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Hispanic link weekly report, October 24, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 24, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Making The News This Week
Evelyn Vega, a 28-year-old mother of three formerly on welfare and now managing a Burger King restaurant in Stamford, Conn., attends the signing of the welfare reform bill by President Reagan in the Rose Garden... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Joe Sandoval of Sacramento as secretary of the Youth and Adult Correction Agency. A 26-year veteran with the Los Angeles Police Department, Sandoval will oversee the state’s prison expansion program. . . Polly Baca, a vice chair of the Democratic National Committee and a former Colorado state senator, gets inducted into
REC’D. HR/CR
the National Hispanic Hall of Fame. She is one of 14 members*.. The board of directors of the League of United LatiiUAnlegp^)) $8&ns Foundation elects Eva P6rez, from Dallas, to become its executive director. She replaces Norma Rivera . . The Association of Community Colleges of California names Tencha Avila, a public relations professional in Washington, D.C., as its 1988 Alumnus of the Year... The attorney for the commonwealth of Arlington, Va, asks Gov. Gerald Balilesto pardon 41-year-old David Vftsquez, imprisoned since 1984 on a murder conviction, on the basis of new evidence linking another man to the crime. V&squez, serving a 35-year sentence, says he pleaded guilty because he was threatened with capital punishment...

Ul& English’s Top Officers Resign Over Remarks
Linda Chavez resigned Oct 17 as president of U.S. English, protesting that remarks by the group’s chairman, John Tanton, “displayed a bias against both Catholics and Hispanics.” She expressed continued support for the movement to declare English the nation’s official language.
Chavez further criticized Tanton for accepting contributions from a foundation that once promoted forced sterilization and from wealthy individuals who support the causes of immigration restriction and population control.
Tanton, a Michigan ophthalmologist, founded U.S. English in 1983. Since then the organization has spent upwards of $18 million to promote Official-English campaigns in more than 40 states. Much of its $7 million budget this year has gone to bankroll ballot initiatives in Arizona, Colorado and Florida.
Submitting his own resignation the same day as Chavez, Tanton charged that “the opponents have been unable to defeat these initiatives on the merits, so they have turned to personal attacks.”
Stanley Diamond, now head of California English, was named acting chairman of the national organization. Chdvez will not be
replaced, according to U.S. English spokesman Tom Olson. A current staff member, Kathy Bricker, was promoted to executive director.
The shake-up was prompted by disclosure of a 1986 discussion paper in which Tanton warned that immigration by Spanish-speakers could bring dire consequences.
Besides the threat of language divisions, he listed “the tradition of the mordida (bribe), the lack of involvement in public affairs”; Roman Catholicism, with its potential to “pitch out the separation of church and state”; low “educability’ and excessive high school drop* out rates; limited concern for the environment and “high fertility.”
“ Gobernar es poblar translates ‘to govern is to populate,’ ” Tanton wrote. “Perhaps this is the first instance in which those with their pants up are going to get caught by those with their pants down. As Whites see their power and control over their lives declining, will they simply go quietly into the night? Or will there be an explosion? We are building in a deadly disunity. All great empires disintegrate. We want stability.”
On learning of Tanton’s views, CBS newsman Walter Cronkite quit the U.S. English advisory
board Oct 13 and told the group to stop using his name in its fund-raising. Cronkite said that he “cannot favor legislation that can even remotely be interpreted to restrict the civil rights or the educational opportunities of our minority population.”
Last week Tanton said his paper was written “to stimulate discussion of difficult issues. It was never my intention to attack or insult anyone.” While apologizing for his “choice of words,” he added: “It is a sad day for America when someone who had devoted his life to public involvement has to step down because of McCarthyite tactics of guilt by association.”
Chavez described Tanton’s comments as “repugnant” and “not excusable,” adding that until last week she was unaware that the tax-exempt corporation behind U.S. English had contributed nearly $200,000 to the Center
continued on page 2
Congressmen Join Fast
Twenty-five members of Congress pledged Oct. 3 to carry on the relay fast begun after United Farmworkers’ President C6sar Chavez ended his 36-day fast in protest of pesticide dangers posed to farm workers. The congressmen joined the ranks of others throughout the nation who have promised to continue the “Fast for Life” by not eating for at least one day.
Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) said in a Capitol Hill ceremony that the purpose of the chain fast was “to draw national attention to the daily horror of the farm workers. Every day, farm workers are asked to walk into a field freshly treated with pesticides.”
According to UFW representative Arturo Ramirez, as a result of the fast, grape shipments have dropped 20% in Chicago, 17% in Detroit and 19% in New York. Ramirez said California markets are selling grapes as low as 29 cents a pound, well below what table grapes are normally sold for at this time.
In addition to Torres, other members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus participating | in the fast are Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.), Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) and Jaime Fuster(D-Puerto Rico).
Ruling Expands Basis for Asylum
A Richmond, Va., federal appeals court ruled Sept. 29 that Salvadorans who refused military service because of that army's human rights abuses are eligible for asylum in the United States
The decision will affect future asylum applicants as well as past applicants whose requests have been turned down by the U.S. Justice Department on the basis of conscientious objection, said Kathy Herrera of the Central American Refugee Center in Washington, D.C.
The number of Salvadoran men in the United States affected by the ruling is impossible to give, said Herrera, but she said this issue is a “ major concern” of many with whom she works.
The defendant in the case against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is an unnamed Salvadoran whose claim was dismissed in December 1987 by the Justice
Department’s Board of Immigration Appeals.
“The court’s decision forces the Justice Department to apply the Refugee Act even-handedly to people of all nationalities without distinctions as to ideology,” said Sylvia Rosales, director of CARECEN, which sided with the defendant in court, filing an amicus brief.
Four percent of Salvadoran asylum applications have been granted by the INS in the past two years, contrasted with a 68% figure for Nicaraguan applications, according to INS figures.
The opinion by Fourth U.S. District Court of Appeals Chief Judge Harrison Winter reads, “Where draft evasion is the expression of political opposition to the government, the Board (of Immigration Appeals) must treat the applicant as it would any other applicant for political asylum.”
- Sophia Nieves


Cisneros Stuns City, Nation With Admission of Affair
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros stunned the city and others by admitting Oct. 14 to having an extramarital relationship with a former political fund-raiser.
Perhaps the most popular and visible Hispanic leader in the nation, he has carefully nurtured a reputation as a devout Catholic and family man. He has been married 19 years, has two teen-age daughters and a 16-month-old son who suffers from a congenital heart defect Cisneros 41, disclosed the two-year relationship with Linda Medlar, separated and a mother of one daughter, following reports in the San Antonio press. He said he has no plans to file for divorce.
He had announced one month ago that he would not seek re-election, citing the
need for a better-paying job to pay for expensive medical treatment required by his son. He acknowledges now that marital problems and the need for time to work them out are other reasons.
Hispanic Democratic leaders agreed there would be little damage to Cisneros’ political career, long and short term.
San Antonio Councilwoman Maria Berrio-jabal, a possible candidate for his seat, does not believe the public will hold the lews against Cisneros. “He put San Antonio jn the map. We are proud of the standard ne set.
“What I’ve seen is support, the kind you give to your brother or a family member who is having a bad time.”
U.S. Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas)
felt the focus would stay on Cisneros’ public performance. “This is a temporary setback personally. Professionally, he has to be considered on his merits”
Texas Republican National Hispanic Assembly Chairman Bob Baildn disagreed. “I think he’s past tense, both politically and as a civic leader."
The disclosure will likely effect his participation in rousing Hispanic support for the Dukakis/Bentsen ticket in Texas, according to several sources He did not attend an Oct. 15 rally with Dukakis in San Antonio at which he had been scheduled. Said Bailon, “His absence will hurt (them). He attracts I think he will be hard pressed to finish out his term.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Chdvez Says Remarks Anti-Hispanic
continued from page 1
for Immigration Studies, Americans for Border Control, Californians for Population Stabilization, and other organizations controlled or influenced by Tanton.
Cordelia Scaife May, an heiress to the Mellon fortune, has contributed at least $2.5 million to Tanton’s network, including U.S. English. Billionaire Warren Buffett has also made generous donations
A former staff director of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, Chdvez said she was especially disturbed to learn that Tanton, as chairman of the Federation for American Immigration Reform between 1981 and 1986, had accepted $370,000 from the Pioneer Fund.
This New York-based foundation was created in 1937 to promote “racial betterment" through eugenics Harry Laughlin, its founder, stated its objectives as“practical population control ... by influencing those forces which govern immigration, the sterilization of degenerates, and mate selection in favor of American racial strains and sound family stock.” Its first project was to popularize Nazi Germany’s program of forced sterilization for persons judged to be genetically inferior. In the
CANF Gets New Director
The Cuban American National Foundation unanimously selected Jacqueline Tillman, a former director in the federal government's National Security Council, as its executive director earlier this month at a meeting in Puerto Rico. Tillman becomes the first woman to head the organization.
In addition to directing the NSC’s Latin American office, Tillman has also served as an aide to former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Jeane Kirkpatrick. Tillman recently resigned from her job at the NSC. She will work out of the group’s Washington, D.C., office.
Tillman, who was selected Oct. 8, follows Jos6 Antonio Font who resigned nearly four months ago.
2
1970s, the Pioneer Fund financed research by William Shockley and Arthu r Jensen attempting to prove that blacks are less intelligent than whites. John Tanton recently denied any knowledge of these activities.
Opponents of Official English in Colorado, Florida and Arizona predicted that the resignation of Chdvez would aid their uphill campaigns to defeat these measures.
“I applaud her for making this decision,” said Martha Jimenez, a Washington, D.C., attorney for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. “We have been telling her all along that the very roots of this organization were anti-Hispanic, that English Only is an attempt to use language as a tool of discrimination. I'm glad she finally listened.” - James Crawford
Latino Undergrads
Hispanics accounted for22% of the undergraduate enrollment increase at the five largest public universities in Illinois from 1980 to 1987, show data in the October issue of The Chicago Reporter.
Hispanics made up 709 of the 3,176 new students in that period.
They comprised 2.3% of the student bodies
Church Arrests by INS Prompt Agency Policy
Reacting to outrage over an incident in Orange, Calif., the western regional office of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service issued a policy Oct 17 which limits the pursuit of suspects into churches.
Saying it recognized that incident as “regrettable,” the INS office prohibited its border patrol agents and investigators from following undocumented immigrants into churches, hospitals or schools without a warrant or advance authorization from a supervisor. An exception was made for fleeing felons.
The new rules follow a Sept. 27 incident when INS agentschased two undocumented persons into a Catholic church, where they were arrested along with five others inside.
in Illinois Increase
at the five schools in 1987, or 3,248, of the 100,065 students In 1980, Latinos made up 2.6%, or 2,539, of the 96,889 undergraduates
The University of Illinois at Chicago had the highest Hispanic enrollment in 1987 with 1,562 students but that figure was down from 1,599 in 1980. Illinois State University, with 202 Hispanics had the lowest.
Enrollment at Top Five Illinois Universities: 1980-87
1980 1987
Hispanic White Black Hispanic White Black
Ul-Chicago 1,599 11,913 3,228 1,562 10,002 1,653
8.8% 65.6% 17.8% 10.1% 64.8% 10.7%
Ul-Urbana 360 23,889 1,038 686 23,994 1,482
1.4 91.2 4.0 2.4 85.3 5.3
Northern III. 280 16.064 1.106 430 16,642 1,009
1.6 90.9 6.3 2.3 89.0 5.4
SlU-Carbondale* 192 15,313 1,778 368 15,585 2,040
1‘1 87.1 10.1 2.0 84.8 11.1
Illinois State 108 15,850 1,492 202 18,070 1,120
0.6 89.9 8.5 1.0 91.9 5.7
* Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Source; Illinois Board of Higher education and The Chicago Reporter.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


James Crawford, guest columnist
What’s Behind the Official-English Movement?
James Crawford's piece on the Official-English movement is the first in a two-part series. The second part will run next week.
It seems only logical that “Official-English” advocates-who assert that a common language is this country’s “main unifying force” - would favor expanded opportunities for immigrants to learn English. Indeed, many voters assume this is an important aim of pending initiatives to declare English the official language of Arizona, Colorado and Florida.
Logical or not, the assumption is false.
U.S. English, a Washington, D.C.-based group, spent lavishly to get these measures on the November ballot. Yet it declines to support legislation to create the New English Literacy Grants program, approved by Congress last spring. The federal subsidy is modest-just $4.8 million this year- but is the first to be earmarked for adult classes in English as a Second Language.
Linda Chavez, who resigned as president of U.S. English Oct 17 to protest its “anti-Hispanic” direction, has spoken favorably of the bill. But, according to U.S. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), a leader in the two*year struggle to enact the bill, the Official-English lobby did nothing to help. When asked why,
Gerda Bikales, then executive director of U.S. English, responded that teaching English was the “moral obligation” of Spanish-lan-guage television stations. Stung by charges of hypocrisy, in 1987 U.S. English began to aid a few private English literacy projects. These grants, however, represented less than 1 % of the group’s $4 million budget.
IMMIGRANTS TOO DIM-WITTEDj?!
If not to enable newcomers to speak our language, what are the priorities of U.S. English? What does it seek to accomplish through Official-English amendments to federal and state constitutions?
U.S. English has been hard to pin down on these questions. In the past, its leaders have sought to abolish health and emergency services, endorse “English-Only” rules in the work place, petitioned to limit broadcasting in other tongues, threatened to boycott businesses that advertise in Spanish and tried to ban telephone bills in Chinese.
Today, U.S. English denies taking any of these positions. It insists that it seeks merely to clarify that English is our national language and that people must know it to get ahead.
Certainly, there is nothing in Official-English legislation to help anyone learn English. On the other hand, there is much to penalize those who have yet to do so. The potential for mischief is wide-ranging.
Would states be allowed to provide drivers’ exams, assist voters, publish tourist information or enforce contracts in languages other than English? Could courts supply translators in eviction, bankruptcy, divorce or adoption proceedings? Would schools be permitted to
use bilingual education to foster fluency in foreign languages? Could Indian or Hispanic legislatorscommurricate with constituents in their native tongues?
Probably not, under the more draconian Official-English measures. Arizona’s Proposition 106, for example, would largely forbid public employees to use other languages on the job. In any case, such questions would be litigated for years to come.
English-Only is a label that has stuck, despite the protests of U.S. English, because it accurately sums up the group’s logic: That people will speak English only if forced to do so. That the crutch of bilingual assistance must be yanked away or newcomers will be permanently handicapped. That immigrants are too lazy or dim-witted to accept “the primacy of English” on their own.
Dr. John Tanton, the founder of U.S. English, argues that we must act now or face upheavals like Canada’s. In an unpublished paper, he raises the specter of our evolving “from a dominant non-Hispanic society with a Spanish influence to a dominant Spanish society with a non-Hispanic influence.
“All great empires disintegrate,” he writes. “We want stability.”
Ironically, Tanton advocates the same brand of language restrictionism that has tied Quebec in kncfts.
LEGISLATING CONFORMITY PRQDUCES DISSENTION
Even if the United States faced a genuine crisis, with ethnic groups forming parties and preaching separatism - even if such fears amounted to more than Hispanophobia - legislating conformity to Anglo culture would produce more dissention than unity.
In 1787, German Americans represented a larger proportion of the mainland population than Hispanics do today - 8.6% versus 8.1%. They took pride in the German language and culture, resenting Ben Franklin’s efforts to “ Anglify” their children. Yet the framers declined to give English official status in our Constitution or to stop printing public documents in German. Their writings suggest this was no oversight The prevailing view, then and throughout most of our history, was that a democratic government has no business telling the people how to talk.
Now U.S. English is asking Congress to reconsider that judgment. Hoping that victories in Arizona, Colorado and Florida will increase its clout, the group has strong-armed Rep. Don Edwards (D-Calif.) into holding hearings on a Constitutional English Language Amendment. The battle is likely to heat up next year.
If U.S. English sincerely wanted to foster ethnic harmony, it would stop chastising immigrants, open its multimillion-dollar campaign chest and join with advocates for Asians and Hispanics to remedy the scarcity of seats in adult English classes. Instead, it exploits strong feelings about language on behalf of a new nativist movement.
(James Crawford is a Washington, D.C.-based journalist and author of Bilingual Education: History, Politics, Theory, and Practice, Crane Publishing Co., November 1988. Formerly, he served as Washington editor of Education Week, 1985-1987, and congressional editor of Federal Times, 1983-1985)
CORPORATE CLAS$IFIEP
INSTRUCTOR: (Two position.)
University of Colorado at Denver; National Veterans Training Institute
This position is responsible for the planning and intensive instruction of high impact, technically complex training program keyed to veterans employment training. The instructor coordinates the scheduling of the instruction and assists the training participants to adjust to the live-in training situation and assists in curriculum development. Must be skilled in making presentations to large groups. Moderate travel.
REQUIREMENTS: A master’s degree from an accredited college or university in behavioral science, education, business administration, adult education ora closely related field, and a minimum of six months of adult group training experience is required Must be willing to work evenings and Saturdays as required. Work week may run to 65-plus hours. Please note: The selection
processforthe instructor will require a one-week assignment as an “understudy at NVTI training site in Denver.
EMPLOYMENT CONDITIONS: These positions are contract, non-tenure positions which aie renewable on an annual basis. Program funding is dependent on congressional appropriation.
SALARY: $32,556 per year.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: A letter of application and a current resume must be received no later than November 1 >, 1988 at 5:00 pm. Please address to: Chair, Search Committee, National Veterans Training Institute, 1250 14th St., Suite 650, Denver, Colo. 80202.
If interested contact Jim Hanson, NVTI, at 1-800-331-0562.
5
Oct. 24,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
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PROFESSIONAL/FACULTY OPENINGS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS
Eastern Michigan University seeks nominations and applications for the following College of Business opportunities.
DEPARTMENT HEAD-MANAGEMENT (#APAA8007) - Leads 21 faculty in Business/Manageria! Communications, Entrepreneurship, General Business, Human Resources Management, Management-Union Relations, Organizational Behavior/Development, and Policy. Maintains link with EMU World College program for study of language and international trade. (Inquiries to Dr. Richard Camp (313) 487-3240). Immediate applicant response ensures early review of materials and possible interviews at professional conferences. Deadline for submission of documents December 31,1988.
DEPARTMENT HEAD-MARKETING (#APAAB008) - Leads 20 faculty in Marketing and Business Law. Immediate applicant response ensures early review of materials. Deadline for submission of documents December 15,1988. (Inquiries to Dr. Joseph Braden (313) 487-0171.)
DEPT. HEAD QUALIFICATIONS: Earned Doctorate fPh.D. or D.B.A. - Management or Juris Doctorate - Marketing) qualifications for tenure at full professor level; an established record of recent scholarly activity with demonstrated ability to provide research/publication leadership, minimum of five years college teaching experience or combination of extensive college teaching and additional relevant professional experience; previous administrative experience desired with ability to interact effectively with campus and community constituencies. Positions to begin August, 1989.
ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR - OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (#FAAA8026) - Will teach graduate/undergradu-ate courses, conduct research, advise students, and participate on committee assignments and community service.
QUALIFICATIONS: ABD required, Doctorate in discipline preferred for Assistant Professor; Doctorate, teaching, and research publication experience required for Associate Professor consideration. (Inquiries to Dr. Rao Tummala (313) 487-2454.) Position available September, 1989. Immediate applicant response ensures early review of materials and possible interviews at professional conferences. Deadline for submission of documents, December 31, 1988.
We offer an excellent benefit and salary package for the selected candidate. Individuals interested in these openings should respond immediately with detailed vita, interest letter, and three reference letters to: Chairperson H -
Search Committee, Position^_, 310 King Hall, EASTERN MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY, Ypsilanti, Ml 48197.
WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPORTUNITY. MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED.
Eastern Michigan University
Administrative Assistant/Board Liaison
National Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist president as board liaison.
Candidate must be able to provide staff support for organization’s board of directors. Good organizational skills needed, plus ability to work independently. Type 60 words per minute. Word processing experience desirable. Bilingual (Engiish/Spanish). Salary$l 8,000 and up, depending on experience.
Send resume tot Lupe Lem us, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St NW, Washington, D.C. 20001.
FELLOWSHIP & GRANT PROGRAMS
The Social Science Research Council announces 3' new fellowship and grant programs to support research on the urban underclass in the United States. Undergraduate Research Assistantships, Dissertation Fellowships (open to minority students only), and Postdoctoral Grants will be offered in 1989.
Application deadline: January 10,1989.
Please contact: Social Science Research Council, Research on the Urban Underclass, 605 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10158.
FELLOWSHIPS
The Southwest Hispanic Research Institute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities residency fellowships for the 1989-90 academic year. The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000 toward relocation costs and other benefits. Interested scholars are invited to submit research proposals on issues critical to an understanding of the Hispanic/Chicano experience in the context of the changing Southwest Eligibility criteria include an awarded doctorate in the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project during the residency period. For proposal guidelines write to Southwest Hispanic Research Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131.
RIO HONDO COLLEGE has an opening for... MULTICULTURAL CENTER DIRECTOR A 10-month position, funded from a Title III Grant. This opening requires a master's degree in a discipline contributing to understanding cultural diversity and prior experience which would contribute to success of a Multicultural Center. Ph.D. and two years postsecondary teaching preferred.
For information/application, contact Jean (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608
EMPLEADOS GUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your $$s impact on your community. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to “Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics,” particularly, decrease the high school dropout rates, unemployment, social, ethnic and sexual discrimination, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system.
NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helped over3,000 H ispanics last year through trai ning, scholarships, and amnesty assistance. Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please call Ms. Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220.
ENGLISH CONVERSATION CLASSES: Three Montgomery County, Md., public libraries - in Kensington, Silver Spring and Rockville - are offering free English classes for the foreign born during November and December. For information and pre-registration, call Nell Marshall at (301)279-1980.
6
Oct. 24, 1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


John Rosales, guest columnist
Reconsidering Cisneros
One of my first assignments on graduating from journalism school six years ago was to interview Henry Cisneros. He had recently been elected as the first Mexican American to serve as mayor of my native San Antonio in a century and a half. He impressed me as few people have.
But shortly thereafter, when I wrote a column for Hispanic Link News Service about heroes, I didn’t pick Cisneros as mine.
I selected instead the other Latino San Antonio mayor, Juan Seguln. He was a Texas rancher and patriot whose views weren’t popular with settlers who came across the Mississippi to claim their stake. And when the United States declared war on Mexico, Segufn's neighbors found him guilty of being brown, a “foreigner" in his own land. He challenged his oppressors by fighting with the Mexican Army of General Santa Anna
Henry Cisneros, I wrote, was a role model, not a hero. He hadn’t been put to the full test yet
In the last few years, Henry Cisneros put San Antonio on the map. He gave it direction, nurtured its economic growth, and brought it a unity of purpose and spirit that never existed before. The citys distinctive, often antagonistic Anglo and Latino communities moved much closer together.
Henry Cisneros did It on a ridiculous mayor's salary of $4,040 a year.
Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale interviewed him in 1984 as his possible vice presidential running mate. He was named to the prestigious presidential commission on Central America headed by Henry Kissinger. And he served most recently as president of the National League of Cities. He quickly became the political hope of U.S. Latinos.
‘SAN ANTONIO, MY NAME GO TOGETHER’
Then this month, Henry Cisneros admitted to having an extramarital affair with a woman who had been active in his re-election campaign.
The mayor professed deep love for the woman, who is married but separated.
Cisneros and his wife Mary Alice have two teen-age daughters and an infant son. The other woman in his life has a 10-year-old daughter.
Cisneros and the woman have been an “item,” talked about but not written about, for two years. Periodic rumors had him fathering an illegitimate child, kicked out of his home; one even had him shot by Mary Alice.
As the talk spread, Cisneros announced this summer that he would not seek re-election or be a candidate for state office. He cited the health of his 16-month-old son, John Paul, who was bom with a defective heart, and his own need to earn money and enjoy a private life.
Then came his full admission this month. First, he apologized. Because of his position, he acknowledged to reporters, “San Antonio and my name go together on these problems. But I guess human beings just aren’t made of plastic and wiring and metal - they are made of flesh and blood and feelings.
‘MANY HAVE BEEN HURT
“It is a profound personal situation and requires an expedient decision because so many people involved have been hurt”
His way of handling his personal shame stands in contrast to that of the man who almost became the Democratic nominee for president. When confronted by similar allegations, Gary Hart chided the press, “Put a tail on me.”
As an elected public official, Henry Cisneros loses some rights to privacy. But he was elected to do a job, not be perfect
I don’t know much about the private life of Juan Seguln. Such matters about politicians weren’t chronicled as closely then.
But I know that Henry Cisneros, the public man, has handled the half-truths and hostility and the issue of his private indiscretions with dignity and courage. Soon as a private man he must sort it all out
Juan Seguln overcame the hostility against him to become San Antonio's mayor. I for one hope that Henry Cisneros returns to public life. I’m still counting on him to be a hero.
(John Roaalea ia a reporter with The San Antonio Light)
Sin polos en la lengua
THE ‘SCOOP1 THAT NOBODY WANTED: Many reporters in San Antonio, as well as a number of us covering Hispanic affairs nationally, had for months been hearing rumors about Mayor Henry Cisneros’ marital infidelity.
Some knew for sure but were bound by “off the record” conversations with the mayor not to print anything.
Knowing that the story would eventually come out, Latino reporters in particular agonized over how to treat a personal issue that would crush, at least temporarily, the big-time political aspirations of our shining knight
They wanted to deal with it ethically, professionally. Because of Cisneros’ magnificent performance as mayor, the San Antonio press wanted to protect him. There were, and still are, those who question the public’s right to know - at least so long as his personal problems did not affect his public performance.
One reporter who succumbed was Alfredo Corchado of the Wall Street Journal. Corchado, in the Journal’s Dallas bureau, heard the rumors at a San Antonio conference a month ago. They had become rampant following the mayor's Sept 12 announcement that he would not seek re-election.
When Corchado returned to Dallas, a woman phoned to tell him more. “I didn’t know what to do about it” he told Sin Pelos, “but she called again and challenged me and said ‘ I have a feeling that because you're a Hispanic reporter you don’t want to bring a Hispanic mayor down.’ ”
This hit a nerve. He approached his bureau chief, and about two weeks ago he was back in San Antonio asking questions It made a lot of people nervous The San Antonio press didn’t want to see an outside reporter scoop them. The scramble started.
The mayor held a 1 1/2 hour interview with the weekly San Antonio Current, denying the rumors with one exception. In its Oct. 12 story, Cisneros admitted to having marital problems.
Among rumors the Current raised and Cisneros shot down: that he had an illegitimate child, that his girlfriend had aborted it and that his wife had shot him.
On Oct. 13, The San Antonio Light printed a column by Rick Casey which verified that Cisneros was having an affair, that the woman was known, and that all else was undocumented. The Current story made it fair game, Casey told us. “He put it on the table so we had to deal with it”
The following day, the San Antonio Express-News ran a column by Paul Thompson which quoted Cisneros on his“deep love” for Linda Medlar, who worked on his last campaign.
Thompson told Sin Pelos that he’d known all the facts for three months but that he didn’t print them because “everyone loves Henry. He’s a prime asset to the community and no one wants to shoot Superman.”
Now Thompson is irked at Casey, they are both irked by the “outsider" Corchado, and Corchado is irked at them.
“It bothers me that they knew about it.. and didn’t print it on its news value, but on the potential of being beat,” explained the 28-year-old Texan. His own story ran in the Journal Oct. 17.
Not all scoops are sweet. _ ^ay B&rbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
'Oct 24,1988
3


COLLECTING
FELLOWS SOUGHT: W.K Kellogg Foundation seeks professionals who want to improve their leadership skills as candidates for the 1989 Kellogg National Fellowship Program. Applicants must be affiliated with a non-profit organization or be self-employed. The deadline is Dec. 19. For more information contact the foundation at 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017 (616) 968-1611.
ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT: The October 1988 issue of The Chicago Reporter, 12 pages, contains a full page on student enrollment broken down by race and ethnicity at the eight largest public universities in Illinois. For a copy send $2.50 to The Chicago Reporter, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, III. 60604 (312) 427-4830.
FILM, VIDEO RELEASES: The Cinema Guild offers an array of Spanish-language films and videos of interest to Hispanics, including videos on contemporary Cuban art and on music in Central America. For a complete listing, write Cinema Guild, 1697 Broadway, New York, N.Y. 10019(212)246-5522.
IMMIGRATION AND CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATION: An 11-page report by the Center for Immigration Studies, “The Impact of Immigration on Congressional Representation,” analyzes the effects of international migration on congressional representation For a copy send $2.00 to CIS, 1775 T St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 328-7228.
BIOLOGICAL FELLOWSHIPS: Applicants are sought for the 60 fellowships that will be awarded through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute 1989 Doctoral Fellowships in Biological Sciences. Awards are for three years, with a $12,300 annual stipend and a $10,700 annual cost-of-living allowance. Deadline is Nov. 14. For more information contact Hughes Doctoral Fellowships, FellowshipOffice, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20418(202)334-2872.
LITERARY CONTEST: Entries are being sought for the 15th annual Chicano Literary Contest. The categories are prose, poetry and theater; works can be submitted in English, Spanish or both. Deadline is Jan. 26, 1989. For more information contact Chicano Literary Contest, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, Calif. 92717 (714) 856-5702.
PRE-MARIEL CUBANS: “The Demographic Characteristics of Pre-Mariel Cubans Living in the United States: 1980” is a 70-page monograph explaining socioeconomic differences among Hispanic subgroups. For a copy send $5 to Graduate School of International Studies, North-South Center, Publications, University of Miami, P.O. Box 24-8123, Coral Gables, Fla. 33124-8123.
CONNECTING
IDENTIFYING LATINA LEADERS
Twenty-five Latinas are being sought for the 1989 class of the National Hispana Leadership Initiative. The program has as its goal the preparation of local Latina community leaders for positions on the national level.
Funded by the Adolph Coors Co., the nine-month program, which begins in February, places the participants at Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government to study public policy and management This marks the program’s second year. Last year’s class numbered 20.
Initiative participants must be at least 25 years of age and agree to mentor two Hispanic women on completing the program.
Program participants are chosen by a 13-member advisory committee that includes a cross section of Hispanic organizational and elected leaders.
Application deadline is Nov. 15. For more information, contact the National Hispana Leadership Institute, 1905 Sherman St, Suite802, Denver, Colo. 80203(303)861-2888.
PARTICIPATING IN HIGHER ED
The Ford Foundation has approved a grant of $436,500 to the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities to help it increase the transfer rate of Texas Hispanics from two- to four-year colleges, HACU announced this month.
The three-year grant will be used to finance a component of HACLTs Hispanic Students Success Program called the Two-Year/Four-Year Program. As part of the transfer program, a system will be developed where students at the four participating community colleges indicate their transfer choices and are put in touch with the institutions. The program has set as a goal to increase from 10-15% to 25% the transfer rate of Hispanic students. Currently, 54% of all Hispanics in higher education in Texas are in community colleges.
HACU estimates it will serve 4,500 students through the project.*
VIDEOS REGISTER, LIBRARIES ELECT
California’s Institute for Bilingual Media Productions has announced the completion of a video to motivate Hispanics to register and vote. The English-language video, with Spanish subtitles, will be shown on TV and disseminated through unions, school districts, churches and other interested parties For information call Barbara Rossetti at (415) 571-1397... The executive board of the Washington, D.C.-based National Association to Promote Library Services to'■the Spanish Speaking elects Newark, N.J., librarian Ingrid Betancourt as its president..
Calendar
THIS WEEK
HI8PANIC MARKET San Antonio Oct. 25
Dick Dillon, founder of the countiys largest advertising agency targeted to Hispanics Mendoza-Dillon, will speak on the Hispanic market’s impact in San Antonio during the San Antonio Advertising Federation’s monthly luncheon. A panel discussion will be led by moderator Lionel Sosa of Sosa& Associates Cindy Still (512) 366-6793
YOUTH SYMPOSIUM Emporia Kan. Oct. 26
A symposium designed to encourage Hispanic students to graduate from high school and to go on to college will be held by the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs and Emporia State University. Workshop topics include career guidanca peer
pressure, postsecondary admissions and financial aid, and Hispanic history and culture.
Steve Ramirez (913) 296-3465
SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAI8ER Fresno, Calif. Oct. 27
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will hold a fund-raising dinner to raise money for deserving Hispanic students The keynote speaker will be the organization's director, Ernest Roblea Michelle Zulim (209) 225-2337
PARENT EDUCATION Chicago Oct. 28
A training conference for Latino parents, “Education: A Family Affair,” will help parents learn how to take an active role in the public school system. Some of the workshop topics include parents and curriculum, the principal’s role and parental responsibility and school reform legislation. Toney Anaya, former governor of New Mexico, will be the keynote speaker. Marta Ayala (312) 744-4404
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Dallas Oct 30-Nov. 3
Oct. 24,1988
The National Minority Supplier Development Council which builds economic links between large corporations and minority-owned businesses, will hold a conference called “ Partners for Profit.” Workshops are scheduled that are geared to corporate representatives, business owners and members of regional councils. Other activities include a luncheon featuring William Verity, Secretary of the Department of Commerce, and a Mexican fiesta.
Conference registrar (212) 944-2430
COMING SOON
WOMEN’S HEALTH
National Conference of Puerto Rican Women Miami Nov. 11-13 C. Monroe (202) 393-1604
Calendar will announce free of charge events of interest to the national Hispanic community. Items should be received two Fridays before the publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items ta Calendar editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
4


UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant Professor III in the sociology of development effective July, 1989.
This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development, international organization, the sociology of agriculture, urbanization and development in the Third World, or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program. Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable. Ph.D. is required. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland, Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, California95616. Applications must be postmarked January 1,1989 or earlier to be considered.
The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
The University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputation for quantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching. The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Professor levels.
A Ph.D. is required. It is desired that the field of specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and family, sociology of organization, economic sociology, historical, comparative sociology, international political economy, or poverty and social welfare. The position is reserved for someone actively engaged in quantitative research and able to regularly participate in teaching a graduate-level sequence in methods and statistics. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application, and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10,1989 or earlier to be considered.
The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
FACULTY POSITIONS:
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK TWO TENURE TRACK, 9-MONTH POSITIONS Assistant/Associate Professor Begin Fall 1989. MSW required. Doctorate in social work, related field or ABD preferred. Health - Potential skills in teaching and direct practice experience in health settings with the aged. Mental Health- Post-master's experience in clinical work and potential in teaching direct practice with children and families desirable. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply for both positions Salary range: $30,252-$39,960. ONE TENURE TRACK, 12-MONTH POSITION Field Coordinator
Begin July1,1989. MSW required. Doctorate in Social Work, related field or ABD preferred. Previous social work field practicum coordination, program experience required and knowledge of community resources Salary range: $31,680 - $48,204.
Send vitae by March 15,1989 (apply for each position separately) to:
Ronald P. Boltz, Director Division of Social Work California State University, Sacramento Sacramento, California 95819-2694
California State Coordinator of tha 1990 Cantu* Program
MALDEF, a national Hispanic civil rights organization, seeks an individual to develop and coordinate a community education program to inform Hispanics about the importance of the 1990 Census The Los Angeles-based position requires Undergraduate degree; 3-5 years community organizing or related activity, knowledge of California Hispanic organizations, local and state policymakers; research, writing and oral communication skills, bilingual in English/Spanish.
Send resum6, writing sample, and 3 references to R. CakJerdn, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St, 11 th FL Los Angeles, Calif.90014 by 10/28/88.
Staff Attornay
MALDEF, a national Hispanic civil rights organization, seeks an experienced civil rights or public interest law attorney for our Los Angeles office.
He/she will be responsible for conducting a personal caseload of litigation and advocacy in the areas of employment and immigrant^ rights and represent MALDEF in public forums Required: Licensed attorney; successful passage of the California bar exam; knowledge of local, state and national Hispanic issues; excellent research, writing and oral communication skills; and must be bilingual in English/Spanish.
Send resum6, writing sample, and3 references to R. Calderbn, MALDEF, 634 So. Spring St, 11 th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 by November 1,1988.
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis Call (301) 251 -2252.
ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND GRADUATE DEAN The University of Texas at El Paso
The University of Texas at El Paso invites applications and nominations for the position of associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean.
The position will report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs The Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean will be responsible for representing the University to federal, state, and private funding sources and for the operation and supervision of the Office of Sponsored Projects and the Graduate School. A major responsibility will be to develop institutional proposals and identify appropriate funding sources to increase institutional and faculty extramural funding. The successful candidate will also provide vigorous leadership in the development of new graduate offerings and strengthening existing offerings.
Applicants are expected to have an earned doctorate, academic and research administrative experience, a strong record of scholarly achievement, a record of obtaining research funding, strong written and oral communication skills and be eligible for appointment as a full professor in an appropriate academic department.
With over 15,000 students, the University of Texas at El Paso is the largest public institution on the United States*Mexico border and it is the second oldest component of the UT System. The bicultural region of El Paso and Juarez offers a mild southwestern climate as well as unique cultural, business, research and educational opportunities. The University is seeking to continue its commitment to enhance these opportunities to provide expanded educational programs to its culturally diverse constituency. Serving a metropolitan population of 1.5 million people, UT El Paso offers a wide variety of both baccalaureate and master’s programs in six academic colleges and thegraduate school. The University has an established doctoral program in Geological Sciences, and approval has been soughtfortwo additional doctoral programs.
Applications and nominations will be accepted until December 15,1988. A starting date of June 1,1989 is anticipated. The Univerrity offers a competitive salary and benefits package. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, and the names Of five references should be sent
Dr. Donald E Moss,
Chairman, Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean Search Committee c/o Office of the President The University of Texas at El Paso 500 University Avenue El Paso, Texas 79968
Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
7


Arts& Entertai
LLAMA A CASA: With the highest-ever number of cassettes pre-ordered in Spanish-language home video history, ET. The Extraterrestrial calls home this week.
MCA Home Video’s E T. debuts Oct. 27 in two dubbed versions- in “neutral and Castillian Spanish.” At a total of 10.6 million English and Spanish cassettes pre-sold, the fantasy/adventure film became the best selling title of all time before its street date.
Other Spanish video titles due out in the next few weeks: Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ, the 1926 classic that starred Ram6n Novarro (from MGM/UA, due Nov.8); Colors; which featured Maria Conchita Alonso (Orion Home Video, Nov. 17); Return to Fantasy Island, starring Ricardo Montalban and Kennedy “The Presidential Years,” starring Martin Sheen (both from Prism Entertainment, Nov. 30).
NO HAY LUGAR COMO LA CASA: A new “arena” version of The Wizard of Oz goes on tour next March - in dual English and Spanish
productions.
Two open casting calls will be held in Hollywood and New York for actors, singers and dancers to perform in both shows. According to a publicist for MMG Arena Productions, various of the roles could be cast with bilingual performers who can sing in both languages.
The Wizard of Oz will travel to 20 cities in the U.S. - the Spanish version will be staged in about half of those.
ONE LINERS: The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists holds a Meet The Candidates Evening Oct. 26. Various Latino members are expected to run for positions on the union’s board of directors... Pl&cido Domingo sings at the Oct 29 benefit premiere performance of a concert by Lalo Shifrin based on Aztec poetry. The composer will conduct the Paris Symphony at the event to be staged near the Teotihuacan ruins... And the Hollywood actors’ organization Nosotros holds a Gala Benefit at the city’s Universal Amphitheatre, Oct. 30, featuring Jos6 Feliciano, Tony Orlando & Dawn and Paul Rodriguez... >. v-
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
GROUPS MAKE HISTORY:The boards of directors of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists, the National Association of Black Journalists and the Asian American Journalists Association met for the first time Oct. 14-16 in Baltimore.
The historic session was as much an effort to encourage ethnic and racial diversity in the nation’s newsrooms as to send a message to the newspaper and broadcast industries that the groups are joining forces.
“Our united efforts are crucial to bring more minority peoples into the profession, to increase their promotion and advancement to all levels of the industry and to stem the alarming trend of theirflight from the profession,” read a statement released by the groups at the end of the meeting. Also joining in the statement was the Native American Press Association through free-lancer MarkTrahant,
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its president.
Two proposals to come out of the meeting were to set up a committee to study the possibility of a joint conference in 1993 and to establish an executive committee composed of each group’s president, immediate past president and executive director that will meet at least once yearly.
The other presidents are Evelyn Hernandez, New York Newsday reporter, NAHJ; Lloyd LaCuesta, a bureau chief with KTVU in San Francisco, AAJA; and Dewayne Wickham, a syndicated columnist with the Gannett News Service, NABJ.
The joint conference committee will report back to the three organizations in January on site possibilities, funding and the commissioning of a study or survey to be released at the conference.
The groups agreed in principle to work on local and regional events before the proposed joint conference, such as an event in 1991 tied to the release of population statistics from the 1990 census.
cago market's largest Spanish-language station, will be leaving the Univision network to join: its competition, the Telemundo network, the two networks confirmed Oct. 13.
The station’s contract with Univision expires at the end of the year and the station has decided to go with Telemundds more lucrative advertising offer. Under the setup offered by Univision, WSNS keeps 75% of advertising revenues generated by the network’s programming. The Telemundo arrangement will up that percentage to 80%.
UNIVISION REPORTS ON ELDERLY: Univision will air Oct. 28 a half-hour special on the needs and demographics of the elderly Hispanic population, one which the Census Bureau reports is growing at a rate three times faster than the overall population.
Y Los Ahos Pasan, which will be broadcast at 10:30 p.m. ET (check local listings), will examine where Hispanic elderly live, their lack of medical care and the financial burdens they face. The show will be hosted by Teresa Rodriguez.
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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,iEC ' D . H R /CR Making The News This Week Evelyn Vega, a 28-year-old mother of three formerly on welfare and now managing a Burger King restaurant in Stamford, Conn., attends the signing of the welfare reform bill by President Reagan in the Rose Garden ... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints Joe Sandoval of Sacramento as secretary of the Youth and Adult Correction Agency . A 26-year veteran with the Los Angeles Police Department , Sandoval will oversee the state ' s prison expansion program . . . Polly Baca, a vice chair of the Democratic National Committee and a former Colorado state senator , gets inducted into the National Hispanic Hall of Fame . She _ board of directors of the League of Un1ted LatuUNtlel!::;u• wuv:ns Foundation elects Eva Perez, from Dallas , to become its executive director. She replaces Norma Rivera . . . The Association of Community Colleges of California names Tencha Avila, a public relations professional in Washington, D.C. , as its 1988' Alumnus of the Year. . . The attorney for the commonwealth of Arlington, Va . , asks Gov . Gerald Baliles to pardon 41-year-old David Vasquez, imprisoned since 1984 on a murder conviction , on the basis of new evidence linking another man to the crime. Vasquez , serving a 35-year sentence, says he pleaded guilty because he was threatened with capital punishment. .. Vol. 6 No. 42 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL 24,1988 US. English's Top Officers Resign Over Remarks Linda Chavez res i gned Oct 17 as president of U . S . English, protesting that remarks by the group's chairman , John Tanton , " displayed a b i as aga i nst both Catholics and Hispanics." She expressed continued support for the movement to decla r e English the nation's official language . Chavez further criticized Tanton for accepting contributions from a foundation that once promoted forced sterilizat i on and from wealthy individuals who support the causes of im migration restriction and population control . Tanton , a Michigan ophthalmologist, founded U . S . English in 1983. Since then the organi zation has spent upwards of $18 million to promote Official-English campaigns ' i n more than 40 states . Much of its$7 million budget this year has gone to bankroll ballot initiatives in Arizona, Colorado and Florida . Submitting his own resignat i on the same day as Chavez , Tanton charged that " the opponents have been unable to defeat these in i tiatives on the merits, so they have turned to personal attacks . " Stanley Diamond , now head of California English , was named acting chairman of the national organization. Chavez will not be replaced, according to U.S. English spokesman Tom Olson. A current staff member , Kathy Bricker , was promoted to executive director . The shake-up was prompted by disclosure of a 1986 discussion paper in which Tanton warned that immigration by Spanish-speakers could bring dire consequences . Besides the threat of language divisions, he listed " the tradition of the mordida (bribe), the lack of involvement in public affairs"; Roman Catholicism , with its potential to " pitch out the separation of church and state" ; low " educability" and excess i ve high school drop out rates; limited concern for the environment and "high fertility. " " Gobernar es poblartranslates 'to govern is to populate,'" Tanton wrote . "Perhaps this is the first instance in which t . hose with their pants up are going to get caught by those . with their pants down . As Whites see their power and control over their lives declining , will they simply go quietly into the night? Or will there be an explosion? We are building in a deadly disunity . All great empires disirl tegrate . We want stability." On learning of Tanton ' s views, CBS newsman Walter Cronkite quit the U .S. English advisory Ruling Expands Basis for Asylum A Richmond, Va. , federal appeals court ruled Sept. 29 that Salvadorans who refused military service because of that army's human rights abuses are eligible for asylum in the United States. The decision will affect future asylum applicants as well as past applicants whose requests have been turned down by the U . S . Justice Department on the basis of conscientious obj ection, said Kathy Herrera of the Central American Refugee Center in Washington , D.C. The number of Salvadoran men in the United States affected by t he ruling is impossible to give , said Herrera , but she said this issue is a " major concern" of many with whom she works. The defendant in the case against the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is an unnamed Salvadoran whose claim was dismissed in December 1987 by the Justice Departmenfs Board of Immigration Appeals. "The court ' s decision forces the Justice Department to apply the Refugee Act even handedly to people of all nationalities without d i stinctions as to ideology , " said Sylvia Rosales, director of CARECEN , which sided with the def endant in court, filing an amicus brief . Four percent of Salvadoran asylum ap plications have been granted by the INS in the past two years, contrasted with a 68% figure for Nicaraguan applications, according to INS figures. The opinion by Fourth U .S. District Court of Appeals Chief Judge Harrison Winter reads, "Where draft evasion is the expression of political opposition to the government , the Board (of Immigration Appeals) must treat the applicant as it would any other applicant for political asylum . " -Sophia Nieves board Oct. 13 and told thegroupto stop using his name in its fund-raising . Cronkite said that he "cannot favor legislation that can even remotely be interpreted to restrict the civi I rights or the ed uca tiona I opportunit ies of our minority population . " Last week Tanton said his paper was written "to stimulate d i scussion of difficult issues . It was never my intention to attack or insult anyone." While apologizing for his "choice o f words," he added : "It is a sad day for America when someone who had devoted his life to public involvement has to step down because of McCarthyite tact ics of guilt by association." Chavez described Tanton ' s comments as "repugnanf' and"not excusable," adding that until last week she was unaware that the tax . exempt corporat ion behind U.S. English had contributed nearly $200,000 to the Center continued o n pag e 2 Congressmen Join Fast Twenty-five members of Congress pledged Oct. 3 to carry on the relay fast begun after United Farmworkers ' President Cesar Chavez ended his 36-day fast in protest of pesticide dangers posed to farm workers . The congress men joined the ranks of others throughout the nation who have promised to continue the " Fast for Life " by not eating for at leas t one day. Rep . Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) said in a Capitol Hill ceremony that the purpose of the chain fast was "to draw national attention to the daily horror of the farm workers . Every day, farm workers are asked to walk into a field freshly treated with pesticides." According to UFW representative Arturo Ramirez, as a result of the fast , grape sh ip ments have dropped 20% in Chicago, 17% in Detroit and 19% i n New York. Ramirez said California markets are selling grapes as low as 29 cents a pound , well below what table grapes are normally sold for at this time. In addition to Torres , other members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus particlpating I in the fast are Rep . Bill Richardson (D-N.M . ) , Rep . Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) , Rep. Albert Bustamante (DTexas) and Jaime Fuster (D Puerto Rico).

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Cisne ros Stuns City, Nation With Admission of Affair Sa n Ant on i o M ayor Henry Cisneros stunned the .city and o th e r s by admitting Oct. 14 to having an extramarital relationship with a former political fund-raiser. Perhaps t he most popular and visible H i spanic l ea de r in the nation , he has carefully nurtured a re putation as a devout Catholic and fami l y ma n . He has been married 19 years, has two teen-age daughters and a 16month-ol d son who suffers from a con genital heart defect. Cisneros, 4 1 , disclosed the two-year relation ship with Linda Medlar, separated and a mother o f one daughter, following reports in the San A nton i o press. He said he has no plans to fi le f o r divorce . He had a n n o unced one month ago that he wou l d not seek citing the need for a better-paying job to pay for expensive medical treatment required by his son. He acknowledges now that marital problems and the need for time to work them out are other reasons. Hispanic Democratic leaders agreed there would be little damage to Cisneros' political career, long and short term . San Antonio Councilwoman Maria ! abal, a possible candidate for his seat, :toes not believe the public will hold the 1ews against Cisneros. "He put San Antonio >n the map. We are proud of the standard ne set. . " What I've seen is support, the kind you give to your brother or a family member who is having a bad time." U.S . Rep. Albert Bustamante ( D-Texas) felt the focus would stay on Cisneros ' public perfo r mance . "This is a temporary setback personally. Professionally , he has to be considered o n his merits." Texas Republican National Hispanic As sembly Chairman Bob Bailon disagreed. "I think he's past tense, both politically and as a civic leader." The disclosure will likely effect his partici pation in rousing Hispanic support for the DukakisiBentsen ticket in Texas, according to several sources. He did not attend an Oct. 15 rally with Dukakis in San Antonio at which he had been scheduled . Said Bailon, " H i s absence will hurt (them) . He attracts. I think he will be hard pressed to finish out his term. " -Darryl Lynette Figueroa Cbavez S a y s Remarks Anti-Hispanic Church Arrests by INS Prom p t Agency Policy con tinued fr o m pag e 1 for iiTim igration stu d ies, Americans for Border Control, Californians for Population Stabili zation, and other organizations controlled or influenced by Ta nton. Cordelia Sca ife Ma y , an heiress to the Mellon fortune, h as contributed a t least $2.5 million to Tanto n' s network, including U . S . English . Billionaire W a r re n Buffett has also made generous donations. A former staff director of the U . S . Civil Rights Comm ission , Chavez said she was especially distu rbed to learn that Tanton, as chairman of the F ederation for American Im migration Re f o r m be t ween 1981 and 1986, had accepted $370,000 from the Pioneer Fund . 1970s, the Pioneer Fund financed research by William Shockley and Arthur Jensen attempt ing to prove that blacks are less intelligent than whites. John Tanton recently denied any knowledge of these activities. Opponents of Official English in Colorado , Florida and Arizona predicted that the resig nation of Chavez would aid their uphill cam pa igns to defeat these measures . " I applaud her for making this decision," said Martha Jimenez , a Washington , D.C. , attorney for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund . "We have been t elling her all along that the very roots of this organization were anti-Hispanic, that English Only is an attempt to use language as a tool of discrimination. I'm glad she finally listened." -James Crawford Reacting to outrage over an incident in Orange, Calif., the western regional office of the U . S . Imm i grat i on and Naturalization Service issued a policy Oct 17 which limits the pursuit of suspects into churches. Saying it recognized that incident as grettable," the INS office prohibited its border patrol agents and investigators from following undocumented immigrants into churches, hospitals or schools without a warrant or advance author i zation from a superfvisor. An exception was made for fleeing felons . The new rules follow a Sept. 27 incident when INS agents chased two undocumented persons into a Catholic church, where they were arrested along with five others inside. Thi.s New York ba sed foundation was created i n 1937 to prom ote " racial bettermenr through eugen ics. Harry Laughlin, its founder, stated Lat •. n 0 u n de rg ra d . s •. n ••••. n 0 .. s I n crease its objecti ves as" practical population con t rol . . . . by influencing those forces which govern . Hispanics accounted for 22% of the underi mmigrati on, th e sterilization of degenerates, , graduate enrollment increase at the five largest . and rnatese1ec tion in favor of American racial public universities in Illinois from 1980 to strains and sound family stock. " Its first 1987, show data in the October issue of The at the five schools in 1987, or 3,248, of the 100,065 s t udents. In 1980, Latinos made up 2 .6%, or 2 , 539, of the 96,889 undergraduates. The University of Illinois at Chicago had the highest Hispanic enrollment in 1987 with 1 ,562 students, but that figure was down from 1 ,599 i n 1980. Illinois State University , with 202 Hispanics, had the lowest. project was to popularize Nazi Germany's Chicago Reporter. program of f o rced sterilization for persons Hispanics made up 709 of the 3,176 new judged to be genetically inferior. In the students in that period. CAN F Gets New Director They comprised 2 . 3% of the student bodies The Cuba n A merican National Foundation unanimous l y selected Jacqueline Tillman , a former director in the federal governmenfs National S e c u r ity Council, as its executive director earlier this month at a meeting in Puerto Rico . T illman becomes the first woman to head th e organization. Enrollment at Top Five Illinois Univ e rsities: 198Q-87 In addition to directing the NSC ' s Latin American office, Tillman has also served as an aide to former U . S . Ambassado r to the United Nations Jeane Kirkpatrick. Tillman recen tly resigned from her job at the NSC. She wi ll work out of the group's Washington, D .C., offi ce. Tillman, wh o was selected Oct. 8 , follows Jose Antonio Font, who resigned nearly four months a go. 2 1980 Hispanic White Black Hi s panic UI-Chicago 1,599 11,913 3 ,228 1 ,562 8.8% 65.6% 17 . 8% 10.1% UI-Urbana 360 23,889 1,038 686 1 . 4 91. 2 4 . 0 2 . 4 Northern Ill. 280 16.064 1.106 430 1 . 6 90.9 6.3 2.3 Sf U-Carbondale* 192 1,778 368 1 .1 87 .1 10.1 2.0 Illinois State 108 15 ,850 1 ,492 202 0 . 6 89. 9 8 . 5 1.0 • S outh e rn Illino i s Univers iiy at Ca r bondale Illinois Board of High& r education and The Ch i cago Reporter . 1987 White Black 10,002 1 ,653 64.8% 10. 7% 23,994 1,482 85. 3 5.3 16 ,642 1,009 89.0 5.4 15 ,585 2 ,040 84.8 11 .1 18,070 1 ,120 91. 9 5.7 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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James Crawford, guest columnist Whafs Behind the Official-English Movement? James Crawford's piece on the Official-English movement is the first in a two-part series The secon d part will run next week . It seems only logical that"Offic i ai-English" advocateswho assert that a common languag e is this country's "main unifying force"would favor expanded opportunities for immigrants to learn E nglis h . In deed, many voters assume this is an important aim of pending initiatives to declare English the official language of Arizona, Colorado and Florida . Logical or not, the assumption is false . U . S . English, a Washington, D.C.based group, spent lavishly to get these measures on November ballot. Yet it declines to support legislation to create the New English Literacy Grants program, approved by Congress last spring . The federal subsidy is modestjust $4.8 million this year-but is the first to be earmarked for adult classes in English as a Second Language. Linda Chavez, who resigned as president of U . S . English Oct 17 to protest its "antiHispanic" direction, has spoken favorably of the bill . But, according to U.S . Sen . John McCain (A-Ariz.), a leader in the two-year struggle to enact the bill , the Official-English lobby did nothing to help. When asked why, G erda Bikales, then executive director of U.S. English, responded thatteaching English was the " moral obligation" of Spanish-lan guage television stations. Stung by charges of hypocrisy, in 1987 U . S . English began to aid a few private English literacy projects. These grants, however, represented tess than 1% of the group's $4 million budget. IMMIGRANTS TOO DIM-WITTED\? ! If not to enable newcomers to speak our language , what are the priorities of U.S. English? What does it seek to accomplish through Official-English amendments to federal and state constitutions? U.S . English has been hard to pin down on these questions. In the past, its .leaders have sought to abolish health and emergency services, endorse" English-Only'' rules in the work place, petitioned to limit broadcasting in other tongues , threatened to boycott businesses that advertise in Spanish and tried to ban telephone bills in Chinese . Today, U.S . English denies taking any of these positions. It insists that it seeks merely to clarify that English is our national language and that people must know it to get ahead . Certainly, there is nothing in Official English legislation to help anyone learn English . On the other hand, there is much to penalize those who have yet to do so. The potential for mischief is wide ranging . Would states be allowed to provide drivers ' exams, assist voters, publish tourist information or enforce contracts in languages other than English? Could courts supply translators in eviction , bankruptcy, divorce or adoption proceedings? Would schools be permitted to . use bilingual education to foster fluency in foreign languages? Could Indian or Hispanic legislators communicate with constituents in their native tongues? Probably not, under the more draconian Official-English measures. Arizona's Proposition 106, for example, would largely forbid public employees to use other languages on the job. In any case, such questions would be litigated for years to come. English-Only is a label that has stuck, despite the protests of U . S . English, because it accurately sums up the group's logic: That people will speak English only if forced to do so. That the crutch of bilingual assistance must be yanked away or newcomers will be permanently handicapped. That immigrants are too lazy or dim-witted to accept "the primacy of English" on their own. Dr . John Tanton, the founder of U .S. English, argues that we must act now or face upheavals like Canada's. In an unpublished paper, he raises the specter of our evolving "from a dominant non-Hispanic society with a Spanish influence to a dominant Spanish society with a non-Hispanic influence. "All great empires disintegrate," he writes. "We want stability." Ironically, Tanton advocates the same brand of language restrictionism that has tied Quebec in kndts. LEGISLATING CONFORMITY PRQDUCES DI.SENTIO,t
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6 . I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PROFESSIONAUFACUlTY .. OPENINGS COLLEGE OF BUSINESS Eastern Michigan University seeks nominations and applications for the following College of Business opportunities. DEPARTMENT HEAD-MANAGEMENT (#APAA8007) Leads 21 faculty in Business/Managerial Communications, Entrepreneurship, General Busi ness, Human Resources Management, Management-Union Relations, Or ganizational Behavior/Development, and Policy . Maintains link with EMU World College program for study of language and international trade . (In quiries to Dr. Richard Camp (313) 487-3240) . Immediate applicant response ensures early review of materials and possible interviews at professional con ferences. Deadline for submission of documents December 31, 1988 . DEPARTMENT HEAD-MARKETING (#APAA8008) Leads 20 faculty in Mar keting and Business Law. Immediate applicant response ensures early re view of materials. Deadline for submission of documents December 15, 1988. (Inquiries to Dr. Joseph Braden (313) 487-0171. ) DEPT. HEAD QUALIFICATIONS: Earned Doctorate (Ph.D . or D.B.A . Man agement or Juris DoctorateMarketing) qualifications for tenure at full professor level; an established record of recent scholarly activity with demonstrated ability to provide research/publication leadership, minimum of five years college teaching experience or combination of extensive college teaching and additional relevant professional experience; previous administrative expe rience desired with ability to interact effectively with campus and community constituencies. Positions to begin August, 1989 . ASSISTANT/ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OPERATIONS RESEARCH AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS (#FAAA8026) Will teach graduate/undergradu ate courses, conduct research, advise students, and participate on committee assignments and community service . QUALIFICATIONS: ABO required, Doctorate in discipline preferred for Assis tant Professor; Doctorate, teaching, and research publication experience re quired for Associate Professor consideration. (Inquiries to Dr. Rao Tum mala (313) 487-2454 . ) Position available September, 1989. Immediate applicant re sponse ensures early review of materials and possible interviews at profes sional conferences. Deadline for submission of documents, December 31, 1988. We offer an excellent benefit and salary package for the selected candidate . Individuals interested in these openings should respond immediately with detailed vita, interest letter, and three reference letters to : Chairperson H • Search Committee; PosHionL_, 310 King Hall, EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsilanti, M148197. WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPORTUNITY. MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED. Eastern Michigan University Admlnlatretlve Assistant/Board Liaison . . National Hispanic organization seeks individual to assist president as board liaison . Candidate must be able to provide staff sup port for organization's board of directors. Good organizational skills needed, plus ability to work independently. Type 60 words per minute . Word processing experience desirable. Bilingual (English/Spanish). Salary $18,000 and up, de pending on experience. Send resume to: Lupe Lemus, National Council of La Raza, 20 F St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001. FELLOWSHIP & GRANT PROGRAMS The Social Science Research Council an nounces 3 : new fellowship and grant programs to support research on the urban underclass in the United States. Undergraduate Research Assistantships, Dissertation Fellowships(open to minority students only), and Postdoctoral Grants will be offered in 1989 . Application deadline : January 10, 1989. Please contact Social Science Research Council, Research on the Urban Underclass, 605 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10158 . Oct. 24, 1988 FELLOWSHIPS The Southwest Hispanic Research Institute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities residency fellowships for the : 1989 academic year. The fellowships aremade possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30 ,000 stipend plus $3,000 toward relocation costs and other benefits . Interested scholars are invited to submit research proposals on issues critical to an understanding of the Hispanic/Chicano experience In the context of the changing Southwest Eligibility criteria Include an awarded doctorate in the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project during the residency period. For proposal guidelines write to Southwest Hispanic Re search Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131. RIO HONDO COLLEGE has an opening for ... MULTICULTURAL CENTER DIRECTOR A 10 month position, funded from a Title Ill Grant. This opening requires a master's degree in a discipline contributing to understanding cultural diversity and prior experience which would contribute to success of a Multicultural Center . Ph. D . and two years postsecondary teaching preferred For information/application , contact Jean (213) 692 ext. 309. Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608 EMPLEADOS GUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your $$s impact on your community. NA TIONAL IMAGE INC . has pledged that all funds received will be used to "Promote the health and welfare of Hispanics," particularly , decrease the high school dropout rates, unem ployment, social, ethnic and sexual nation, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helpedover3,000 Hispanics last year through training, scholar ships, and amnesty assistance . Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001 . For membership information please call Ms . Aurora Mojica , Executive Director , at (202) 737 . ENGLISH CONVERSATION CLASSES: Three Montgomery County, Md., public libraries-in Kensington, Silver Spring and Rockville are offering free English classes for the foreign born during November and December. For in formation and pre-registration, call Nell Marshall at (301) 279 . Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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John Rosales, gueet columnlet Reconsidering Cisneros One of my first assignments on graduating from journalism school six years ago was to interview Henry Cisneros. He had recently been elected as the first Mexican American to serve as mayor of my native San Antonio In a century and a half. He Impressed me as few people have. But shortly thereafter, when I wrote a column for Hispanic Link News Service about heroes, I didn't pick Cisneros as mine. I selected Instead the other Latino San Antonio mayor, Juan Seguin. He was a Texas rancher and patriot whose views weren't popular with settlers who came across the Mississippi to claim their stake. And when the United States declared war on Mexico, Seguin's neighbors found him guilty of being brown, a "foreigner" in his own land. He challenged his oppressors by fighting with the Mexican Army of General Santa Anna. Henry Cisneros, I wrote, was a role model, not a hero. He hadn't been put to the full test yet In the last few years, Henry Cisneros put San Antonio on the map. He gave It direction, nurtured Its economic growth, and brought it a unity of purpose and spirit that never existed before. The city's distinctive, often antagonistic Anglo and Latino communities moved much closer together. Henry Cisneros did It on a ridiculous rnayol's salary of $4,040 a year. Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale interviewed him in 1984 as his possible vice presidential running mate. He was named to the prestigious presidential commission on Central America headed by Henry Kissinger. And he served most recently as president of the National League of Cities. He quickly became the political hope of U.S. Latinos. 'SAN ANTONIO, MY NAME GO TOGETHER' Then this month, Henry Cisneros admitted to haviny an extramarital affair with a woman who had been active in his re-election campaign. Sin pelos en Ia lengua THE 'SCOOP THAT NOBODY WANTED: Many reporters in San Antonio, as well as a number of us covering Hispanic affairs nationally, had for months been hearing rumors about Mayor Henry Cisneros' marital infidelity. Some knew for sure but were bound by"off the record" conver sations with the mayor not to ;>rint anything . Knowing that the story would eventually come out, Latino reporters in particular agonized over how to treat a personal issue that would crush, at least temporarily, the big-time political aspirations of our shining knight. They wanted to deal with it ethically, professionally. Because of Cisneros' magnificent performance as mayor, the San Antonio press wanted to protect him. There were, and still are, those who question the public's right to know at least so long as his personal problems did not affect his public performance. One reporter who succumbed was Alfredo Corchado of the Wall Street Journal. Corchado, in the Journal's Dallas bureau, heard the rumors at a San Antonio conference a month ago. They had become rampant following the mayor's Sept 12 announcement that he would not seek re-election. When Corchado returned to Dallas, a woman phoned to tell him more. "I didn't know what to do about it," he told Sin Pelos, "but she called again and challenged me and said'l have a feeling that because you're a Hispanic reporter you don't want to bring a Hispanic mayor down.' " The mayor professed deep love for the woman, who Is married but separated. Cisneros and his wife Mary Allee have two teen-age daughters and an Infant son. The other woman In his life has a 1 o-yeal"'old daughter. Cisneros and the woman have b8en an "Item," talked about but not written about, for two years. Periodic rumors had him fathering an Illegitimate child, kicked out of his home; one even had him shot by Mary Allee. As the talk spread, Cisneros announced this summer that he would not seek re-election or be a candidate for state office. He cited the health of his 16month-old son, John Paul, who was born with a defective heart, and his own need to earn money and enjoy a private . life. Then came his full admission this month. First, he apologized. Because of his position, he acknowledged to reporters," San Antonio and my name go together on these problems . But I guess human beings just aren't made of plastic and wiring and metal they are made of flesh and blood and feelings. 'MANY HAVE BEEN HURT "It is a profound personal situation and requires an expedient decision because so many people involved have been hurt" His way of handling his personal shame stands in contrastto that of the man who almost became the Democratic nominee for president. When confronted by similar allegations, Gary Hart chided the press, "Put a tail on me." As an elected public official, Henry Cisneros loses some rights to privacy. But he was elected to do a job, not be perfect I don't know much about the private life of Juan Seguin . Such matters about politicians weren't chronicled as closely then. But I know that Henry Cisneros, the public man, has handled the halftruths and hostility and the issue of his private Indiscretions With dignity and courage. Soon as a private man he must sort It all out. Juan Seguin overcame the hostility against him to become San Antonio's mayor . I for one hope that Henry Cisneros returns to public life . I'm still counting on him to be a hero. (John Rosales Is a reporter with The San Antonio Light.) This hit a nerve. He approached his bu_reau chief, and about two weeks ago he was back in San Antonio asking questions. It made a lot of people nervous. The San Antonio press didn't want to see an outside reporter scoop them. The scramble started. The mayor held a 1 1/2 hour interview with the weekly San Antonio Current, denying the rumors with one exception . . In its Oct. 12 story, Cisneros admitted to having marital probiems. Among rumors the Current raised and Cisneros shot down: that he had an illegitimate child, that his girlfriend had aborted it and that his wife had shot him. On Oct. 13, The San Antonio Light printed a column by Rick Casey which verified that Cisneros was having an affair, that the woman was known, and that all else was undocumented. The Current story made it fair game, Casey told us. "He put it on the table so we had to deal with it." The following day, the San Antonio Express-News ran a column by Paul Thompson which quoted Cisneros on his "deep love" for Linda Medlar, who worked on his last campaign. Thompson told Sin Pelos that he'd known all the facts for three months but that he didn't print them because "everyone loves Henry . He's a prime asset to the community and no one wants to shoot Superman.'' Now Thompson is irked at Casey, they are both irked by the "outsider" Corchado, and Corchado is irked at them. "It bothers me that they knew about it. . . and didn't print if on its news value, but on the potential of being beat," explained the 28 yearold Texan. His own story ran in the Journal Oct. 17. Not all scoops are sweet. Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report ' Oct. 24, 1988 3

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COLLECTING FELLOWS SOUGHT: W.K Kellogg Foundation seeks professionals who want to improve their leadership skills as candidates for the 1989 Kellogg National Fellowship Program. Applicants must be affiliated with a non-profit organization or be self-employed. The deadline is Dec. 19. For more information contact the foundation at 400 North Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. 49017 (616) 968-1611. ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT: The October 1988 issue of The Chicago Reporter, 12 pages, contains a full page on student enrollment broken down by race and ethnicity at the eight largest public universities in Illinois. For a copy send $2.50 to The Chicago Reporter, 332 S . Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill . 60604 (312) 427-4830. FILM, VIDEO RELEASES: The Cinema Guild offers an array of Spanish-language films and videos of interest to Hispanics , including videos on contemporary Cuban art and on music in Central America . For a complete listing, write Cinema Guild, 1697 Broadway, New York, N .Y. 10019 (212) 246-5522. IMMIGRATION AND CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATION: An 11-page report by the Center for Immigration Studies, "The Impact of Immigration on Congressional Representation," analyzes the effects of international migration on congressional representation. For a copy send $2.00 to CIS, 1775 T St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 328-7228. BIOLOGICAL FELLOWSHIPS: Applicants are sought for the 60 fellowships that will be awarded through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute 1989 Doctoral Fellowships in Biological Sciences . Awards are for three years, with a $12,300 annual stipend and a $10,700 annual cost-of-living allowance . Deadline is Nov. 14 . For more information contact Hughes Doctoral Fellowships, Fellowship Office, National Research Council, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW , Washington, D.C. 20418 (202) 334-2872. LITERARY CONTEST: Entries are being sought for the 15th annual Chicano Literary Contest. The categories are prose, poetry and theater, works can be submitted in English, Spanish or both . Deadline is Jan. 26, 1989. For more information contact Chicano Literary Contest, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, Calif. 92717 (714) 856-5702. PRE-MARIEL CUBANS: "The Demographic Characteristics of Pre-Mariel Cubans Living in the United States: 1980" is a 70-page monograph explaining socioeconomic differences among Hispanic subgroups. For a copy send $5 to Graduate Schoo! of International Studies, North-South Center, Publications, University of Miami, P.O. Box 24-8123, Coral Gables, Fla . 33124-8123. IDENTIFYING LATINA LEADERS Twenty-five Latinas are being sought for the 1989 class of the National Hispana Leadership Initiative . The program has as its goal the preparation of local Latina community leaders for positions on the national level. Funded by the Adolph Coors Co., the nine-month program , which begins in February, places the participants at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government to study public policy and management This marks the program's second year. Last year's class numbered 20. Initiative participants must be at least 25 years of age and agree to mentor two Hispanic women on completing the program . Program participants are chosen by a 13-member advisory committee that includes a cross section of Hispanic organizational and elected leaders. Application deadline is Nov. 15. For more information, contact the National Hispana Leadership Institute, 1905 Sherman St, Suite802, Denver, Colo . 80203 (303) 861-2888. PARTICIPATING IN HIGHER ED The Ford Foundation has approved a grant of $436,500 to the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities to help it increase the transfer rate of Texas Hispanics from two-to four year colleges, HACU announced this month. The three-year grant will be used to finance a component of HACl!s Hispanic Students Success Program called the TwoYear/Four Year Program. As part of the transfer program, a system will be developed where students at the four participating community colleges indicate their transfer choices and are put in touch with the institutions. The program has set as a goal to increase from 10-15% to 25% the transfer rate of Hispanic students. Currently, 54% of all Hispanics in higher education in Texas are in community colleges. HACU estimates it will serve 4,500 students through the. project. VIDEOS REGISTER, LIBRARIES ELECT California's Institute for Bilingual Media Productions has announced the completion of a video to motivate Hispanics to register and vote. The English-language video, with Spanish subtitles, will be shown on TV and disseminated through unions, school districts, churches and other interested parties. For information call Barbara Rossetti at (415) 571-1397. . . The executive board of the Washington, D.C. based National Association to Promote Library Services to 'the Spanish Speaking elects Newark, N .J., librarian Ingrid Betancourt as its president. .. Calendar pressure, postsecondary admisaions and financial aid, and Hispanic history and culture . The National Minority Supplier Development which builds economic links between large corpora tions and minority-owned businesses, will hold a conference called" Partners for Profit. " Workshops are scheduled that are geared to corporate re presentatives, business owr.ers and members of regional councils. Other activities include a luncheon featuring William Verity , Secretary of the Department of Commerce, and a Mexican fiesta THIS WEEK HISPANIC MARKET San Antonio Oct. 25 Dick Dillon, founder of the country's largest advertising agency targeted to Hispanics, Mendoza-Dillon , will speak on the Hispanic markets impact in San Antonio during the San Antonio Advertising Feder ation's monthly luncheon . A panel discussion will be led by moderator Lionel Sosa of Sosa & Associates. Cindy Still (512) 366-6793 YOUTH SYMPOSIUM Emporia, Kan. Oct. 26 A symposium designed to encourage Hispanic stu dents to graduate from high school and to go on to . college will be held by the Kansas Advisory Commit tee on Hispanic Affairs and Emporia State University. Workshop topics include career guidance, peer H i spani c Link Weekly Report Steve Ramirez (913) 296-3465 SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER Fresno, Calif . Oct. 27 The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will hold a dinner to raise money for deserving Hispanic students. The keynote speaker will be the organization's director, Ernest Robles. Michelle Zulim (209) 225-2337 PARENT EDUCATION Chicago Oct. 28 A training conference for Latino parents," Educatiort A Family Affair,' ' will help parents learn how to take an active role in the public school system. Some of the workshop topics include parents and curriculum, the principars role and parental responsibility and school reform legislation . Toney Anaya, former governor of New Mexico, will be the keynote speaker . Marta Ayala (312) 7 44-4404 BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT Dallas Oct. 3 Oct. 24, 1988 Conference registrar (212) 944-2430 COMING SOON WOMEN'S HEALTH National Conference of Puerto Rican Women Miami Nov. 11-13 C. Monroe (202) 393-1604 Calendar will announce free of charge events of interest to the national Hispanic community . Items should be received two Fridays before the publication date . Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number . Address items to : Calendar editor , Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St NW , Washington, D.C. 20005. 4

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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY ! FACULTY P08ITION8: CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, SACRAMENTO DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK TWO TENURE TRACK, 9-MONTH POSITIONS Aulatllnt/ Aaeocl8te Proteaeor University of California , Davis . The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant P r ofessor Ill i n the sociology of development , e f fective July, This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development , international organization , the sociology of agriculture , urbani zation and development in the Third World, or economic development and social change . Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program . Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable . Ph.D. is required . The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology . Begin MSW required. Doctorate in social work, related field or ABO preferred . Health Potential skills in teaching and direct practice experience in health settings with the aged. Mental HealthPost-maste(s experience in clinical work and potential in teaching direct practice ' with children and families desirable . Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply for both pos i tions. Salary range: $30,252-$39,960. To apply , send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to : Lyn Lofland, Chair, Development Search Comm i ttee , Sociology Department , University of California, Davis , California 956 6 . Applications must be postmarked January 989 or earlier to be considered . The University of California is an affirmative actiorVequal opportunity employer. TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY ONE TENURE TRACK, 12-MONTH POSITION Field Coordlnetor The Univers i ty of California, Davis . The College of Letters and Science invites applicatio n s for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputat i on for quantitative research and publication and a st r ong commitment to teaching . The level of appointment may be at the Ass i stant or Associate Professor levels. BeginJuly1,1989 . MSWrequired. Doctorate in Social Work, related field or ABO preferred . Previous social work field practicum coor dination, program experience required and knowledge of community resources. Salary range : $31 ,880-$48, 204. A Ph.D. is required It is desired that the field of specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and family, sociology of organization, economic sociology , historical , comparat i ve sociology, international political economy , or poverty and social welfare. The position is reserved for someone actively engaged in quantitative research and able to regularly participate in teach i ng a graduate-level sequence in methods and statistics. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology . Send vitae by March 15 , 1989 (apply for each position separately) to : To apply , send curriculum vitae , letter of application , and the names of three re f erences whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to : James Cramer , Chair , Quantitative Search Committee, Soc i ology Department , University of California, Davis, Calif . 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10 , 1989 or earlier to be considered. Ronald P . Boltz, Director Division of Social Work Galiforn i a State University , Sacramento Sacramento, California 95819-2894 The Univers i ty of California is an affirmat ive actiorVequal opportunity employer . Cellfomle St8te Coordlnetor of the 1880 Cenaua Progrem MALDEF , a national Hispanic civil rights organization, seeks an individual to develop and coordinate a community education pro gram to Inform Hiapanica about the importance of the 1990 Census. The Loa position requires: Undergraduate degree ; 3 5 years community organizing or related activity; knowledge of California Hispanic organizations. local and state policymakers ; research , writing and oral communication skills, bilingual in English/Spanish. Send resume , writing sample , and 3 re f erences to R . Calder6n, MALDEF, 834 S. Spring St, 11th Fl, Loa Angeles, Calif . 90014 by 1 0/28/88. St8ff Attorney MALDEF , a national Hispanic civil rights organization , seeks an experienced civil rights or public Interest law attorney for our Loa Angeles office . He/she will be responsible for conducting a pel'll0n8f caseload ofiltiliatiOn and advocacy in the areas of employment and immigrants' rights and MALDEF in public forums. Required: Licensed attorney; successful paaaage of the Gal ifomia bar exam; knowledge of local, state and national Hispanic issues; excellent research, writing and oral com munication skills; and must be bilingual in English/Spanish. Send reaumlt, writing sample, and3 referen ces toR. Calder6n, MALDEF, 834 So . Spring St , 11th Floor , Loa Angeles, Calif. 90014 by November 1 , 1988. ENTRY Lt:VEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County , Md . , are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251. Hispanic Link Weekly Report ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND GRADUATE DEAN The University of Texas at El Paso The University ofTexas at El Paso invites applications and nominat i ons for the position of 1 ssoc i ate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean . The position will report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs . The Aaaociate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean will be responsible for representing the Un i versity to federal , state , and private funding sources and for the operat i on and supervision of the Office of Sponsored Projects and the Graduate School. A major responsibility will be to develop institutional proposals and identify appropriate funding sources to increase institutional and faculty extramural funding. The successful candidate will also provide vigorous leadership in the development of new graduate offerings and strengthening existing offerings. Applicants are expected to have an earned doctorate, academic and research administrative experience , a strong record of scholarly achievement , a record of obtaining research funding , strong written and oral communication skills and be eligible for appointment as a full professor in an appropriate academic department. W i th over 15,000 students, the University of Texas at El Paso i s the largest public institution on the United State&Mexico border and it is the second oldest component ofthe UT System. The bicultural region of El Paso and Juarez offers a mild southwestern climate as well as unique cultural , business , research and educational opportunities. The University is seeking to continue its commitment to enhance these opportunities to provide expanded educational programs to its culturally diverse constituency . Serving a metropolitan population of 1 . 5 million people, UT El Paso offers a wide variety of both baccalaureate and maste(s programs in six academic colleges and the graduate school. The University has an established doctoral program i n Geological Sciences, and approval has been soughtfortwo additional doctoral programs. Applications and nominations will be accepted until December 15, 1988. A starting date of June 1 , 1989 is anticipated . The Univer r ;ty offers a competitive salary and benefits package. A letter of application , curriculum vitae, and the names of five references should be sent Dr . Donald E. Moss, Chairman, Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean Search Committee C/o Off i ce of the President The Un i versity of Texi!IS at El Paso 500 University Avenue El Paso, Texas 79968 Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer. 7

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Arts & Entertainment productions . Two open casting calls will be held in Hollywood and New York for actors, singers and dancers to perform iri both shows . According to a publicist for MMG Arena Productions, various of the roles could be cast with bilingual performers who can sing in both languages. LLAMA A CA SA : With t h e highest ever number of cassettes pre . ordered in Span is h-l anguage h o me video history , E T. The Extra terrestrial calls ho me t hi s wee k . The Wizard of Oz will travel to 20 cities in the U.S. the Spanish version will be staged in about half of those. MCA Home Video's E T. d ebuts Oct. 27 in two dubbed versions-in "neutral and Cas ti lli an Spa n ish." At a t otal of 1 0.6 million English and Spanish cassettes pre-sold, the fantasy/adventure film became the best selling title of a ll time before its street date . ONE LINERS: The American Federation of Television and Radio Artists holds a Meet The Candidates Evening Oct. 26. Various Latino members are expected to run for positions on the union's board of directors. . . Placido Domingo sings at the Oct. 29 benefit premiere performance of a concert by Lalo Shifrin based on Aztec poetry. The composer will conduct the Paris Symphony at the event to be staged near the Teotihuacan ruins .. . And the Hollywood actors' organization Nosotros holds a Gala Benefit at the city's Universal Amphitheatre, Oct. 30, featuring Jose Feliciano, TonyOrlaodo & Dawn and Paul Other Spanish vi d e o titl es due out i n t he next few weeks: Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ, the 1926 classic t h a t starred Ramon Novarro (fro!TJ MGM/UA, due No v.8); Colors; whic h fe a tured Maria Conchita Alonso (Orion Home Video, Nov. 17); Ret urn to Fantasy Island, starring Ricardo Montalban and Kenn e dy "The Presidential Years," starring Martin Sheen (bo t h from Prism Entertainment, Nov . 30). NO HAY LUGAR COMO LA CASA: A new " arena " version of The Wizard of Oz goes on tour next March in dual English and Spanish Rodriguez.. . ' -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report GROUPS MAKE HISTORY: The boar ds of directors of the National Associati o n of Hispanic Journalists, the National Associ atlon of Black Journalists and t he Asian American Journalists Association met for the first time Oct. 14-16 in Baltimor e. The historic s ession was as much an e f fort to encourage ethnic and racia l dive r s ity in the nation ' s new s rooms as to send a messa ge to the newspaper and broadcast indu s t ries that the group s are joining forces. "Our united efforts are crucial to brin g more minority peo ples into the profession, to in crease their promo tion and advancement to all levels of t he industry and to ste m the alanning trend o f their flight from the p ro f ession ; ' read a statement releasP.d by the groups at the end of the meeting. Also join i ng in the statemen t was the Native American Press ASsociation t h r ough free-lancer Mark HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A na tion a l pu b lic atio n o f HlspRni c Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW Washington; D.C . 20005 (202) 234..0280 or 234..0737 Publisher. Hector Er ick s en-Mendoza Editor. Feli x P erez Reporting: Antonio M e iias-Re ntas. Darryl Lynette F igueroa, Sophia Nieve!i . ) Graphics/Produc t i o n : Car los Arr i en, Zoi l a Eli a s No port i on of Hisp a nic Link Weekly Report maybe rep rod ucec or broadcast i n a n y form without advance permi ss i on. Annual subscri ption (50 issues): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLAS S IF I ED: Ad rates 90 cents pe r word Display ads are $45 per col u m n. i nc h . A d s p lac ed by Tuesday will run in W ee kl y Re p ort mail ed Fr i day o f sa me week . Multiple u se o n request 8 its president. cago markefs largest Spanish-language station , Two proposals to come out of the meeting will be leaving the Univision network to join were to set up a committee to study the its competition, the Telemundo network, the possibility of a joint conference in 1993 and two networks confirmed Oct. 13. to establish an executive committee composed The stat i on's contract with Univision expires of each group's president , immediate past at the end of the year and the station has president and executive director that will decided to go with Telemundcis more lucrative meet at least once yearly . advertising offer. Under the setup offered by The other presidents are Evelyn Hernandez, Univision, WSNS keeps 75% of advertising New York Newsday reporter, NAHJ; Lloyd revenues generated by the network's prograrn LaCuesta, a bureau chief with KTVU in San ming . The Te/emundo arrangement will up Francisco , AAJA; and Dewayne Wickham, a that percentage to 80% . syndicated columnist with the Gannett News UNIVISION REPORTS ON ELDERLY: Service, NABJ. lmivlsion will air Oct. 28 a half-hour special The joint conference committee will report on the needs and demographics of the elderly back to the three organizations in January on Hispanic population , one which the Census site possibilities, funding and the commisBureau reports is growing at a rate three sioning of a study or survey to be released at times faster than the overall population. the conference. Y Los Alios Pasan , which will be broadcast The groups agreed in principle to work on at 10:30 p . m . ET (check local listings), will local and regional events before the proposed examine where Hispanic elderly live, their joint conference, such as an event in 1991 lack of medical care and the financial burdens tied to the release of population statistics theyface. TheshowwillbehostedbyTeresa from the 1990 census . Rodriguez . STATION DEFECTS: WSNS.TV, the -Felix Pt.rez 1 By Mark Mattern =teprlnted with permission of Rocky Mountain News H i span i c Link Weekly Report