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Hispanic link weekly report, November 7, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 7, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Making The News Thjs Week
The National Association of Human Rights Workers chooses John Castillo, director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, as its president elect. Castillo will be the first Hispanic to head the organization since its founding in 1947. . . In recognition of this summer's fast by United Farm Workers President C6sarCh6vez, the New York City Council unanimously passes a resolution calling on all city agencies and residents to join the table grape boycott... The Corpus Christi (Texas) Chamber of Commerce picks Tony Bonilla as its president elect. Bonilla will be the first Latino to head the 2,000-member group. . . Michael Jimenez, a nine-year veteran of the Miami Fire Department, receives the Florida firefighter of the year
award for rescuing two people tragy£fi/iS»>a car... Al
Campos, Anardo Valdez (gold, basketball), Arnold Astrada (silver, shot put) and Mark Trujillo (bronze|yJ^athdE) j^flflnedals at the recently held Paralympics in Seoul, South Korea... A federal district judge in Los Angeles sentences Raul L6pez-Alvarez, a 29-year-old former Mexican police officer and a graduate of East Los Angeles’ Garfield High School, to 400 years plus life in prison in connection with the 1985 torture-death of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Agent Enrique Camarena... Luz Berrios Berrios, a 38-year-old occupational therapist from Puerto Rico, receives a five-year sentence in Hartford, Conn., for conspiring to use part of the $7.1 million stolen from a Wells Fargo depot in 1983 for a toy giveaway. Prosecutors maintain she is a leader of the militant Puerto Rican independence group, Los Macheteros...
Vol. 6 No. 44

Nov. 7, 1988
Latino Reps. Expected
m _ m a m m_^ _
U.S. Hispanics are experiencing “a spirit of economic optimism,” according to a survey released Oct.28. Ofthe500 Hispanics interviewed, 43% consider themselves better off financially than they were four years ago and 39% feel they are “about the same.” Only 14.4% say they are worse off.
Latino leaders say the positive response does not contradict the fact that the Hispanic poverty rate increased in the ’80s, standing at 27.3% in 1986. Harry PachOn, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, explained to Weekly Report,“Four years ago there was a recession. It was one of the worst times in the decade. Most Americans would say they are better off.
“Another look,” he noted, “shows that the gap between Hispanics and Anglos continues to widen. So it depends on how you look at it.”
According to Southwest Voter Research Institute Director Bob Brischetto, “People generally tend to be more optimistic than their situation (would warrant) when they report financial data.”
The telephone survey was conducted between Sept. 24 and Oct. 1 in California, Texas, New York, Florida and Illinois by Fleishman-Hillard Research of St. Louis. The sampling error is listed as plus or minus4 to6 percentage points.
Company spokesperson Joe Trevino felt the results show that “irrespective of whoever gets elected, Hispanics feel it is within their ability to progress and achieve.”
More than half of the adult Hispanics sampled expect to be better off in the next few years, the survey showed. Twenty-one percent said their financial status would be “about the same.” The survey also showed that 38.8% believe the Democratic Party is more likely to strengthen the U.S. economy in the future, while 30.6% believe Republicans are more apt to improve it.
Among Latinos contacted, reactions to survey findings were limited by what were called “defects” in the sample population. The primary criticism was that the same number of Latinos-100 - were interviewed in each of the five states, giving the6% Hispanic population
in Florida, for example, as much weight as the estimated 35% Latinos in California Additionally the Hispanic population in Florida is primarily composed of higher-income Republican Cubans.
Democratic Party Vice Chairperson Polly Baca also noted that a survey conducted solely by phone automatically excludes many immigrants without permanent homes and without telephones. She called the survey “skewed toward higher-income Hispanics.” Pachdn noted, however, that a 21% preference shown by the survey for female political candidates, with a higher percentage
continued on page 3
Polling Latinos: Success, Assimilation, Day Care
In your opinion, are there more opportunities than you had for your children to become successful as adults?
Yes 90.3% No 5.9%
Do you think your generation is more assimilated into American culture than your parents’ generation?
Yes 80.6% No 12.0%
Are any of your children currently enrolled in a day-care program?
Yes 10.5% No 87.8%
Source: Fleishman-Hillard Research
Latino Reps. Expected to Win Nov. 8 Races
If the vote goes as expected Nov. 8, Hispanics will have one less voting member in Congress next year. All ten voting members running for re-election are expected to retain their seats, but those vying for retiring Manuel Lujan’s (R- N. M.) spot are both Anglo.
Some races bear watching for other reasons* according to staff of the National Associa^ tion of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials
Robert Garcia(D-N.Y.), whose South Bronx seat was thought to be in jeopardy because of his reported involvement in the Wedtech contracting scandal, appears to be secure. “It’s not at risk, but.. .the challenge will be greater than usual,” said Luis Baquedano, a research assistant with NALEO. Usually, Garcia garners 60% of the primary vote in his heavily Democratic district but this year he drew only 40%.
Other races of interest include:
• Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) is expected to retain his seat. His challenger is Ralph Ramirez, a former campaign manager for California Gov. George Deukmejiaa Ramirez ran against Martinez in a 1982 special election, losing by only 500 votes.
• Incumbent Florida Assemblywoman Arnhilda Gonzalez-Quevedo, elected as a Republican, switched parties and is now running in a tight race as a Democrat.
- Sophia Nieves
Reps. Say Judgeships Not Enough
Three Illinois state representatives say the appointment of two Hispanics and nine blacks to newly-created Cook County associate circuit judgeships Oct. 28 is a step forward, but not big enough.
Of the 204 associate judges, one is Hispanic and 21 are black. Cook County is 10% Hispanic and 26.5% black.
A total of 26 associate judgeships were filled through voting held among the circuit court judges who chose from a finalist field of 52. Hispanics named were Grace Dickler,34, a federal immigration judge, and Daniel Miranda, 40, a former assistant public defender.
Representatives Miguel del Valle, Anthony
Young and Paul Williams will continue to press a reapportionment suit filed in March against the county until single- or multiple-member judicial districts are drawn. Currently, all county residents can vote for at-large circuit judges. City residents can also vote for city candidates and suburb residents for suburb candidates.
Del Valle said,“Until we create voting districts that do not dilute (minority) voting strength we are not going to get a Hispanic appellate court judge or a black supreme court judge.” He attributed this appointment of minorities to the bench to pressure brought by the suit.
- Sophia Nieves


Jersey City Accord Aids Hispanic Special Ed. Students
The predominantly Puerto Rican Jersey City, N.J., school district must provide bilingual evaluative personnel for Hispanic students who are or are suspected of being mentally impaired, according to a settlement approved last month by a federal judge in Newark.
The settlement, which came about as a result of a seven-year-old lawsuit brought by the Puerto Rican Education Coalition against the Jersey City Board of Education, will halt the misplacement of limited-English-proficient students into special education classes as well as provide better-tailored services to those students who are in need
of them, said Juan Cartagena, the plaintiffs' attorney.
“There was always the fear that there were kids who were placed in special education classes who didn’t need to be,” said Cartagena, who took the case on while an attorney with the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund. He now works for New York’s Community Service Society.
Approximately 110 students were in need of bilingual evaluative services in the last three years, said Cartagena. He expects another 80 to require services this semester.
By the end of next month, the district must halt all evaluative testing unless per-
formed by a bilingual team. Other corrective actions include the creation of new native-language classes when necessary, hiring of additional bilingual personnel, establishment of a committee that will issue updates regularly to the plaintiffs’ attorneys and the re-evaluation of students who were tested by monolingual teams during the last two years.
The settlement, approved Oct. 14, also states parents will be provided with a translation of the rationale used to place their children in special education classes.
- Felix Perez
Bill Revamps Set-Aside Contracts
Legislation sponsored by Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) will penalize government contractors when they fail to meet minority subcontracting goals. The provision is part of a bill expected to be signed by President Reagan restructuring the 23-year-old 8(a) set-aside program which helps minority-owned concerns obtain subcontracting business.
Currently, the federal government has the authority to terminate or restructure a contract with a firm that does not meet its minority subcontracting goal, but it is rarely exercised, according to Torres’ legislative assistant Albert Jacquez.
Under the new provision, the minority hiring
goal and the fine for not meeting it would be negotiated.
“I think this legislation had to come about because (prime contractors) are just not serious about dealing with minority and small disadvantaged contractors,” said Torres. He said only 2.4% of the $63.4 million subcontracted by government contractors in fiscal year 1987 went to minority subcontractors.
Other changes to be instituted in the program through the bill include extension of the time minority firms may participate and the injection of competitiveness into the process used to award contracts to subcontractors.
- Sophia Nieves
Dade County Employees Charge Bias
A group of Dade County, Fla., Hispanic employees filed a complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Oct. 27, charging that they are underrepresented in high-level positions, are underpaid compared to other groups and have suffered reprisals for their attempts to bring the situation to light.
The attorney for the 1,000-member Federation of Hispanic Employees of Metro-Dade
FBI Retaliation Charged
About half of the 50 Hispanic agents who testified in the FBI discrimination case they won Sept. 30 have since faced retaliation from their superiors, said Hugo Rodriguez, lead counsel in the case. He planned to file a motion in El Paso, Texas, Nov. 3 that would document four of the cases and ask U.S. District Court Judge Lucius Bunton to intervene.
The retaliatory action taken against the four veteran agents involves the revoking of one agent”s gun and bureau car, accusations against anotherof having compromised national security with his testimony, and administrative action taken against two agents who discussed the case with the media, said Rodriguez’s associate, Orlando Quintera. He added that Matt Perez, lead agent in the discrimination suit isone of the two under fire. - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
and Public Health Trust, Luis Fors, said he conducted a study using county records that showed Hispanics make up 27% of the county work force while comprising 34% of the municipality’s population. Fors also said Hispanics accounted for only 11.9% of employees earning $60,000 or more, 13.5% of those earning $45,000 or higher and 19.1% of workers being paid $30,000 and above.
Fors added that the group refrained from taking action for a year and a half because it felt it could address the situation in good faith with then-County Manager Sergio Pereira and current Manager Joaquin Avifib. “ It was because we had county managers who were Hispanic that we took so long to file,” said Fors. Fors attributes the disparate treatment to county policy. _ Felix Perez
Tex Official Withdraws Fractious Polling Order
Texas Secretary of State Jack Rains withdrew a directive Oct. 31 which critics said was designed to keep South Texas Hispanics from the polls. Pressure brought through lawsuits filed by two Travis County precinct judges Oct. 27 and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Oct. 28 resulted in the action, according to Randy Erben, assistant secretary of state.
Erben said the plaintiffs in the first case filed, Walter Timberlake and Jerry Buttrey, agreed to drop their lawsuit filed in Texas Supreme Court if Rains agreed to cancel the memorandum that would have increased the power granted to poll watchers to challenge questionable voters and to verify registration.
The MALDEF brief, filed in federal district court, objected to another action by Rains that remains unresolved. The secretary impounded HidalgoCounty absentee ballots because they were misprinted, allowing voters to vote for presidential and vice presidential candidates from different parties, instead of only those candidates on the same ticket.
“Under Texas law if a vote cast for a vice presidential nominee differs (in party) from the presidential nominee, it cancels their ballot,” said Erben, who maintains the state is trying to protect voters. Hispanics make up 33% of the voters in Hidalgo County.
Judith Saunders-Castro, a MALDEF staff attorney, said the actions were “racist” and intended to deprive Mexican Americans of the right to vote. - Sophia Nieves
Latinos Score High on Civil Rights
Seven of 11 Hispanic voting members of the U.S. House of Representatives had a voting record of 90% or betterwhen measured on 15 issues considered to be pro-civil rights, reports a survey by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights released Oct 27 in Washington, The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights tallied the voting records of all members of the 100th Congress, which ran from January 1987 to October 1988, on issues such as the Civil Rights Restoration Act, the Fair Housing Amendments Act, the Hate Crime Statistics Act and the Japanese American Redress Act.
Following are the voting records of voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus: Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) 100%
Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) 100
Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) 100
Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) 100
Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) 100
Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) 93
Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) 93
Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) 87
Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas) 73
Kika de la Garza (D-Texas) 67
Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.) 40
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Linda Chavez, guest columnist
U.S. English Should Chart New Course
Until recently, I was president of U.S. English. The symbol of a Hispanic leading an organization promoting English as the official language of the United States delighted those who support the cause and infuriated those who oppose it. Ultimately, I resigned not because I have changed my views about the importance of maintaining a common language in this country but because the actions of the chairman and founder of U.S. English, John Tanton, undermined my ability to defend the organization against charges that it was anti-Hispanic.
In a private memo written a year before I joined U.S. English, Tanton asked questions about Hispanics and Catholics which I believe reflected his bias against both groups. The main thesis of the memo written for a small discussion group that Tanton leads was that the demographic changes occurring in California and elsewhere could lead to inevitable conflicts between Anglos and the Asians and Latins who were quickly displacing them.
Rather than simply addressing what the effects might be of high levels of immigration from Latin America and Asia - good and ill-Tanton assumed the worst “Will Latin American migrants bring with them the tradition of the mordida (bribe), the lack of involvement in public affairs, etc.?” he asked. With Latins mostly Catholic, “what are the implications of the changes (in immigration and fertility patterns) for the separation of church and state? The Catholic Church has never been reticent on this point,” he asserted. “If they get a majority of the voters, will they pitch out this concept?” The message is unmistakable - a white Protestant majority is threatened to be overtaken by persons whose values and traditions are alien. The theme is not new. The Know-Nothing Party of the mid-19 th century was founded on similar fears that Irish Catholic immigrants would conspire to undermine democratic freedoms. But what reasonable person today worries that Catholics will have less respect for the separation of church and state than others do? Most of the immigrants about whom Tanton is concerned are Mexicans. Anyone who knows even a little Mexican history is aware of the outright
Survey Shows Small Democratic Preference
continued from page 1
found among Spanish dominant Hispanics, confirms statistics gathered by NALEO over the past four years. Latinas account for 18% of Hispanic elected officials, while in the overall population women comprise 12%, he said.
He also remarked that the small margin of preference shown for the Democrats, which Hispanics traditionally support, should sound “a warning bell (to the party.). It may point to possible shifts in the future.”
Another finding of the survey was that 62.4% of Latinos are not more inclined to vote for a Hispanic political candidate than a non-Hispanic, while 32.4% said they would be more likely to vote for a Hispanic. Said Brischetto, “This is surprising because as we study voting patterns, we see that people do vote more along ethnic lines than that suggests.”
Pachon, on the other hand, said, “This should demolish the right wing criticism that Hispanics only vote on the basis of ethnicity.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
hostility of the Mexican government toward the Catholic Church for most of its history.
I had not seen Tanton’s memo prior to the time its contents were made public in a newspaper article a few weeks ago. Had I seen it before I became president of U.S. English, I would have not accepted the position. When I did see it, its contents and other allegations about some supporters of the organization prompted my resignation. Tanton followed suit. But despite Tanton’s personal views and his role in the organization, I am still convinced that the goal U.S. English promotes- maintaining a common language- is not only good for the nation, but for Hispanics as well.
It has been very important in this great social experiment of American democracy to have had a common language for 200 years. It facilitates the process by which all of us- Poles, Italians, Greeks, Germans, Mexicans- become Americans. We can talk to each other, settle our differences, participate in the democratic process. Having that common language doesn’t restrict our ability to retain our separate language or traditions in our private lives through our churches, synagogues, community groups and especially in our families But it does mean we can come together as a people bound by love of our democratic freedoms and with the capacity to exercise those freedoms in a language we all understand.
In the five years in which U.S. English has existed, it has played an important part in the debate on language policy in the United States. For the most part, its activities have centered on passing laws to promote English as the official language of thecountry and individual states. It has been very successful in this drive, but the various initiative and legislative battles have also proved polarizing in some of the communities. The time is at hand for the organization to move beyond such initiatives - to concentrate its resources to promote English proficiency and bilingual education reform- which will have far greater impact on maintaining a common language than simply declaring English the official language. U.S. English has begun work already in this area and may be able not only to make a positive contribution by expanding its efforts but to overcome the taint of the recent controversy in the process.
(Linda Chavez, a former Reagan White House aide, served as president of U.S. English from Aug. 17, 1987, to Oct 17, 1988.)
Latino Views on the Economy, Education, Politics
In the next few years, do you expect your family to be better off, about the same, or worse off financially than you are now?
Better Off 53.8% About Same 21.0% Worse Off 7.2% Don’t Know 18.0%
In the next two years, do you expect the U.S. economy to be:
Stronger 37.8% About Same 27.2% Weaker 16.4% Don’t Know 18.6% Which political party is more likely to strengthen the U.S. economy in the future: the Democrats or the Republicans?
Democrats 38.8% Republicans 30.6% Neither 6.4% Don’t Know 23.4% Do you rate the quality of your children’s education as excellent, good, fair or poor?
Excellent 23.2% Good 35.4% Fair 27.0% Poor 8.9%
How likely is it that at least one of your children will earn a college degree?
Very Likely 47.3% Likely 33.8% Somewhat Likely 9.7% Not Likely 4.6%
Do you strongly agree, agree, disagree or strongly disagree that Hispanics should become more assimilated into American culture?
Strongly Agree 33.6% Agree 46.0% Disagree 11.8% Strongly Disagree 1.6%
Wou Id you be more or less likely to vote for a candidate who is bilingual or doesn’t it make a difference?
More Likely 46.4% Less Likely 0.4% No Difference 50.2%
Would you be more or less likely to vote for a female candidate or doesn’t it make a difference?
More Likely 21.0% Less Likely 6.6% No Difference 67.6%
Source: Fleishman-Hillard Research
Note: Based on a random sample of 500 Hispanic households in the California counties of Los Angeles, Santa Clara and San Diego, the Texas counties of Bexar, Comar and Guadalupe, Dade County, Fla., Cook County, III., and Manhattan, N.Y.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Nov. 7, 1988
3


Aurora Camacho de Schmidt, guest columnist
Violent Movement
Violence and a Non-
Violence works quickly, but in the realms of life, results are never swift - Howard Brinton 1943
The attack Dolores Huerta, vice president of the United Farm Workers of America, suffered at the hands of police recently raises important questions. Huerta was demonstrating peacefully outside the San Francisco hotel where George Bush attended a campaign dinner after he had declared that he would not support the UFW boycott of California table grapes.
Huerta, 52, suffered life-endangering injuries.
What does this say about the brutal cost of exercising basic rights in the United States? Is non-violence a moral choice or a tactical methodology? What other recourse do farm workers have in the face of oppression?
The grape boycott is a disciplined, nonviolent action aimed at focusing public attention on the indiscriminate use of deadly pesticides in U.S. agriculture. The threat to human life is so great that even California Farmer, a growers’ publication, had charged the grape growers with greed. Concern over the effect of pesticides on farm workers and consumers was the primary focus of the 36-day fast of Cesar Chavez, president of the UFW, this past summer. This is the kind of action that has characterized the life of the union. Self-sacrifice is the only weapon against social complacency and numbness. At every turn, the union had met violence with nonviolence. Its constitution is explicit:
... every member of this Union is sworn to reject the use of violence in any form for any Union activity.
The commitment to non-violence as a method reflects the unequal struggle that farm workers face, for which they need a tool more powerful than any traditional form of social pressure. It is at this point that farm labor organizing becomes a social movement, connected with social change at large. Martin Luther King recognized this when he wrote to Cesar Chavez at the end of his first public fast: Your past and present commitment is eloquent testimony to the constructive power of non-violent action and the
destructive impotence of violent reprisal... The plight of your people and ours is so grave that we all desperately need the inspiring example and effective leadership you have given...
Non-violence is often resistance, but never passivity. King, Chavez and Huerta show in their lives that non-violence is only for the very strong. Only active, disciplined, intelligent non-violence can resist the weight of institutional violence that characterizes farm workers’ lives.
More than two million farm workers live at the mercy of a multibillion dollar industry. The majority of workers and their families suffer employment uncertainty, bad housing, poor or no medical care, lack of education and opportunities - and exposure to pesticides.
Yet at stake is the possibility of birth defects, cancer and poisoning among farm workers. Since 1984, in McFarland, Calif., the heart of one of the world’s richest agricultural areas, five children have developed some form of cancer and six more have died. There are documented cases in that area of severe birth defects among children born to parents who harvest table grapes.
At least four people have been shot by police or company security guards while voting at a union election or picketing. Are the perpetrators deranged? Or are these tragic actions part of something more than insidious and difficult to eradicate? Chavez answers: There have been too many accidents in the fields, on trucks, under machines, in buses, and through the indiscriminate use of pesticides. People ask me if they are deliberate, and they are, in the sense that they are the direct result of a system which treats workers like agricultural implements, not human beings.
The history of the union is the history of a non-violent movement that goes beyond immediate gains in thefield of labor, calling usall to a new understanding. Howard Brinton, a Quaker writing in the midst of World War II, could see that the transforming power of nonviolence could not be swift. “Narrow is (the non-violent) way, fraught with many possibilities of defeat, yet also with the opportunity for a far greater victory.”
The union struggles for itself. It also struggles for you and me. Its banners proclaim,"IHasta la Victoria!”
(Aurora Camacho de Schmidt works for the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia.)
Sin petes en la
WILL THEY DEBATE? Yes, the sin pelos en la lengua debate between New York Daily News columnist Juan Gonzdlez and Institute for Puerto Rican Policy Executive Director Angelo Falc6n is becoming a reality.
As reported here a couple of weeks ago, the pair locked cuernos over a Gonzalez column in which he cited a colonial “dependency” mentality as a major cause of the group’s problems in New York. Falcon called Gonzalez’s assessment “a confused piece of junk.” Then Gonzalez, responding to a gentle nudge by this column, said he’d be glad to debate the issue. Falcon reacted affirmatively, asking us only, “Who am I debating - Juan or his ego?”
With that brotherly beginning, New York Newsday reporter Elaine Rivera has gained a commitment from the New York/New England regional representatives of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists to organize the showdown.
But all parties agree, once the “dependency” issue is aired, the debaters should turn the discussion to what New York’s Puerto Rican leadership must do to help the community gain its deserved place and voice. Arriba y adelante...
WILL CISNEROS RETURN? If you’re still wondering whether
Henry Cisneros’ extramarital misadventure will cause irreparable damage to his career in public service, hear this:
• The same day the 41 -year-old San Antonio mayor admitted his affection for campaign fund-raiser Linda Medlar, 39, a Latina conference on family values was kicking off in his city. And the first time his name was mentioned from the rostrum, the audience broke into rousing applause.
• That night in Denver, Cisneros kept a commitment to participate in a fund-raiser for Mayor Federico Pena and was given a standing ovation.
• A poll conducted by the Ft. Worth Star-Telegram and WFAA-TV a few days later (and released Oct. 30) showed Cisneros’ popularity as a 1990 Texas gubernatorial candidate greater than that of either state Atty. Gen. Jim Mattox or Treasurer Ann Richards, two likely Democratic aspirants for the office. Fifty-four percent of the Texans questioned had a favorable opinion of him. Ony 15% viewed him unfavorably.
WHO HAS CLOUT? Maybe Juan Gonzdlez and/or Angelo Falc6n can interpret it for us:
A breakdown of the “100 Influentials” saluted in this month’s Hispanic Business magazine shows that among Cubans so identified, 92% were male, 8% female; among Mexican Americans it was 64% male, 36% female; and among Puerto Ricans, it was only 46% male vs. 54% female. _ Kay Barbaro
4
Nov. 7,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
HISPANIC SURVEY: A 29-page survey of Hispanic attitudes in economics, politics, education and culture offers a breakdown for each question by age, gender, income and educational level, language preference and voting status. The survey is available free of charge by contacting Joe Trevino, Fleishman-Hillard Research, 1301 Connecticut Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 659-0330.
LAWYERS’ FEES: “The Cost of Personal Legal Services” says that consumers can save considerable money on legal bills by careful shopping and being willing to negotiate. It says the average discounted hourly rate is $67. For a copy of the 52-page report, send $13 to National Resource Center for Consumers of Legal Services, Independence Square, 124-D E. Broad St., Falls Church, Va. 22046(703) 536-8700.
AIDS ANDTHETHIRD WORLD: The 1988-89 edition of “AIDS and the Third World” looks at the spread of AIDS cases on a country-bycountry basis. Among other things, the report says that AIDS is now spread primarily by heterosexuals. For a copy of the 194-page book, send $9.50 to the Panos Institute, 1409 King St., Alexandria, Va. 22314 (703) 836-1302.
STUDENT, PARENT MOTIVATIONAL BOOKLETS: “15 Motivational Booklets for Students and Parents” is an 11-page guide that contains a listing of bilingual aids to help students and parents get the most out of the educational system. Fora free copy, send a self-addressed label to Moreno Educational Co., P.O. Box 19329, San Diego, Calif. 92119 (619) 461-0565.
LATINO INFLUENTIALS: The November issue of Hispanic Business magazine lists 100 Latino influentials and reports on how some of them feel on the issues of the day. For a copy send $2 to HB, 360 S. Hope St., Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 93105 (805) 682-5843.
CONSTITUTION BICENTENNIAL MATERIALS: Bilingual versions of the National Anthem, the Pledge of Allegiance, the American’s Creed, the Mayflower Compact, the Declaration of Independence, the Gettysburg Address and the U.S. Constitution are available as a package for $5.95. To order (specify stock #28-01) send a check or money order to Bicentennial Commeratives, 808 17th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID LIST: “Some Financial Aid Resources for U.S. Hispanic/Latino Undergraduate Students, 1988-89” is available for free from the University of California’s Office of Hispanic Programs, College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. To receive a copy, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to Samuel Mark, director, LAS Hispanic Programs, USC,727 W.27thSt., Los Angeles, Calif. 90007(213)743-0977.
CONNECTING
WHITE HOUSE FELLOWS SOUGHT
The White House has put out a call for applicants for its 1989-90 fellowship program. The yearlong program gives exceptional people from all walks of life a chance to participate in the executive branch of the government and learn about policy-making.
Some 11 to 19 fellows will be selected for the highly competitive program, which runs from Sept. 1,1989, to Aug. 31,1990.
Although there are no educational requirements or particular professions emphasized, the 24-year-old program’s fellows have all been in the early stages of their careers and involved in their communities Pay, commensurate with felloWs education and experience, can reach $58,000.
Deadline for the program is Dec. 15, 1988. Brochures and applications can be obtained by contacting the Presidents Commission of White House Fellowships, 712 Jackson Place NW, Washington, D.C. 20503 (202) 395-4522.
MALDEF TO TARGET UNDERCOUNT
In February the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will kick off its national initiative to encourage more Hispanics to participate in the 1990 census.
Called “iH&gase contar!- Make Yourself Count!,” the initiative will enlist the support of national Hispanic groups, community-based organizations, churches and groups that serve the immigrant population in particular. MALDEF also plans to run public service announcements on Spanish-language TV, radio and publications.
Currently, the outreach effort has coordinators in California and the Midwest. It seeks to have one in Texas also. Arturo Vargas, the program’s national coordinator, said he is hopeful the program will lower the Hispanic undercount, now said to be 4-7%, to that of the general population, 1%.
To become involved contact Vargas at MALDEF, 1990 Census Program, 634 S. Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 629-2512.
ENGLISH CLASSES, MEMBERSHIP SURVEY
The Montgomery County, Md., public libraries are offering free English classes this month and next for foreign-born persons. Two of the three libraries (Twinbrook, Nell Marshall (301) 279-1980; Long Branch, Judy Horowitz 565-7410) will offer five sessions. The other (Kensington Park, Paulette Burt 897-0010) is offering seven sessions... The Eugene and Agnes Meyer Foundation awards the Metropolitan Washington Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies $5,000 to support its Latino Leadership Institute...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
GALA RECEPTION Washington, D.C. Nov. 9
The Multicultural Intern Program, an alternative high school for immigrant youth, will hold a gala fund-raiser. Proceeds from this reception will be used for scholarships.
Maria Tukeva (202) 673-3551
LATINA DINNER Chicago Nov. 10
Mujeres Latinas En Accion will hold its annual dinner. It will include entertainment by the Clemente Steel Band. Mary Gonzalez-Koenig, executive director of the Spanish Coalition, an employment training program, will give the keynote speech.
Alicia Amador (312) 226-1544
PUERTO RICAN WOMEN Washington, D.C. Nov. 11
“Hispanic Women and Health: Taking Charge” is the name of the conference to be held by the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women. A primary goal is to provide leaders with ways to help promote change within their own communities. Subjects to be addressed by speakers and panelists include teen-age pregnancy, AIDS and access to health care.
J. Freyre (305) 866-1353
COMING SOON
SPANISH PATHWAYS IN FLORIDA Florida Endowment for the Humanities Tampa, Fla Nov. 14 Gary Mormino(813) 272-3473
WOMEN’S LUNCHEON
The National Council of Hispanic Women
Washington, D.C. Nov. 14
Marla Elena Diago (202) 566-9068
TRADE SHOW AND EXPO Hispanic Business New York Nov. 15-18 Diana Castro (805) 682-5843
THE FAMILY AND LITERACY
Immaculata College Bicultural/Bilingual Studies
Master’s Program
Immaculata, Pa. Nov. 16
Emily Kirsch (215) 647-4400
SPOTLIGHT
HISPANICS IN THE INDEPENDENT SECTOR: The Institute of Non-Profit Organization Management will hold a conference in San Francisco, Nov. 14-16. It focuses on the role of Hispanic non-profit organizations in helping further the cause of Latinos, the historical development of these organizations and their roles in contemporary society. Speakers will also address management of Hispanic non-profit organizations, religious and social action movements. For more information call Michael O’Neill at (415) 666-6867.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Nov. 7,1988
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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN
Southwest Texas State University of San Marcos, Texas invites applications or nominations for the position of Chair of the Department of Psychology. Applicants should qualify for a tenurable appointment at the rank of associate professor or professor, should show evidence of leadership and provide evidence of substantial achievement in teaching and research, as well as skills at interpersonal communication, program development and resource procurement.
Area of specialization is not a major consideration. The appointment will be effective September 1,1989, and it is a 12-month appointment. Southwest Texas State University enrolls approximately 20,000 students. The Department of Psychology enrolls approximately 4,000 students per semester with over 600 majors. The faculty includes 18 full-time and 7 part-time members. A master's level program is under consideration.
Applicants should submit a complete resume with a cover letter, a one-page statement of leadership philosophy, and at least three references to Dr. Karen Brown, Chair, Search Committee, Institute of Social Work, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE JANUARY 15, 1989.
Southwest Texas State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
FELLOWSHIPS
The Southwest Hispanic Research Institute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities residency fellowships for the 1989-90 academic year. The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000 toward relocation costs and other benef ita interested scholars are invited to submit research proposals on Issues critical to an understanding of the Hispanic/Chicano experience in the context of the changing Southwest Eligibility criteria include an awarded doctorate in the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research project during the residency period. For proposal guidelines write to Southwest Hispanic Research Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131.
BILINGUAL SECRETARY Need excellent Spanish and English. Salary commensurate with experience. Range $15,000 - $22,000. Washington, D.C., public relations firm dealing in international trade, politics and business communications. Call Jeff Keffer (202) 328-0880.
EL CAMINO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT
Invites applications for Full-Time Instructor of Accounting.
Applicants must be qualified to teach any of the Accounting courses offered by the College and have at least one area of specialization, i.e. Computer Applications in Accounting, Income Taxation, Intermediate Accounting. Applicants must hold or qualify for a valid California Community College Instructor Credential in appropriate subject and have a Master's degree in Accounting or Business with major course work in Accounting. Proficiency with computers required.
Contract shall begin February 6, 1989. Evening hours maybe required. Application deadline: December 2,1988.
For district application and instruction apply to:
El Camino Community College Personnel Service 16007 Crenshaw Blvd.
Torrance, Calif. .90506 (213) 715-3477
EMPLEADOS QUBERNAMENTALES
GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES
You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your $$s impact on your community. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to “Promote the health and welfare of His panics,” particularly, decrease the high school dropout rates, unemployment, social, ethnic and sexual discrimination, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system.
NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helped over3,000 Hispanics last year through training, scholarships, and amnesty assistance. Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code #0443 contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please call Ms. Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737-9220.
ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND GRADUATE DEAN The University of Texas at El Paso
The University of Texas at El Paso invites applications and nominationsforthe position of Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean.
The position will report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean will be responsible for representing the University to federal, state, and private funding sources and for the operation and supervision of the Office of Sponsored Projects and the Graduate School. A major responsibility will be to develop institutional proposals and identify appropriate funding sources to increase institutional and faculty extramural funding. The successful candidate will also provide vigorous leadership in the development of new graduate offerings and strengthening existing offerings.
Applicants are expected to have an earned doctorate, academic and research administrative experience, a strong record of scholarly achievement, a record of obtaining research funding, strong written and oral communications skills and be eligible for appointment as a full professor in an appropriate academic department.
With over 15,000 students, the University of Texas at El Paso is the largest public institution on the U nited States- Mexico border and it is the second oldest component of the UT System. The bicultural region of El Paso and Juarez offers a mild southwestern climate as well as uniquecultural, business, research and educational opportunities. The University is seeking to continue its commitment to enhance these opportunities to provide expanded educational programs to its culturally diverse constituency. Serving a metropolitan population of 1.5 million people, UT El Paso offers a wide variety of both baccalaureate and master's programs in six academic colleges and the graduate school. The University has an established doctoral program in Geological Sciences, and approval has been sought fortwo additional doctoral programs.
Applications and nominations will be accepted until December 15,1988. A starting date of June 1, 1989 is anticipated. The University offers a competitive salary and benefits package. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, and the names of five references should be sent
Dr. Donald E. Moss,
Chairman, Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean Search Committee c/o Office of the President The University of Texas at El Paso 500 University Avenue El Paso, Texas 79968
Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer.
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Nov. 7,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
RIO HONDO COLLEGE has an opening for...
MULTICULTURAL CENTER DIRECTOR A 10-month position, funded from a Title III Grant. This opening requires a master's degree in a discipline contributing to understanding cultural diversity and prior experience which would contribute to success of a Multicultural Center. Ph.D. and two years postsecondary teaching preferred.
For information/application, contact Jean (213)
692-0921 ext. 309.
Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608
Hispanic Link Weekly Report 7
DALLAS WATER UTILITIES DIRECTOR OF WATER UTILITIES
The City of Dallas’ Water Utilities is currently seeking qualified applicants to fill the position of Director of Water Utilities. This position is involved in the development and control of water and wastewater services provided by the City. Responsibilities include the development of water resources, establishment of rate schedules, determining sales of waterto other cities, maintenance of the wastewater system and establishment and maintenance of the water utilities networks system.
Qualified applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering and registration as a Professional Engineer. A graduate degree is preferred. Qualified applicants should have 10 or more years experience working with all phases of municipal water and wastewater systems.
Salary range is $54,602 to $87,400 depending upon education and experience. Submit a resume by Friday, December 2, 1988 to: Staffing Manager, Personnel Department, 1500 Manila City Hall, Room 6AN, Dallas, Texas 75201.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H
DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
The City of Dallas is currently seeking qualified candidates for the position of Assistant Directorof Housing and Neighbor hood Services. This position is responsible for representing the department in Neighborhood Services as well as administering environmental codes which regulate neighborhood quality and housing safety.
Qualified applicants must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Business Administration, Public Administration, or a related field with a minimum of six years experience. Program Management-Computer Information Systems experience is desirable. A Master’s Degree is preferred. Must also demonstrate oral and written communication skills.
Salary range is $41,041 to $54,268 depending upon education and experience. Individuals interested in this position should submit a resum§ by November 25,1988 to: Staffing Manager, Personnel Department, 1500 Manila City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas, Texas 75201.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant Professor III, in the sociology of development, effective July, 1989.
This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development, international organization, the sociology of agriculture, urbanization and development in the Third World, or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program. Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable. Ph.D. is required. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland, Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Applications must be postmarked January 1,1989 or earlier to be considered.
The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY
The University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputation for quantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching. The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Professor levels.
A Ph.D. is required. It is desired that field of specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and family, sociology of organization, economic sociology, historical, comparative sociology, international political economy, or poverty and social welfare. The position is reserved for someone actively engaged in quantitative research and able to regularly participate in teaching a graduate-level sequence in methods and statistics. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology.
To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application, and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department University of California, Davis, Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10,1989 or earlier to be considered.
The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer.
FACULTY POSITIONS:
CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY SACRAMENTO DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK TWO TENURE TRACK, 9-MONTH POSITIONS Assistant/Associate Professor Begin Fall 1989. MSW required. Doctorate in social work, related field or ABD preferred. Health - Potential skills in teaching and direct practice experience in health settings with the aged. Mental Health^ Post- master’s experience in clinical work and potential in teaching direct practice with children and families desirable. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply for both
positions. Salary range: $30,252 -$39,960.
ONE TENURE TRACK,
12-MONTH POSITION Field Coordinator
Begin July 1,1989. MSW required. Doctorate in Social Work, related field or ABD preferred. Previous social work field practicum coordination, program experience required and knowledge of community resources. Salary range: $31,680 - $48,204.
Send vitae by March 15, 1989 (apply for each position separately) to:
Ronald P. Boltz, Director Division of Social Work
California State University, Sacramento Sacramento, California 95819-2694
H
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed-of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
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DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
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Arts & Entertainment
‘GRINGO’ MOVES: The much-awaited release of the film Old Gringo has been postponed a year, it was announced recently.
The announcement was made late last month by Dawn Steel, president of Columbia Pictures, and Jane Fonda, the film's star. Claiming the film’s post-production won’t be completed until early next year, the studio slated Old Gringo's release for the fall 1989.
Production of the film, based on the novel Gringo Viejo by Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes, has been plagued by controversy from the beginning. Fonda, who is producing the film under the Fonda Films banner, has reportedly been associated with the project since Fuentes began writing the book eight years ago.
Luis Valdez had originally been picked to write the film’s screenplay, but the writer and director of La Bamba removed himself from the project citing differences over his first draft. Argentina’s Luis Puenzo, who reportedly has said he didn’t know much about Mexican culture, was picked to direct. He co-wrote the screenplay with Aida Bortnik,
who shares his screenwriting Oscar for La historia oficial.
Another problem arose when actor Burt Lancaster, who had been set to play the title role (based on the life of U.S. journalist Ambrose Bierce), was replaced by Gregory Peck. In a lawsuit Lancaster claims that he was fired because of the studio’s inability to insure him because of his age.
Aside from Fonda and Peck Old Gringo stars Puerto Rican actor Jimmy Smits in the role of a Mexican revolutionary.
In other film items, Juan Jose Jusid’s film Made in Argentina has been announced as the winner in the Feature Length category of the first National Latino Film and Video Festival, which begins next week in New York... Actor Anthony Quinn is now in the Mexican city of Durango filming Vengeance, which is expected to be released here next year...
ONE LINER: Federico Garcia Lorca’s drama Blood Wedding, which last month closed the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, opens at San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre Nov. 9. The production is a new adaptation by GLTF artistic director Gerald Freedman, who codirects with Argentine choreographer Graciela Daniele...
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
WRITERS PROJECT: The Education Writers Association is accepting applications from reporters or writers in 20 cities, including Albuquerque, N.M,San Antonio,Los Angeles, Miami, Tucson, Ariz., and the Washington, D.C, area, to cover school programs for disadvantaged urban youth as part of a two-year project meant to increase media coverage of effective programs.
The stories would appear in a periodical that is published five times a year and sent to 10,000 education professionals, reporters, libraries and community groups. Writers would work on a part-time, free-lance basis.
For more information, contact Lisa Walker, EWA, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 310, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 429-9680.
ESCALANTE BIOGRAPHY: A biography of Jaime Escalante written by Jay Mathews, Los Angeles bureau chief for The Washington
Post, will be released Nov. 28 by Henry Holt and Company of New York.
Mathews has been following Escalante since 1982, when he read in the Los Angeles Times that the Bolivian teacher had inspired 18 students at predominantly Latino Garfield High School to pass the advanced placement test in calculus.
An excerpt of the book, titled “Escalante, The Best Teacher in America,” will run in the Nov. 20 issue of the Los Angeles Times magazine. Reader’ s Digest will carry a condensed version of it in its January issue. A Spanish-language edition of Reader's Digest will be available in March. For a copy send $2.25 plus postage and handling to Reader's Digest, Latino America, 2655 Le Jeune Road, Suite 301, Coral Gables, Fla. 33T34;
100 INFLUENTIAL HISPANICS: Hispanic Business magazine carries its annual discussion of the most pressing issues of the day with 100 of the nation’s most influential Latinos in its November issue. The Hispanic leaders were selected from diverse fields
The magazine is also sponsoring Nov. 15-
18 in New York a media and marketing conference.
Editor/Publisher Jesus Chavarria said the focus of the Se Habla Espahol conference will be to assist companies interested in marketing to the Hispanic consumer.
Contact Steve Crandell at (805) 682-5843.
NOTABLE: Los Angeles Times reporter Marita Hernandez and local TV station KNBC were presented outstanding journalism awards from the Los Angeles chapter of the California Chicano News Media Association for coverage related to the Immigration Reform and Control Act . . Juan Gonzalez, New York Daily News columnist, and John Garcia, formerly a reporter with Gannetfs Westchester Newspapers, won first place awards from the New York State Associated Press As-sociation. Gonzalez won for his column writing for a newspaper with a circulation over 150,000. Garcia, now New York bureau chief for Vista magazine, won in the in-depth reporting category at a newspaper with a circulation between 50,000 and 150,000.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
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Publisher HActor Ericksen- Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.
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Actor Martin Sheen, second from right in the front pew, and California Assemblyman Gray Davis, third from right, join in a candlelight vigil in Los Angeles for United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta. (See Camacho de Schmidt guest column.) Photo by George Rodriguez
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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Making The News This Week award for rescuing two people car . . . AI Campos, Anardo Valdez (gold, basketball), Arnold Astrada (silver, shot put) and Mark Trujillo (bronzeN(i)VathoJl \988nedals at recently held Paralympics in Seoul, South Korea . . . A federal d1stnct judge in Los Angeles sentences Raul L6pez-Aivarez, a former Mexican police officer and a graduate of East Los Angeles Garfield High School, to 400 years plus life in prison in connection with the 1985 torture-death of U . S . Drug Enforcement Administration Agent Enrique Camarena. . . Luz Berrios Berrios, a 38-year-old occupational therapist from Puerto Rico, receives a five-year sentence in Hartford, Conn. , for conspiring to use part of the $7. 1 million stolen from a Wells Fargo depot in 1983 for a toy giveaway. Prosecutors maintain she is a leader of the militant Puerto Rican independence group, Los Macheteros ... The National Association of Human Rights Workers chooses John Castillo, director of the Michigan Department of Civil Rights, as its president elect. Castillo will be the first Hispanic to head the organization since its founding in 1947 ... In recognition of this summer's fast by United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez, the New York City Council unanimously passes a resolution calling on all city agencies and residents to join the table grape boycott. .. The Corpus Christi (Texas) Chamber of Commerce picks Tony Bonilla as its president elect. Bonilla will be the first Latino to head the 2,000 member group. . . Michael Jimenez, a nine-year veteran of the Miami Fire Department, receives the Florida firefighter of the year Vol6No.44ll HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Nov. 7,1988 Latinos Optimistic About Future U.S. Hispanics are experiencing "a spirit of economic optimism; according to a survey released Oct. 28. Of the 500 Hispanics inter viewed, 43% consider themselves better off financially than they were four years ago and 39% feel they are "about the same." Only 14.4% say they are worse off . Latino leaders say the positive response does not contradict the fact that the Hispanic poverty rate increased in the '80s, standing at 27. 3% in 1986. Harry Pach6n, executive director of the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, explained to Weekly Report,"Fouryears ago there was a recession. It was one of the worst times fn the decade. Most Americans would say they are better off. "Another look, " he noted, "shows that the gap between Hispanics and Anglos continues to widen. So it depends on how you look at it." According to Southwest Voter Research Institute Director Bob Brischetto, " People generally tend to be more optimistic than their situation (would warrant) when they report financial data." The telephone survey was conducted bet ween Sept. 24 and Oct. 1 in California, Texas, New York, Florida and Illinois by Fleishman Hillard Research of St. Louis. The sampling error is listed as plus or minus4 to6 percentage points. in Florida , for example , as much weight as the estimated 35% Latinos in California Addition ally the Hispanic population in Florida is primarily composed of higher income Repu blican Cubans. Democratic Party Vice Chairperson Polly Baca also noted that a survey conducted solely by phone automatically excludes many immigrants without permanent homes and without telephones. She called the survey "skewed toward higher-income Hispanics . " Pach6n noted , however, that a 21% pre ference shown by the survey for female political candidates, with a higher percentage continued on page 3 Polling Latinos: Success, Assimilation, Day Care In your opinion , are there more opportunities than you had for your children to become successful as adults? Yes 90.3% No 5.9.% Do you think your generation is more as similated into American culture than your parents' generation? Yes 80.6% No 12.0% Are any of your children currently enrolled in a day-care program? Yes 10.5% No 87.8% Source : Fleis hman Hillard Resear c h Latino Reps. Expected to Win Nov. 8 Races If the vote goes as expected Nov. 8, Hispanics will have one less voting member in Congress next year . All ten voting members running for re-election are expected to retain their seats, but those vying for retiring Manuel Lujan's ( R N . M.) spot are both Anglo . Some races bear watching for other reasons, according to staff of the National tion of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. Robert Garcia(D-N.Y.) , whose South Bronx seat was thought to be in jeopardy because of his reported involvement in the Wedtech contracting scandal, appears to be secure. "lfs not at risk, but. .. the challenge will be greater than usual," said Luis Baquedano, a research assistant with NALEO. Usually, Garcia garners 60% of the primary vote in his heavily Democratic district, but this year he drew only 40%. Other races of interest include: • Rep . Matthew Martinez (DCalif. ) is expected to retain his seat. His challenger is Ralph Ramirez, a former campaign manager for California Gov . George Ramirez ran against Martinez in a 1982 special election, losing by only 500 votes. • Incumbent Florida Assemblywoman Arnhilda GonzalezQuevedo, elected as a Republican, switched parties and is now running in a tight race as a Democrat. Sophia Nieves Company spokesperson Joe Trevino felt the results show that" irrespective of whoever gets elected, Hispanics feel it is within their ability to progress and achieve." More than half of the adult Hispanics sampled expect to be better off in the next few years, the survey showed. Twenty-one percent said their financial status would be "about the same ." The survey also showed that 38. 8% believe the Democratic Party is more likely to strengthen the U.S . economy in the future, while 30.6% believe Republicans are more apt to improve it. Reps. Say Judgeships Not Enough Three Illinois state representatives say the appointment of two Hispanics and nine blacks to newly-created Cook County as sociate circuit judgeships Oct. 28 is a step forward, but not big enough. Among Latinos contacted, reactions to sur vey findings were limited by what were called "defects" in the sample population. The primary criticism was that the same number of Latinos-1 00were interviewed in each of the five states, giving the6% Hispanic population Of the 204 associate judges, one is Hispanic and 21 are black. Cook County is 10% Hispanic and 26.5% black. A total of 26 associate judgeships were filled through voting held among the circuit court judges who chose from a finalist field of 52. Hispanics were Grace Dickler,34, a federal immigration judge, and Daniel Miranda, 40, a former assistant public defender. Miguel del Valle, Anthony Young and Paul Williams will continue to press a reapportionment suit filed in March against the county until singleor multiple member judicial districts are drawn. Currently, all county residents can vote for at-large circuit judges. City residents can also vote for city candidates and suburb residents for suburb candidates. Del Valle said,"Until we create voting districts that do not dilute (minority) voting strength we are not going to get a Hispanic appellate court judge or a black supreme court judge." He attributed this appointment of minorities to the bench to pressure brought by the suit. Sophia Nieves

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Jersey City Accord Aids Hispanic Special Ed. Students The predominantly Puerto Rican Jersey City, N.J . , school district must provide bilingual evaluative personnel for Hispanic stu dents who are or are suspected of being mentally impaired, according to a settlement approved last month by a federal judge in Newark. The settlement, which came about as a result of a seven-year-old lawsuit brought by the Puerto Rican Education Coalition against the Jersey City Board of Education, will halt the misplacement of limited-English proficient students into special education classes as well as provide better-tailored services to those students who are in need of them, said Juan Cartagena, the plaintiffs' attorney. "There was always the fear that there were kids who were placed in special edu cation classes who didn't need to be," said Cartagena, who took the case on while an attorney with the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund . He now works for New York's Community Service Society. Approximately 11 0 students were in need of bilingual evaluative services in the last three years, said Cartagena. He expects another 80 to require services this semester. By the end of next month, the district must halt all evaluative testing unless perBill Revamps Set-Aside Contracts Legislation sponsored by Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif . ) will penalize government contractors when they fail to meet minority subcontracting goals. The provision is part of a bill expected to be signed by President Reagan restructuring the 23-year-old 8(a) set-aside program which helps minority-owned concerns obtain sub contracting business. Currently, the federal government has the authority to terminate or restructure a contract with a firm that does not meet its minority subcontracting goal, but it is rarely exercised, according to Torres' legislative assistant, Albert Jacquez. Under the new provision, the minority hiring goal and the fine for not meeting it would be negotiated. "I think this legislation had to come about because (prime contractors) are just not serious about dealing with minority and small dis advantaged contractors," said Torres . He said only 2.4% of the $63.4 million subcon tracted by government contractors in fiscal year 1987 went to minority subcontractors. Other changes to be instituted in the pro gram through the bill include extension of the time minority firms may participate and the injection of competitiveness into the process used to award contracts to subcontractors. -Sophia Nieves Dade County Employees Charge Bias A group of Dade County, Fla., Hispanic employees filed a complaint with the U .S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Oct. 27, charging that they are underrepre sented in high-level positions, are underpaid compared to other groups and have suffered reprisals for their attempts to bring the situation to light. The attorney for the 1 ,000-member Federa tion of Hispanic Employees of Metro-Dade FBI Retaliation Charged and Public Health Trust, Luis Fors, said he conducted a study using county records that showed Hispanics make up 27% of the county work force while comprising34% of the muni cipality's population. Fors also said Hispanics accounted for only 11. 9% of employees earning $60,000 or more, 13.5% of those earning $45,000 or higher and 19.1% of workers being paid $30,000 and above. Fors added that the group refrained from taking action for a year and a half because it felt it could address the situation in good faith with then-County Manager Sergio Pereira and current Manager Joaquin Avin6 . "It was because we had county managers who were Hispanic that we took so long to file," said Fors. Fors attributes the disparate treatment to county policy. Felix Perez formed by a bilingual team . Other corrective actions include the creation of new native language classes when necessary, hiring of additional bilingual personnel, establish ment of a committee that will issue updates regularly to the plaintiffs' attorneys and the re-evaluation of students who were tested by monolingual teams during the last two years. The settlement, approved Oct. 14, also states parents will be provided with a trans lation of the rationale used to place their children in special education classes. Felix Perez Tex. Official Withdraws Fractious Polling Order Texas Secretary of State Jack Rains withdrew a directive Oct. 31 which critics said was designed to keep South Texas Hispanics from the polls . Pressure brought through lawsuits filed by two Travis County precinct judges Oct. 27 and the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund Oct. 28 resulted in the action, according to Randy Erben, assistant secretary of state. Erben said the plaintiffs in the first case filed, Walter Timberlake and Jerry Buttrey, agreed to drop their lawsuit filed in Texas Supreme Court if Rains agreed to cancel the memorandum that would have increased the power granted to poll watchers to challenge questionable voters and to verify registration. The MALDEF brief, filed in federal district court, objected to another action by Rains that remains unresolved. The secretary impounded Hidalgo County absentee ballots because they were misprinted, allowing voters to vote for presidential and vice presidential candidates from different parties, instead of only those candidates on the same ticket. "Under Texas law if a vote cast for a vice presidential nominee differs (in party) from the presidential nominee, it cancels their ballot," said Erben, who maintains the state is trying to protect voters. Hispanics make up 33% of the voters in Hidalgo County. Judith Saunders-Castro, a MALDEF staff attorney, said the actions were "racisf' and intended to deprive Mexican Americans of the right to vote. Sophia Nieves About half of the 50 Hispanic agents who testified in the FBI discrimination case they won Sept. 30 have since faced retaliation from their superiors, said Hugo Rodriguez, lead counsel in the case. He planned to file a motion in El Paso, Texas, Nov. 3 that would document four of the cases and ask U.S. District Court Judge Lucius Bunton to intervene. Latinos Score High on Civil Rights The retaliatory action taken against the four veteran agents involves the revoking of one agenf s gun and bureau car, accusa tions against another of having compromised national security with his testimony, and administrative action taken against two agents who discussed the case with the media, said Rodriguez's associate, Orlando Quintera. He added that Matt Perez, agent in the discrimination suit is one of the two under fire. Darryl Lynette Figueroa 2 Seven of 11 Hispanic voting members of the U.S. House of Representatives had a voting record of90% or better when measured on 15 issues considered to be pro-civil rights, reports a survey by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights released Oct. 27 in Washington. The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights tallied the voting records of all members of the 1 OOth Congress, which ran from January 1987 to October 1988, on issues such as the Civil Rights Restoration Act, the Fair Housing Amendments Act, the Hate Crime Statistics Act and the Japanese American Redress Act. Following are the voting records of voting members of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus: Albert Bustamante (DTexas) 100% TonyCoelho(D-Calif.) 100 Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) 100 Bill Richardson (D-N.M.) 100 Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) 100 Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.) 93 Edward Roybal (D-Calif.) 93 Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) 87 Solomon Ortiz (D-Texas) 73 Kika de Ia Garza (D-Texas) 67 Manuel Lujan (R-N.M.) 40 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Linda Chavez, guest columnist U.S. English Should Chart New Course Until recently, I was president of U.S . English. The symbol of a Hispanic leading an organization promoting English as the official language of the United States delighted those who support the cause and infuriated those who oppose it. Ultimately, I resigned not because I have changed my views about the importance of maintaining a common language in this country but because the actions of the chairman and founder of U.S . English, John Tanton, undermined my ability to defend the organization against charges that it was anti-Hispanic. hostility of the Mexican government toward the Catholic Church for most of its history. I had not seen Tanton ' s memo prior to the time its contents were made public in a newspaper article a few weeks ago. Had I seen it before 1 became president of U.S . English , I would have not accepted the position. When I did see it , its contents and other allegations about some supporters of the organization prompted my resignation. Tanton followed suit. But despite Tanton's personal views and his role in the organization, I am still convinced that the goal U.S. English promotes-maintaining a common language-is not only good for the nation, but for Hispanics as well. In a private memo written a year before I joined U.S . English, Tanton asked questions about Hispanics and Catholics which I believe reflected his bias against both groups. The main thesis of the memo written for a small discussion group that Tanton leads was that the demographic changes occurring in California and elsewhere could lead to inevitable conflicts between Anglos and the Asians and Latins It has been very important in this great social experiment of American democracy to have had a common language for 200 years. It facilitates the process by which all of us-Poles, Italians, Greeks, Germans, Mexicans-become Americans. We can talk to each other, settle our differences, participate in the democratic process. Having that common language doesn't restrict our ability to retain our separate language or traditions in our private lives through our churches, synagogues, community groups and especially in our families. But it does mean we can come together as a people bound by love of our democratic freedoms and with the capacity to exercise those freedoms in a language we all understand. who were quickly displacing them. Rather than simply addressing what the effects might be of high levels of immigration from Latin America and Asia-good and iiiTanton assumed the worst. "Will Latin A merican migrants bring with them the tradition of the mordida (bribe), the lack of involvement in public affairs , etc. ? " he asked. With Latins mostly Catholic, " what are the implica tions of the changes (in immigration and fertility patterns) for the separation of church and state? The Catholic Church has never been reticent on this point, " he asserted. "If they get a majority of the voters, will they pitch out this concept?" 1 n the five years in which U.S . English has existed, it has played an important part in the debate on language policy in the United States. For the most part , its activities have centered on passing laws to promote English as the official language of the country and individual states. It has been very successful in this drive, but the various initiative and legislative battles have also proved polarizing in some of the communities. The time is at hand for the organization to move beyond such initiatives-to concentrate its resources to promote English proficiency and bilingual education reform-which will have far greater impact on maintaining a common language than simply declaring English the official language. U.S. English has begun work already in this area and may be able not only to make a positive contribution by expanding its efforts but to overcome the taint of the recent controversy in the process. The message is unmistakable-a white Protestant majority is threatened to be overtaken by persons whose values and traditions are alien. The theme is not new. The Know-Nothing Party of the mid-19th century was founded on similar fears that Irish Catholic immigrants would conspire to undermine democratic freedoms. But what reasonable person today worries that Catholics will have less respect for the separation of church and state than others do? Most of the immigrants about whom Tanton is concerned are Mexicans. Anyone who knows even a little Mexican history is aware of the outright (Linda Chavez , a former Reagan White House aide, served as president of U.S. English from Aug. 17 , 1987, to Oct 17, 1988.) Survey Shows Small Democratic Preference continued from page 1 found among Spanish dominant Hispanics, confirms statistics gathered by NALEO over the past four years . Latinas account for 18% of Hispanic elected officials, while in the overall population women comprise 12% , he said . He also remarked that the small margin of preference shown for the Democrats, which Hispanics traditionally support, should sound "a warning bell (to the party.) . It may point to possible shifts in the future." Another finding of the survey was that 62.4% of Latinos are not more inclined to vote for a Hispanic political candidate than a non-Hispanic, while 32.4% said they would be more likely to vote for a Hispanic. Said Brischetto, "This is surprising because as we study voting patterns, we see that people do vote more along ethnic lines than that suggests. " Pach6n , on the other hand , said , "This should demolish the right wing criticism that Hispanics only vote on the basis of ethnicity. " Darryl Lynette Figueroa Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report Latino Views on the Economy, Education, Politics In the next few years, do you expect yourfamily to be better off, about the same, or worse off financially than you are now? Better Off 53.8% About Same 21.0% Worse Off 7.2% Don't Know 18.0% In the next two years, do you expect the U.S . economy to be: Stronger 37.8% About Same 27.2% Weaker 16.4% Don't Know 18.6% Which political party is more likely to strengthen the U .S. economy in the future: the Democrats or the Republicans? Democrats 38.8% Republicans 30.6% Neither 6.4% Don't Know 23.4% Do you rate the quality of your children' s education as excellent, good, fair or poor? Exceilent 23.2% Good 35.4% Fair 27.0% Poor 8.9% How likely is it that at least one of your children will earn a college degree? Very Likely47.3% Likely33.8% SomewhatUkety9.7% Not Likely4.6% Do you strongly agree, agree, disagree or strongly disagree that Hispanics should become more assimilated into American culture? Strongly Agree 33.6% Agree 46.0% Disagree 11 .8% Strongly Disagree 1.6% Would you be more or less likely to vote for a candidate who is bilingual or doesn't it make a difference? More Likely 46.4% Less Likely 0.4% No Difference 50.2% Would you be more or less likely to vote for a female candidate or doesn't it make a difference? More Likely 21 .0% Less Likely 6.6% No Difference 67.6% Source: Fleishman Hillard Resea rch Note: Based on a random sample of 500 Hispanic households in the California counties of Los Angeles, Santa Clara and San Diego , the Texas counties of Bexar , Comar and Guadalupe , Dade County, Fla., Cook County, Ill., and Manhattan, N .Y. Nov . 7 , 1988 3

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Aurora Camacho de Schmidt, guest columnist Violence and a Non-Violent Movement Violence works quickly, but in the realms of life, results are never swift. -Howard Brinton 1943 The attack Dolores Huerta, vice president of the United Farm Workers of America, at the hands of police recently raises important questions. Huerta was demonstrating peacefully outside the San Francisco hotel where George Bush attended a campaign dinner after he had declared that he would not support the UFW boycott of California table grapes. Huerta, 52, suffered life-endangering injuries. What does this say about the brutal cost of exercising basic rights in the United States? Is non-violence a moral choice or a tactical methodology? What other recourse do farm workers have in the face of oppression? The grape boycott is a disciplined, non violent action aimed at focusing public atten tion on the indiscriminate use of deadly pesticides in U .S. agriculture. The threat to human life is so great that even California Farmer, a growers' publication, had charged the grape growers with greed. Concern over the effect of pesticides on farm workers and consumers was the primary focus of the 36 day fast of Cesar Chavez, president of the UFW, this past summer. This is the kind of action that has characterized the life of the union . Self-sacrifice is the only weapon against social complacency and numbness. At every turn, the union had met violence with non violence. Its constitution is explicit: . . . every member of this Union is sworn to reject the use of violence in any form for any Union activity. The commitment to non-violence as a method reflects the unequal struggle that farm workers face, for which they need a tool more powerful than any traditional form of social pressure . It is at this point that farm labor organizing becomes a social movement, connected with social change at large. Martin Luther King recognized this when he wrote to Cesar Chavez at the end of his first public fast: 4 Your past and present commitment is eloquent testimony to the constructive power of non-violent action and the Sin pelos en Ia len .gua. WILL THEY DEBATE? Yes, the sin pelos en Ia lengua debate between New York Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez and Institute for Puerto Rican Policy Executive Director Angelo Falc6n is becoming a reality. As reported here a couple of weeks ago, the pair locked cuernos over a Gonzalez column in which he cited a colonial "dependency" mentality as a major cause of the group's problems in New York Falcon called Gonzalez's assessment "a confused piece of junk." Then Gonzalez, responding to a gentle nudge by this column, said he'd be glad to debate the issue. Falc6ri reacted affirmatively , asking us only, "Who am I debating-Juan or his ego?" With that brotherly beginning, New York Newsday reporter Elaine Rivera has gained a commitment from the New York/New England regional representatives of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists to organize the shoWdown . But, all parties agree, once the "dependency" issue is aired, the debaters should turn the discussion to what New York's Puerto Rican leadership must do to help the community gain its deserved place and voice. Arriba y adelante ... WILL CISNEROS RETURN? If you're still wondering whether destructive impotence of violent reprisal. . . The plight of your people and ours is so grave that we all desperately need the inspiring example and effective leadership you have given. .. Non-violence is often resistance, but never passivity . King, Chavez and Huerta show in their lives that non-violence is only for the very strong. Only active, disciplined, intelligent non-violence can resist the weight of institutional violence that characterizes farm workers' lives. More than two million farm workers live at the mercy of a multibillion dollar industry. The majority of workers and their families suffer employment uncertainty, bad housing, poor or no medical care, lack of education and opportunities-and exposure to pesticides. Yet at stake is the possibility of birth defects, cancer and poisoning among farm workers. Since 1984, in McFarland, Calif . , the heart of one of the world's richest agricultural areas, five children have developed some form of cancer and six more have died. There are documented cases in that area of severe birth defects among children born to parents who harvest table grapes. At least four people have been shot by police or company security guards while voting at a union election or picketing. Are the perpetrators deranged? Or are these tragic actions part of something more than insidious and difficult to eradicate? Chavez answers : There have been too many accidents in the fields, on trucks, under machines, in buses, and through the indiscriminate use of pesticides. People ask me if they are deliberate , and they are, in the sense that they are the direct result of a system which treats workers like agricultural implements, not human beings The history of the union is the history of a non-violent movement that goes beyond immediate gains in the field of labor, calling us all to a new understanding . Howard Brinton, a Quaker writing in the midst of World War II, could see that the transforming power of non violence could not be swift. " Narrow is (the non-violent) way , fraught with many possibilities of defeat, yet also with the opportunity for a far greater victory." The union struggles for itself . It also struggles for you and me . Its banners proclaim," iHasta Ia Victoria! " (Aurora Camacho de Schmidt works for the American Friends Service Committee in Philadelphia.) Henry Cisneros' extramarital misadventure will cause irreparable damage to his career in public service, hear this: • The same daythe .. 41yearolcfSan Antonio mayor admitted his affection for campaign fund-raiser Linda Medlar, 39, a Latina conference on family values was kicking off in his city. And the first time his name was mentioned from the rostrum , the audience broke into rousing applause. • That night in Denver , Cisneros kept a commitment to participate in a fund-raiser for Mayor Federico Peiia and was given a standing ovation. • A poll conducted by the Ft. Worth Star Telegram and WFAA TV a few days later (a ' nd released Oct. 30) showed Cisneros' popularity as a 1990 Texas gubernatorial candidate greater than that of either state Atty. Gen . Jim Mattox or Treasurer Ann Richards, two likely Democratic aspirants for the office. Fifty-four percent of the Texans questioned had a favorable opinion of him. Ony 15% viewed him unfavorably. WHO HAS CLOUT? Maybe Juan Gonzalez and/or Angelo Falc6n can interpret it for us: A breakdown of the "100 lnfluentials" saluted in this month's Hispanic Business magazine shows that among Cubans so identified, 92% were male, 8% female ; among Mexican Americans it was 64% male, 36% female; and among Puerto Ricans, it was only46% male vs . 54% female . Kay Barbaro Nov . 7,1988 1-tispanic Link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING H I SPANIC SURVEY: A 29-page survey of Hispanic attitudes in economi c s , politics, education and culture offers a breakdown for eac h question by age, gender, income and educational level, language pr efere nce and voting status. The survey is available free of charge b y contac t i ng Joe Trevino , Fleishman-Hillard Research, 1301 Con necti cut Ave . NW, Washington, D . C . 20036 (202) 659-0330. LAWYERS' FEES: " The Cost of Personal Legal Services" says that consumers can save considerable money on legal bills by careful shopping and being willing to negotiate. It says the average discounted hourly rate is $67. For a copy of the 52-page report, send $13 to Na tional Resource Center fo r Consumers of Legal Services , Indepen dence Square, 124-D E . Broad St. , Falls Church, Va. 22046 (703)5368700. AIDSANDTHE THIRDWORLD:The 1988-89 edition of"AIDSand t h e Third World " looks at the spread of AIDS cases on a country-by country basis . Among other things, the report says that AIDS is now spread primarily by heterosexuals. For a copy of the 194-page book. send $ 9 .50 to the Panos Institute, 1409 King St., Alexandria, Va. STUDENT, PARENT MOTIVATIONAL BOOKLETS: "15 Motivational Boo k lets for S tudents and Parents" is an 11-page guide that contains a listing o f bilingual aids to help students and parents get the most out of the educational system. For a free copy, send a self-addressed label to Moreno Educational Co., P . O . Bo x 19329, San Diego, Calif. 92119 (619) 461-0565. LAT INO INFLUENTIALS : The November issue of Hispanic Business magazine lists 100 Latino influentials and reports on how some of t h e m f ee l o n the issues of the day. For a copy send $2 to HB , 360 S . H o p e St. , Suite 300C, Santa Barbara, Calif. 931 05 (805) 682-5843. CONSTITUTION BICENTENNIAL MATERIALS : Bilingual versions of t h e National Anthem, the Pledge of Allegiance, the American ' s C r e ed , the Mayflower Compact, the Declaration of Independence, t h e Gettysburg Address and the U.S . Constitution are available as a package for $5.95. To order (specify stock #28-01) send a check or m o n e y order to Bicentennial Commeratives, 808 17th St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20006. COLLEG E FINANCIAL AID LIST: " Some Financial Aid Resources fo r U . S . Hispanic / Latino Undergraduate Students, 1988-89" is available for free from the University of California ' s Office of Hispanic Programs, College of Letters, Arts and Sciences. To receive a copy, send a self addressed , stamped envelope to Samuel Mark. director, LAS Hispanic P rogra ms , USC , 727 W. 27th St. , Los Angeles, Calif . 90007 (213) 7430977. PUERTO RICAN WOMEN Washington , D . C . Nov . 11 CONNECTING WHITE HOUSE FELLOWS SOUGHT The White House has put out a call for applicants for its 1989-90 fellowship program . The yearlong program gives exceptional people from all walks of life a chance to participate in the executive branch of the government and learn about policy-making. Some 11 to 19 fellows will be selected for the highly competitive program , which runs from Sept. 1, 1989, to Aug . 31,1990. Although there are no educational requirements or particular professions emphasized, the 24-year-old program's fellows have all been in the early stages of their careers and involved in their communities. Pay, commensurate with fellow's education and experi ence, can reach $58,000. Deadline for the program is Dec. 15, 1988. Brochures and applications can be obtained by contacting the Presidenfs Commission of White House Fellowships, 712 Jackson Place NW, Washington, D . C . 20503 (202) 395-4522. MALDEF TO TARGET UNDERCOUNT In February the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund will kick off its national initiative to encourage more Hispanics to participate in the 1990 census. Called "iHagase contar!-Make Yourself Count!, " the initiative will enlist the support of national Hispanic groups, community-based organizations, churches and groups that serve the immigrant population in particular . MALDEF also plans to run public service announcements on Spanish-language TV, radio and publications. Currently, the outreach effort has coordinators in California and the Midwest. It seeks to have one in Texas also . Arturo Vargas, the program ' s national coordinator, said he is hopeful the program will lower the Hispanic undercount, now said to be 4-7%, to that of the general population, 1%. To become involved contact Vargas at MALDEF, 1990 Census Program , 634 S . Spring St., 11th Floor, Los Angeles, Calif. 90014 (213) 629-2512. ENGLISH CLASSES, MEMBERSHIP SURVEY . The Montgomery County, Md., public libraries are offering free English classes this month and next for foreign-born persons. Two of the three libraries (Twinbrook. Nell Marshall (301) 279-1980; Long Branch , Judy Horowitz 565-741 0) will offer five sessions. The other (Kensington Park. Paulette Burt 897-001 0) is offering seven sessions. .. The Eugene and Agnes Meyer Foundation awards the Metropolitan Washington Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies $5,000 to support its Latino Leadership Institute. . . TRADE SHOW AND EXPO Hispanic Business Calendar THIS WEEK GALA RECEPTION W as hin g t o n , D .C. N o v . 9 The Mu l t i c ul t ur a l Int ern Pr o gram , an al t ern a t i ve hig h sch ool for imm ig rant youth, will hold a gala fund-r a i ser . P r oceeds from this rec e ption will be u se d fo r sc h o larsh ips. " Hispanic Women and Health : Taking Charge " is the name of the conference to be he l d by the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women. A primary goal is to provide leaders with ways to help promote c hange within their own communities. Subjects to be addressed by speakers and panelists include teen-age pregnancy, AIDS and a c cess to health care . New York Nov . 15-18 Diana Cas t ro (805 ) 682-5843 THE FAMILY AND LITERACY Immaculata College Bicultural / Bilingual Studies Master's Prog r am Immaculata , Pa. Nov . 16 Emily Kirsch (215) 647-4400 Maria Tukeva (202) 6733 5 5 1 LAT I NA DINNER Chicago Nov. 10 Mu j e r es Latinas En Acci 6 n will hold its annual dinn e r . I t w ill i n c lud e e ntertainment by the Clem e nte Stee l B a nd . Mary Gonzalez-Koenig , executive director of t h e Spa ni s h C oa l i ti o n , an employment training program, wi ll give th e keynote speech. A l icia Ama d o r (31 2) 226-1544 Hi s p a nic Link Weekl y Report J . Freyre (305) 866-1353 COMING SOON SPANISH PATHWAYS IN FLORIDA Florida Endowment for the Humanities Tampa , Fla Nov. 14 Gary Mormino (813 ) 272-3473 WOMEN'S LUNCHEON The National Council of Hispanic Women Washington , D . C . Nov. 14 Maria Elena Diago (202) 566-9068 Nov . 7 ,1988 SPOTLIGHT HISPANICS IN THE INDEPENDENT SECTOR: The Inst itute of Non-Prof i t Organization Management will hold a conference in San Francisco , Nov . 14-16. It focuses on the role of Hispanic non-profit zations in helpi ng further the cause of Latinos, the historical development of these organizations and the i r roles in contemporary soc iety. Speakers will also address management of Hispanic non-profit organizations, religious and social action movements. For more information call Michael 0 ' Neill at (415) 666-6867. 5

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6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT CHAIRMAN EL CAMINO COMMUNITY COLLEGE DISTRICT Southwest Texas State University of San Marcos, Texas invites applications or nominations for the position of Chair of the Department of Psychology. Applicants should qualify for a tenurable appointment at the rank of associate professor or professor, should show evidence of leadership and provide evidence of substantial achievement in teaching and research, as well as skills at interpersonal communication, program development and resource procurement. Invites applications for Full-Time Instructor of Accounting. Applicants must be qualified to teach any of the Accounting courses offered by the College and have at least one area of speciali zation, i.e. Computer Applications in Account ing, Income Taxation, Intermediate Accounting . Applicants must hold or qualify for a valid California Community College Instructor Cre dential in appropriate subject and have a Master's degree in Accounting or Business with major course work in Accounting . Pro ficiency with computers required. Area of specialization is not a major consideration. The appointment will be effective September 1, 1989, and it is a 12-month appointment. Southwest Texas State University enrolls approximately 20,000 students. The Department of Psychology enrolls approximately 4,000 students per semester with over 600 majors. The faculty includes 18 full-time and 7 part-time members. A master's level program is under consideration . Applicants should submit a complete resume with a cover letter, a one-page statement of leadership philosophy, and at least three references to Dr. Karen Brown, Chair , Search Committee, Institute of Social Work, Southwest Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666. COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BEFORE JANUARY 15, 1989. Contract shall begin February 6, 1989. Evening hours may be required. Application deadline: December 2, 1988. Southwest Texas State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. FELLOWSHIPS The Southwest Hispanic Research Institute at the University of New Mexico announces the availability of two humanities residency fellowships for the -1989 academic year. The fellowships are made possible by a grant from the Rockefeller Foundation and provide for a $30,000 stipend plus $3,000 toward relocation costs and other benefits. Interested scholars are Invited to submit research pro pose Is on Issues critical to an understanding of the HispaniC/Chicano experience In the context of the changing Southwest Eligibility criteria Include an awarded doctorate In the humanities or related social sciences and ability to devote full time to a research proJect during the residency period. For propose! guidelines write to Southwest Hispanic Re search Institute, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131. EMPLEADOS OUBERNAMENTALES GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES You can ensure that your contribution goes to the Hispanic organization that will maximize your Sis impact on your community. NA TIONAL IMAGE INC. has pledged that all funds received will be used to"Promote the health and welfare of His panics," particularly, decrease the high school dropout rates, unem ployment, ethnic and sexual discrimi nation, and to provide training on how to successfully navigate the Federal employment system. NATIONAL IMAGE INC. helped over3,000 Hispanics last year through training, scholar ships, and amnesty assistance. Target your Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) code contribution to NATIONAL IMAGE, INC., 20 F Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20001. For membership information please call Ms. Aurora Mojica, Executive Director, at (202) 737. BILINGUAL SECRETARY Need excellent Spanish and English. Salary commensurate with experience. Range $15,000-$22,000. Washington, D.C., public relations firm dealing in international trade, politics and business communications. Call Jeff Keffer (202) 3280880. For district application and instruction apply to: El Camino Community College Personnel Service 16007 Crenshaw Blvd. Torrance, Calif . . 90506 (213) 715-3477 ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT FOR RESEARCH AND GRADUATE DEAN The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at El Paso invites applications and nominations for the position of Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean. The position will report to the Vice President for Academic Affairs. The Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean will be responsible for representing the University to federal, state, and private funding sources and for the operation and supervision of the Office of Sponsored Projects and the Graduate School. A major responsibility will be to develop institutional proposals and identify appropriate funding sources to increase institutional and faculty extramural funding. The successful candidate will also provide vigorous leadership in the development of new graduate offerings and strengthening existing offerings. Applicants are expected to have an earned doctorate, academic and research administrative experience, a strong record of scholarly achievement, a record of obtaining research funding, strong written and oral communications skills and be eligible for appointment as a full professor in an appropriate academic department. With over 15,000 students, the University of Texas at El Paso is the largest public institution on the United States-Mexico border and it is the second oldest component ofthe UT System . The bicultural region of El Paso and Juarez offers a mild southwestern climate as well as unique cultural, business, research and educational opportunities. The University is seeking to continue its commitment to enhance these opportunities to provide expanded educational programs to its culturally diverse constituency. Serving a metropolitan population of 1 . 5 million people, UT El Paso offers a wide variety of both baccalaureate and master's programs in six academic colleges and the graduate school. The University has an established doctoral program in Geological Sciences, and approval has beensoughtfortwo additional doctoral programs. Applications and nominations will be accepted until December 15, 1988. A starting date of June 1, 1989 is anticipated. The University offers a competitive salary and benefits package . A letter of application, curriculum vitae, and the names of five references should be sent Dr. Donald E. Moss, Chairman, Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Dean Search Committee do Office of the President The University of Texas at El Paso 500 University Avenue El Paso, Texas 79968 Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer . Nov. 7, 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DALLAS WATER UTILITIES DIRECTOR OF WATER UTILITIES The City of Dallas ' Water Utilities is currently seeking qualified applicants to fill the position of Director of Water Utilities. This position is involved in the development and control of water and wastewater services provided by the City. Responsibilities include the develop ment of water resources, establishment of rate schedules, determining sales of water to other c ities, maintenance of the wastewater system and establishment and maintenance of the water utilities networks system. Qualified applicants must have a Bachelor's Degree in Engineering and registration as a Professional Engineer. A graduate degree is preferred. Qualified applicants should have 10 or more years experience working with all phases of municipal water and wastewater systems. Salary range is $54,602 to $87,400 de pending upon education and experience. Submit a resume by Friday, December 2, 1988 to: Staffing Manager , Personnel Depart ment, 1 500 Marilla City Hall , Room 6AN, Dallas, Texas 75201 . EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES ASSISTANT DIRECTOR The City of Dallas is currently seeking qualified candidates for the position of As sistant Director of Housing and Neighbor hood Services. This position is responsible for representing the department in Neighbor hood Services as well as administering environmental codes which regulate neighborhood quality and housing safety. Qualified applicants must have a Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration, Public Administration, or a related field with a minimum of six years experience. Program Management Computer Information Systems experience is desirable. A Master's Degree is preferred . Must also demonstrate oral and written com munication skills. Saiary range is $41 . 041 to $54,268 de pending upon education and experience. Individuals interested in this position should submit a resume by November 25, 1988 to: Staffing Manager, Personnel Department, 1500 Marilla City Hall, Room 6AN Dallas , Texas 75201. EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M!F/H RIO HONDO COLLEGE has an opening for ... MULTICULTURAL CENTER DIRECTOR A 10-month position, funded from a Title Ill Grant. This opening requires a master's degree in a discipline contributing to understanding cultural diversity and prior experience which would contribute to success of a Multicultural Center. Ph . D . and two years postsecondary teaching preferred For information/application, contact Jean (213) 692 ext. 309. Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whittier, Calif. 90608 Hi spanic L ink Weekl y R eport UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, DAVIS TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY University of California, Davis . The College of Letters and Science invites applications for an Assistant Professor Ill, in the sociology of development, effective July, 1989. This is a tenure-track position. Areas of research specialization could include women and international development, international organization, the sociology of agriculture, zation and development in the Third World , or economic development and social change. Teaching responsibilities include a graduate course in development planning in the International Agriculture Development program . Employment or research expertise in a developing country is desirable. Ph.D. is required. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology. To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: Lyn Lofland , Chair, Development Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis, California 95616. Applications must be postmarked January 1, 1989 or earlier to be considered. The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. TENURE-TRACK POSITION IN SOCIOLOGY The University of California, Davis. The College of Letters and Science invites applications for a sociologist with an emerging or established reputation for quantitative research and publication and a strong commitment to teaching. The level of appointment may be at the Assistant or Associate Professor levels . A Ph.D . is required. It is desired that field of specialization be in one of the following areas: Gender and family, sociology of organization , economic sociology, historical, comparative sociology, international political economy, or poverty and social welfare. The position is reserved for someone actively engaged in quantitative research and able to regularly participate in teaching a graduate-level sequence in methods and statistics. The appointment will be in the Department of Sociology. To apply, send curriculum vitae, letter of application, and the names of three references whom we may contact for letters of recommendation to: James Cramer, Chair, Quantitative Search Committee, Sociology Department, University of California, Davis , Calif. 95616. Applications must be postmarked by January 10, 1989 or earlier to be considered. The University of California is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. FACUL TV POSITIONS: CAUFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY SACRAMENTO DIVISION OF SOCIAL WORK TWO TENURE TRACK, 9-MONTH POSITIONS AssistanVAssociate Professor Begin Fall1989. MSW required . Doctorate in social work, related field or ABO preferred . Health Potential skills in teaching and direct practice experience in health settings with the aged. Mental Health-. Post-master's experience in clinical work and potential in teaching direct practice with children and families desirable. Minorities and women are especially encouraged to apply for both positions. Salary range : $30,252-$39,960. ONE TENURE TRACK, 12-MONTH POSITION Field Coordinator Begin July 1, 1989. MSW required. Doctorate in Social Work, related field or ABO preferred. Previous social work field practicum coor dination, program experience required and knowledge of community resources. Salary range : $31,680-$48,204. Send vitae by March 15, 1989 (apply for each position_sep_ arately) to: _ Ronald P . Boltz , Director Division of Social Work California State Ufliversity, 'Sacramento Sacramento, California 95819 DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to : Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. Ordered by Organization Street -------------DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) City , State & Zip -----------$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ____ _ _ _ _ _ 7

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Arts & Entertainment who shares his screenwriting Oscar for La historia oticial. Another problem arose when actor Burt Lancaster, who had been set to play the title role (based on the life of U.S. journalist Ambrose Bierce), was replaced by Gregory Peck. In a lawsuit Lancaster claims that he was fired because of the studio's inability to insure h1m because of his age . 'GRINGO' MOVES: The much-awaited release of the film Old Gringo has been postponed a year, it was announced recently. The announcement was made late last month by Dawn Steel, president of Columbia Pictures, and Jane Fonda, the film's star. Claiming the film ' s post-production won't be completed until early next year, the studio slated Old Gringo's release for the fall1989. Aside from Fonda and Peck, Old Gringo stars Puerto Rican actor Jimmy Smits in the role of a Mexican revolutionary . Production of the film, based on the novel Gringo Viejo by Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes, has been plagued by controversy from the beginning. Fonda, who is producing the film under the Fonda Films banner, has reportedly been associated with the project since Fuentes began writing the book eight years ago. In other film items, Juan Jose Jusid's film Made in Argentina has been announced as . the winner in the Feature Length category of the first National Latino Film and Video Festival , which begins next week in New York. . . Actor Anthony Quinn is now in the Mexican city of Durango filming Vengeance, which is expected to be released here next year ... ONE LINER: Federico Garcia Lorca's drama Blood Wedding, which last month closed the Great Lakes Theater Festival in Cleveland, opens at San Diego's Old Globe Theatre Nov . 9. The production is a new adaptation by GL TF artistic director Gerald Freedman, who co directs with Argentine choreographer Graciela Daniele ... Luis Valdez had originally been picked to write the film's screenplay, but the writer and director of La Bamba removed himself from the project citing differences over his first draft. Argentina's Luis Puenzo , who reportedly has said he didn't know much about Mexican culture, was picked to direct. He co-wrote the screenplay with Aida Bortnik, Media Report WRITERS PROJECT: The Education Writers Association is accepting applications from reporters or writers in 20 cities, including Albuquerque, N . M.,San Antonio, Los Miami, Tucson, Ariz., and the Washington, D.C., area, to cover school programs for dis advantaged urban youth as part of a two-year project meant to increase media coverage of effective programs . The stories would appear in a periodical that is published five times a year and sent to 10,000. education professionals, reporters, libraries and community groups . Writers would work on a part-time, free-lance basis. For more information, contact Lisa Walker, EWA, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW,Suite310, Washington, D .C. 20036 (202) 429-9680. ESCALANTE BIOGRAPHY: A biography of Jaime Escalante written by Jay Mathews, Los Angeles bureau chief for The Washington HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-Q280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez RePorting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danyl Lynette Figueroa. Sophia Nieves. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 Issues): InstitutionS/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 Post, will be released Nov. 28 by Henry Holt and Company of New York. Mathews has been following Escalante since 1982, when he read in the Los Angeles Times that the Bolivian teacher had inspired 18 students at predominantly Latino Garfield High School to pass the advanced placement test in calculus. An excerpt of the book, titled "Escalante, The Best Teacher in America," will run in the Nov . 20 issue of the Los Angeles Times magazine . Reader's Digest will carry a con densed version of it in its January issue. A Spanish-language editiori of Reader's Digest will be available in March. For a copy send $2.25 plus postage and handling to Reader's Digest, Latino America, 2655 LeJeune Road, Suite 301, Coral Gables, Fla . 33134. 100 INFLUENTIAL HISPANICS: Hispanic Business magazine carries its annual discus sion of the most pressing issues of the day with 100 of the nation's most influential Latinos in its November issue. The Hispanic leaders were selected from diverse fields . The magazine is also sponsoring Nov. 1 5--Antonio Mejias-Rentas 18 in New York a media and marketing conference. Editor/Publisher Jesus Chavarria said the focus of the Se Habla Espafwl conference will be to assist companies interested in marketing to the Hispanic consumer. Contact Steve Crandell at (805) 682-5843. NOTABLE: Los Angeles Times reporter Marita Hernandez and local TV station KNBC were presented outstanding journalism awards from the Los Angeles chapter of the California Chicano News Media Association for cover age related to the Immigration Reform and Control Act. . . Juan Gonzalez , New York Daily News columnist, and John Garcia, for merly a reporter with Gannetfs Westchester Newspapers, won first place awards from the New York State Associated Press As sociation. Gonzalez won for his column writing for a newspaper with a circulation over 150,000 . Garcia , now New York bureau chief for Vista magazine, won in the in-depth reporting cate gory at a newspaper with a circulation between 50,000 and 150,000. Darryl Lynette Figueroa Hispanic Link Weekly Report