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Hispanic link weekly report, October 31, 1988

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Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, October 31, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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KEC'D. HR/CR
Making The News
The Latin American Law Enforcement Association, the Mexican American Correctional Association, the Chicano Correctional Workers Association and the Latino Peace Officers Association endorse presidential candidate Michael Dukakis at a Los Angeles function... Former Ambassador Abelardo Valdez, the chief of protocol during the Jimmy Carter administration, joins the Dukakis/Bentsen National Campaign as an adviser. . . U.S. Rep. Jack Kemp, a New York Republican, donates $1,000 to the campaign of businessman Lee Trevino in his effort to unseat U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzdlez... The Pennsylvania state Senate unanimously approves the nomination of Harrisburg Councilman O. Frank Garcia to fill a vacancy on the state
Crime Victim’s Compensation Board. . . ThWrty/eml|erldJfjtfe of Ladies Homes Journal names Lupe AnguraJro? an exfflPQ and founder of National Women’s Employment and Education Inc., which offerstraining nationwide, as one of America’s 100 Most Important Women... US West Communications, a 14-state, diversified corporation, presents its most prestigious Vail Award to employee Sally Martlnez-Koon for an act of heroism. Martinez-Koon saved a woman from a flaming car in Denver. The woman suffered third-degree burns, Martinez-Koon had first- and second-degree burns... Raul and Mary Lugo, the parents of a then-16-year-old daughter, Diane, who nearly died from an overdose of potassium while a patient at the Willford Hall U.S. Air Force Medical Center in San Antonio, receive an out-of-court settlement of $3 million. Diane;i18, is now a quadraplegic and cannot swallow or speak...
Vo I. 6 No.43
fa) HISPANj^pN^WEEKL^EPORT (B)
Oct 31, 1988
LULAC Seeks Citizenship Bureau
Hispanic Swing Vote
The League of United Latin American Citizens? board of directors adopted a resolution Oct 22 to lobby for creation of a federal bureau that would assist new immigrants and promote naturalization to legal U.S. residents, said LULAC National President Jose Garcia DeLara The proposed bureau would be independent of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service. DeLara said many persons eligible for citizenship do not apply due to fear of the INS or lack of information. “The spirit of INS has been to apprehend, not to educate or create new citizens. We need to separate the two,” he said.
The proposal, approved at LULAC’s national board meeting in Washington, D.C., was framed
Forty^seven of 50 states and the District of Columbia face a severe shortage of minority teachers, according to a report released Oct. 24 by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education in Washington, D.C.
The “Teacher Education Pipeline” report says the racial and ethnic composition of the nation’s public school students are“diametri-cally opposed” to racial and ethnic enrollment in teacher education programs.
Eugene Eubanks, president of AACTE, said his group’s 1987 fall enrollment survey reveals that the shortage is worse than had been expected.
Among its findings:
• A typical college education department of 400 students enrolls about 362 whites, 22 blacks, seven Hispanics, three Asians and two Native Americans.
• Though there are more than one million limited-English-proficient children in public schools, or 2.5% of the public school enrollment, less than 1 % of the 300,000 prospective teachers are specializing in bilingual education.
• Schools, colleges and departments of education within New Mexico’s institutions of higher education enroll the greatest number of Hispanic students - 33%.
U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos agreed that the problem is serious. He called for review of teacher certification examinations and training programs* and for directing children
by the San Francisco-based Latino Issues Forum. It states: “Nationally 28% of legal immigrants who have lived in the United States for over ten years have not been naturalized. In California... 76% of eligible Latinos, or over one million, are not citizens.” Nine million legal immigrants have entered the country this decade, it says. Two million more will apply for permanent residency through the Immigration Reform and Control Act.
Mike Zamba, government affairs directorof the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, another organization which supports the idea, said, “We have no illusions” that it will happen immediately. He
continued on page 2
early to the profession. Of increased economic support, he said it is an “obvious?’ requirement but “not the only answer.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
PUBLIC SCHOOL COMPOSITION, TEACHER-TRAINING ENROLLMENT TOP LATINO POPULATED STATES
HISP. BLACK WHITE ASIAN
Ariz.
K-12 23% 4% 64% 1%
SCDE* 9 3 80 ★Hr
Calif. K-12 34 12 43 11
SCDE 11 2 81 3
Fla. K-12 11 24 63 1
SCDE 5 8 86 ★★
N.M. K-12 41 2 44 1
SCDE*** 33 2 14 ★★
N.Y. K-12 21 27 47 4
SCDE 1 2 93 ★★
Texas K-12 37 17 44 2
SCDE 8 11 78 1
* Students enrolled in teacher-training programs. ** Less than 1%. *** In New Mexico, 47% classified themselves as “Other.”
Source: The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
Hispanic Swing Vote A Myth, Says Scholar
The widely reported swing-vote capability of Hispanics in next month’s presidential elections will not materialize, said the primary researcher for the first national survey on Latino political attitudes in a statement released Oct. 19.
Rodolfo de la Garza, the director of the University of Texas at Austin’s Center for Mexican American Studies and the lead investigator in the Latino National Political Survey, said Hispanics cannot constitute a swing vote because they do not fit its definition. De la Garza said a swing vote “means people who switch back and forth (between parties). Hispanics don’t do this because they are highly partisan.”
De la Garza would not predict a voter turnout figure among Hispanics except to say that most Hispanics are poor and “poor people are less likely to vote.”
De la Garza noted two scenarios where the Mexican American vote can tilt the scales of victory in favor of the Democrats:
• If Republicans do not have more than a 5% lead in Texas after the Anglo and black vote is tallied; or
• If Vice President George Bush does not have more than a 3% lead in California after the Anglo and black vote is tallied.
The first results of the survey will be available in 1990.
League Warns Candidates
Officials of the League of United Latin American citizens warned presidential candidates Oct. 20 that they must begin to address the specific problems of Hispanics before apathy sets in among Hispanic voters.
“Slapping us on the back and telling us you’re our friends and speaking Spanish isn’t good enough,” said Rub£n Bonilla, past president and general counsel of LULAC.
Bonilla said George Bush and Michael Dukakis need to offer solutions for problems such as poverty and low educational achievement. After the November election, LULAC plans to present initiatives it feels the winner should act upon.
Minority Teacher Crunch Worsening


Nicaraguan Influx Overburdens Dade County Services
Whether it be because of the worsening economy in Nicaragua or the continuing war there between the Sandinista government and the U.S.-backed contra rebels or both, Dade County, Fla., cannot adequately serve the burgeoning influx of Nicaraguan exiles, says a county refugee coordinator.
Perry Rivkind, the district director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service in Miami, estimates that in recent months as many as 300 Nicaraguans per week have arrived in the area.
Bobby Bernal, the refugee/immigration coordinatorforthe Dade County Manager's Office, says his agency “cannot serve them because federal guidelines are very specific on that.”
Because the vast majority of Nicaraguan
exiles, said to number between 75,000 and 125,000 in Dade County alone, do not qualify for federal aid programs due to their state of legal limbo, the county is quickly exhausting its emergency services.
The arrival of unanticipated exiles in Dade coincides with a similar surge in the Texas Rio Grande Valley. According to INS figures, more than 12,000 Central Americans have requested asylum from January through September of this year. Some 60% of the requests were from Nicaraguans. The INS estimates there are 150,000 to 200,000 Nicaraguans in the United States.
Many of the recent arrivals are taking what is known as the “4M” route - from Managua, Nicaragua, to Mexico City, to Matamoros, Mexico, and finally to Miami.
Duke Austin, a spokesman for the Washington, D.C., headquarters of the INS, said although there may be more requests for asylum, the apprehension figures for the busy Texas-Mexico border do not reveal j increased numbers of undocumented entries ; k “Our figures from the Border Patrol don’t say” that apprehensions along that border are up, he said. Austin speculated the increased asylum requests are due primarily j to Nicaraguans already here.
Dade County’s Bernal said despite the | sprouting up of Nicaraguan community organizations in South Florida, they cannot absorb theircompatriots. “For the situation j to get any better, the federal government needs to get on the stick..mx P6rez
LULAC Says Residents Distrust INS FBI to Appeal Verdict,
continued from page 1
mentioned that NALEO has been working on the issue for five years.
Latino Issues Forum Executive Director John Gamboa pointed to a change in climate. He said the support of INS Commissioner Alan Nelson and Western Region Commissioner Harold Ezell had been garnered at separate meetings held over the summer.
Forum Program Director Lydia Camarillo attributed the“surprising” response to a willingness to avoid blame on the low naturalization rate. “It was very clear that protection of the borders is the priority; citizenship will never be. But if that responsibility is shifted, there won’t be a sense of failing to meet the goal.”
DeLara also pointed to a list of recent supporters, including U.S. Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.), chairman of an immigration subcommittee, and Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.).
Gamboa, Forum board chairman and former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Reynoso, and board member Ralph Abascal, of the California Rural Legal Assistance Foundation, have a Nov. 10 meeting scheduled with U.S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh to seek his support The U.S. Justice Department oversees the INS.
They will also attempt to enlist the cooperation of U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos
at another November meeting.
The proposed citizenship bureau would make immigrants aware of citizenship benefits, such as increased employment opportunities, and would help them meet the English-language requirements for citizenship under a more streamlined process.
The Forum proposal stated that INS Outreach Director E.B. Duarte admitted that no current policy exists that encourages eligible residents to naturalize.
DeLara said the LULAC board also voted to:
• officially support the retention of Lauro Cavazos as education secretary when his term expires Jan. 20;
• oppose the legalization of drugs; and
• advertise against official-English amendments.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Says LULAC Director
The FBI is expected to appeal a federal court decision that found the agency guilty last month of discrimination against Hispanic agents, especially in the area of choice job assignments needed for career advancement according to an official of the League of United Latin American Citizens.
The Texas State Director of LULAC, John Garcia, said that William Sessions, FBI director, had “relatively assured” LULAC’s board Oct. 21 that an appeal would be made. “He said, ‘Don’t be offended. It will just be a matter of course,’ ” said Garcia.
Antonio Silva, one of the attorneys representing the plaintiffs in the class action suit, said he feels that FBI is postponing announcement of the appeal until after the Nov. 8 election.
Latino Reps. Environment Votes Vary
Eight of 11 voting Hispanic members of the U.S. House of Representatives scored 50% or above on pro-environment votes tallied by the League of Conservation Voters during 1987-88, according to information released by the group Oct. 6. The overall average for Democratic House members was 66%; for
Fla. English Foes to Appeal Decision
Opponents of Florida’s Official English initiative planned to appeal on Oct. 26 the dismissal of a lawsuit which contends petitions to put the question on the ballot are invalid. But they were not optimistic about the outcome.
“It looks grim,” said Martha Jimenez, associate counsel for the Washington, D.C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. MALDEF will file a supporting brief if the court decides to review the case.
The suit was dismissed Oct. 24 by Judge James Kehoe of the U.S. District Court Fourth Southern District. He determined
the state was not directly in violation of the Voting Rights Act, which requires dual-language voting materials in counties where at least 5% of the residents speak Spanish.
Jon Weber, executive director of Speak Up Now for Florida, which is working with the four Spanish-speaking plaintiffs, agreed that the likelihood of being granted an appeal by the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was slim. Weber said his group is continuing to campaign against the initiative.
“What were talking about here is whether we want to start chopping out foreign languages,” he said.
- Sophia Nieves
Republican members it was 35%.
“The National Environmental Scorecard,” ' released every two years, ranked Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) at 88% of a possible 100%. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) earned 77%, Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) 75%, and Rep. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) 75%.
Most Congressional Hispanic Caucus members ranked considerably lower. Rep. Manuel Lujan (R-M.N.) had the lowest rating-13%. E.“Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas), chair of the House Agriculture Committee, drew a 38% score.
Reps. Matthew Martinez and Tony Coelho, Democrats from California, each scored 56%. Rep. Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) and Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) scored 50%.
Rep. Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas), who authored an amendment to the House Endangered Species Act which environmental groups objected to, earned a 44% score. His amendment, which was defeated, would have delayed by two years regulations requiring shrimp trawlers to install devices which prevent sea turtles from drowning in their nets.
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Link staffers in their Washington office: (from left) Sophia Nieves, Felix Perez, Hector Ericksen and Darryl Figueroa; (above) Tana and Charlie Ericksen.
ATINO BEAT
With little money hut much ganas, a tiny news agency links Hispanics across America.
A handful of reporters working in cramped quarters off the lobby of a Washington, D.C., condo cover Hispanic America like nobody’s business.
Despite a tight budget, the four staffers of Hispanic Link News Service report every week in surprising scope what is happening in the Hispanic community across the country.
The little news agency produces three weekly opinion columns (in English and Spanish), syndicated nationwide in some 200 newspapers, 40 of them Spanish-language. It also publishes a six-page weekly newsletter that goes out to 1,200 subscribers.
And although founder Charlie Ericksen doubts his enterprise will ever be a money-maker, Hispanic Link measures its success in other ways.
For Hispanic Link, founded in 1980 to give U.S. Latinos an ear and a voice in the nation’s capital, has evolved into more than just a news agency. It also is a training ground for Hispanic reporters, a gathering place for local and visiting Latinos and a center to campaign for better treatment—and more employment— of Hispanics in the nation’s news media.
Ibday, Link is basically self-supporting, but it has yet to show a profit Essentially, it is a labor of love.
“Nothing else that Fve accomplished professionally has meant as much to me. I’d probably do it all again,* says the 58-year-old Ericksen, who has never drawn a salary for his work. On the contrary, he and his wife, Tana (short for Sebastians), have had to sell two houses to keep the agency afloat.
A veteran journalist and long-time activist in the Hispanic community, Ericksen worked for print and broadcast media in Los Angeles, Mexico City, and the Far East earlier in his career. Before starting the news service, he was director of press and publications for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights.
The commitment to start the Link dates to the days when his children were going to school in California. As Ericksen— a non-Hispanic—explains it, he became increasingly concerned over the attitude of school officials toward Latinos.
“No part of my kids that was Hispanic in nature was given any value by the schools or anybody,* he says. “They were only measured by that part of them that was Anglo.*
Although it took a few years, “I finally decided on a course of action. I would combine what I could do—writing columns and covering the news—and what I was committed to doing—changing the system.*
Ericksen credits Tana, whom he married 35 years ago in her small Mexican
Douglas R Martinez, a former Link staffer, lives in Arlington, Virginia.
village of Bahia La Ventosa, and son Hector, 34, with keeping things going— financially and otherwise—during critical times.
“Tana started babysitting when we needed the money,* he says. “I don’t think we could have continued to operate without it.*
Hector wears the hats of Weekly Report publisher, ad salesman and circulation manager. He is also the Link’s office manager, bookkeeper and vacuum-cleaner operator—the latter a chore shared by everyone else on the staff.
The eldest of five children, Hector quit his administrative job with the Mexican American Opportunity Foundation in California five years ago to help his father with the business end of the operation “for a year or two."
Now raising three children of his own, he earns less than he did running three MAOF daycare programs in Salinas.
Sitting on a sofa in his living room, the
bearded and bespectacled Ericksen padre enjoys talking about “the indirect impact we’ve had through those reporters who worked with us and went on to top jobs in the establishment press."
He is talking about people like Steve Padilla, who left the Link to join The San Diego Union (and later, The Los Angeles Times)', Elaine Rivera, who moved on to The Washington Times and then to New York’sNewsday, Efrarn Hernandez, who went directly to The Hartford Cour-ant; Carlos Morales, who became a copy editor at The Miami News; and Julio Ojeda, now with the St. Paul Pioneer Press Dispatch.
Ericksen is quick to credit the Gannett Foundation for making this training possible. It has provided $50,000 a year for internships (generally two positions annually) since 1983.
Felix Perez, the Weekly Report’s 27-year-old editor, feels “rejuvenated” when the newsletter comes out each Friday and
_______________
he says to himself, “Hey, this isn’t bad and I helped to produce it.”
That sort of experience “injects you with the energy to continue on those days that last until midnight or later,” says Perez, who “graduated” to the editor slot in 1986 after a one-year Gannett internship.
Perez came to the Link from East Chicago, Indiana, two courses short of his journalism degree. He is completing that degree at Howard University, and has just joined the board of directors of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists as regional representative, replacing Hector Ericksen.
Link personnel are encouraged to become active leaders in the field of journalism.
“They’ve got to be persuasive with editors in the establishment media, letting them know what a bad job newspapers are doing in covering the U.S. Hispanic community," says Ericksen.
Weekly Report’s news coverage does not differ from that of establishment media, according to former editor Padilla. “It simply includes Hispanics as a legitimate source of news.”
There is a conscious effort, he adds, not to pull away from the pain and problems of the Hispanic community.
A recent issue of the Report, for example, told of the woes of Marielitos (Cubans who fled the island in the Mariel boatlift of 1980) detained in American jails; the dearth of Latinos in the fall TV schedule and the election of a new president of LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens.
The newsletter also contains commentary, a calendar of events, employment classifieds, news on the arts and 'â–  entertainment, a media report and a cartoon.
But the most popular regular feature in the Report is the column Sin Pelos en la Lengua, signed by Kay Bdrbaro, a tongue-in-cheek pseudonym for Charlie Ericksen. The signature is a Spangli-sized version of the expression Uque barbaro,* which translates loosely as “how awful.*
Sin Pelos is an irreverent view of American society through a Hispanic prism. It makes fun of everybody and takes on the establishment with glee.
In a recent column, Kay B&rbaro took on The Washington Post for having “only one full-time reporter or editor who is Hispanic.” Bdrbaro invited readers to supply the name of any major newspa-per with a worse record to pass along to j Post editor Ben Bradlee. “He can use it to defend his record.”
The Report’s mix of news, commentary and humor has proved popular with readers such as Jesus Rangel, chief correspondent of The New York Times’ New Jersey bureau.
“For my purposes as a journalist, there’s no better source or more relevant information on Hispanics anywhere,” he says.
It is its diversity that makes the column service so appealing to subscribers, says Gary Neeleman of The Los Angeles Times Syndicate, which distributes the service.
“They seem to select the people who know most about a subject and to balance the material among the Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Mexican Americans and other groups in the country so it is truly a national Hispanic-oriented service."
The dozens of informal correspondents across the country have developed a special loyalty to the Link, according to former editor Padilla.
“We stay in touch, send in news stories and call when something happens in our communities,” he says.
“When I first heard the name ‘Hispanic Link’ I thought it was kind of dumb, but with these links all over, I guess that’s exactly what it is.” Q
VISTA â–  Pago 12
REPRINTED FROM VISTA MAGAZINE, SEPT. 3,1988


Dear Weekly Report Reader:
Happy birthday to us!
Hispanic Link Weekly Report celebrated its fifth birthday last month. The occasion was acknowledged by Vista - the popular weekend supplement that is tucked into more than 20 Sunday newspapers across the country and delivered to 1.2 million homes. (Vista had a celebration of its own in September, converting from monthly to weekly).
Free-lance writer Doug Martinez authored the piece. With Vista’s permission, we are sharing it with you.
The occasion is a good one to invite you to acquaint your friends with Weekly Report - at our expense. Send us the names and addresses of any persons you feel will enjoy and benefit from .Weekly Report and we’ll mail them a free current copy with your compliments.
This hopefully will 1) let your friends and business acquaintances know that you’re thinking of their interests, 2) keep them up-to-the-minute on what’s happening in the Hispanic community, and 3) gain us some more satisfied subscribers.
Use the space below to start, and attach any other names or lists of names of individuals whom you feel deserve to know about the wealth of information offered each week in our evergrowing, ever-improving Hispanic Link Weekly Report.
Thanks and best wishes,
Felix Perez Hector Ericksen-Mendoza
•: Editor Publisher
Dear Felix and Hector,
Please send a free copy of Weekly Report, with my compliments, to those persons I have listed below.
My name___________________
Title and organization (if appropriate):_____
Please return this sheet to: Felix Perez, Editor Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 Phone: (202) 234-0280
PLEASE SEND A FREE CURRENT ISSUE OF HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT, WITH MY COMPLIMENTS, TO THE FOLLOWING PERSONS:
Name_______
Organization Address____
Name_______
Organization Address____
Name Name
Organization Organization
Address Address
Name Name
Organization Organization
Address Address


INSTRUCTOR (2 Positions) UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER NATIONAL VETERANS’ TRAINING INSTITUTE
Responsible for planning and intensive instruction of high impact, technically complex training programs for veterans’ employment and training. Coordinates scheduling of instruction, assists training participants to adjust to live-in training situation, and assists in curriculum development. Must be skilled at making presentations to large groups. Moderate travel.
Requirements: Master’s degree from accredited college or university in Behavioral Science, Education, Business Administration, Adult Education ora closely related field, and minimum of six month’s adult group training experience are required. Must be willing to work evenings and Saturdays as required. Work weeks may run 65+ hours. Please Note: The selection process for the Instructor will require a one-week assignment as “understudy” at the NVTI training site in Denver.
Employment Conditions: Positions are contract, non-tenure, renewable on an annual basis. Program funding dependent upon Congressional appropriation.
Salary: $32,556/year.
Application Deadline: A letter of application and a current resume must be received no later than 5:00 p.m., November 11, 1988. Please address to: Chair, Search Committee, National Veterans’ Training Institute, 1250 14th Street, Suite 650, Denver, CO 80202. If interested, contact Jim Hanson at(303) 892-1712, outside Colorado, 1 -800-331 -0562 for a copy of complete announcement.
The University of Colorado at Denver is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
MATHEMATICS FACULTY OPENINGS
We are seeking applicants for two tenure-track opportunities in Mathematics. Resr ponsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate level courses in content and methods in support of Mathematics Education program and University certificate programs.
Qualifications: substantial graduate work beyond undergraduate major in Mathematics necessary, Ph.D. or Ed.D. in Mathematics Education required. Must hold valid teaching certificate with demonstrated record of successful teaching experience.
Excellent benefit package - rank/salary commensurate with experience. To apply send letter of interest detailed vita, plus three letters of reference to: Chair-Selection Committee, Position FAA8218.310 King Hall, EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsi-lanti, Mich. 48197.
Deadline for receipt January 30, 1989. Inquiries to Dr. Don Lick (313) 487-1444.
ART HISTORIAN
Eastern Michigan University seeks an Art Historian - specialty: 19th century art secondary field non-Western art for Fall, 1989. Full-time, tenure-track, Assistant/Associate Professor. Rank/salary commensurate with qualifications; excellent benefit package. Required: Ph.D. and teaching experience required; publication experience desirable.
To apply send detailed vita, 3 letters of recommendation and offprints (non-returnable) to: Chair-Selection Committee, Position FAAA 8033,310 King Hall, EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197.
Immediate response desired for review prior to CAA conference (interviews there by appointment only). Deadline for receipt of materials- January 20,1989.
WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPORTUNITY. MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED.
FELLOWSHIPS
The Southwest Hispanic Research Institute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities residency fellowships for the 1989-90 academic year. The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000 toward relocation costs and other benefits. Interested scholars are invited to submit research pro* posals on issues critical to an understanding of the Hispanic/Chicano experience in the context of the changing Southwest Eligibility criteria include an awarded doctorate in the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project during the residency period. For proposal guidelines write to Southwest Hispanic Research Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131.
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Reports “guest columnist’ feature. Approx. 500 words. For writets guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
RIO HONDO COLLEGE has an opening for... MULTICULTURAL CENTER DIRECTOR
A 10-month position, funded from a Title III Grant. This opening requires a master’s degree in a discipline contributing to understanding cultural diversity and prior experience which would contribute to success of a Multicultural Center. Ph.D. and two years postsecondary teaching preferred.
For informatiorVapplication, contact Jean (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608
FACULTY POSITIONS:
CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY SACRAMENTO
DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK TWO TENURE TRACK,
9-MONTH POSITIONS Assistant/Associate Professor
Begin Fall 1989. MSW required. Doctorate in social work, related field or ABD preferred. Health - Potential skills in teaching and direct practice experience in health settings with the aged. Mental Health- Post-master’s experience in clinical work and potential in teaching direct practice with children and families desirable. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply for both positions. Salary range: $30,252-$39,960.
ONE TENURE TRACK,
12-MONTH POSITION Field Coordinator
Begin July 1,1989. MSW required. Doctorate in Social Work, related field or ABD preferred. Previous social work field practicum coordination, program experience required and knowledge of community resources. Salary range: $31,680 - $48,204.
Send vitae by March 15, 1989 (apply for each position separately) to:
Ronald P. Boltz, Director Division of Social Work
California State University, Sacramento Sacramento, California 95819-2694
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed: of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by . Organization Street______
City, State & Zip
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts & Entertainment
RETURN OF THE WOLVES: The group Los Lobos launches a national tour this week to coincide with the recent release of its all-Spanish album.
Titled La pistola y el corazon, the all-acoustic album of folkloric Mexican songs marks the 15th anniversary of Los Lobos. The title track is a song written for the album by drummer Louie Perez, with music by guitarist/vocalist David Hidalgo.
This is the first all-Spanish album by Los Lobos since the 1978 Just Another Band from East LA La pistola y el corazon was released this month by Warner/Slash.
The 11-city tour begins Nov. 1 in Phoenix, Ariz. (the group’s first appearance there), and will continue through Nov. 18 in Albuquerque, N.M., Austin, San Antonio and Houston, Texas, Boston, New York, Washington, D.C., Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles.
FESTIVAL FILE: The 13th edition of the San Antonio CineFestival
gets under way this week at the city’s Guadalupe Theater.
The event opens Nov. 4 with a reception in honor of actresses Katy Jurado and Kamala Lopez followed by the San Antonio premiere screening of the 1987 Mexican feature Dias dificiles. As many as 90 film and video projects will be screened throughout the festival, which continues through Nov. 13.
As part of this year’s CineFestival, the forum An Introduction to the Assistant Director’s Training Program will be held Nov. 5.
The program, which trains second assistant directors for motion pictures and television, is sponsored by the Director's Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers.
ONE LINERS: Cutting Edge Entertainment has optioned the film rights to The Artist, a novella by Nicholasa Mohr published in 1986 by Arte Publico Press. Ray Blanco will write and produce the film... Performances of Federico Garda Lorca’s La zapatera prodigiosa continues at GALA Hispanic Theatre in. Washington, D.C., through Nov. 20...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TV MARTI UNDERWAY: Studies are currently underway to determine the nuts and bolts of a television counterpait to Radio Marti, says Voice of America spokesperson Mike Schoenfeld- TV Marti is expected to begin broadcasting news and entertainment shows to Cuba early next year.
President Reagan signed a proposal Oct. 1 that provides $7.5 million for the studies and a 90-day trial broadcasting period. After that time, the 101 st Congress will determine the station’s fate.
This is only the second time Western television programming will be beamed to a Communist nation. A West Berlin station broadcasts to East Germany.
The National Association of Broadcasters and other groups oppose the project, saying that TV Marti signals might interfere with other broadcasting. Others warned that Castro might jam VHF signals in the Florida area
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Instltutions/agencies $118
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Jacqueline Tillman, new executive director of Cuban American National Foundation, noted that both concerns had been raised but never materialized with Radio Marti. It premiered in May 1985.
A Miami studio will broadcast to a balloon tethered at an air force base in the Florida Keys, which in turn will send the signal to Cuba.
“TV Marti,” said Tillman, “will continue the effort to inform the Cuban people about what*s going on in the world.” She added that Castro’s negative image among Americans helped CANF push the proposal through at a time when Congress was seeking to cut back its budget.
CELEBRITY APPEALS: Public service announcements encouraging Univision viewers to register and vote are appearing daily on the Spanish-language network, according to Univision News Director Guillermo Martinez. Soon, in a joint effort with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, PSAs will also urge those eligible for naturalization to become citizens, said NALEOs Mike Zamba.
Salsa singer Celia Cruz, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Antonia Hernandez, and actor Edward James Olmos are among those appearing in the announcements, Martinez noted.
San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros, U.S. Reps. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Solomon Ortiz(D-Texas), and comedian Paul Rodriguez are among those scheduled to encourage naturalization.
GANNETT FUNDING: The Gannett Co. has awarded a $100,000 grant to the Michigan State University School of Journalism in East Lansing to establish programs that increase the number of Hispanics in journalism study there.
The Hispanics in Journalism Scholarship program will offer renewable grants of up to $5,000 to Hispanic students, beginning in 1990. Gannett will provide half the budget for the four-year initial program.
According to Tom Callinan, editor of the Lansing State Journal, which is owned by Gannett, there are only six Hispanic reporters in the state.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week The Latin American Law Enforcement Association , the Mexican American Correctional Association, the Chicano Correctional Workers Association and the Latino Peace Officers Association endorse presidential candidate Michael Dukakis at a Los Angeles funcfion .. . Former Ambassador Abelardo Valdez, the chief of protocol during the Jimmy Carter administration, joins the Dukakis/Bentsen Nat i onal Campaign as an adviser. . . U .S. Rep. Jack Kemp, a New york Republican, donates $1,000 to the campaign of businessman Lee Trevino in his effort to unseat U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez ... The Pennsylvania state Senate unanimously approves the nomination of Harrisburg Councilman 0. Frank Garcia to fill a vacancy on the state Crime Victim's Compensation Board . . . Th\fNovemlterlme of Ladies Homes Journal names Lupe AnguMWfl, an founder of National Women's Employment and Education Inc. , which offers training nationwide, as one of America ' s 100 Most Important Women ... US West Communications , a 14-state, diversified corporation, presents its most prestigious Vail Award to employee Sally Martlnez Koon for an act of heroism. Martinez-Koon saved a woman from a flaming car in Denver. The woman suffered third-degree burns, Martinez-Koon had first-and second-degree burns ... Raul and Mary Lugo, the parents of a then-16-year-old daughter, Diane, who died from an overdose of potassium while a patient at the Willford Hall U.S. Air Force Medical Center in San Antonio, receive an out-of court settlement of $3 million. Diane;.18, is now a quadraplegic and cannot swallow or speak ... VoL6No.431 HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I OcL 31,1988 LULAC Seeks Citizenship Bureau _ The League of United Latin American Citizens' board of directors adopted a resolution Oct. 22 to lobby for creation of a federal bureau that would assist new immigrants and promote naturalization to legal U .S. residents, said LULAC National President Jose Garcia Delara The proposed bureau would be independent of the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service . Delara said many persons eligible for citizenship do not apply due to fear of the INS or lack of information. "The spirit of INS has been to apprehend, not to educate or create new citizens. We need to separate the two," he said. The proposal, approved at LULAC's national board meeting in Washington , D .C., was framed by the San Francisco-based Latino Issues Forum. It stafes: "Nationally 28% of legal immigrants who have lived in the United States for over ten years have not been naturalized. In ' California ... 76% of eligible Latinos, or over one million , are not citizens." Nine m)llion legal immigrants have entered country this decade, it says . Two million more will apply for permanent residency through the Immigration Reform and Control Act. Mike Zamba, government affairs director.of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, another organization which supports the idea, said, "We have no illusions " that it will happen immediately. He continued o n page 2 Minority Teacher Crunch Worsening Forty-seven of 50 states and the District of Columbia face a severe shortage of minority teachers, according to a report released Oct. 24 by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education in Washington, D . C . The "Teacher E ducation Pipeline" report says the racial and ethnic comp0sition of the nation ' s public school studentsare" diametri cally opposed " to racial and ethnic enrollment in teacher education programs. Eugene Eubanks, president of AACTE, said his group's 1987 fall enrollment survey reveals that the shortage is worse than had been expected. Among its findings: • A typical college education department of400 students enrolls about362 whites, 22 blacks, seven Hispanics, three Asians and two Native Americans. • Though there are more than one million limited-English-proficient children in public schools, or 2 . 5% of the public school enroll ment, less than 1% of the 300,000 prospective teachers are specializing in bilingual education . e Schools, colleges and departments of education within New Mexico's institutions of higher education enroll the greatest number of Hispanic stuaents-33%. U . S . Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos agreed that the problem is serious. He called for review of teacher certification examinations and training programs, and for directing children early to the profession . Of increased economic support, he said it is an "obvious'' requirement , but "not the only answer." -Darryl Lynette Figueroa PUBLIC SCHOOL COMPOSITION, TEACHERTRAINING ENROLLMENT TOP LATINO POPULATED STATES HISP. BLACK WHITE ASIAN Ariz. K-12 23% 4 % 64% 1 % SCDE * 9 3 80 Calif. K-12 34 12 43 11 SCDE 11 2 81 3 Fla. K-12 11 24 63 SCDE 5 8 86 ** N.M. K-12 41 2 44 SCDE*** 33 2 14 ** N.Y. K-12 21 27 47 4 SCDE 1 2 93 Texas K-12 37 17 44 2 SCDE 8 11 78 • Students enrolled in teacher-training programs. ** Less than 1%. *** In New Mexico, 47 % c la ss ifi e d them se l ves as other ... Source : The American A ssociation of Colleges for Teacher Edu ca tion Hispanic Swing Vote A Myth, Says Scholar The widely reported swing-vote capability of Hispanics in next month's presidential elections will not materialize , said the primary researcher for the first national survey on Latino political attitudes in a statement released Oct. 19. Rodolfo de Ia Garza , the director of the University of Texas at Austin's Center for Mexican American Studies and the lead investigator in the Latino National Political Survey, said Hispanics cannot constitute a swing vote because they do not fit its definition . De Ia Garza said a swing vote "means people who switch back and forth (between parties) . Hispanics don't do this because they are highly partisan." De Ia Garza would not predict a voter turnout figure among Hispanics except to say that most Hispanics a re poor and "poor people are less likely to vote." De Ia Garza noted two scenarios where the Mexican American vote can tilt the scales of victory in favor of the Democrats: • If Republicans do not have more than a 5% lead in Texas after the Anglo and black vote is tallied; or • If Vice President George Bush does not have more than a 3% lead in California after the Anglo and black vote is tallied. The first results of the survey will be available in 1990. League Warns Candidates Officials of the League of United Latin American citizens warned presidential can didates Oct. 20 that they must begin to address the specific problems of Hispanics before apathy sets in among Hispanic voters. "Slapping us on the back and telling us you ' re our friends and speaking Spanish isn ' t good enough," said Ruben Bonilla, past pre sident and general counsel of LULAC. Bonilla said George Bush and Michael Dukakis need to offer solutions for problems such as poverty and low educational achievement. After the November election, LULAC plans to present initiatives it feels the winner should act upon.

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I ' Nicaraguan Influx Overburdens Dade County Services Whether i t be because of the worsening economy in Nicaragua or the continuing war there between the Sandinista govern ment and the U . S. backed contra rebels or both, Dade County, Fla., cannot adequately serve the burgeoning influx of Nicaraguan exiles, says a county refugee coordinator. Perry Rivkind , the district director of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service in Miami, estimates that in recent months as many as 300 Nicaraguans per week have arrived in the area . Bobby Bernal, the refugee/immigration coordinator for the Dade County Manager's Office, says his agency "cannot serve them because federal guidelines are very specific on that. " Because the vast majority of Nicaraguan exiles, said to number between 75,000 and 125,000 in Dade County alone, do not qualify for federal aid programs due to their state of legal limbo, the county is quickly e xhausting its emergency services. The arrival of unanticipated exiles in Dade coincides with a similar surge in the Texas Rio Grande Valley . According to INS figures , more than 12 ,000 Central Americans have requested asylum from January through September of this year. Some 60% of the requests were from Nicaraguans. The INS estimates there are 150,000 to 200,000 Nicaraguans in the United States. Many of the recent arrivals are taking what is known as the "4M" route-from Managua , Nicaragua, to Mexico City, to Matamoros, Mexico, and finally to Miami. LULAC Says Residents Distrust INS continued from page 1 mentioned that NALEO has been working on the issue for five years . Latino Issues Forum Executive Director John Gamboa pointed to a change in climate. He said the support of INS Commissioner Alan Nelson and Western Region Commissioner Harold Ezell had been garnered at separate meetings held over the summer. Forum Program Director Lydia Camarillo attributed the " surprising" response to a willing ness to avoid blame on the low naturalization rate . "It was very clear that protection of the borders is the priority; citizenship will never be . But if that responsibility is shifted, there won' t be a sense of failing to meet the goal. " Delara also pointed to a list of recent supporters, including U . S . Rep. Howard Berman (D-Calif.) , chairman of an immigration sub committee, and Rep . Edward Roybal (D-Calif . ) . at another November meeting. The proposed citizenship bureau would make immigrants aware of citizensh i p benefits, such as increased employment opportunities, and would help them meet the English-language requirements for citizenship under a more streamlined process. The Forum proposal stated that INS Outreach Director E. B . Duarte admitted that no current policy exists that encourages eligible residents to naturalize. Delara said the LULAC board also voted to : e officially support the retention of Lauro Cavazos as education secretary when his term expires Jan. 20; e oppose the legalization of drugs; and e advertise against official-English amend ments. Darryl Lynette Figueroa Duke Austin , a spokesman for the Wash ington, D . C., headquarters of the INS, said although there may be more requests for asylum, the apprehension figures for the busy Te xas-Mexico border do not reveal 1 j increased numbers of undocumented en tries. "Our figures from the Border Patrol don' t say " that apprehensions along that border are up, he said. Austin speculated the increased asylum requests are due primarily to Nicaraguans already here . Dade County's Bernal said despite the sprouting up of Nicaraguan community or ganizations in South Florida , they cannot absorb their compatriots. " For the situati on to get any better, the federal government needs to get on the stick . . . " Felix Pere z FBI to Appeal Verdict, Says LULAC Director The FBI is expected to appeal a federal court decision that found the agency guilty last month of discrimination against His panic agents, especially in the area of choice job assignments needed for career advancement , according to an official of the League of United Latin American Citizens. The Texas State Director of LULAC , John Garcia, said that William Sessions, FBI director , had "relatively assured " LULAC' s board Oct. 21 that an appeal would be made . "He said , ' Don't be offended. It will just be a matter of course,' " said Garcia. Antonio Silva , one of the attorneys representing the plaintiffs in the class action suit, said he feels that FBI is postponing announcement of the appeal until after the Nov. 8 election. . Gamboa, Forum board chairman and former California Supreme Court Justice Cruz Rey noso, and board member Ralph Abascal, of the California Rural Legal Assistance Found ation, have a Nov. 10 meeting scheduled with U .S. Attorney General Richard Thornburgh to seek his support. The U.S. Justice Department oversees the INS. Latino Reps. Environment Votes Vary They will also attempt to enlist the cooperation of U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos Eight of 11 voting Hispanic members of the U .S. House of Representatives scored 50% or above on pro-environment votes tallied by the League of Conservation Voters during 1987-88, according to information released by the group Oct. 6 . The overall average for Democratic House members was 66%; for Fla. English Foes to Appeal Decision 2 Opponents of Florida' s Official English initiative planned to appeal on Oct. 26 the dismissal of a lawsuit which contends petitions to put the question on the ballot are invalid . But they were not optimistic about the outcome. "It looks grim," sa i d Martha Jimenez, as sociate counsel for the Washington, D . C., office of the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. MALDEF will file a supporting brief if the court decides to review the case. The suit was dismissed Oct. 24 by Judge James Kehoe of the U . S . District Court Fourth Southern District. He determined the state was not directly in violation of the Voting Rights Act , which requires dual-lan guage voting materials in counties where at least 5% of the residents speak Spanish . Jon Weber, executive director of Speak Up Now for Florida, wh ich is working with the four Spanish-speaking plaintiffs, agreed that the likelihood of being granted an appeal by the 11th U.S . Circuit Court of Appeals was slim . Weber said his group is continuing to campaign against the initiative. "What were talking about here is whether we want to start chopping out foreign lan guages," he said . Sophia Nieves Republican members it was 35% . "The National Environmental Scorecard," released every two years, ranked Henry Gon zalez (DTexas) at 88% of a possible 1 OOo/o. Rep. Robert Garcia (DN . Y . ) earned 77%, Rep . Esteban Torres ( D-Calif . ) 75%, and Rep . Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) 75% . Most Congressional Hispanic Caucus members ranked considerably lower. Rep . Manuel Lujan (R-M . N . ) had the lowest rating 13%. E. " Kika " de Ia Garza(D-Texas) , chair of the House Agriculture Committee, drew a 38% score. Reps. Matthew Martinez and Tony Coelho, Democrats from California, each scored 56%. Rep . Bill Richardson (D-N . M . ) and Albert Busta mante (DTexas) scored 50% . Rep. Solomon Ortiz(DTexas) , who authored an amendment to the House Endangered Species Act which environmental groups objected to, earned a 44% score. His amend ment, which was defeated , would have delay e d by two years regulations requiring shrimp trawlers to install devices which prevent sea turtles from drowning in their nets. Hi s p a n ic Lin k W eekly R e p ort

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A handful of reporters working in cramped quarters off the l obby of a Washington, D.C. , condo cover Hispanic America like nobod y's business. Despite a tight budget, the four staf fers of Hispanic Link News Service report _every week in surprising scope what IS happening in the Hispanic community across the country. The little news agency produces three weekly opinion colunms (in English and Spanish), syndicated nationwide in some 200 newspapers, 40 of them Spanish l anguage. It also publishes a six-page weekly newsletter that goes out to 1,200 subscnbers. And although founder Charlie Erick sen doubts his enterprise will ever be a money-maker, H ispanic Link measures its s uccess in other ways. For His panic Link, founded in 1980 to give U.S. Latinos an ear and a voice in the nation's capital, has evolved into more than just a news agency. It also is a training ground for Hispanic reporters, a gathering place for local and visiting Latinos and a center to campaign for better treatment-and more employment of Hispanics in the nation's news media. Today , Link is basically self-support ing, but it has yet to show a profit. Essenti9lly, it is a labor oflove. "Nothing else that I've accomplished professi onally has meant as much to me. I'd probably do it all again," says the 58-y ear-old Ericksen, who has n ever drawn a salary for his work. On the contrary, he and his wife, Tan a (short for Sebastiana), have h a d to sell two houses to keep the agency afloat. A veteran journalist and long-time activist in the Hispanic community, Ericksen work ed for print and broadcast media in Los Angeles, Mexico City , and the Far East earlier in his career. B e fore starting the n ews service, he was directo r o f press and publications for the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. The commitment to start the Link dates to the days when his children were going to school in California. As Ericksena non-Hispanic-explains it, he became increasingly concerned over the attitude of schoo l officials toward Latinos. "No part o f my kids that was Hispanic in nature was given any value by the schoo ls or a nybody," he says. "They were only measured by that part of them that was Anglo." Although it took a few years, "I finally decided on a course of action. I would combine what I could do-writing col umns and covering the news-and what I was committed to doing-ehanging the system." Ericksen credits Tana, whom he mar ried 35 years ago in her small Mexican DougiCUJ R Mart(Mz, a former Link staffer, lives in Arlington, Virginia. Covering the Link staffers in their Washington office: (from left) Sophia Nw:es, Felix Perez, Hector Ericksen and Darryl Figueroa; (above) Tana and Charlie Ericksen . village of Bahia La Ventosa, and son H ector, 34, with keeping things goingfinancially and otherwise---
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Dear Weekly Report Reader: Happy birthday to us! Hispanic Link Weekly Report celebrated its fifth birthday last month. The occasion was acknowledged by Vzsta the popular weekend supplement that is tucked into more than 20 Sunday newspapers across the country and delivered to 1.2 million homes. (Vista had a celebration of its own in September, con verting from monthly to weekly). Free-lance writer Doug Martinez authored the piece. With Vista's permission, we are sharing it with you. The occasion is a good one to invite you to acquaint your friends with Weekly Report at our expense. Send us the names and addresses of any persons you feel will enjoy and benefit from Weekly Report and we'll mail them a free current copy with your compliments. This hopefully will 1) let your friends and business acquain tances know that you're thinking of their interests, 2) keep them up-to-the-minute on what's happening in the Hispanic com munity, and 3) gain us some more satisfied subscribers. Use the space below to start, and attach any other names or lists of names of individuals whom you feel deserve to know about the wealth of information offered each week in our ever growing, ever-improving Hispanic Link Weekly Report. Thanks and best wishes, Felix Perez Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor Publisher Dear Felix and Hector, Please send a free copy of Weekly Report, with my compli ments, to those persons I have listed below. My name ______ _ Title and organization (if appropriate): ___ _ Please return this sheet to: Felix Perez, Editor Hispanic Link Weekly Report 1420 N Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 Phone: (202) 234-0280 .................................................................................... PLEASE SEND A FREE CURRENT ISSUE OF HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT, WITH MY COMPLIMENTS, TO THE FOLLOWING PERSONS: Name Name Organization Organization Address Address Name Name Organization Organization Address Address Name Name Organization Organization Address Address

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INSTRUCTOR (2 Positions) UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO AT DENVER NATIONAL VETERANS' TRAINING INSTITUTE Responsible for planning and intensive instruction of high impact, technically complex training programs for veterans' employment and training. Coordinates scheduling of instru c tion , assists training participants to adjust to live-in training situation, and assists in curriculum development. Must be skilled at making presentations to large groups. Moderate travel. Requirements: Master's degree from accredited college or university in Behavioral Science, Education, Business Administration, Adult Education ora closely related field, and minimum of si x month' s adu l t group training experience are required. Must be willing to w o rk evenings and Saturdays as required. Work weeks may run 65 +hours. Please Note: The selection process for the Instructor will require a one-week assignment as " understudy' ' at the NVTI training site in Denver . Employment Conditions: Positions are contract, non tenure, renewable on an annual basis. Program funding dependent upon Congressional appropriation. Salary: $32,556/year. Application Deadline: A letter of application and a current resume must be received no later than 5:00p. m., November 11, 1988. Please address to: Chair, Search Committee, National Veterans ' Training Institute, 1250 14th Street, Suite 650, Denver, CO 80202. If interested, contact Jim Hanson at(303) 892, outside Colorado, 1-800-331-0562 fora copy of complete announcement. The University of Colorado at Denver is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. MATHEMATICS FACULTY OPENINGS We are seeking applicants for two tenure track opportunities in Mathematics. Res ponsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate level courses in content and methods in support of Mathematics Education program and Univers ity certificate programs. Qualifications: substantial graduate work beyond undergraduate major in Mathematics necessary, Ph.D. or Ed.D. in Mathematics Education required . Must hold valid teaching certificate with demonstrated record of sue cessful teaching experience. Excellent benefit package -rank/salary commensurate with experience. To apply send letter of interest, detailed vita , plus three letters of reference to: Chair-Selection Committee , Position FAA8218 ,310 King Hall , EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsi lanti , Mich. 48197. Deadline for receipt: January 30, 1989. Inquiries to Dr. Don Lick(313) 487. ART HISTORIAN FELLOWSHIPS The Southwest HIs panic Research I nstltute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities residency fellowships for the-1989 academic year. The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000 toward relocation costs and other benefits. Interested scholars are Invited to submit research pro posals on Issues critical to an understanding of the HispaniC/Chicano experience In the context of the changing Southwest Eligibility criteria include an awarded doctorate In the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project during the residency period . For proposal guidelines write to Southwest Hispanic Re search Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131. JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's " guest columnist" feature . Approx. 500 words. For writer's guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D.C. 20005. RIO HONDO COLLEGE has an opening for ... MULTICULTURAL CENTER DIRECTOR A 10-month position, funded from a Title Ill Grant. This opening requires a master's degree in a discipline contributing to understanding cultural diversity and prior experience which would contribute to succesa of a Multicultural Center. Ph . D . and two years postsecondary teaching preferred For infonnation/appllcation, contact Jean (213) 692 ext. 309. Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608 FACULTY POSITIONS: CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY. SACRAMENTO DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK TWO TENURE TRACK, 9-MONTH POSITIONS Assistant/ Associate Professor Begin Fall1989. MSW required. Doctorate in social work, related field or ABO preferred. Health Potential skills in teaching and direct practice experience in health settings with the aged . Mental Health-Post master's experience in clinical work and potential in teaching direct practice with children and families desirable. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply for both positions. Salary range: $30,252-$39,960. ONE TENURE TRACK, 1 2 MONTH POSITION Field Coordinator Begin July 1 ,'1989. MSW required . Doctorate in Social Work, related field or ABO preferred. Previous social work field practicum coor dination, program experience required and knowledge of community resources. Salary range: $31 ,680$48, 204. Send vitae by March 15, 1989 (apply for each position separately) to: Ronald P. Boltz, Director Division of Social Work California State University, Sacramento Sacramento, California 95819 Eastern Michigan University seeks an Art Historian-specialty: 19th century art , secondary field non-Western art for Fall , 1989. Full-time , tenure-track, AssistanVAssociate Professor. Rank/salary commensurate with qualifications; excellent benefit package. Required: Ph.D . and teaching experience required ; publication experience desirable. To apply send detailed vita, 3 letters of recommendation and offprints (non-returnable) to : Chair-Selection Committee , Position FAAA 8033,310 King Hall , EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed •. of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Immediate response desired for review prior to CAA conference (interviews there by appointment only) . Deadline for receipt of materials-January 20, 1989. WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPOR TUNITY . MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED . H ispa ni c Link Weekl y R e p o rt CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch . Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment gets under way this week at the city's Guadalupe Theater. The event opens Nov. 4 with a reception in honor of actresses Katy Jurado and Kamala Lopez followed by the San Antonio premiere screening of the 1987 Mexican feature Dias dificiles. As many as 90 film and video projects will be screened throughout the festival, which continues through Nov . 13. RETURN OF THE WOLVES: The group Los Lobos launches a national tour this week to coincide with the recent release of its allSpanish album. Titled La pistola y el coraz6n, the all-acoustic album of folkloric Mexican songs marks the 15th anniversary of Los Lobos. The title track is a song written for the album by drummer Louie Perez , with music by guitarist/vocalist David Hidalgo. As part of this year's Cine Festival, the forum An Introduction to the Assistant Director's Training Program will be held Nov. 5 . This is the first all-Spanish album by Los Lobos since the 1978 Just Another Band from East LA La pistola y el coraz6n was released this month by Warner/Slash. The program, which trains second assistant directors for motion pictures and television, is sponsored by the Director's Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers. ONE LINERS: Cutting Edge Entertainment has optioned the film rights to The Artist, a novella by Nicholasa Mohr published in 1986 by Arte Publico Press . Ray Blanco will write and produce the film .. . Performances of Federico Garcia Lorca' s La zapatera prodigiosa continues at GALA Hispanic Theatre in . Washington, D .C., through Nov . 20 ... The 11-city tour begins Nov. 1 in Phoenix, Ariz . (the group' s first appearance there), and will continue through Nov . 18 in Albuquerque , N.M., Austin, San Antonio and Houston, Texas , Boston, New York, Washington, D . C., Chicago, San Francisco and Los Angeles. FESTIVAL FILE: The 13th edition of the San Antonio Cine Festival Media Report TV MARTI UNDERWAY: Studies are cur rently underway to determine the nuts and bolts of a television counterpa1 t to Radio Marti, says Voice of America spo kesperson Mike Schoenfeld. TV Marti is expected to begin broadcasting news and entertainment shows to Cuba early next year. President Reagan signed a proposal Oct. 1 that provides $7. 5 million for the studies and a 90-day trial broadcasting period. After that time, the 101 st Congress will determine the station' s fate. This is only the second time Western tele vision programming will be beamed to a Com munist nation. A West Berlin station broadcasts to East Germany. The National Association of Broadcasters and other groups oppose the project, saying that TV Marti signals might interfere with other broadcasting . Others warned that Castro might jam VHF signals in the Florida area . HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas . Darryl L y nett e Figueroa, Sophia Nieves . No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advan ce permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rate s 90 cent s per word . Display ads are $45 per column in c h . Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week . Multiple use rates on request. 6 Jacqueline Tillman , new executive director of Cuban American National Foundation, noted that both concerns had been raised but never materialized with Radio Marti It premiered in May 1985. A Miami studio will broadcast to a balloon tethered at an air force base in the Florida Keys, which in turn will send the signal to Cuba . "TV Marti," said Tillman, " will continue the effort to inform the Cuban people about what's going on in the world." She added that Castro ' s negative image among Americans helped CANF push the proposal through at a time when Congress was seeking to cut back its budget CELEBRITY APPEALS: Public service announcements encouraging Univision view ers to register and vote are appearing daily on the Spanish-language network, according to Univision News Director Guillermo Martinez. Soon , in a joint effort with the National As sociation of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, PSAs will also urge those el igible for naturalization to become citizens, said NALEO's Mike Zamba. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Salsa singer Celia Cruz, Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund President Antonia Hernandez, and actor Edward James Olmos are among those appearing in the announcements, Martinez noted. San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros , U.S . Reps. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) and Solomon Ortiz (DTe:Xa's), and comedian Paul Rodriguez are among . those scheduled to encourage naturalization . GANNETT FUNDING: The Gannett Co. has awarded a $100,000 grant to the Michigan State University School of Journalism in East Lansing to establish programs that increase the number of Hispanics in journalism study there . The Hispanics in Journalism Scholarship program will offer renewable grants of up to $5,000 to Hispanic students, beginning in 1990. Gannett will provide half the budget for the four-year initial program . According to Tom Callinan, editor of the Lansing State Journal, which is owned by Gannett, there are only six Hispanic reporters in the state. Darryl Lynette Figueroa /// TACOS R US Hispanic Link Weekly Report