING
AIDS PROGRAMS FUNDED
The U.S. Conference of Mayors recently gave$156,793 in grants to eight organizations that have AIDS information and education programs targeted to Hispanics blacks and other minorities in several cities across the country.
Four of the eight programs directly target the Hispanic community. Others include Hispanics in their target groups.
The organizations include El Centro Human Services, Los Angeles; the Santa Cruz AIDS Project, Santa Cruz, Calif.; the Pilsen Catholic Youth Center, Chicago; and El Congreso de Latinos Unidos in Philadelphia. Each was given between $19,000 and $20,000 for education programs that range from public service announcements to classes.
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT SOUGHT
The Hispanic Development Project of New York, the Reader's Digest Foundation and the General Foods Fund recently announced a program to award grants to groups that encourage Hispanic parents to become involved in their children’s education.
The program offers awards to schools, parents’ groups and others who devise projects to promote school/parent partnerships in education. Projects should be aimed at expanding the list of school-related activities that parents can become involved in, especially during the summer months.
Any school, parents’ group or education agency is eligible to compete for the awards. The project must relate to Hispanic parents whose children are in grades K through 9 and attend a school which is at least 25% Hispanic. Project awards wil I consist of grants of u p to $5,000.
Send inquiries to Carmen Lydia Ramos, coordinator, Hispanic Policy Development Project, 250 Park Ave. South, Suite 5000a, New York, N.Y. 10003(212)529-9323. Deadline for applications is Feb. 1.
UNIVERSITY BECKONS LATINOS
In an attempt to attract Hispanic and black high school students, the University of Illinois is pledging to meet 100% of the minority students’ financial needs and is awarding any senior who graduates in the top 10% of his or her class a $500 merit scholarship.
According to Stanley Ikenberry, University of Illinois president, Illinois students are being wooed away to out-of-state campuses.
Of the 15,891 undergraduate students at the University of Illinois’ Chicago campus, 9.8% are Latino. Of 27,065 undergraduates at the school’s Urbana-Champaign campus, 2.4% are Hispanic.
' - Julio Laboy
Calendar
As it has in the past Weekly Report will compile a list of major1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will ! be published in early January. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendareditor, Hispanic LinkWeeklyReport 1420 . N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280.
THIS WEEK
SPANISH DANCE ARTS
Brooklyn, N.Y. Dec. 28 and Jaa 3
The Brooklyn Children's Museum is sponsoring the
Spanish Dance Arts troupe in a lecture/performance
demonstration for children, including the history
and culture of Spain and Flamenco dance.
Carlota Santana (212) 473-4605
COMING SOON
RUBEN BLADES BENEFIT CONCERT Americas 2001 Los Angeles Jan. 3 Roberto Rodriguez (213) 727-2046
CUBAN AMERICAN CONFERENCE Cuban American National Council Miami Jan. 31-Feb 3 Alina Becker (305) 642-3484
ALASKA STATE BILINGUAL CONFERENCE Alaska State Department of Education Anchorage Feb. 3-5 Mike Travis (907) 465-2970
ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 5-6 Ana Romero (818) 338-8877
JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITY CONFERENCE Dec. 21,1987
California Chicano News Media Association
Los Angeles Feb 5-6
Lourdes Cbrdova Martinez (213) 743-7158
CALIFORNIA BILINGUAL EDUCATION California Association for Bilingual Education San Francisco Feb 10-13 Mary Jew (415) 239-0697
COMMUNICATIONS FAIR
Howard University School of Communications
Washington, D.C. Feb 18-20
Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636-7491
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANIC PUBLICATIONS CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Publications will hold its first independent convention in Las Vegas, Nev., Feb. 18-20. Hoping to draw owners, publishers and editors of publications in the United States and Mexico, the convention will highlight the role of Hispanic print in the U.S. market and the value of Hispanic print as an investment. Forfurther information call Fred Flores at (702) 384-1514.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4


ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY
College of Education
Arizona State University is one of the largest comprehensive public institutions in the United States with a student enrollment of over 40,000, approximately one-quarter of which is at the graduate level, with undergraduate enrollment concentrated at the upper division. Located in the rapidly growing Phoenix metropolitan area, ASU enjoys the change and development characteristics of the American Southwest A progressive academic setting and high technology environment provide a wide range of living, educational, and recreational opportunities.
CENTER FOR BIUNGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATION- Center Director. Associate/Full Professor, tenure-track with a teaching assignment in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. Earned doctorate in Education or related field and experience in Bilingual/ Bicultural Education required.
CENTER FOR INDIAN EDUCATION-Center Director. Associate/ Full Professor, tenure-track with a teaching assignment in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. Earned doctorate in Education or related field and successful experience in the education of American Indians required.
CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
All positions involve teaching in an undergraduate teacher education program with integrated field experience, teaching graduate courses, conducting research, and supervising students pursuing advanced degrees.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION-AssistanVAssociate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16,1988. Earned doctorate in Early Childhood Education or related field, evidence of scholarly productivity, and ability to work as a member of an Early Childhood interdisciplinary term required.
HUMANITIES EDUCATION - Visiting Professor. This is a one academic year, non-tenure-track appointment, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate in one of the Humanities disciplines (eg., American Studies, Art, Architecture, Music, Literature, Philosophy, Cultural History, Western Civilization, Art History, teaching experience in interdisciplinary Humanities, exemplary lecturing skills required.
MATHEMATICS EDUCATION - Assistant/Associate Professor,
tenure-track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate with a specialization in Mathematics/Mathematics Education, evidence of scholarly productivity, and expertise in microcomputerapplications, software evaluation and curriculum development required.
READING EDUCATION-Assistant/Associate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16,1988. Earned doctorate with a specialization in Reading Education, evidence of scholarly productivity in Reading Education, evidence of curriculum development classroom organization and management at elementary, junior or senior high school levels required.
SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION - AssistanVAssociate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate in a social science discipline with a strong background in elementary education, or an earned doctorate in education with strong disciplinary work in one or more of the social sciences, and ability to work as a member of a Science/Social Studies interdisciplinary team required.
PSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION
COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY-AssistanVAssociate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16,1988. Earned doctorate in Counseling Psychology, evidence of scholarly productivity in Counseling Psychology, and strong identity as a Counseling Psychologist required.
Application Procedure: Send letter of interest curriculum vita and 3 letters of recommendation to:
Ms. Linda Pedersen
Secretary to the Associate Dean for Personnel College of Education, Office of the Dean Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 85287-0211
The Search Committees will begin reviewing applications on January 15,1988.
ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. APPLICATIONS ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED FROM WOMENS AND ETHNIC AND OTHER MINORITY GROUP INDIVIDUALS.
CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, BAKERSFIELD
9001 Stockdale Highway; Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
The College invites applications for tenure-track faculty appointments in the following areas:___________________________________
School of Arts & Sciences Biology: Assistant Professor(2), Comparative Vertebrate Morphology and Plant Genetics. Chemistry: Assistant Professor, Organic/ Analytical Chemistry.
Communications: Assistant Professor, Journalism.
Computer Science: Rank Open (2), Computer Architecture, Operating Systems, Data bases Computer Science/Physica/Electrical Engineering: Rank Open.
Criminology: Rank Open.
Economics: Assistant Professor, Economic DevelopmenVIntemational Economics/Com-parative Systems
English: Assistant Professor, Victorian Literature.
Geology: Assistant Professor, Petroleum Geology/Petroleum Engineering/Hydrology. Mathematics: Assistant Professor (2), one position in any area including algebra, geometry, topology, statistics and math education; other position involves supervision and coordination of instructors as well as teaching in remedial mathematics.
Nursing: Rank Open (2), Pediatric Nursing and Medical Surgical Nursing.
Psychology: Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology.
Sociology: Assistant Professor, Demography/ Race and Ethnic Relations.
The school is also searching for the following full-time temporary positions.
Fine Arts: Lecturer (2-year appointment), Theatre Design; Lecturer, Gallery Curator/ Modem Art Historian.
Foreign Languages: Lecturer, Spanish. Mathematics: Lecturer(2), all areas including statistics, mathematics education, and remedial mathematics.
Philosophy: Lecturer, Social and Political Philosophy/Philosophy of Law.
Religious Studies: Lecturer, Biblical Literature/Religion in Western Civilization.
School of Business & Public Admin.
Accounting: Rank Open.
Management Rank Open.
Public Administration: Assistant Professor. Contact Dr. Harry Kelsey, Dean, School of Business and Public Administration. Application Deadline January 30, 1988, or until positions are filled.
School of Education Educational Administration: Full Professor, Educational Administration in Elementary and Secondary Schools.
Elementary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Ed, emphasis in Language Arts; Student Teacher Supervision. Elementary Education/Chlld Development
Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Ed, Child Development and Early Childhood Education; Student Teacher Supervision. Elementary Educatlon/Readlng: Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Ed and Reading; Student Teacher Supervision. Secondary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction; General Methods; Learning Process; Student Teacher Supervision.
Contact Dr. Rodolfo G Serrano Dean, School ;of Education. Application Deadline January '4,1988, or until positions are filled.
. In addition, this College continues to seek applicants for temporary faculty appointments in the areas listed above as well as other areas of the fine arts, behavioral and social sciences, sciences and professional programs (nursing, criminal justice, public administration, {health science^Applications from under-represented minorities and women in all areas especially encouraged.
CSB is the youngest of the nineteen campuses of the California State University System. The campus is located in the City of Bakersfield which has a metropolitan population of roughly 250,000 and it serves a diverse population of about 700,000, located i primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley. { CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative ^Action Employer.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
MORE’87 INREVIEW: The effect of La Samba was felt not only in film and television but in the recording industry as well.
The highest ranking ever achieved by that Mexican folk song came in August, when the Los Lobos single from the movie’s soundtrack (on Warner Bro&/Slash) reached No. 1 on Billboards pop charts. The record also topped the magazine’s ‘Hot Latin 50” charts in September and took the No. 11 slot in its year-end “top pop single” charts.
Other Latinos on year-end charts (in the Dec. 27 Billboard issue) are: Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam (No. 17, Head to Toe and No. 31, Lost in Emotion - both Columbia); Linda Ronstadt (No. 39, with James Ingram on Somewhere Out There, MCA) Suzanne Vega, (No. 52, Luka, AAM) and Gloria Estefan & Miami Sound Machine (No. 72, Rhythm Is Gonna Get You, Epic).
Jerry Garcia, lead guitarist and lyricist for The Grateful Dead, had a great comeback. In the Dark (Arista) was the band’s highest ranking album ever and Touch of Gray their first top-40 single.
Linda Ronstadt proved to be a versatile vocalist, with the March release of Trio (Warner Bros.), an album with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, and November’s Canciones de mi padre (Elektra/ Asylum).
Two Latino recording artists were recognized with stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: Celia Cruz in September and Jos6 Feliciano in December.
In the fine arts, the year's top event was the opening of the nation’s “most comprehensive” Latino art show in Houston, in May. Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors moved to Washington, D.C., in October.,
The second MiraI Canadian Club Hispanic Art Tour closed in Los Angeles in June, while Coors announced the (1988) schedule for its own National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour in November.
The Hispanic presence on stage grew, particularly at some of the nation’s most respected theater organizations. San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre was the recipient of a Ford Foundation grant to fund its Teatro Meta through 1989.
The development of Latino playwrights continued in the summer, with the Hispanic Playwrights Project at the South Coast Repertory in Southern California, and in the fall, with the Hispanic Playwrights in Residence project at New York’s INTAR Theater.
Miami staged its second Festival de Teatro Hispano in May, while New Yorks Festival Latino in August, provided longer runs for fewer plays, and extended performances in San Francisco, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Mexico.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
ADVERTISING INTERNSHIP OPEN: The American Association of Advertising Agencies is seeking Hispanic, black and other minority students interested in advertising careers to work at its member agencies as part of its 10-week Minority Advertising Intern Program.
Positions are available in art, copywriting, media and research. They are located in several cities, including New York, Chicago and Los Angeles.
Applicants must be upperclassmen or graduate students. Undergraduate students will receive a stipend of $250 a week. Graduate students will earn more. Approximately 450 students have participated in the program since it started 15 years ago.
For more information, applications and a brochure, write: The Minority Advertising Intern
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
a national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Erick sen- Mendoza Editor F&lix P6rez
Reporting; Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, Julio Laboy.
Graphics/Production: Carlos Anion, Zoila Elias
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission
Annual subscription (50 issues) $96.
Trial subscription (13 issues) $26.
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word. Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
Program, AAAA, 666 Third Ave, New York, N.Y. 10017.
ENCUENTRO GOES SOLO: Encuentro, a free, quarterly Quincentenary bulletin published by the University of New Mexico’s Latin American Institute, will be offered on a subscription basis starting with its first 1988 issue.
Encuentro was funded for the past two years by the National Endowment forthe Arts and the National Endowment forthe Humanities. The publication reports on preparations underway for the 1992 Quincentenary celebration. It publishes news announcements of international events and includes short articles and essays.
Endowment funds expire at the end of the year. The annual institution and corporate rate will be $24 and the individual rate $12.
1 Write: Encuentro, LatinAmerican Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M.
187131.
NAH J STUDENT AWARDS: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is offering The Mark Zambrano Scholarship and awards to students demonstrating an interest in pursuing careers in print or broadcast journalism.
Zambrano, an NAHJ member and Chicago Tribune reporter, died in March. The $1,000 award is being made available to a college upperclass or graduate student exhibiting an interest in establishing a career in print or broadcast journalism.
NAHJ will also award a total of $2,000 to undergraduate students based on financial need and journalism interests and skills Students who will enroll in college for the fall 1988 semester are eligible.
The application deadline for both awards is March 11, 1988. For more information and applications contact Jocelyn Cbrdova, NAHJ educational programs manager, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202)783-6228. - Julio Laboy
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week equal opportunity for Hispanics, blacks and other minorities. . . Denver Mayor Federico Pefta appoints RubAn Valdez, former speaker of the Colorado House of Representatives and former director of the state's Department of Labor and Employment, to the city's Career Service Board . . Dr. Haclb Aoun, a 32year-old Venezuela born cardiologist, agrees to drop his $35 million lawsuit apmt Jqh ' s Hospital. Aoun sued the Maryland hospital for'iifre, breach of confidentiality for revealing he had AIDS. Aoun contracted the disease while working as a medical resident at the hospital and piercing his finger with a broken tube of tainted blood. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed . . . Amoldo Aragones, a therapist at Southwest Detroit Community Health Services, receives the Michigan Hispanic Mental Health Association's 1987 Outstanding Health Therapist of the Year :Award ... Sen. Dennis DeConclnl (D-Ariz.) requests an independent probe by the Office of Special Investigations ofthe U.S. General Accounting Office into the 1985 slaying of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Camarena was killed in Guadalajara, Mexico. . . New York City Mayor Edward Koch appoints Sally Hemt11nde2-P1ftero as commissioner of Financial Services and chairman of the city's Financial Services Corporation . HernandezPil'lero, 34, currently serves as the deputy borough president of Manhattan ... The California Postsecondary Education Committee announces that former state Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso will head its advisory panel to assess California schools' commitm,ent to providing VoL 5 No. 50 HISPANIC LIN New Study Redefines US. Salvadoran Immigrant The percentage of Salvadoran immigrants who came to the United States since 1980 and consider themselves political refugees has risen to49%, up from 19% for those who . arrived between 1941, according to a Salvadoran university study which will be formally released to U.S. media next year . The finding contradicts the belief upon which the Reagan administration bases its asylum policy toward Salvadorans. The adminitltration claims nearly all came for eco nomic reasons. The Spanish-language study, "EI Salvador 1987: Salvadoran Refugees in the United States," reported respondents living here gave these reasons for immigrating: Economic Political Both study Declined/Other 1941-1979 58 . 0% 7.8 10.8 42 19.2 1980 36.1% 28.5 20.6 2 . 3 12 . 5 Directed by Segundo Montes, a professor at Central American University in San Salvador and director of the university's Human Rights Institute, the study showed that 50% of those who arrived in 1980 and after are urbanites and 48% do not plan to return despite leaving immediate family behind. The study also found that 10% of the recent immigrants are here legally, 17% are in the proc . ess of obtaining legal residence, 73% are undocumented, 56% are employed and speak "passable/good" English, 41% work at jobs requiring skilled labor and 8% are profes sionals. Those immigrants who came from Salvadoran urban areas average 12% more years of education than their urban peers who remained and 30% more than rural Salvadorans. Forty-nine percent of the males and 40% of the females work in skilled occupations. The next largest category of male occupations is , unskilled labor 40%. Domestic work was the second most prevalent occupation among females 35%. Montes' study was funded partially by Georg& town University of Washington, D.C., and as sisted in its data collection by Salvadoran consulates and U.S. refugee organizations. As part of the study , 2,121 Salvadorans residing in El Salvador with relatives in the United States and 1',330 immigrants in the United States were surveyed . Montesalsoconducted27 irt-depth interviews with relatives-in El Salvadorof Salvadoran immigrants and performed case studies of two Salvadoran towns, lntipuca and Casitas, both known to have lost so-so% of their populations to migration . The surveys and interviews also found that Junlpero Serra Beatified Pope John Paul II approved Dec. 11 the beatification of Junlpero Serra, the 18th century, Spairt-born missionary who founded a line of missions along the California coast. Beatification is the second step toward sainthood . The papal approval endorsed a finding by Vatican investigators that Serra interceded in the miraculous cure in 1960 of a nun suffering from lupus, a chronic disease of the connective tissue. To , grant canoni zation, the Vatican must conclude that a second miracle occurred because of Serra's intervention. N.Y. Latino Legislative Body to Meet New York state's recently established Puerto Rican/ Hispanic Task Force will meet at Manhattan's Museo del Barrio Dec. 21 to announce the group's goals and directives and to seek general support According to Roberto Calderln, the task force's executive director, the group is the first in the nation formed specifically to address Hispanic concerns through legislation. The task force is composed of 30 assembly men who have Hispanic constituencies of 15% or greater. Twenty-five of its members are non-Hispanic. The task force will sponsor its first conference, Somos UnoWe Are OneMarch 13 in Albany . Housing, health and education will be among several topics addressed at the Albany gathering , Calderln said. the recent immigrant averages a little less than nine years education and sends roughly $115 a month to relatives in El Salvador. The money sent back to El Salvador, which the study estimated at $113 million monthly, represents 46% of the recipients' incomes. Salvadorans in this country, estimated to number between 900,000 and 1 million,con stitute the fourth largest U .S. Hispanic group behind Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans. The report said an additional 250,000 reside in other Central American countries and Mexico . In 1986 El 1 Salvador counted 5.7 million residents. "If our nation loses almost 20% of its popu continued on Jiage 2 Cities Support Roybal Bill The Laredo, Tex.,CityCounc ! l unanimously passed a resolution Dec . '1 in support of Congressman Edward Roybars (D-Calif.) Family Unification Act. The resolution was sponsored by Councilman Jose Valdez and supported by the Texas Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights and the League of United Latin American Citizens. The act prohibits the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service from utilizing funds to deport undocumented individuals whose family members have been legalized It was attached to the House appropriations bill, which was approved Dec. 4. The bill is now in a congres sional joint conference committee. El Paso and Chicago recently passed re solutions in favor of Roybars legislation and a similar resolution was to be presented to the Houston City Council Dec. 16. HLWR Resumes Jan. 4 Hispanic Link Weekly Report will not publish the week of Dec. 28. It will resume Jan. 4. The subscription rate for Weekly Report will increase to $108 for individuals and $118 for institutions effective Jan. 1. Current subscribers may extend their subscriptions at the present $96-a-year rate in December regardless of when their subscriptions expire.

PAGE 2

Marie I Detainee Review Inadequate The U.S. Justic;:e Department established Qec. 11 a process to re-examine the status of m _ ore than 7,600 Marie! detainees con sidered • excludable." Cuban American leaders, advocacy groups and lawyers for the imprisoned _ Cubans called the procedures both prison uprisings. . , . . assistance of make oral presentations Pei'lalver said that on the positive side, a or cros&examine wltnesses. The process is based ,on the pacts that ended the prison sieges in Oakdale, La, and . Atlanta "lt(the procedure) has some positive points and it has some elements that are missing . , lfs . a plan that we to work upon and review mechanism has been established "It falls short of due process," said Pei'la!ver . and the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization A document issued Dec . 11 by the Justice Service will . not be on the appeal panel. The Qepartment _says: "The decision to repatriate Department has said that I NS . .would is final and subject to no further review or be stripped . of the power to decide which appeal." deta.inees could be paroled, according to Some are satisfied with the plan. Aida Rep. Pat Swindall (R-Ga). Betancourt, spokesperson for families of The panels are composed of three Justice . detainees who . met with officials during . the Department officials . prison disturbances, said, "We believe the Advocates for the detainees are wary of . U.S. officials be very -.,t>u ild . upon hi . order to see that justice ' is done," RafaeiPei'lalver, attorney for Miamfs Auxiliary Bishop Agustin told Weekly Rep6rl Roman played a key role in settling the review process, which does not alloW the According to Pei'lalver, he and Roman were detainees to present evidence. The procedure to mee . t with Justice Department officials in also does . not permit detainees to rebut Washington Dec. 18..in an attempt to review testimony on file against them, ' utilize full the departmenf s plan. -Julio Laboy Chi. Latino Political Clout An estimated46% increase among Chicago's Latino population from 1980 to 1990 could result in at least three more Latino aldermanic wards and one additional seat in the state legislature, according to a report released Dec. 15 by the Latino lnsfitute. The report, "Latino Perspectives for 1990: New Numbers, New Leverage," analyzes the population changes . in Chicago's Hispanic communities and possible political implications. "The report shows the Latino population is not only growing but in what specific areas of Chicago," .• said Latino Institute Research Director John Attinasi. Prior to 1986, Ch i cago had one Hispanic alderman out of 50. A special election in 1986, following a court-mandated redistricting plan, resulted in four Latino aldermen. . "Because Latinos will comprise one-fifth of all Chicagoans in 1990; an equitable goal should be to have ten of the 50 aldermen in the City Council representing the study says. The Chicago . Department of Plan ning projects there will be 615,513 Hispanics in 1990, or 20% of the city's population. According to Attinasi, a new Latino ward could be created in Chicago's Southside and two others on the Northside. "Whoever is the alderman will have to pay attention to Latinos and the economic sector will have to realize the growth and potential for services," he said . The Latino Institute points to other key electoral implications: • Redistricting the 21st and 22nd state representative districts to include greater concentrations of Latinos should result in another Latino state legislator. e .At least 18 wards will have 5,000 or more Hispa_nics. -: Melinda Machado Chicago Population Trends and Projections GROUP 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 Latino 3.4% 7.3% 14.1% ' 20.3% 25.4% 30.2% Black 22.9 32.7 39.5 40.8 39.7 36.7 White 76.4 65.5 43.8 37. 0 29. 4 26.4 Total* 3.55 3 .37 3 .01 3 . 03 3 .01 3.04 *In millions Source : "Latino Perspectives tor 1990 : New Numbers,_ New LB.vacags" lation • to migration and if most of that group in El Salvador. The House passed the legi& is young, educated, skilled and so productive lation, the Moakley-DeConcini bill, in July. as to contribute46% ofthe income of relatives The Reagan administration's belief that they left behind, El Salvador will have suffered Salvadoran immigrants came here for eco an irreparable damage," Montes told Weekly nomic reasons shapes its asylum policy Report "I see it as a hemorrhage," he added. toward the . group, say refugee advocates. The cities where the vast majoritY of SalvaThe latest figures show that 5% of the Salva dorans have settled are LosAngeles(350,000), dorans who apply for asylum are accepted. washington, D.C. , (150,000), New York and The acceptance rate for Nicaraguans is86% . San Francisco (100,000 each). Duke Austin, a spokesrpan for the U.S. Forty-eight percent of U.S. Salvadorans Immigration and Naturalization Service, said arrived since 1982, the report said. some of the statements in Montes' study are The U .S. Senate is expected to vote next • arguable at best." He said" evidence of per month on a bill that would provide a two-year secution of deported Salvadorans is non moratorium on the deportation of Salvadorans existent in the 10,000 cases I am aware of." until the General Accounting Office completes -Robert Riccio 2 , Hispanic Bar Endorses Kennedy's Nomination The Hispanic National Bar Association endorsed Supreme Court nominee Anthony Kennedy in testimony presented . Dec . 16 before the Senate Judiciary Committee . According to BaltazarBaca, HNBA'sWash ington, D.C., counsel, Kennedy was not en dorsed unanimously. Serious concerns were aired during HNBA's testimony regarding Kennedy's past decisions on civil rights. The organizat i on has never presented oral testimony in the selection of a Supreme Court judge . HNBA has more than 4,000 members. Antonia Hernandez, president of the Mexican .American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, also testified before the committee . MALDEF did not take a position by press time. Obledo Elected Chainnan Mario Obledo, a former League of United Latin American Citizens president, was elected Dec. 13 to ' chair the National Rainbow Coalition's 1 national board of directors. Obledo, a Sacramento attorney, will serve a two-year term for the political advocacy group, which was founded by the Rev. Jackson in 1984. It has 50,000 members nationwide. Jury Convicts -Policemen A Los Angeles Superior Court jury Dec . 10 found two Huntington Park, Calif. , police officers guilty of torturing a handcuffed, 17 • year-old Salvadoran to elicit a confession. William Lustig and Robert Rodriguez were convicted of felony assault under the color . of authority and misdemeanor inhumane treatment of a prisoner. Jaime Ramirez, now 18 years old, was arrested by a third . officer in November 1986 on suspicion of stealing car stereo equipment. Lustig and Rodriguez arrived at the arrest scene, where Ramirez said the two took turns applying several shocks to his inner thighs with an unauthorized stun gun. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Armando Mena, guest columnist Visiting Sinta Claes Barbara, my 4-year-old, is on Santa's lap, whispering in his ear. Francisco, 1 1/2, has already accepted the red and white candy cane and is tongue-testing it. His big brown eyes evaluate the red and white man who bounces his sister. In Fran cisco's mind, he has in no way compromised himself by accepting the gift. If impulse dictates, it would be his legal and moral right to cry or go back and pull Santa's beard. Julia, 10, and Laura, 9 , observe . Pensive Julia. Inscrutable Laura. On the way to see Santa, Julia and I had been discussing the Hispanic influence in California. A school assignment prompted her interest. (My reward for voting Yes on Bonds, I tho ught.) We tal k ed abou t foods and street names and wh at Easterners call the "casual California manner." We touched on pinatas, tile roofs, art and clothing styles. I even confessed mi envidia-my envy-that her tias Antonia and Maria were the Virgin Mary in the annual posadas, whi l e the most I ever rated was procession. FROM LOS ANGELES TO MEXICO CITY Our c onve r sation traveled from Olvera Street in Los Angeles to Mexico City, with its magnificent Christmas light displays. The latter image apparently took time to settle in. Now, watching her sister animate her long list of desires to the red and white man, Julia demands: "Daddy, what did Hispanics contribute to our American Christmas?" "Mena, Mena, Mena," I encourage myself. I rack my brain. How is this descendant of Montezuma, Geronimo, Garza and Cortez going to answer that question? lfs worse than being on both sides of the Alamo . Maybe I should have voted No on School Bonds. Then it comes to me the vision of Dutch children and adults waving and cheering as a swarthy man dressed in bright red approaches them in a tiny boat. He calls out in Spanish and ' waves. SINTA CLAES-THE HISPANIC LINK "Mija," I announce, "our Hispanic link is Santa Claus himself." Every Dec . 6, I relate to her, Santa Claus and his original elf, Black Peter, a small Moor, leave Spain in their boat and head for Amsterdam. When Sinta Claes-as the Dutch call him-reaches shore, he asks the pa rents if their children have been good or bad . S i nta is wearing an ornate bishop's miter. He walks aided by a golden crook. Sinta Claes, as honored by the Dutch, is Saint Nicolas of Bari, Turkey. He is the patron saint of merchants, women of marriageable age, pawn brokers and, most important, sailors . He has survived a Protestant reformation, church schisms and Madison Avenue advertising with only a couple of letters changed in his name . Undoubtedly, he will outlive this column, too . CHEATING THE DEVIL Around 300 A.D. he was cheating the Devil out of sailor's lives and providing bags of gold for the dowries of destitute maidens and ransomed generals. It was the Spanish sailors who first brought St. Nicolas to America . They named a port in his honor on Columbus' first voyage to Haiti . Later they established a small town in Florida, St. Nicolas Ferry, now known as Jacksonville. "Mija," 1 conclude, "Hispanics cannot claim Santa Claus entirely, but we did contribute something, just as the Dutch, Germans, Italians and Americans did." My recitation pleases her. I can read it in her soft, watery eyes . As her younger sister dismounts Santa Claus, Julia walks over and takes her by the hand . "Did you know," 1 hear her whisper, "that Santa Claus is Chicano?" (Armando Mena works as a marketing consultant in Vienna, Va This column first ran in Hispanic Link News Service in 1980.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua 'TIS THE SEASON: As Christmas approaches, fellowship and good will sweep across the land. Well, almost. .. UNWELCOME WAGON: My holiday holly corsage goes to the folks who live in and around our nation's capital. As part of its six-part series, "The New Immigrants," which concluded this weekend, The Washington Post asked 1,319 randomly chosen area residents how newly arrived members of certain national-origin groups affected the community . Coming in next to last in the Posrs ethnic popularity contest were Salvadorans, who are witho.,Jt doubt the area's most exploited residents: 13% of the respondents said Salvadorans made the area a better place to live; 18% said they made it a worse place to live. Most unwelcome of all were I !anians, with an 11% better, 28% worse rating. All the other groups received more "better'' votes than "worse" ones: Koreans33%-8%, Vietnamese37%-13%, Filipinos28%-6%, Africans21%-11%, and West lndians20%-10%. ANOTHER REBUFF: As is its custom, Englands Oxford University picked 32 U.S. students to become Rhodes Scholars this monthbut, alas, as happens far more often than not, it couldn't find a single U.S. Latii)O or Latina who met its high standards. AND A WELCOME: I've always stood in awe of merchants and demographers who could count with such precision that they could determine exactly who ate a fast-food chain's 10 billionth hamburger or who was the 240 millionth baby born in this country. It also struck me as odd coincidence that the honorees were always such pleasant , personable , photogenic people. When pleasant, personable, photogenic Martin a 30-yearold Mexican residing in Chicago, was recently identified to the press as the one-millionth person to apply for legalization, I immediately called Immigration & Naturalization Service spokesman Verne Jervis to find out how INS (which was a wee bit off on some of its other estimates this year) could count across thousands of square miles with such instant precision. But to no avail . "Scientific," is all he would tell me. "Very scientific." He probably doesn't want the Russians to learn our high-tech free-world marketing techniques. CATCH OF THE YEAR: The New York cops arrested a lady bank robber suspect this month who is believed to have pulled off a string of six heists since September. She was described in the New York Post as having an "attractive reddish-brown leonine mane" which, it reported, she snipped short just before her capture. "She" turned out to be 32-yearold Frank Quote the Post: "Investigators did not recover Hernandez's gun, the $11,000, his wardrobe-or his electric curlers." POLITICAL HIGHLIGHT OF= THE YEAR: The Florida weekly newspaper El Sol de Hialeah, owned by that city's Mayor Raul Martinez, charged while he was running for re-election that his opponent Nllo Juri dyes his moustache. Gary Hart no doubt wishes that The Miami Herald had stayed . home and checked that one out instead of following him to Washington. ' YEAR-END MYSTERY: With so many new Latino magazines coming onto the scene this year hoping to tap that elusive national Hispanic market, I'm wondering what ever happened to Nuestrothe magazine that raised the hopes and spirits of so many of us when it debuted a dozen years ago. The last issue we saw was months ago. It shut down its editorial office in Washington, D.C., this fall and moved to New York. But when we dial the telephone number that we had for it there, an operator tells us that the phone has been disconnected . Any subscribers left out there who can offer me a clue? Kay Barbaro Hi spa ni c Lin k Weekly Report Dec. 21, 1987 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING CONNECTING CHICAGO HEALTH SURVEY: The Latino Institute has released a 1-------------------------J 11 Opage health survey of 307 households on Chicago's Southside. For a copy of "Tocar El Coraz6n: Needs Assessment for Project Allvlo," send $5 with your request to: Project Alivlo, c/o The Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, Sixth Floor, Chicago, Ill. 60604. CHICAGO LATINO POPULATION ESTIMATES: The Latino In stitute has published a study on the city's projected Latino population growth and Its political Implications. Copies of the 16page report, "Latino Perspectives for 1990: New Numbers, New Leverage," are available for $5. Address requests to: Graclela Kenlg, director of communications, The Latino Institute, 228 S. Wabash, Sixth Floor, Chicago, Ill. 60604. BILINGUAL EDUCATION NEWSLETTER: FORUM, a bimonthly English-language newsletter published by the National Clearinghouse for Bilingual Education, is available free of charge. To be put on the mailing list, write: FORUM, NCBE, 11501 Georgia Ave., Wheaton, Md. 20902. POSADA REENACTMENTSCRIPT: "La Posada/The Posada" is a 32-page booklet, with songs, on the story of Marfa and Jose's search for lodging in Bethlehem and how it is re-enacted by Hispanic groups. For a copy in Spanish or English (indicate which), send $1 to: Augsburg Publishing House, 426 S. Fifth St., Box 1209, Minneapolis, Minn. 55440. HIGHER EDUCATION TRENDS: "Trends in Higher Education: Participation and Success" is a 39-page booklet that examines the actual and projected supply of Hispanic and other minority students, their participation and enrollment, retention and success, and re presentation in professions. To obtain a copy of the report, send $12 to: Education Commission of the States, 1860 Lincoln St., Suite300, Denver, Colo. 80295. MIGRANT EDUCATION: The Migrant Education Council of the Education Commission of the States has issued a report, "Migrant Education: A Consolidated View,'; which cites the need for additional resources for migrant farm-worker students and looks at their history. For a free copy of the report, write: Migrant Education Council, Education Commission of the States, 1860 Lincoln St. Suite 300, Denver , Colo. 80295. UNDOCUMENTED ALIEN HOSPITAL CARE: The U.S. General Accounting Office recently released a report titled "Undocumented Aliens: Estimating the Costs of Their Uncompensated Hospital Care." For a free copy (specify GAO/PEMD-87 -24 BR, Sept. 16), write: GAO, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877, AIDS PROGRAMS FUNDED The U.S. Conference of Mayors recentlygave$156,793 in grants to eight organizations that have AIDS information and education programs -targeted to Hispanics, blacks and other minorities in several cities across the country. Four of the eight programs directly target the Hispanic community. Others include Hispanics in their target groups. The organizations include El Centro Human Services, Los Angeles; the Santa Cruz AIDS Project, Santa Cruz, Calif.; the Pilsen Catholic Youth Center, Chicago; and El Congreso de Latinos Unidos in Philadelphia. Each was given between $19,000 and $20,000 for education programs that range from public service announcements to classes. PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT SOUGHT The Hispanic Development Project of New York, the Reader's Digest Foundation and the General Foods Fund recently announced a program to award grants to groups that encourage Hispanic parents to become involved in their children's education. The program offers awards to schools, parents' groups and others who devise projects to promote schooVparent partnerships in education. Projects should be aimed at expanding the list of school-related activities that parents can become involved in, especially during the summer months. Any school, parents' group or education agency is eligible to compete for the awards. The project must relate to Hispanic parents whose children are in grades K through 9 and attend a school which is at least 25% Hispanic . Project awards will consist of grants of up to $5,000. Send inquiries to Carmen Lydia Ramos, coordinator, Hispanic Policy Development Project, 250 Park Ave. South, Suite 5000a, New York, N.Y. 10003 (212) 529. Deadline for applications is Feb. 1. UNIVERSITY BECKONS LATINOS In an attempt to attract Hispanic and black high school students, the University of Illinois is pledging to meet 100% of the minority students' financial needs and is awarding any senior who graduates . in the top 10% of his or her class a $500 merit scholarship. According to Stanley Ikenberry, University of Illinois president, Illinois students are being wooed away to out-of-state campuses. Of the 15,891 undergraduate students at the University of Illinois' Chicago campus, 9.8% are Latino. Of 27,065 undergraduates at the school's Urbana-Champaign campus, 2.4% are Hispanic. Julio Laboy Carlota Santana (212) 473-4605 California Chicano News Media Association Los Angeles Feb. 5 Calendar As it has in the past, Weekly Report will compile a list of major 1988 conferences, seminars and banquets scheduled by Hispanic organizations. The list will 1 be published in early January. Organizations that wish to have their event included should phone or send the following information: date, place, brief description of event and name and telephone number of contact person. Address all correspondence to Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280. THIS WEEK SPANISH DANCE ARTS Brooklyn, N.Y. Dec. 28 and Jan. 3 The Brooklyn Children's Museum is sponsoring the Spanish Dance Arts troupe in a lecture/performance demonstration for children, including the history and culture of Spain and Flamenco dance. 4 COMING SOON RUBEN BLADES BENEFIT CONCERT Americas 2001 Los Angeles Jan. 3 Roberto Rodriguez (213) 727 CUBAN AMERICAN CONFERENCE Cuban American National Council Miami Jan. 31-Feb. 3 Alina Becker (305) 642 ALASKA STATE BILINGUAL CONFERENCE Alaska State Department of Education Anchorage Feb. 3 Mike Travis (907) 465 ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 5 Ana (818) 338 JOURNALISM OPPORTUNITY CONFERENCE Dec. 21, 1987 Lourdes C6rdova Martinez (213) 7 43 CALIFORNIA BILINGUAL EDUCATION California Association for Bilingual Education San Francisco Feb . 1 0 Mary Jew (415) 239 COMMUNICATIONS FAIR Howard University School of Communications Washington, D.C. Feb. 18 Mary Carter-Williams (202) 636 SPOTLIGHT HISPANIC PUBLICATIONS CONFERENCE: The National Association of Hispanic Publications will hold its first independent convention in Las Vegas, Nev., Feb. 18-20 . Hoping to draw owners, publishers and editors of publications in the United States and Mexico, the convention will highlight the role of Hispanic print in the U.S. market and the value of Hispanic print as an investment. For further information call Fred Flores at (702) 384. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY College of Education Arizona State Unlveralty is one of the largest comprehensive public institutions in the United States with a student enrollment of over 40, 000, approximately one-quarter of which is at the graduate level, with undergraduate enrollment concentrated at the upper division. Located in the rapidly growing Phoenix metropolitan area. ASU enjoys the change and development characteristics of the American Southwest A progressive academic setting and high technology environment provide a wide range of living , educational, and recreational opportunities. CENTER FOR BILINGUAL/BICULTURAL EDUCATIONCenter Director . Associate/Full Professor , tenure-track with a teaching assignment in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. Earned doctorate in Education or related field and experience in BilinguaV Bicultural Education required . CENTER FOR INDIAN EDUCATIONCenter Director. Associate/ Full Professor, tenure-track with a teaching assignment in the Division of Curriculum and Instruction. Earned doctorate in Education or related field and successful experience in the education of American Indians required . CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION All positions involve teaching in an undergraduate teacher education program with integrated field experience, teaching graduate cour:ses. conducting research, and supervising students pursuing advanced degrees. EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCA TlONAssistant/ Associate ProfesSor, tenure-track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate in Early Childhood Education or related field, evidence of scholarly productivity , and ability to work as a member of an Earty Childhood interdisciplinary term required . HUMANITIES EDUCATIONVisiting Professor. This is a one academic year , non-tenure-track appo i ntment, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate in one of the Humanities disciplines (e.g., American Studies, Art , Architecture, Music, Literature, Philosophy, Cultural History, Western Civilization, Art History), teaching experience in interdisciplinary Humanities, exemplary lecturing skills required. MATHEMATICS EDUCATIONAssistant/ Associate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate with a specialization in Mathematics/Mathematics Education, evidence of scholarly productivity, and expertise in microcomputer applications. software evaluation and curriculum development required . READING EDUCATIONAssistant/ Associate Professor, tenure track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate with a specialization in Reading Education , evidence of scholarly productivity in Reading Education, evidence of curriculum development, classroom organization and management at elementary, junior or senior high school levels required. SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATIONAssistant/ Associate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate in a social science discipline with a strong bacj(ground in elementary education. or an earned doctorate in education with strong disciplinary work in one or more of the social sciences. and ability to work as a member of a Science/Social Studies interdisciplinary team required PSYCHOLOGY IN EDUCATION COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGYAssistant/ Associate Professor, tenure-track, effective August 16, 1988. Earned doctorate in ing Psychology, evidence of scholarly productivity in Counseling Psychology , and strong identity as a Counseling Psychologist required . Application Procedure: Send letter of interest, curriculum vita and 3 letters of recommendation to: Ms . Linda Pedersen Secretary to the Associate Dean for Personnel College of Education, Office of the Dean Arizona State University Tempe, Arizona 85287-0211 The Search Committees will begin reviewing applications on January 15, 1988. ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, AFFIRMATIVE ACTION EMPLOYER. APPLICATIONS ARE STRONGLY ENCOURAGED FROM WOMEN; AND ETHNIC AND OTHER MINORITY GROUP INDIVIDUALS. CALIFORNIA STATE COLLEGE, BAKERSFIELD 9001 Stockdale Highway; Bakersfield, California 93311-109. 9 The College invites applications for tenure track faculty appointments in the following areas: School of Arts & Sciences Biology: Assistant Professor(2), Comparative Vertebrate Morphology and Plant Genetics. Chemistry: Assistant Professor, Organic/ Analytical Chemistry. Communications: Assistant Professor , Journalism. Computer Science: Rank Open (2), Computer Architecture , Operating Systems. Data bases. Computer Science/PhysicS/Electrical Engineering: Rank Open. Criminology: Rank Open . Economics: Assistant Professor, Economic Development/International Economies/Com parative Systems. English: Assistant Professor, Victorian Lit erature. Geology: Assistant Professor, Petroleum Engineering/Hydrology . Mathematics: Assistant Professor (2), one position in any area including algebra, geo metry , topology, statistics, and math education ; other position involves supervision and co ordination of instructors as well as teaching in remedial mathematics. Nuralng: Rank Open (2) , Pediatric Nursing and Medical Surgical Nursing . Psychology: Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology. Hispanic Link Weekly Report Sociology: Assistant Professor, Demography/ Race and Ethnic Relations. The school is also searching for the following full-time temporary positions. Fine Arta: Lecturer (2year appointment), Theatre Design ; Lecturer, Gallery Curator/ Modern Art Historian . Foreign Languages: Lecturer , Spanish. Mathematics: Lecturer(2) , all areas including statistics, mathematics education, and re medial mathematics. Philosophy: Lecturer, Social and Political Philosophy/Philosophy of Law. Religious Studies: Lecturer, Biblical Litera ture/Religion in Western Civilization. School of Business & Public Admin. Accounting: Rank Open . Management: Rank Open . Public Administration: Assistant Professor. Contact Dr . Harry Kelsey , Dean , School of Business and Public Administration. Appli cation Deadline January 30, 1988, or until positions ar13 filled. School of Education Educational Administration: Full Professor, Educational Administration in Elementary and Secondary Schools. Elementary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Ed, emphasis in Lan guage Arts; Student Teacher Supervision. ' Elementary Education/Child Development , Assistant or Associate Professor , Elementary Ed, Child Development and Early Childhood Education; Student Teacher Supervision. Elementary Education/Reading : Assistant or Associate Professor, Elementary Ed and Reading ; Student Teacher Supervision . Secondary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor, Curriculum and Instruction; General Methods; Learning Process; Student Teacher supervision . Contact Dr . Rodolfo G. Serrano, Dean. School :of Edu c ation. Application Deadline January • 4, 1988, or until positions are filled. , In addition , this College continues to seek applicants for temporary faculty appointments in the areas listed above as well as other areas of the fine arts, behavioral and social sciences. sciences and prOfessional programs ' (nursing, criminal justice, public administration. ! health unde. represented minorities and women in . all areas especially encouraged CSB is the youngest of the nineteen campuses of the California State University System . The campus is located in the City of Bakersfield which has a metropolitan popu , lation of roughly 250,000 and . It serves a diverse population of about 700,000, located l primarily in the Southern Sen Joaquin Valley . : CSB is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative 1A.ction Employer. 5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment MORE '87 IN REVIEW: The effect of La Bamba was felt not only in film and television but in the recording industry as well. The highest ranking ever achieved by that Mexican folk song came in August, when the Los Lobos single from the movie's soundtrack (on Warner Bros./Slash) reached No . 1 on Billboards pop charts. The record also topped the magazine's "Hot Latin 50" charts in September and took the No. 11 slot in its year-end "top pop single" charts. Other Latinos on year-end charts (in the Dec. 27 Billboard issue) are: Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam (No. 17, Head to Toe and No. 31, Lost in Emotion-both Columbia); Linda Ronstadt (No. 39, with James Ingram on Somewhere Out There, MCA) Suzanne Vega,(No. 52, Luka, A&M) and Gloria Estefan& Miami Sound Machine(No. 72, Rhythm Is Gonna Get You, Epic). Jerry Garcia, lead guitarist and lyricist for The Grateful Dead, had a great comeback. In the Dark (Arlsta) was the bands highest ranking album ever and Touch of Gray their first single. Linda Ronstadt proved to be a versatile vocalist, with the March release of Trio (Warner Bros.), an album with Dolly Parton and Emmylou Harris, and November's Canciones de mi padre (Eiektra/ Asylum). Two Latino recording artists were recognized with stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame: Celia Cruz in September and Jose Feliciano in December. In the fine arts, the year's top event was the opening ofthe nation's "most comprehensive" Latino art show in Houston, in May. Hispanic Art in the United States: Thirty Contemporary Painters and Sculptors moved to Washington, D.C., in October., The second Mira! Canadian Club Hispanic Art Tour closed in Los Angeles in June, while Coors announced the (1988) schedule for its own National Hispanic Art Exhibit and Tour in November. The Hispanic presence on stage grew, particularly at some of the nation's most respected theater organizations. San Diego's Old Globe Theatre was the recipient of a Ford Foundation grant to fund its Teatro Meta through 1989. The development of Latino playwrights continued in the summer, with the Hispanic Playwrights Project at the South Coast Repertory in Southern California, and in the fall, with the Hispanic Playwrights in Residence project at New York's INTAR Theater. Miami staged its second Festival de Teatro Hispano in May, while New York's Festival Latino, in August, provided longer runs for fewer plays, and extended performances in San Francisco, San Juan, Puerto Rico, and Mexico. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report Program, AAAA, 666 Third Ave , New York, N.Y. 10017. NAHJSTUDENT AWARDS: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is offering The Mark Zambrano Scholarship and awards to students demonstrating an interest in pur suing careers in print or broadcast journalism ENCUENTRO GOES SOLO: Encuentro, a free, quarterly Quincentenary bulletin ADVERTISING INTERNSHIP OPEN: The lished by the University of New Mexico's American Association of Advertising Agencies Latin American Institute, will be offered on a is seeking Hispanic, black and other minority subscription basis starting with its first 1988 students interested in advertising careers to issue. work at its member agencies as part of its Encuentro was funded for the past two 1 o-week Minority Advertising Intern Program. years by the National Endowment fort he Arts Positions are available in art, copywriting, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. media and research. They located in The publication reports on preparations under several cities, including New York, Chicago way for the 1992 Quincentenarycelebration. and Los Angeles. It publishes news announcements of internaApplicants must be upperclassmen or gra-: tional events and includes short articles and duate students. Undergraduate students will essays. receive a stipend of$250 a week. Graduate Endowment funds expire at the end of the students will earn more. Approximately 450 year. The annual institution and corporate students have participated in the program rate will be $24 and the individual rate $12. since it started 15 years ago. 1 Write: Encuentro, Latin American Institute, For more information, applications and a I University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, N.M. brochure, write: The Minority Advertising Intern 87131. I HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT a national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or 234.0737 Publisher. Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Melinda Machado, I Julio Laboy . Graphics/Production : Carlos Arrien, Zoila Elias No poTtion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproducad j or broadcast in any form without advanca parmission. 1 Annual subscription (50 Issues) S98. Trial subscription (13 Issues) S28. CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 75 cents per word Display ads are $35 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on r8Cluest. 6 Zambrano, an NAHJ member and Chicago Tribune reporter, died in March. The $1,000 award is being made available to a college upperclass or graduate student exhibiting an interest in establishing a career in print or broadcast journalism. NAHJ will also award a total of $2,000 to undergraduate students based on financial need and journalism interests and skills. Stu de nt s who will enroll in college for the fall 1988 semester are eligible. The application deadline for both awards is March 11, 1988. For more information and applications contact Jocelyn C6rdova, NAHJ educational programs manager, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D .C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. -Julio LabOY Hispanic Link Weekly Report