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Hispanic link weekly report, November 14, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 14, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
United Farm Workers President Cesar Chdvez leaves a Bakersfield, Calif., hospital after receiving treatment for a fractured right wrist, bruised back, chest and head he incurred when he fell eight feet from his home porch in Keene... Puerto Rico’s Father Varela Association, a group of Cubans living in the island, gives to Miami Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman the Order of the Father Varela award for his work on behalf of incarcerated Mariel refugees. . . Valerie Wilson, the daughter of retired New York City police detective Rafael Rodriguez, says she will not cooperate with the Queens district attorney’s investigation of her complaint of being sexually abused and racially harassed by police officers while the district attorney decides whether to prosecute her for the same incident. The officers claim she
REC'D. HR/Ut
NOV 1 4 1983
assaulted them and resisted arrest.. .TV personality/journalist Geraldo Rivera undergoes surgery on his nose after having it broken during the taping of a show with white supremacists. Rivera was hit with a chair during a melee. . . Conan Owen, a Honduran-American resident of Annandale, Va., arrives in New York after spending 20 months in a Spanish prison for a crime U.S. officials say he did not commit. Owen, 24, awaits a parole hearing on a cocaine smuggling charge... The Associated Press names Oakland A’s outfielder Jose Canseco, the first player ever to hit 40 home runs and steal 40 bases in one season, as its player of the year... Californian Robin Ventura, a member of this year's Olympic gold medal baseball team, wins the Golden Spikes Award. The award goes to the top amateur baseball player...

Despite State Victories, U.& English Future Cloudy
HOW THEY VOTED
Here’s how voters cast their ballots on Official-English initiatives:
ARIZONA
Proposition 106 bans nearly all use of languages other than English at all levels of government, calls for “all reasonable steps to preserve, protect and enhance the role of the English language,” and allows individuals to sue to enforce the measure.
YES 580,830 50.5%
NO 569,993 49.5%
COLORADO
Constitutional Amendment No. 1: English is the official language of the state of Colorado. YES 733,930 60.6%
NO 476,362 39.4%
FLORIDA
Constitutional Amendment No. 11: English is the official language of the state of Florida. YES 3,346,451 83.7%
NO 652,112 16.3%
11 -State Exit Poll Taken
Hispanic support was 77.8% for Michael Dukakis in 11 Midwestern and Eastern states on Nov. 8, according to the head of the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration and Education Project.
exit poll of3,500 Hispanics, said the percentage of support was the highest since Hubert Humphrey ran for the presidency in 1968.
The Latinos were surveyed in New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Kansas, Pennsylvania and Missouri. Bush polled 18.9%.
CORRECTION
A sentence in guest columnist’s Jim Craw-orcfs Oct 31 piece, “Ideologically, other donors to Tanton’s network run the gamut from Warren Buffett, a billionaire financier whose other philanthropic interests include the nuclear freeze movement and the Pioneer Fund.. was incorrect due to an editing error. Buffett is not connected to the Pioneer Fund.
With the U.S. English victories in Arizona, Colorado and Florida Nov. 8, the number of states throughout the country which have passed official-English referendums increased to 16, but it seems unclear where the group is headed.
According to some observers, the national group’s ability to capitalize on its victories has been hampered by recent disclosures of founder John Tanton, which sparked widespread charges of racism and led President Linda Chavez.
One reflection of this may be the tight race in Arizona, which had been projected to pass Proposition 106 with 65% of the vote. Instead, it flip-flopped throughout the day, finally resting at 50.5%, or 580,000 votes.
Said Perry Baker, a spokesman for the No
Professional and activist Puerto Ricans polled by the New York City-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy felt by a margin of 62.8% to 3.0% that Michael Dukakis would better represent their communities than would George Bush as president, but 29.6% thought neither of the two would guard their interests. The poll was released Nov. 7.
Radio Spots Draw Scrutiny
U.S. Attorney General Dick Thornburgh is continuing an investigation into a GOP Spanish-language advertising campaign in South Texas to determine if the federal Voting Rights Act has been violated.
Thirty-two Justice Department observers were expected to have been on hand at polling places in Hidalgo County on Nov. 8. A Justice Department spokesman said such actions are usually taken when there is “some indication there might be problems at a given location.”
Rep. Jack Brooks (D-Texas) characterized the Republican radio spots, which warned listeners that voting officials would be watching them closely, “as an obvious attempt to hold down overall voter turnout among Spanishspeaking citizens.”
on 106 Committee, “This shows me that this is a fairly confused state. And considering how Republican and conservative it is, (the closeness of the race) shows we were right.” The Arizona law carries specific language.
In Florida the repercussions are vague, but the measure racked up3,346,451, ora whopping 84%, putting the onus for enactment on the state legislature. The highlight there was not the results, but a fracas at the U.S. English victory bash on election night in Miami.
Florida English chairman Mark LaPorta had already shocked supporters by giving a conciliatory message with opposition group head Jon Weber. When LaPorta suggested that an anti-bilingual ordinance in Dade County should be repealed because the amendment had passed, the crowd became enraged. They
It sampled 424 leaders in New York (65.1%) and 23 other states, as well as Puerto Rico (2.5%). A plurality of them, 40.9%, felt neither Bush nor Dukakis would represent the island well. About 36% thought Dukakis would be better than Bush, 4.9%.
The survey indicated that the negative opinion of Bush was based on disapproval of Reagan’s performance as president, 84.5% to 11.2%, while 73.6% said Puerto Ricans as a group were worse off than in 1980. Only 5.5% felt Puerto Ricans were better off.
Of those surveyed, 76.4% had planned to vote for Dukakis compared to 8.8% for Bush.
Also measured were political attitudes related to Puerto Rico. Nearly a third of the community leaders disapproved of Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon’s performance, with 21.7% supportive, the study showed. Forty-four percent preferred independence for the island, 14.1% were satisfied with commonwealth status and 13.8% favored statehood.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
COMPLETE STATE AND CONGRESSIONAL RESULTS Starting on page 4
continued on page 2
30% of P. Ricans Distrust Candidates


Hispanics Make Small Gains in November Elections
The nationwide election Nov. 8 brought few surprises for Latinos. Incumbent Hispanics running in U.S. House of Representatives races retained their seats, but now number 10 voting members- a loss of one-with the retirement of Manuel Lujan (D-N.M.). His position was filled by a non-H is panic.
Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.), dogged in recent months by reported associations with a federal government contracting scandal, emerged unscathed, with 92% of the voters in his Bronx district affirming their support.
In California, Democratic incumbent Matthew Martinez came away with 60% of the vote to retain his House seat over Republican Ralph Ramirez.
There appeared to be slight growth in
Hispanic state house representation. Massachusetts elected its first Hispanic state representative. Connecticut added one Hispanic to its legislature for a total of two.
In state races:
• Marla Sanchez ran unopposed and was elected to a state representative’s seat in Hartford, Conn. Under state law, she will also be allowed to retain her seat on the Hartford school board. Sanchez, 62, was until recently an anomaly in Hartford politics - a Hispanic with political clout.
As a behind-the-scenes “kingmaker,” Sanchez has served on the 53-member Democratic Party town committee for almost 20 years. She is considered largely responsible for the appointment of Hartforcf s first Latino school superintendent 10 years ago.
• Democrat Nelson Merced, 40, became the first Hispanic in the Massachusetts legislature. He won a seat in the newly created 5th District in Suffolk County, which is 40% black, 40% white and 20% Latino.
“I sought to create a multiracial and multiethnic campaign committee,” said Merced, who is executive director of La Alianza Hispana. “The big victory was when I ran against five other candidates in the Democratic primary and I won with 45%.”
• In Oregon, Democrat Rocky Barilla, the
sole Hispanic member in the state legislature, lost 51% - 49% against challenger Gene Derfler. Annabelle Jaramillo, former head of National Image, was defeated in her attempt to unseat incumbent Assemblyman John Schoone. - Sophia Nieves
Groups Planning National Opposition
continued from page 1
surged toward LaPorta and Weber. Pandemonium ensued.
According to Weber, “It created a heightened awareness about the spirit that motivates this movement.” Said LaPorta, who has since apologized for the suggestion, “They lacked decorum, but I breached (political) protocol.”
In Colorado, the official-English amendment, which passed with 61 % of the vote, is effective immediately and supercedes laws to the contrary. “There is speculation all over the place as to what it will do,” said lawyer Ken Padilla.
In Florida opponents will likely move for a rehearing before the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which on Nov. 4 ruled 2-1 that citizens^ initiatives do not have to be circulated in Spnaish in predominantly Hispanic areas.
Weber, executive director of Speak Up Now for Florida, said a new ruling could retroactively invalidate the Nov. 8 vote on the issue.
Appealing to the Colorado Supreme Court is one of the next steps for anti-English only groups there, said Rudolph Schware, of the Colorado chapter of the National Lawyers
The National Hispanic Media Coalition filed petitions with the Federal Communications Commission Nov. 1 to deny license renewals to Los Angeles TV stations KCOP and KCET for failure to hire and promote Latinos adequately. The 32-member organization also challenged the operating license of station KTTV, owned by Rupert Murdoch’s Fox Broadcasting Network, through a newly created company.
It is the first legal action undertaken by the Latino community against Los Angeles TV stations. Licenses for all three expired in September. The stations, channels 13, 28 and 11, will continue to operate pending FCC review.
The coalition based its complaints on comparisons of FCC employment records for 1983 and 1988. Station KCET beefed up its
Guild. “Hell no, we’re not giving up the fight”
In Arizona, legal steps are also being considered, but the groups primarily stressed the need for national opposition. The English Plus Information Clearinghouse will hold a meeting next month in Washington, D.C., at which such a strategy is to be assessed.
Said Arizona co-chairman of No on 106 Tom Espinosa, “We better not play it Arizona, Colorado, etc., but join together and with other ethnic groups to counter... this blossoming of racism at its worst.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Island Politicos Re-elected
Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n was re-elected Nov. 8 to a second four-year term. Also re-elected was Jaime Fuster, the island’s resident commissioner in the U.S. House of Representatives.
Hernandez Colon won 49% of the vote in a three-way race where almost 2 million votes were cast. He received 856,697 votes.
Fuster, also in a three-man contest, carried 50% of the vote, or 850,356. This will be his second term.
staff during that time, from 137 to 253, but the Latino portion increased by only 1.25 percentage points, from 11% to 12.25%, FCC records show.
KCOPs Latino staff increased from 8.51% to 12.63%, but the entire staff of 190 does not include one Latino manager or craftsman. There are 10 Latinos in the professionals category.
Station KTTV increased the number of Latinos in the top four job categories by only 0.63% despite an FCC warning in 1983 that they improve their compliance with equal employment opportunity laws.
Esther Renteria will head Rainbow Broadcasting, a group of Hispanic broadcasters and civic leaders which seeks control of KTTV.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Hispanics Nationwide Prefer Dukakis, 58%
Hispanic voters favored Michael Dukakis by 22 percentage points over George Bush, 58%- 36%, in late October, according to a national poll released Nov. 1 by Univision. Dukakis was particularly favored by Latinas, 62% to 32%, and younger Hispanics, 60% to 36%.
Seventy percent of the 700 registered Latino voters sampled for the poll felt it was time for a change from Reagan policies, with 67% preferring a big government that offers more services to its citizens.
The Univision poll included favorability ratings for each candidate and President Reagan. Its results were:
Favorable Unfavorable
Dukakis 60% 29%
Reagan 58 38
Bentsen 57 19
Bush 46 46
Quayle 21 56
The narrowest margins between Dukakis and Bush were among Hispanic voters over 65 years of age, 53% to 42%, and men, 55% to 40%.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Calif., N.M., Texas Polled
At least 70% of the Latino voters in Texas, California and New Mexico preferred Michael Dukakis over George Bush for president, according to an exit poll conducted night by the Southwest Voter Research Institute.
SVRI’s 240 pollsters found that 82% of the Latinos in Texas voted for Dukakis, 75% in California and 60% in New Mexico.
In Texas, 91% support by Hispanic voters helped re-elect Lloyd Bentsen to the U.S. Senate.
The Institute polled 2,228 Texas Latinos, 1,311 in California and 763 in New Mex'ica The survey is representative of more than 90% of the Latino voters in all three states.
Group Fights Stations’ FCC Renewal
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Lauro F. Cavazos, guest columnist
Education Begins at Home
Once, for almost a whole day, I planned to become a commercial fisherman. Instead, I went to college and then to graduate schools; got bachelor’s and master’s degrees in zoology; and then a Ph.D. in physiology. Later, I became the tenth president of my alma mater. At that time, I was also elected the third president of Texas Tech University and Health Sciences Center.
Why did I take the road to classrooms, research and study instead of the one to wind, weather and water?
Soon after graduation from high school, I had joined the U.S. Army. The day I was discharged, my father met me at the bus depot. Driving through my hometown of Kingsville, Texas, he asked me, “Well, son, what do you want to do with the rest of your life?” I said I liked to fish. Maybe I’d be a commercial fisherman. At that moment, we were passing the local university, Texas A&l.
“Well, maybe tomorrow you should go see the registrar and go to college,” he said.
My father was one reason I went the direction I did. The foreman on the King Ranch, he had the equivalent of a high school education. Another reason was my mother. She had about a third grade education. My parents were not well educated, but they were very wise. They knew the value of education and communicated that to their five children.
My brother became the first Hispanic general in the U.S. Army. He recently retired with four stars. I am the first Hispanic Cabinet member in our nation’s history. My sister and my other two brothers also graduated from college. We have our parents to thank.
And that*s what Hispanic and all otherchildren need today: parents and teachers who care. All the fancy programs, all the federal or private money in the world won’t encourage them - individually- to raise their expectations in life. Education must begin at home.
Sometimes I sense in the Hispanic community a lack of respect for education, at least compared to the respect I knew as a child in South Texas. This is not in keeping with early Spanish tradition which established seven universities in the Americas before Harvard opened its doors.
Today, Hispanics have one of the highest high school dropout rates in the country. By the time they are 18 or 19 years old, nearly 30% of all Hispanic students have dropped out of high school, and in my home state of Texas, 45% drop out.
Recently, I asked the principal of an inner-city high school what reason students give for leaving school. He listed several, but the one that particularly haunts me is that they have not seen any benefit of education in the lives of their own parents. What a tragedy for humankind!
There are solutions for these problems. Students can say no to drugs; that is something within their control. More money can be made available for college scholarships and loans. That is something I - and many others - are working on right now. The key to change, however, is at home.
When I was growing up, there was no TV, and we couldn’t afford a radio. But my father did buy a set of encyclopedias, which we read voraciously. And we made regular trips to the library in town. Parents must read, must insist theirchildren read, and above all, must demand that their children stay in school.
I will never forget the look of pride on my parents’ faces as I accepted my first degree. I had not earned it for them. But they knew that I had earned it because of them. They had inspired me to have something they themselves never did.
Most parents can give their children what my parents gave me. They can say, “Yes, son; yes, daughter, you can be a scientist, a teacher, a lawyer, an artist, a university president. If you have an education, you can be whatever you dare to dream.”
(Lauro F. Cavazos is U.S. Secretary of Education.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
For U.S. Hispanics, the election was lost long before Tuesday.
For us, there could be no winner.
Once we allowed ourselves to believe that we were the “swing vote.” But the real swing vote was made up of folks who are easily frightened by skin color and foreign accents. They were the candidates’ focus.
The year 1988 topped off a politically dirty decade in which Hispanics and blacks were put back in their place. They were told in no uncertain terms that racism and nativism are still alive and well in this nation - and that’s okay with our political leadership.
The Republicans sang songs that made the scaredy-cats and the sickies squeal with fear and delight. The ballad of Willie Horton, with choruses in English-Only, topped the charts.“Please God, keep our nation red, WHITE and blue” got the platinum.
The Democrats, forced by real liberals to let Jesse Jackson do a warm-up act for their big vaudeville show, did absolutely nothing to uplift the campaign or change its tone.
Who did Hispanics really have to choose from?
In a Los Angeles Herald Examiner column last month, Rodolfo Acuna, a longtime leader in Southern California’s Latino community, offered this Tex-Mex bromide about politicians: “Never trust a Mexican who smokes a cigar or a gringo who speaks Spanish.” He followed it with these caricatures of Democrats Dukakis and Bentsen:
Texas millionaire Lloyd Bentsen’s Spanish is excellent because “his family comes from the Rio Grande Valley, where they made their money buying land and working Mexicans cheap.”
He quoted The Texas Observer on Bentsen’s 1970 win over Sen. Ralph Yarborough, the liberal incumbent: “Bentsen owed his victory to his ‘anti-nigger, anti-Mexican, anti-youth sentiments.’ ”
Wrote Acuna: “By choosing Bentsen as his running mate, Dukakis signalled that he would concentrate on Bentsen’s America at the expense of the minorities and the poor.”
Latino writers and broadcasters nationally noted the duo’s failure to embrace the farm worker issues of C6sar Chavez, immigration inequities, or legitimate economic and educational concerns that unite Mexican Americans with fellow U.S. residents of Caribbean and Latin American background. Education is the No. 1 Hispanic issue; our worry, way before thinking of college costs, is getting our kids through an inferior, indifferent, discriminatory public school system.
Acuna’s choice on Nov. 8?
After attacking the Reagan Revolution “for abruptly short-circuiting many Latino gains of the’60s” and confessing, “I surely don’t want to become one of Bush’s little brown ones,” he picked the Democratic team as “the lesser of evils.”
Other Latinos weren’t so forgiving of the Democrats. They stayed home. When you’re not welcome at a party, why go?
The political year 1988 will be remembered by Latinos for reasons other than the presidential vote.
It will be remembered as the year Willie Veldsquez died and Henry Cisneros stumbled. They were our two biggest hopes.
In June, cancer took Velasquez. The Pied Piper of voter registration did more in his 44 years on earth to bring Hispanics into the system than the two major political parties have done in their combined history.
Then last month, coping with a rocky marriage, Cisneros, 41, announced his intention to withdraw from public life until he could put his private life back in order. San Antonio’s mayor since age 33, Cisneros had brought together divisive factions in his city and moved it forward with the kind of statesmanship so lacking in presidential politics this year.
Last week capped a decade of rude disappointments for 20 million U.S. residents who truly want to be full partners in democracy.
May the decade of the’90s treat us all with greater kindness and wisdom.
- Kay Barbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Nov. 14, 1988
3


State Hispanic Election Results Coast to Coast
Non-Hispanic candidates appear with a ’ +' symbol after their names. Incumbents' names are followed by an asterisk *. Political parties are (D) Democrat, (R) Republican, (I) Independent, (L) Liberal, (Al) American Independent, (CAR) Citizens Against Rising Electric Rates, (NA) New Alliance, (RTL) Right to Life and (PBP)
People Before Profits..
All results are unofficial. Any incomplete results have a majority of the precincts reporting. Nl means results were not in.
ARIZONA State Senate District 2
(Conconino, Gila, Mojave, Navajo, Yavapai Counties)
Tony Gabald6n* (D) 26,623 60%
James Lee + (R) 17,865 40%
District 7
(Gila, Pima, Pinal, Santa Cruz Counties)
Pete Rios* (D) 18,142 63%
Mari Gardne + (R) 10,752 37%
District 10
(Pima County)
Jesus Higuera* (D)
District 11
(Pima County)
Jaime Guti6rez* (D)
District 22 (Maricopa County) Manuel Pena* (D) Richard Adams + (R)
Unopposed
Unopposed
9,900 64% 4,785 31%
State House
(Each House district has two representatives.)
Final Results in U.S. House
CALIFORNIA
District 11 (San Mateo County)
Victor Martinez (P&F) 2,804 1%
Tom Lantos*+(D) 138,579 71% G.M. Quraishi-t-(R) 47,032 24%
District 15
(Fresno, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus Counties)
Tony Coelho*+ (D) 111,771 70% Carol Harner + (R) 45,479 28%
Richard Harris+ (L) 3,408 2%
District 25 (Los Angeles County)
Edward Roybal* (D) 80,425 85% Raul Reyes (P&F) 8,300 9%
John Thie + (L) 5,385 6%
District 30 (Los Angeles County)
Matthew Martinez* (D) 69,065 61 % Ralph Ramirez (R) 41,558 36%
Houston Myers + (Al) 2,590 2%
District 34 (Los Angeles County)
Esteban Torres* (D) 88,103 63%
Charles House+ (R) 48,641 35%
COLORADO District 4
(Weld, Larimer Counties)
Charles Vigil (D) 44,133 27%
Hank Brown*+(R) 120,600 73%
CONNECTICUT District 1
(Hartford County)
B. Kennelly*+ (D) 175,259 77%
Mario Robles (R) 51,541 23%
NEW MEXICO District 3
(Santa Fe, San Miguel, other northern counties)
Bill Richardson* (D) 98,637 73%
Cecilia Salazar (R) 36,783 27%
NEW YORK District 18
(Westchester and Bronx Counties) Robert Garcia* (D) 72,808 92%
Fred Brown + (R) 5,679 7%
Daniel Verhoff-i- (C) 729 1%
TEXAS District 15
(Hidalgo, Starr, other southern ‘ counties)
Kika de la Garza* (D) 124,540 95% Gloria Hendrix + (L) 7,061 5%
District 20 (Bexar County)
Henry B.Gonz4lez*(D)Q4,341 72% Lee Trevino (R) 36,701 28%
District 23
(Webb, La Salle, other southern counties)
A. Bustamante* (D) 112,464 66% Jerome Gonzales (R) 58,488 34%
District 26 (Denton, Tarrant Counties)
Jo Ann Reyes (D) 67,626 31%
Dick Armey* + (D) 149,754 69%
District 27
(Nueces, Kleberg, Cameron, Willacy Counties)
Solom6n Ortiz* Unopposed
District 7
(Gila, Pima, Pinal, Santa Cruz Counties)
Richard Pacheco* (D) Unopposed
District 8
(Pima County)
Rub6n Ortega (D) 14,701 29%
Mike Palmer + (D) 14,680 29%
Lloyd Fenn + (R) 10,252 21%
W. Shumaker + (R) 10,333 21%
District 10
(Pima County)
Carmen Cajero* (D) 12,191 42%
Phillip Hubbard (D) 10,257 36%
Greg David + (R) 4,768 17%
LorenzoTorres (PBP) 1,574 5%
District 23
(Maricopa County)
Armando Ruiz* (D) 8,036 34%
Sandra Kennedy*-!- (D) 8,826 37%
Roland Campbell + (R) 3,713 16%
C. Edward Cornell + (R) 2,606 11%
G. Campbell (NA) 538 2%
CALIFORNIA State Senate
District 3
(Marin, San Francisco Counties)
Ron Rodriguez (P&F) 2,206 2%
Milton Marks* + (D) 80,473 60%
Carol Marshall + (R) 49,208 37%
Mark Pickens + (L) 2,235 2%
State Assembly
District 55
(Highland Park, Lincoln Heights, Los
Angeles, Pasadena)
Richard Polanco* (D) 43,011 75%
Evelina Alarc6n (P&F) 8,895 16%
William Wilson + (L) 5,192 9%
District 56
(Bell Gardens, Vernon)
L. Roybal-Allard* (D) 25,515 80%
Axhel Munoz (P&F) • - - 2,092" •J 7%
Stephen Sheldon + (R) 4,388 13%
District 59
Alhambra, Pico Rivera)
Charles Calder6n* (D) 64,820 87%
Steven Pencall + (L) 10,018 13%
District 79
(San Diego)
Pete Chacdn* (D) 50,738 69%
GaryGahn+ (R) 20,109 27%
John Shea + (L) 3,100 4%
COLORADO State Senate
District 18
(Boulder County) Jana M6ndez* (D) 24,927 61%
Robert Wells + (R) District 25 15,968 39%
(Adams County) Bob Martinez* (D) 12,735 53%
District 31 (Denver County) Don Sandoval* (D) 17,329 75%
Christine Vdldez (R) 5,795 25%
State House
District 2 (Denver County) Tony Hernandez* (D) Unopposed
District 3 (Denver County) Phil Hernandez (D) Unopposed
District 4 (Denver County) Don Mares (D) 10,321 74%
John Orr-i- (R) 3,705 26%
District 30 (Adams County) Guillermo De Herrera(D)7,184 51%
Dave Dunnel*+ (R) 6,851 49%
District 31 (Boulder County) Mike Romero (D) 5,893 47%
Faye Fleming*-!- (R) 6,524 53%
District 32 (Adams County) Jeannie Resser*(D) Unopposed
District 42 (Pueblo County) Gil Romero* (D) Unopposed
District 43 (Pueblo County) Juan Trujillo* (D) 8,521 51%
Mike Salas (R) 8,251 49%
CONNECTICUT State Assembly
District 130
(Fairfield County)
Amerigo Santiago (D) 2,621 77%
Roberto Orellano (R) 808 23%
District 6
(Hartford County)
Marla Sdnchez (D) Unopposed
FLORIDA
State Senate
District 33
(Dade County)
Roberto Casas (R) Unopposed
District 40
(Dade County)
Javier Souto (R) 48,836 53%
Dick Anderson + (D) 43,246 47%
State House District 65
(Hillsborough County)
Elvin Martinez* (R) Unopposed
District 99
(Broward County)
Lily Guzm&n* (R) 15,900 37%
4
Nov. 4,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Exclusively from Hispanic Link Weekly Report
District 105
(Dade County)
Alberto GutmSn* (R) Unopposed District 109 (Dade County)
Luis Rojas (R) 14,642 65%
Irene Secada (D) 7,833 35%
District 110
(Dade County)
Lincoln Dfaz Balart* (R) Unopposed
District 111 (Dade County)
Nilo Juri (R) 11,249 70%
Lucy Piniero (D) 4,827 30%
District 112 (Dade County) Carlos Valdes (R) 17,003 73%
Manolo Arques (D) 6,169 27%
District 113 (Dade County) Luis Morse* (R) 13,999 84%
Jos6 Beiter (D) 2,687 16%
District 115 (Dade County) Mario Diaz Ballart (R) Unopposed
ILLINOIS State House
District 9
(Cook County)
Miguel Santiago (D) Unopposed
District 20
(Cook County)
Ben Martinez* (D) 10,584 84%
Fred Ddvila (R) 2,079 16%
INDIANA State House
(Each district has two representatives.)
District 12
(Lake County)
Jesse Villalpando* (D) Unopposed
KANSAS State Senate District 28
(Sedgwick County)
Paul Feliciano* (D) 9,911 55%
Mark Gitzon + (R) 7,956 45%
District 34
(Finney, Gray, Barton, Saline, Ellis Counties)
Frances Garcia (D) Unopposed
District 40
(Wyandotte, Leavenworth Counties) Alfred Ramirez* (R) Unopposed
District 57
(Shawnee County)
Joyce Romero (D) 1,432 33%
George G6mez (R) 2,871 67%
District 96
(Sedgwick County)
Mario Ramos (R) 2,525 38%
George Dean*+ (D) 4,099 62%
MASSACHUSETTS State House
District 5 (Suffolk County) Nelson Merced (D) Althea Garrison + (I) 3,225 1,812 64% 36%
District 2 (Bristol County) John Soto (D) Steve Carroll* + (R) 4,376 10,931 29% 71%
MONTANA
State House
District 87 (Yellowstone County) Jack Ramirez* (R) Unopposed
NEVADA State Assembly
District 28
(Washoe County)
Courtenay Swain* + (D) 3,535 61% Doris George (R) 1,924 35%
Louis Tomburello-t- (L) 229 4%
NEW MEXICO State Senate
District 5
(Rio Arriba County)
Emilio Naranjo* (D) Unopposed
District 6
(Taos, Morea, Sante Fe Counties) Carlos Cisneros* (D) Unopposed
District 9
(Sandoval, McKinley Counties) Dennis Ch&vez (D) Unopposed
District 11
(Bernalillo County)
Tom Benavidez* (D) Unopposed
District 12
(Bernalillo County)
Michael Alarid* (D) Unopposed
District 13
(Bernalillo County)
Tito Chdvez* (D) Unopposed
District 14
(Bernalillo County)
Manny Arag6n* (D) 4,623 60%
Yvonne Rodriguez (R) 3,076 40%
District 23
(Los Alamos, Sandoval Counties) Ernest Aguilar (D) 4,184 24%
Steven Stoddard*-!- (R) 8,822 76%
District 24
(Santa Fe County)
Edward L6pez* (6) Unopposed
District 25
(Santa Fe County)
Rom&n Maes* (D) 9,528 59%
Nancy Applegate + (R) 6,667 41%
District 26
(Bernalillo County)
Martin Chavez (D 7,735 64% Mary Guffey + (R) 4,424 36%
District 28
(Catron, Grant, Socorro Counties) Ben Altamirano* (D) 7,833 65%
Paul Hunter + (R) 4,173 35%
District 29
(Valencia County)
Tony Romo (D) 7,290 49%
Anthony Williams*-!- (R) 7,501 51%
District 30
(Cibola County)
Joseph Fidel (D Unopposed
District 36 (Dona Ana County) Mary Jane Garcia (D) 6,986 56%
Ellen Steele* + (R) 5,416 44%
District 38 (Dona Ana County) Fernando Macias* (D) 6,830 55%
William Ikard + (R) 5,611 45%
State House
District 7 (Cibola County) Toby Michael* (D) Unopposed
District 8 (Valencia County) Fred Luna* (D) 5,159 58%
Melvin C6rdova (R) 3,688 42%
District 10 (Bernalillo County) Henry Saavedra* (D) Unopposed
District 11 (Bernalillo County) Frances Armijo* (D) Unopposed
District 12 (Bernalillo County) Delano Garcia (D) Unopposed
District 13 (Bernalillo County) Daniel Silva* Unopposed
District 14 (Bernalillo County) Frank Lucero (D) 2,494 80%
John Hoffman + (R) 622 20%
District 15 (Bernalillo County) Raymond Sanchez* (D) 4,616 60%
Albert Martinez (R) 3,027 40%
District 16 (Bernalillo County) Ray Vargas* (D) 3,821 72%
Angel Collado (R) 1,502 28%
District 17
(Bernalillo County) Edward S&ndoval* (D)
District 21
(Bernalillo County) Patricia Baca* (R)
District 23 (Bernalillo County) Don Silva* (R)
District 26
(Bernalillo County) Ram6n Huerta* (D) John Lowder + (R)
District 27 (Bernalillo County) Yolanda Apodaca (D) Linda Tytler*+ (R)
District 33 (Dona Ana County) Paul Taylor* (D) Richard Schlater+ (R)
District 34 (Dona Ana County) Ralph Hartman*+ (D) Jimmy Benton (R)
Unopposed
Unopposed
Unopposed
2,919 56% 2,303 44%
2,666 39% 4,171 61%
5,177 59% 1,324 30%
3,148 70% 1,324 30%
District 40
(Rio Arriba, Santa Fe, San Miguel Counties)
Nick Salazar* (D) Unopposed District 41 (Rio Arriba County)
Louis S&nchez* (D) Unopposed
District 42
(Taos County)
Frederick Peralta* (D) Unopposed
District 45
(Santa Fe County)
Angie Vigil-P6rez* (D) 5,232 71%
W. Shrecengost+ (R) 2,179 29%
District 46
(Sante Fe County)
Ben Luj&n* (D) Unopposed
District 48
(Sante Fe County)
Luciano Varela* (D
District 49
(Catron, Socorro, Valencia Coun> ties)
Michael Olguin* (D) 4,883 56%
Hubert Spurgin + (R) 3,426 39%
Howard Hutchinson + (L) 431 5%
District 50
(Valencia, Torrance County)
Phil Martinez (R) 3,561 39%
Gary King* + (D) District 51 5,591 61%
(Otero County) Mariano T6rrez (D) 1,803 47%
L. Scheffield*+ (R) District 52 2,025 53%
(Otero, Lincoln, Sierra County)
Ivan Padilla (D) 3,339 42%
Paul Harrington + (R) 4,661 58%
continued on page 6
5
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Nov. 4,1988


State Hispanic Election Results Coast to Coast
District 58 District 54
(Eddy, Chaves Counties) (Kings County)
B. Perea-Casey* (D) 3,334 60% Henry Betancourt (R) 1,895 13%
Hubert Quintana (R) 2,214 40% Tom Catapano*+ (D) 12,371 87%
District 60 District 65
(Lea County) (New York County)
Joe Trujillo (D) 2,766 46% Robert Santiago (6) 664 2%
Earlene Roberts + (R) 3,197 54% Alex Grannis*+ (D) 30,904 73%
District 63 Yvette Adam + (R) 10,762 25%
(Curry County) District 68
Vincent Gallegos* (D) 2,069 61% (New York County)
Chris S&ndoval (R) 1,296 39% Angelo Del Toro* (D) 20,086 90%
District RK James Boykins + (R) 1,844 8%
(Sandoval, Cibola Counties) Barbara VanRossem + (C) 302 2%
James Madalena* (D) 3,075 63% District 72
Pete Salazar (R) 1,802 37% (New York County)
District RS Bias Miranda (R) 3,941 18%
(San Miguel, Colfax, Mora Counties) John Murtaugh*+ (D) 17,841 82%
E. Kelly Mora* (D) Unopposed District 73
District 70 (Bronx County)
(San Miguel, Guadalupe Counties) Samuel Vigil* (D) 5,290 70% Josd Serrano* (D) Alice Paul + (R) 20,638 1,159 95% 5%
Ted Herburger+ (R) 2,291 30% District 74 (Bronx County)
NEW YORK Hdctor Diaz* (6) Wilfredo Ayala (R) 18,301 2,120 87% 10%
State Senate Michael Walters-)- (C) 628 3%
District 20 (Kings County) Luis Osorio (L)
District 77 (Bronx County)
1,500
Ada Smith + (D) 27,48
District 30
(Bronx, New York Counties) Olga Mdndez* (D) 46,89
Cecilio Diaz (R) 5,67
Benjamin Newmark+ (C) 72
District 32
(Bronx County)
Israel Ruiz* (D) 34,42
Kevin Brawley+ (C) 1,20
District 36
(Westchester County)
State Assembly
District 27
(Queens County)
David Camisa (R)
N. Mayersohn*+ (D)
District 32
(Queens County)
James Morales (C)
E. Abramson*+ (D) Adolphus Frazier + (L
District 51
(Kings County)
James Brennan* (D)
Olga G6mez (C)
District 53
(Kings County)
Vito L6pez* (D)
5% Israel Martinez* (D) 10,629 77%
15% S. Ramos-Alamo (R) 3,112 23%
80% District 79
(Bronx County) Marie Ignarro (R) 5,363 75%
88% G. Friedman*-)- (D) 16,024 75%
11% 1% OREGON
97% State House District 34
39% (Benton, Polk Counties)
Annabelle Jaramillo (D) 6,159 37%
John Schoone*+ (R) 10,560 63%
62% District 31
37% (Marion, Polk Counties)
14% Rocky Barilla* (D) 11,199 49%
Gene Derfler+(R) 11,559 51%
PENNSYLVANIA
8,289 20,404 29% 71% State House District 180
1,037 4% (Philadelphia County) Ralph Acosta* (D) Thomas Malkowski + (R) Nl
18,768 74% Mike Bunk-t- (I)
5,659 22%
RHODE ISLAND
16,777 91% State House
1,654 9% District 46
(Washington County) John Hernandez* (D) Unopposed
Unopposed
TEXAS
Supreme Court, Place 3 Raul Gonzdiez (D) 2,791,160 57% Chas. Howell + (R) 2,018,436 41% Calvin Scholz+(L) 79,207 2%
State Senate
District 14
(Hays, Travis Counties)
G. Barrientos* (D) 160,353 67%
Matt Harnest+(D) 72,576 30%
Gary Johnson + (L) 7,094 3%
District 20
(Brooks, Kenedy, San Patricio, other southern counties)
Carlos Truan* (D) Unopposed
District 26
(Bexar County)
N.G. Garcia (D) 73,691 43%
Kenneth Hendrix + (L) 2,775 2%
Cyndi Krier*+ (R) 93,629 55%
State House District 16
(Montgomery, Harris counties)
Keith Valigura (R) 19,613 55%
Joe Melton* + (D) 15,904 45%
District 23
(Jefferson County)
Frank Collazo* (D Unopposed
District 34
(Nueces County)
Hugo Berlanga* (D) Unopposed
District 35
(Nueces County)
Eddie Cavazos* (D) Unopposed
District 37
(Brooks, Kenedy, Starr, other southern counties)
Irma Rangel* (D) Unopposed
District 39
(Cameron County)
Eddie Lucio* (D) Unopposed
District 40
(Hidalgo County)
Alejandro Moreno* (D) Unopposed
District 41
(Hidalgo County)
Juan Hinojosa* (D) 18,494 66%
Jeff Waguespack + (R) 9,611 34%
District 42
(Hidalgo County)
Renato Cudllar* (D) Unopposed
District 43
(Webb County)
Henry Cudllar* (D) Unopposed
District 51
(Travis County)
Lena Guerrero* (D) 25,305 91%
Thomas Burns + (L) 2,480 9%
District 72
(El Paso County)
Paul Moreno* (D) 11,298 74%
WaltWoelper+ (R) 3,880 26%
District 74
(El Paso County)
Nicol&s Pdrez* (D) 14,848 80%
Jackson Wilbourn + (R) 3,9794 20%
District 115
(Bexar County)
Orlando Garcia* (D) 18,242 93%
Tom Snead + (L) 1,312 7%
District 116
(Bexar County)
Gregory Luna* (D) 21,387 94%
Tom Morefield+(L) 1,424 6%
District 117
(Bexar County)
Frank Madia* (D) Unopposed
District 118
(Bexar County)
Ciro Rodriguez* (D) 18,479 94%
B. Warren Harrison + (L) 1,177 6%
District 124
(Bexar County)
Dan Morales* (D) 27,126 94%
Ron Dodson + (L) 1,766 6%
District 143
(Harris County)
Albert Luna* (D) Unopposed
District 148
(Harris County)
Romdn Martinez* (D) Unopposed
State Board of Ed. District 1
(West-Southwest Texas)
Rend Nufiez(D) Unopposed
District 2
(South Texas)
Mary Berlanga* (D) 167,921 62%
F. Boatright + (R) 103,343 38%
District 3
(South Texas)
Esteban Sosa (D) 146,419 59%
Mary Williamson + (R) 98,284 39%
WASHINGTON
State House
District 11
(King County)
Margarita Prentice* (D) 18,179 58% Mike Sweeney + (R) 13,156 42%
THANK YOU
The staff of Hispanic Link Weekly Report would like to thankall those people and groups that helped it obtain the election results presented in this week’s issue. Foremost among those indispensable helpers was the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
6
Nov. 14, 1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


DIRECTOR OF CHICANO STUDIES
FACULTY OPENINGS
The University of Texas at El Paso
The University of Texas at El Paso seeks candidates for the position of Director of the Chicano Studies Program with a joint faculty appointment in an academic department. Rank and salary are open and commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Required qualifications: Earned doctorate in liberal arts, science, education, nursing and/or allied health, business, and engineering; strong record of teaching, scholarly activity, and administrative experience; ability to work with various academic units and community groups; fluent in Spanish and knowledgeable of the demographics of the Chicano population.
Duties: Responsible for course and program development; initiates and coordinates research and publication efforts; organizes lecture series and cultural performances, often in collaboration with community organizations and regional universities; teaching and student advising; the director reports directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Chicano Studies offers an interdisciplinary BA and selected minor areas of academic concentration. The program facilitates research, publications, and cultural services of importance to the Chicano community.
The position is available after June 1,1989. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and publication samples must be submitted by December 7, 1988 to:
Dennis J. Bixler-M&rquez, Chicano Studies Director Search Committee, Chicano Studies Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0563
Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer.
EDITOR/JOURNALIST/
RESEARCHER
BILINGUAL
(ENGLISH/SPANISH)
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST
Small, busy office in downtown Washington, D.C. seeks responsible "front desk" individual to answer phones and perform general office duties. Excellent phone skills; written and verbal skills in English and Spanish; excellent typing skills; IBM/pc experience. Must be able to work under pressure and maintain composure. EOE. Non-Smoker. $16,000.
PLEASE NO TELEPHONE CALLS OR VISITS. Send resumes to 1000 16th St. NW, #504, Washington, D.C. 20036.
STATEWIDE CONFERENCE ON THE
RETENTION OF MINORITY STUDENTS:
SETTING THE OHIO AGENDA FOR THE 21ST CENTURY
January 10-11,1989 Columbus, Ohio
Keynote Speakers Vincent Tinto Elsa Nunez-Wormack
Sponsored by The Ohio State University Office of Student Life University College
For more information contact: The Ohio State University Department of Conferences & Institutes P.O. Box 21878 Columbus, Ohio 43221 _______(614) 292-8571_____
Need bilingual editor-journalist-researcher preferably knowledgeable about Mexico. Resume . Mexico-United States Institute, 50 E St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY
Eastern Michigan University seeks applicants for Fall 1989 for two tenure-track Assistant Professor positions in the following:
PHILOSOPHY: (FA8037) -- to teach introductory and advanced philosophy courses (concentration in recent European thought, post- structuralism Hermeneutics, etc. desired). Application deadline January 15,1989.
HISTORY: (FA8038) -* to teach British history and introductory 20th century world history. Application deadline January 30,1989.
Qualifications: both of the above require a Ph.D. prior to hire date in specialization; and college/university level teaching experience in specific discipline. A commitment to excellence in teaching and advising students and doing research and committee work essential.
To apply (note dates on each), send letter of interest, detailed resume with 3 references to: Chair-Search Committee, Position FA80___, 310 King Hall, EAST-
ERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197.
We take pride in the pursuit of our affirmative action objectives and encourage qualified women and minorities to consider this opportunity. Multicultural experience desired.
Girl Scouts of The U.S.A. has the following job opportunities:
PERSONNEL CONSULTANTS
Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the areas of AA/EOE planning, performance management, recruitment, legislation, etc...Candidate should have at least 3-5 years solid generalist background, ability to train & interface with all levels of management. Travel approx. 40-50%. Salary $30’s.
MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS
Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the total management function, including needs identification and problem solving. Candidates should have at least 5 years broad management experience, knowledge of strategic & tactical planning, financial operations and fund development. Travel approx. 75%. Salary to $40’s.
For immediate consideration, send resume’ to:
Janice Jacobs, Senior Employment Specialist, Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., 830 Third Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10016
AA/EOE M/F/H/V
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by _ Organization Street_______
City, State & Zip.
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
7


COLLECTING
HISPANIC POVERTY: “Shortchanged: Recent Developments in Hispanic Poverty, Income and Employment” is a 40-page report looking at these three areas between 1978 and 1987. To obtain a copy, send a check for $6 to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 236 Massachusetts Avenue NE, Suite 306, Washington, D.C. 20002.
STUDENTS’ DEFINITION OF SUCCESS: “High School and Beyond” is a study that found that most students felt job success is more important than making lots of money. For a free copy of the report, contact the National Center for Education Statistics, Education Department, 565 New Jersey Ave. NW, Room 300, Washington, D.C. 20208 (202) 357-6828.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
THE SPANISH IN FLORIDA Tampa, Fla. Nov. 14
This program, sponsored by the Florida Endowment for the Arts to mark the quincentenary of Columbus’ arrival to North America, will include presentations about the fi rst Spaniards and the mark they left. This will also be the first step for a traveling Columbus exhibit.
Gary Mormino (813) 272-3473
THE INDEPENDENT SECTOR San Francisco Nov. 14-16 The Institute of Non-Profit Organization Management will hold a conference designed to focus on the role of Hispanic non-profit organizations in helping further the cause of Latinos. Among the topics to be considered are the historical development of these organizations and their roles in contemporary society.
Michael O’ Neill (415) 666-6867
EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY POLITICS . New York Nov. 15
Panel discussions on education’s role in community empowerment will be held as part of Puerto Rican Heritage Month. Speakers include Diana Caballero of the Puerto Rican and Latino Education Roundtable and Julio Rivera of ASPIRA, an education advocacy group.
Carlos Sanabria (212) 772-5689 TRADE SHOW AND EXPO
New York Nov. 15-18
A three-part conference sponsored by Hispanic Business magazine on marketing to the U.S. Hispanic consumerwill include seminars, a media expo and an awards banquet Information will be available on advertising techniques and marketing strategies. Diana Castro (805) 682-5843
SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER Los Angeles Nov. 16
The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will hold a fund-raising dinner. Money raised will be used to further the education of Hispanic graduate and undergraduate students throughout the country. Mary Brooks (818) 448-6797
THE FAMILY AND LITERACY Immaculata, Pa. Nov. 16
Immaculata College Bicultural/Bilingual Studies Master’s Program will sponsor a colloquium on the family’s role in developing literacy. Jose Silva, director of the Center for Family Literacy in Perth Amboy, N.J., will be among those giving a presentation. Emily Kirsch (215) 647-4400
TECHNICAL AND CAREER CONFERENCE Washington, D.C. Nov. 17-19 The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold a conference that will include an award ceremony, technical workshops and a job fair. Workshop topics include government policy and technical careers, engineering for space and mentoring. Orlando Guti6rrez (301) 552-3137
CHURCH LEADERSHIP Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minn. Nov. 17-19 World Vision and Twin Cities Urban Resourcing Network will sponsor a conference bringing together community leaders, pastors and others to determine effective ways to develop a new generation of
Christian leaders from inner-city neighborhoods. Speakers include Jesse Miranda, an expert in Hispanic church growth, and David Mendez, founder of Logos Bible College in San Diego.
Art Erickson (612) 825-6863
ANNIVERSARY EVENT Washington, D.C. Nov. 18 ASPIRA will hold a reception to celebrate the education advocacy group’s 20th anniversary and the appointment of Janice Petrovich as executive director. Ivelisse Rodriguez (202) 835-3600
GOAL SETTING Trenton, N.J. Nov. 18
The Hispanic Women’s Task Force of New Jersey will hold a seminar on strategy building and goal setting designed to help those attending to develop techniques for setting personal and organizational goals.
Wanda Garcia (609) 757-6349
HUMAN RIGHTS LAW CONFERENCE Los Angeles Nov. 19
The National Centerfor Immigrants’ Rights will hold a human rights conference. The conference will include a presentation about petitions made to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on Behalf of Political Prisoners. Speakers will include Clara “Zazi” Pope, legal coordinator, legal support network, Amnesty International.
Peter Schey (213) 388-8693
STARS AWARDS
Washington, D.C. Nov. 19
The Hispanic Institute for the Performing Arts will
hold an awards ceremony to honor individuals, art
organizations or corporations that promote Hispanic
arts.
Myrna Torres (202) 289-8541
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 * N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias*Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.
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THE HISPANIC SWING VOTE
- houu do m tuis staged?
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

REC 'D. HR/l;l Making The News This Week NOV 1 4 1988 assaulted them and resisted arrest. . . TV personality/journalist Geraldo Rivera undergoes surgery on his nose after having it broken during the taping of a show with white supremacists. Rivera was hit with a chair during a melee . . . Conan Owen, a Honduran-American resident of Annandale , Va., arrives in New York after spending 20 months in a Spanish prison for a crime U . S . officials say he did not commit. Owen, 24, awaits a parole hearing on a cocaine smuggling c harge . . . The Associated Press names Oakland A ' s outfielder Jose Canseco, the first player ever to hit40 home runs and steal40 bases in one season, as its player of the year . .. Californian Robin Ventura, a member of th i s year's Olympic gold medal baseball team, wins the Golden Spikes Award . The award goes to the top amateur baseball player ... United Farm Workers President Cesar Chavez leaves a Bakersfield, Calif. , hospital after receiving treatment for a fractured right wrist , bruised back, chest and head he incurred when he fell eight feet from his home porch in Keene ... Puerto Rico's Father Varela Association, a group of Cubans living in the island, gives to Miami Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman the Order of the Father Varela award for his work on behalf of incarcerated Mariel refugees. . . Valerie Wilson, the daughter of retired New York City police detective Rafael Rodriguez, says she will not cooperate with the Queens district attorney's investigation of her complaint of being sexually abused and racially harassed by police officers while the district attorney decides whether to prosecute her for the same incident. The officers claim she VoLONo.••ll HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT I Nov.14, 1988 Despite State Victories, U.S. English Future Cloudy H .OW THEY VOTED Here' s how voters cast their ballots on Official-English initiatives: ARIZONA Proposition 106 bans nearly all use of languages other than English at all levels of government, calls for" all reasonable steps to preserve , protect and enhance the role of the English language, " and allows indivi duals to sue to enforce the measure . YES 580,830 50.5% NO 569,993 49.5% COLORADO Constitutional Amendment No . 1 : English is the official language of the state of Colorado . YES 733,930 60.6% NO 476,362 39.4% FLORIDA Constitutional Amendment No. 11: English is the official language of the state of Florida. YES 3 ,346,451 83.7% NO 652,112 16.3% 11-State Exit Poll Taken Hispanic support was 77. 8 % for Michael Dukakis in 11 Midwestern and Eastern states on Nov. 8, according to the head of the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration and Education Project. exit poll of3,500 H i spanics, said the percentage of support was the highest since Hubert Humphrey ran for the presidency in 1968. The Latinos were surveyed in New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Kansas, Pennsylvania and Missouri. Bush polled 18. 9%. CORRECTION A sentence in guest columnisfs Jim Crawords Oct 31 pie ce, "Ideologically, other donors to Tanton ' s network run the gamut from Warren Buffett, a billionaire financier whose other philanthropi c interests include the nuclear freeze movement and the Pioneer Fund ... ," was incorrect due to an editing error. Buffett is not connected to the Pioneer Fund . With the U . S . English victories in Arizona , Colorado and Florida Nov . 8 , t he number of states throughout the country which have passed official-English referendums increas e d to 16, but it seems unclear where the group is headed . According to some observer s , the national group' s ability to capitalize on its victories has been hampered by re cent disclosures of founder John Tanton , which sparked w i de spread c harges of racism and led President Linda Ch a vez . One reflection of this may be the tight ra c e in Arizona, which had been projected to pass Proposition 106 with 65% of the vote. Instead , it flip-flopped throughout the day , finally resting at 50. 5 % ,or 580,000 votes. Said Perry Baker , a spokesman for the No on 106 Com m ittee , " This shows me that this is a fairly confused state. And consideri ng how Republican and conservative it is , (the closeness of the race) shows we were right. " The Arizona law carries specific language. In Florida the repercussions are vague, but the measure racked up3,346,451 , or a whop ping 84%, putting the onus for enactment on the state legislature. The h ighlight there was not the results , but a fracas at the U.S. English victory bash on election night in Miami. Florida English chairman Mark LaPorta had already shocked supporters by giving a con c iliatory message with opposition group head Jon Weber. When LaPorta suggested that an b i lingual ordinance in Dade County should be repealed because the amendment had passed , the crowd became enraged. They conti nued o n page 2 30/o of P. Ricans Distrust Candidates Professional and a c tivist Puerto Ricans polled by the New Yo r k City-based Institute for Puerto Rican Policy felt by a margin of 62. 8 % to 3 . 0 % that Michael Dukakis would better represent their c ommunities than would George Bush as president, but 29. 6 % thought neither of the two would guard their interests. The poll was r e leased Nov. 7 . Radio Spots Draw Scrutiny U . S . Attorney General Dick Thornburgh is continuing an investigation into a GOP Spanish language advertising campaign in South Texas to determine if the federal Voting R ights Act has been violated . Thirty-two Justice Department observers were e xpected to have been on hand at polling places in Hidalgo County on Nov . 8 . A Justice Department spokesman said such actions are usually taken when there is " some indication there might be problems at a given location . " Rep. Jack Brooks (D-Te xas) characterized the Republican radio spots, which warned listeners that voting officials would be wat c hing tilem closely, " as an obvious attempt to hold down overall voter turnout among Spanishspeaking citizens. " It sampled 424 leaders in New York (65 . 1 %) and 23 other states, as well as Puerto Rico (2 . 5%) . A plurality of them , 40. 9% , felt neither Bush nor Dukakis would represent the island well . About 36% thought Dukakis would be better than Bush, 4 . 9% . The survey indicated that the negat i ve opinion of Bush was based on disapproval of Reagan's performance as president, 84.5% to 11. 2% , while 73. 6 % said Puerto Ricans as a group were worse off than in 1980. Only 5 . 5% felt Puerto Ricans were better off. Of those surveyed , 76.4% had planned to vote for Dukakis compared to 8.8% for Bush . Also measured were political attitudes related to Puerto Rico. Nearly a third of the community leaders disapproved of Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon ' s performance, with 21.7% supportive, the study showed. Forty-four percent preferred independence for the island , 14. 1 % were satisfied with commonwealth status and 13. 8% favored statehood. Darryl Lynette Figueroa COMPLETE STATE AND CONGRESSIONAL RESULTS Starting on page 4

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Hispanics Make Small Gains in November Elections The nationwide election Nov. 8 brought few surprises for Latinos. Incumbent His panics running in U.S. House of Representatives races retained their seats, but now number 10 voting members-a loss of onewith the retirement of Manuel Lujan (D N .M.). His position was filled by a non Hispanic. Robert Garcia (0-N.Y.), dogged in recent months by reported associations with a federal government contracting scandal, emerged unscathed, with 92% of the voters in his Bronx district affirming their support. In California, Democratic incumbent Mat thew Martinez came away with 60% of the vote to retain his House seat over Republican Ralph Ramirez . There appeared to be slight growth in Hispanic state house repr esentation. Mas sachusetts elected its first Hispanic state representative. Connecticut added one Hispanic to its legislature for a total of two. In state races: • Maria Sanchez ran unopposed and was elected t o a state representative' s seat in Hartford, Conn. Under state law, she will also be allowed to retain her seat on the Hartford school board. Sanchez, 62, was unti l recently an anomaly in Hartford politics -a Hispanic with political clout. As a behind-the-scenes " kingmaker, " chez has served on the 53-member Demo cratic Party town committee for almost 20 years . She is considered largely responsible for the appointment of Hartford ' s first Latino . school superintendent 1 0 years ago. Groups Planning National Opposition continued from page 1 surged toward LaPorta and Weber. Pan demonium ensued. According to Weber, " It created a heightened awareness about the spirit that mot i vates this movement." Said LaPorta, who has since apologized for the suggestion, "They lacked decorum, but I breached (political) protocol." In Colorado, the official-English amendment , which passed with 61% of the vote, is effective immediately and supercedes laws to the con trary. "There is speculation all over the place as to what it w i ll do," said lawyer Ken Padilla . In Florida opponents will likely move for a rehearing before the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which on Nov. 4 ruled 2-1 that citizens' initiatives do not have to be circulated in Spnaish in predominantly Hispanic areas. Weber, executive director of Speak Up Now for Florida, said a new ruling could retroactively invalidate the Nov. 8 vote on the issue . Appealing to the Colorado Supreme Court is one of the next steps for anti-English only groups there, said Rudolph Schware, of the Colorado chapter of the National Lawyers Guild . " Hell no, we' re not giving up the fight. " In Arizona , legal steps are also being con sidered , but the groups primarily stressed the need for national opposition. The English Plus Information Clearinghouse will hold a meeting next month in Washington, D.C., at which such a strategy is to be assessed. Said Arizona co-chairman of No on 106 Tom Espinosa , " We better not play it Arizona , Colorado, etc., but join together and with other ethnic groups to counter ... this blossom ing of racism at its worst. " Darryl Lynette Figueroa Island Politicos Reelected Puerto Rico Gov. Rafael Hernandez Colon was re-elected Nov. 8 to a second four-year term . Also re-elected was Jaime Fuster , the island ' s resident commissioner i n the U.S. House of Representatives. Hernandez Colon won 49% of the vote in a three-way race where almost 2 million votes were cast. He received 856,697 votes. Fuster, also in a three-man contest, carried 50% of the vote, or 850,356. This will be his second term . Group Fights Stations' FCC Renewal The National Hispanic Media Coalition filed petitions with the Federal Communications Commission Nov. 1 to deny license renewals to Los Angeles TV stations KCOP and KCET for failure to hire and promote Latinos adequately. The 32-member organization also challenged the operating license of station KTTV , owned by Rupert Murdoch' s Fox Broad casting Network, through a newly created company. It is the first legal ac t ion undertaken by the Latino community against Los Angeles TV stations. Licenses for all three expired in September. The stations, channels 13, 28 and 11, will continue to operate pending FCC review. The coalition based its complaints on com parisons of FCC employment records for 1983 and 1988. Station KCET beefed up its 2 staff during that time, from 137 to253, but the Latino portion increased by only 1 .25 per centage points, from 11% to 12. 25% , FCC records show. KCOP's Latino staff increased from 8 .51% to 12 . 63%, but the entire staff of 190 does not include one Latino manager or craftsman. There are 10 Latinos in the professionals category. Station KTTV increased the number of Latinos in the top four job categories by only 0.63% despite an FCC warning in 1983 that they improve their compliance with equal employ ment opportunity laws . Esther Renteria will head Rainbow Broad casting, a group of Hispanic broadcasters and civic leaders which seeks control of KTTV. Darryl Lynette Figueroa e Democrat Nelson Merced, 40, became the first Hispanic in the Massachusetts legislature. He won a seat in the newly created 5th District in Suffolk County, which is 40% black, 40% white and 20% Latino. " I sought to create a multiracial and multi ethnic campaign committee," said Merced, who is executive director of La Alianza Hispana " The big victory was when I ran against five other candidates in the Demo cratic primary and I won with 45% . " • In Oregon, Democrat Rocky Barilla , the sole Hispanic member in the state legislature , lost 51% -49% against challenger Gene Derfler. Annabelle Jaramillo, former head of National Image, was defeated in her a ttempt to unseat incumbent Assemb lyman John Schoone. Sophia Nieves Hispanics Nationwide Prefer Dukakis, 58/o Hispanic voters favored Michael Dukakis by22 percentage points over George Bush , 58% -36%, in late October, according to a national poll released Nov. 1 by Univision . Dukakis was pa r ticularly favored by Lat i n as, 62 % to 32% , and younger Hispanics, 60% to 36%. Seventy percent of the 700 registered Latino voters sampled for the poll felt it was time for a change from Reagan policies, with 67% preferring a big government that offers more services to its citizens. The Univision poll included favorability ratings for each candidate and President Reagan . Its results were: Favorable Unfavorable Dukakis 60% 29% Reagan 58 38 Bentsen 57 19 Bush 46 46 Quayle 21 56 The narrowest margins between Dukak is and Bush were among Hispanic voters over 65 years of age, 53% to 42%, and men , 55% to 40%. Darryl Lynette Figue ro a Calif., N. M., Texas Polled At least 70% of the Latino voters in Texas , ,, California and New Me x ico preferred Michael Dukakis over George Bush for president, according to an e x it poll conducted night by the Southwest Voter Research Institute. SVRI ' s 240 pollsters found that 82% of the Latinos in Texas voted for Dukakis, 75% in California and 60% in New Mexico. In Texas, 91% support by Hispanic voters helped re-elect Lloyd Bentsen to the U . S. Senate. The Institute polled 2,228 Texas Latinos, 1 , 311 in Californiaand 763 in New Mexico . The survey is representative of more than 90% of the Latino voters in all three states. H is p anic Lin k Weekly R e p o rt

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Lauro F. Cavazos, guest columnist Education Begins at Home Once, for almost a whole day, I planned to become a commercial fisherman. Instead, I went to college and then to graduate schools; got bachelor's and master's degrees in zoology; and then a Ph.D. in physiology. Later, 1 became the tenth president of my alma mater. At that time, I was also elected the third president of Texas Tech University and Health Sciences Center. Why did 1 take the road to classrooms, research and study instead of the one to wind, weather and water? Soon after graduation from high school, I had joined the U .S. Army. The day I was discharged, my father met me at the bus depot. Driving through my hometown of Kingsville , Texas, he asked me, " Well, son, what do you want to do with the rest of your life? " I said I liked to fish. Maybe I ' d be a commercial fisherman. At that moment, we were passing the local university, Texas A& I. " Well, maybe tomorrow you should go see the registrar and go to college," he said . My father was one reason I went the direction I did. The foreman on the King Ranch, he had the equivalent of a high school education. Another reason was my mother. She had about a third grade education. My parents were not well educated, but they were very wise. They knew the value of education and communicated that to their five children. My brother became the first Hispanic general in the U.S. Army. He recently retired with four stars. I am the first Hispanic Cabinet member in our nation' s history. My sister and my other two brothers also graduated from college. We have our parents to thank. And that's what Hispanic and all other children need today: parents and teachers who care. All the fancy programs, all the federal or private money in the world won' t encourage themindividuallyto raise their e xpectations in life . Education must begin at home. Sometimes I sense in the Hispanic community a lack of respect for education, at least compared to the respect I knew as a child in South Te x as. This is not in keeping with early Spanish tradition which established seven universities in the Americas before Harvard opened its doors. Today, Hispanics have one of the highest high school dropout rates in the country. By the time they are 18 or 19 years old, nearly 30% of all Hispanic students have dropped out of high school, and in my home state of Texas , 45% drop out. Recently, I asked the principal of an inner-city high school what reason students give for leaving school. He listed several, but the one that particularly haunts me is that they have not seen any benefit of education in the lives of their own parents. What a tragedy for humankind! There are solutions for these problems. Students can say no to drugs; that is something within their control. More money can be made available for college scholarships and loans. That is something 1and many others-are working on right now. The key to change, however, is at home. When 1 was growing up, there was no TV, and we couldn't afford a radio. But my father did buy a set of encyclopedias, which we read voraciously. And we made regular trips to the library in town. Parents must read , must insist their children read, and above all, must demand that their children stay in school. 1 will never forget the look of pride on my parents' faces as I accepted my first degree. I had not earned it for them. But they knew that I had earned it because of them. They had inspired me to have something they themselves never did. Most parents can give their children what my parents gave me. They can say, " Yes , son ; yes, daughter, you can be a scientist, a teacher, a lawyer, an artist, a university president. If you have an education, you can be whatever you dare to dream." (Lauro F . Cavazos is U.S. Secretary of Education.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua For U.S. Hispanics, the election was lost long before Tuesday. For us there could be no winner. Once allowed ourselves to believe that we were the "swing vote. " But the real swing vote was made up of folks who are easily frightened by skin color and foreign accents. They were the candidates' focus. The year 1988 topped off a politically dirty decade in which Hispanics and blacks were put back in their place. They were told in no uncertain terms that racism and nativism are still alive and well in this nation-and that's okay with our political leadership. The Republicans sang songs that made the scaredy-cats and the sickies squeal with fear and delight. The ballad of Willie Horton, with choruses in English-Only, topped the charts. "Please God, keep our nation red , WHITE and blue" got the platinum. The Democrats, forced by real liberals to let Jesse Jackson do a warm-up act for their big vaudeville show, did absolutely nothing to uplift the campaign or change its tone. Who did Hispanics really have to choose from? In a Los Angeles Herald Examiner column last month, Rodolfo Acuna, a longtime leader in Southern California's Latino community, offered this Tex-Mex bromide about politicians: "Never trust a Mex ican who smokes a cigar or a gringo who speaks Spanish." He followed it with these caricatures of Democrats Dukakis and Bentsen: Texas millionaire Lloyd Bentsen' s Spanish is excellent because " his family comes from the Rio Grande Valley , where they made their money buying land and working Mexicans cheap. " He quoted The Texas Observer on Bentsen's 1970 win over Sen . Ralph Yarborough, the liberal incumbent: "Bentsen owed his victory to his nigger , anti-youth sentiments.'" Wrote Acuna: "By choosing Bentsen as his running mate, Dukakis signalled that he would concentrate on Bentsen's America at the expense of the minorities and the poor. " Latino writers and broadcasters nationally noted the duo's failure to embrace the farm worker issues of Cesar Chavez, immigration inequities, or legitimate economic and educational concerns that unite Mexican Americans with fellow U.S . residents of Caribbean and Latin American background. Education is the No. 1 Hispanic issue ; our worry, way before thinking of college costs, is getting our kids through an inferior, indifferent, discriminatory public school system. Acuna's choice on Nov. 8? After attacking the Reagan Revolution "for abruptly shortcircuiting many Latino gains of the '60s" and confessing, " I surely don't want to become one of Bush ' s little brown ones," he picked the Democratic team as "the lesser of evils. " Other Latinos weren' t so forgiving of the Democrats. They stayed home. When you' re not welcome at a party, why go? The political year 1988 will be remembered by Latinos for reasons other than the presidential vote. It will be remembered as the year Willie Velasquez died and Henry Cisneros stumbled. They were our two biggest hopes. In June, cancer took Velasquez. The Pied Piper of voter registration did more in his 44 years on earth to bring Hispanics into the system than the two major political parties have done in their combined history. Then last month, coping with a rocky marriage, Cisneros, 41 , announced his intention to withdraw from public life until he could put his private life back in order. San Antonio' s mayor since age 33, Cisneros had brought together divisive factions in his city and moved it forward with the kind of statesmanship so lacking in presidential politics this year. Last week capped a decade of rude disappointments for 20 million U.S. residents who truly want to be full partners in democracy. May the decade of the'90s treat us all with greater kindness and wisdom. Kay Barbaro Hispa ni c Lin k Weekl y R e port Nov . 14, 1988 3

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State Hispanic Election Resu Its Coast to Coast Non-Hispanic candidates appear with a '+' symbol after their names. Incumbents' names are fol lowed by an asterisk*. Political par ties are (D) Democrat, (R) Republican, (I) Independent, (L) Liberal, (AI) American Independent, (CAR) Citizens Against Rising Electric Rates, (NA) New Alliance, (RTL) Right to Life and (PBP) People Before Profits .. All results are unofficial. Any in complete results have a majority of the precincts reporting. Nl means results were not in. ARIZONA State Senate District 2 (Conconino, Gila, Mojave, Navajo, Yavapai Counties) Tony Gabald6n* (D) James Lee + (R) District 7 26, 623 60% District 7 17,865 40% (Gila, Pima, Pinal, Santa Cruz Counties) (Gila, Pima, Pinal, Santa Cruz Richard Pacheco* (D) Unopposed Counties) Pete Rios* (D) Mari Gardne + (R) District 10 (Pima County) Jesus Higuera* (D) District 11 (Pima County) Jaime Gutierez* (D) District 22 (Maricopa County) 18,142 63% 10,752 37% Unopposed Unopposed Manuel Pena* (D) 9,900 64% Richard Adams+ (R) 4,785 , 31% State House (Each House district has two representatives.) District 8 (Pima County) Ruben Ortega (D) Mike Palmer+ (D) Uoyd Fenn + (R) W. Shumaker+ (R) District 10 (Pima County) Carmen Cajero* (D) Phillip Hubbard (D) Greg David + (R) LorenzoTorres (PBP) District 23 (Maricopa County) Armando Rufz* (D) Sandra Kennedy*+ (D) Roland Campbell+ (R) C. Edward Cornell+ (R) G. Campbell (NA) 14,701 29% 14,680 29% 10,252 21% 10,333 21% 12,191 42% 10,257 36% 4,768 17% 1,574 5% 8,036 34% 8,826 37% 3,713 16% 2,606 11% 538 2% District 31 (Denver County) Don Sandoval* (D) 17,329 75% Christine Valdez (R) 5,795 25% State House District 2 (Denver County) Tony Hernandez* (D) District 3 (Denver County) Phil Hernandez (D) District 4 (Denver County) Don Mares (D) John Orr+ (R) District 30 (Adams County) Unopposed Unopposed 10,321 74% 3,705 26% Guillermo De Herrera(D)7, 184 51% Dave Dunnel*+ (R) 6,851 49% District 31 (Boulder County) Final Results in U.S. House CALIFORNIA Mike Romero (D) 5,893 47% Faye Fleming*+ (R) 6,524 53% CALIFORNIA District 11 (San Mateo County) Victor Martinez (P&F) 2,604 Tom Lantos*+(D) 138,579 G.M. Quraishi + (R) 47,032 District 15 1% 71% 24% (Fresno, Mariposa, Merced, Stanislaus Counties) TonyCoelho*+ (D) 111,771 70% Carol Harner+ (R) 45,479 28% Richard Harris+ (L) 3,408 2% District 25 (Los Angeles County) Edward Roybal* (D) 80,425 85% Raul Reyes (P&F) 8,300 9% John Thie + (L) 5,385 6% District 30 (Los Angeles County) Matthew Martinez* (D) 69,065 Ralph Ramirez (R) 41 ,558 Houston Myers+ (AI) 2,590 District 34 (Los Angeles County) Esteban Torres* (D) 88,103 Charles House + (R) 48,641 COLORADO District 4 (Weld, Larimer Counties) 61% 36% 2% 63% 35% Charles Vigil (D) 44,133 27% Hank Brown*+ (R) 120,600 73% CONNECTICUT District 1 (Hartford County) B. Kennelly*+ (D) 175,259 77% Mario Robles (R) 51,541 23% 4 NEW MEXICO District 3 (Santa Fe, San Miguel, other northern counties) Bill Richardson* (D) 98,637 73% Cecilia Salazar (R) 36,783 27% NEW YORK District 18 (Westchester and Bronx Counties) Robert Garcia* (D) 72,808 92% Fred Brown + (R) 5,679 7% Daniel Verhoff+ (C) 729 1% TEXAS District 15 (Hidalgo, Starr, other counties) Kika de Ia Garza* (D) 124,540 95% Gloria Hendrix+ (L) 7,061 5% District 20 (Bexar County) Henry B . Gonzalez* (D}94,341 Lee Trevino (R) 36,701 District 23 72% 28% (Webb, La Salle, other southern counties) A. Bustamante* (D) 112,464 66% Jerome Gonzales (R) 58,488 34% District 26 (Denton, Tarrant Counties) JoAnn Reyes (D) 67,626 31% Dick Armey* +(D) 149,754 69% District 27 (Nueces, Kleberg, Cameron, Willacy Counties) Solom6n Ortiz* Unopposed State Senate District 3 (Marin, San Francisco Counties) Ron Rodriguez (P&F) 2,206 2% Milton Marks*+ (D) 80,473 60% Carol Marshall + (R) 49,208 37% Mark Pickens + (L) 2,235 2% State Assembly District 55 (Highland Park, Lincoln Heights, Los 75% 16% District 32 (Adams County) Jeannie Resser*(D) District 42 (Pueblo County) Gil Romero* (D) District 43 (Pueblo County) Juan Trujillo* (D) Mike Salas (R) Unopposed Unopposed 8,521 8,251 51% 49% CONNECTICUT State Assembly Angeles, Pasadena) Richard Polanco* (D) Evelina Alarc6n (P&F) William Wilson+ (L) 43,011 8,895 5,192 9% District 130 District 56 (Bell Gardens, Vernon) L . Roybal-Allard* (D) 25,515 80% ' Ax he I ! Munoz (B&F Y (; ,,.,, '""2,092<' • 7"/o Stephen Sheldon+ (R) 4,388 13% District 59 Alhambra, Pico Rivera) Charles Calder6n* (D) 64,820 Steven Pencall + (L) 10,018 District 79 (San Diego) Pete Chac6n* (D) 50,738 Gary Gahn + (R) 20,109 John Shea+ (L) 3,100 COLORADO State Senate District 18 87% 13% 69% 27% 4% (Fairfield County) Amerigo Santiago (D) Roberto Orellano (R) 2,621 77% 808 23% District 6 n ?-,;. (Hartford County) Marfa Sanchez (D) Unopposed FLORIDA State Senate District 33 (Dade County) Roberto Casas (R) Unopposed District 40 (Dade County) Javier Souto (R) 48,836 53% Dick Anderson+ (D) 43,246 47% State House District 65 (Boulder County) Jana Mendez* (D) Robert Wells+ (R) 24,927 61% (Hillsborough County) 15,968 39% Elvin Martinez* (R) Unopposed District 25 (Adams County) Bob Martinez* (D) District 99 (Broward County) 12,735 53% Lily Guzman* (R) 15,900 37% Nov. 4, 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Exclusively from Hispanic Link Weekly Report District 105 (Dade County) Alberto Gutman* (R) Unopposed District 109 (Dade County) Luis Rojas (R) 14,642 65% Irene Secada (D) 7,833 35% District 11 o (Dade County) Lincoln Diaz Balart* (R) Unopposed District 111 (Dade County) Nilo Juri (R) 11,249 70% Lucy Piniero (D) 4,827 30% District 112 (Dade County) Carlos Valdes (R) 17,003 73% Manolo Arques (D) 6,169 27% District 113 (Dade County) Luis Morse* (R) 13,999 84% Jose Beiter (D) 2,687 16% District 115 (Dade County) Mario Diaz Ballart (R) Unopposed ILLINOIS State House District 9 (Cook County) Miguel Santiago (D) Unopposed District 20 (Cook County) Ben Martinez* (D) 10,584 Fred Davila (R) 2,079 INDIANA State House (Each district has two representatives.) 84% 16% George G6mez (R) 2,871 67% District 96 (Sedgwick County) Mario Ramos (R) 2,525 38% George Dean*+ (D) 4,099 62% MASSACHUSETTS State House District 5 (Suffolk County) Nelson Merced (D) 3,225 64% Althea Garrison + (I) 1,812 36% District 2 (Br i stol County) John Soto (D) 4,376 29% Steve Carroll*+ (R) 10,931 71% MONTANA State House District 87 (Yellowstone County) Jack Ramirez* (R) Unopposed NEVADA State Assembly District 28 (Washoe County) Courtenay Swain*+ (D) 3 , 535 61% Doris George (R) 1,924 35% Louis Tamburello+ (L) 229 4% NEW MEXICO State Senate District 5 (Rio Arriba County) Emilio Naranjo* (D) Unopposed District 6 (Taos, Morea, Sante Fe Counties) District 24 (Santa Fe County) Edward L6pez* (D) Unopposed District 25 (Santa Fe County) Roman Maes* (D) 9,528 59% Nancy Applegate + (R) 6,667 41% District 26 (Bernalillo County) Martin Chavez (D 7,735 64% Mary Guffey+ (R) 4,424 36% District 28 (Catron, Grant, Socorro Counties) Ben Altamirano* (D) 7 , 833 65% Paul Hunter+ (R) 4,173 35% District 29 (Valencia County) Tony Rome (D) 7,290 49% Anthony Williams*+ (R) 7 ,501 51% District 30 (Cibola County) Joseph Fidel (D Unopposed District 36 (Dona Ana County) Mary Jane Garcia (D) 6,986 56% Ellen Steele*+ (R) 5,416 44% District 38 (Dona Ana County) Fernando Macias* (D) 6,830 55% William Ikard+ (R) 5,611 45% State House District 7 (Cibola County) Toby Michael* (D) Unopposed District 8 (Valencia County) Fred Luna* (D) 5,159 58% Melvin C6rdova (R) 3,688 42% District 10 (Bernalillo County) Henry Saavedra* (D) Unopposed District 12 ,_ . .., Car l os Cisneros * .(D) --.-Unopposed District 11 (Lake County) Jesse Villalpando* (D) Unopposed KANSAS State Senate District 28 (Sedgwick County) Paul Feliciano* (D) Mark Gitzon + (R) District 34 9 ,911 55% 7,956 45% (Finney , Gray, Barton, Saline, Ellis Counties) Frances Garcia (D) Unopposed District 40 (Wyandotte, Leavenworth Counties) Alfred Ramirez* (R) Unopposed District 57 (Shawnee County) Joyce Romero (D) 1,432 33% Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report District 9 (Sandoval, McKinley Counties) Dennis ChAvez (D) Unopposed District 11 (Bernalillo County) Tom Benavidez* (D) Unopposed District 12 (Bernalillo County) Michael Alarid* (D) Unopposed District 13 (Bernalillo County) Tito Chavez* (D) Unopposed District 14 (Bernalillo County) Manny Arag6n* (D) 4,623 60% Yvonne Rodriguez (R) 3,076 40% District 23 (Los Alamos, Sandoval Counties) Ernest Aguilar (D) 4,184 24% Steven Stoddard*+ (R) 8 , 822 76% (Bernalillo County) Frances Armijo* (D) Unopposed District 12 (Bernalillo County) Delano Garcia (D) Unopposed District 13 (Bernalillo County) Daniel Silva* Unopposed District 14 (Bernalillo County) Frank Lucero (D) 2,494 80% John Hoffman + (R) 622 20% District 15 (Bernalillo County) Raymond Sanchez* (D) 4,616 60% Albert Martinez (R) 3,027 40% District 16 (Bernalillo County) Ray Vargas* (D) 3,821 72% Angel Collado (R) 1,502 28% Nov . 4, 1988 District 17 (Bernalillo County) Edward SAndoval* (D) Unopposed District 21 (Bernalillo County) Patricia Baca* (R) Unopposed District 23 (Bernalillo County) Don Silva* (R) Unopposed District 26 (Bernalillo County) Ram6n Huerta* (D) 2,919 56% John Lowder+ (R) 2,303 44% District 27 (Bernalillo County) Yolanda Apodaca (D) 2,666 39% Linda Tytler* + (R) 4,171 61% District 33 (Dona Ana County) Paul Taylor* (D) 5,177 59% Richard Schlater+ (R) 1,324 30% District 34 (Dona Ana County) Ralph Hartman*+ (D) 3,148 70% Jimmy Benton (R) 1,324 30% District 40 (Rio Arriba, Santa Fe, San Miguel Counties) Nick Salazar* (D) Unopposed District 41 (Ri o Arriba County) Louis Sanchez* (D) Unopposed District 42 (Taos County) Frederick Peralta* (D) Unopposed District 45 (Santa Fe County) Angie Vigil-Perez* (D) 5,232 71% W. Shrecengost+ (R) 2,179 29% District 46 (Sante Fe County) Ben Lujan* (D) District 48 (Sante Fe County) Luciano Varela* (D District 49 (Catron, Socorro, Valencia Coun ties) Michael Olguin* (D) 4,883 56% Hubert Spurgin+ (R) 3,426 39% Howard Hutchinson+ (L) 431 5% District 50 (Valencia, Torrance County) Phil Martinez (R) 3,561 39% Gary King*+ (D) 5,591 61% District 51 (Otero County) Mariano T6rrez (D) 1,803 47% L. Scheffield* + (R) 2,025 53% District 52 (Otero, Lincoln, Sierra County) Ivan Padilla (D) 3,339 42% Paul Harrington+ (R) 4 ,661 58% continued on page 6 5

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State Hispanic Election Results Coast to Coast District 58 District 54 TEXAS District 74 (Eddy, Chaves Counties) (Kings County) Supreme Court, Place 3 (EI Paso County) B. Perea-Casey* (D) 3,334 60% Henry Betancourt (R) 1,895 13% Raul Gonzalez (D) 2 , 791,160 57% Nicolas Perez* (D) 14,848 80% Hubert Quintana (R) 2,214 40% Tom Catapano * + (D) 12,371 87% Chas. Howell+ (R) 2,018 , 436 41% Jackson Wilbourn+ (R) 3 , 9794 20% District 60 District 65 Calvin Scholz + (L) 79,207 2% District 115 (Lea County) (New York County) State Senate (Bexar County) Joe Trujillo (D) 2,766 46% Robert Santiago (C) 664 2% District 14 Orlando Garcia* (D) 18,242 93% Earlene Roberts + (R) 3,197 54% Alex Grannis*+ (D) 30,904 73% Tom Snead+ (L) 1,312 7% District 63 Yvette Adam + (R) 10,762 25% (Hays, Travis Counties) District 116 G. Barrientos* (D) 160,353 67% (Curry County) District 68 Matt Harnest + (D) 72,576 30% (Bexar County) Vincent Gallegos* (D) 2 , 069 61% (New York County) Gary Johnson+ (L) 7,094 3% Gregory Luna* (D) 21,387 94% Chris Sfindoval (R) 1,296 39% Ang e lo DelToro* (D) 20,086 90% District 20 Tom Morefield+ (L) 1,424 6% District 65 James Boykins+ (R) 1,844 8% (Brooks, Kenedy, San Patricio, District 117 (Sandoval, Cibola Counties) Barbara VanRossem + (C) 302 2% other southern counties) (Bexar County) James Madalena* (D) 3,075 63% District 72 Carlos Truan* (D) Unopposed Frank Madia* (D) U n opposed Pete Salazar (R) 1,802 37% (New York County) District 26 District 118 District 68 Bias Miranda (R) 3,941 18% (Bexar County) (Bexar County) (San Miguel, Colfax , Mora Counties) John Murtaugh*+ (D) 17,841 82% N .G. Garcia (D) 73,691 43% Giro Rodriguez* (D) 18,479 94% E . Kelly Mora* (D) Unopposed District 73 Kenneth Hendrix+ (L) 2,n5 2% B . Wa rren Har rison+ (L) 1 , 1n 6% District 70 (Bronx County) Cyndi Krier*+ (R) 93,629 55% District 124 (San Miguel, Guadalupe Counties) Jose Serrano* (D) 20,638 95% State House (Bexar County) Samuel Vigil* (D) 5 , 290 70% Alice Paul+ (R) 1,159 5% Dan Morales* (D) 27,126 9 4 % Ted Herburger+ (R) 2,291 30% District 74 District 16 Ron Dodson + (L) 1,766 6% (Bronx County) (Montgomery , Harris counties) District 143 Hector Diaz* (D) 18,301 87% Kei th Vali gura (R) 19,613 55% NEW YORK Wilfredo Ayala (R) 2,120 10% Joe Melton * + (D) 15,904 45% (Harris County) Albert Luna* (D) Unopposed State Senate Michael Walters+ (C) 628 3% District 23 District 148 r. District 20 District 77 (Jefferson County) (Harris County) (Kings County) (Bronx County) Frank Collazo* (D Unopposed Roman Martinez* (D) Unoppos ed ! Luis Osorio (L) 1,500 5% Israel Martinez* (D) 10 , 629 77% District 34 l Armando DeMarino (R) 5,166 15% S. Ramos-Aiamo (R) 3 , 112 23% (Nueces County) State Boar d o f Ed. Ada Smith+ (D) 27,487 80% District 79 Hugo Berlanga* (D) Unopposed District 1 District 30 (Bronx County) District 35 (West-Southwest Texas) (Bronx, New York Counties) Marie lgnarro (R) 5,363 75% (Nueces County) Rene Nunez (D) Unopposed Olga Mendez* (D) 46 , 894 88% G. Friedman*+ (D) 16,024 75% Eddie Cavazos* (D) Unopposed District 2 Cecilio Diaz (R) 5 , 676 1 1 % District 37 (South Texas) Benjamin Newmark+ (C) 728 1% OREGON (Brooks, Kenedy, Starr, other Mary Berlanga* (D) 167,921 62% District 32 State House southern counties) F . Boatright + (R) 103,343 38% (Bronx County) Irma Rangel* (D) Unopposed District 3 Israel Ruiz* (D) 34,426 97% District 34 District 39 (South Texas) Kevin Brawley+ (C) 1,204 39% (Benton, Polk Counties) (Cameron County) Esteban Sosa (D) 146,419 59% • District 36 Annabelle Jaramillo (D) 6,159 37% Eddie Lucio* (D) Unopposed Mary Williamson + (R) 98 , 284 39% I (Westchester County) John Schoone*+ (R) 10,560 63% District 40 District 31 WASHINGTON Lorenzo Delgado (R) 60,357 62% (Hidalgo County) i S . Oppenheimer*+ (D) 36,269 37% (Marion, Polk Counties) Alejandro Moreno* (D) Unopposed State House Humphrey Sarlo+ (RTL) 1 , 372 14% Rocky Barilla* (D) 11,199 49% State Assembly Gene Derfler + (R) 11,559 51% District 41 District 11 (Hidalgo County) District 27 PENNSYLVANIA Juan Hinojosa* (D) 18,494 66% (Ki ng County) (Queens County) Jeff Waguespack+ (R) 9,611 34% Margarita Prentice* (D) 18, 179 58% Mike Sweeney+ (R) 13,156 42% David Camisa (R) 8,289 29% State House District 42 N. Mayersohn*+ (D) 20 , 404 71% District 180 (Hidalgo County) District 32 (Philadelphia County) Renato Cuellar* (D) Unopposed (Queens County) Ralph Acosta* (D) District 43 THANK YOU James Morales (C) 1,037 4% Thomas Malkowski+ (R) Nl (Webb County) E . Abramson*+ (D) 18,768 74% Mike Bunk+ (I) Henry Cuellar* (D) Unopposed The staff of Hispanic Link Weekly Adolphus Frazier+ (L) 5,659 22% Report would like to thank all those District 51 District 51 people and groups that helped it RHODE ISLAND (Travis County) obtain the election results pre(Kings County) State House Lena Guerrero* (D) 25,305 91% sented in this week's issue. Fore-James Brennan* (D) 16,n7 91% Thomas Burns+ (L) 2,480 9% most among those indispensable Olga (C) 1,654 9% District 46 District 72 helpers was the National Associa-District 53 (Washington County) (EI Paso County) tion of Latino Elected and Appoint(Kings County) John Hernandez* (D) Unopposed Paul Moreno* (D) 11,298 74% ed Officials. Vito L6pez* (D) Unopposed Walt Woelper + (R) 3,880 26% 6 Nov . 14, 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Repon

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DIRECTOR OF CHICANO STUDIES . FACUL TV OPENINGS HISTORY & PHILOSOPHY The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at El Paso seeks candidates for the position of Director of the Chicano Studies Program with a joint faculty appointment in an academic department. Rank and salary are open and commensurate with qualifications and experience. Eastern Michigan University seeks ap plicants for Fall 1989 for two tenure-track Assistant Professor positions in the follow ing: Required qualifications : Earned doctorate in liberal arts, science, education, nursing and/or allied health, business, and engineering; strong record of teaching, scholarly activity, and administrative experience; ability to work with various academic units and community groups; fluent in Spanish and knowledgeable of the demographics of the Chicano popula tion. PHILOSOPHY: (FA8037) --to teach in troductory and advanced philosophy courses (concentration in recent European thought, poststructuralism Hermeneutics, etc. desired). Application deadline January 15, 1989. Duties: Responsible for course and program development ; initiates and coordinates re search and publication efforts; organizes lecture series and cultural performances, often in collaboration with community organizations and regional universities; teaching and student advising; the director reports directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs . HISTORY : (FA8038) --to teach British history and introductory 20th century world history. Application deadline January 30, 1989 . Chicano Studies offers an interdisc i plinary BA and selected minor areas of academic con centration. The program facilitates research, publications, and cultural services of impor tance to the Chicano community . Qualifications : both of the above re quire a Ph. D . prior to hire date in specialization ; and college/university level teaching experience in specific dis cipline . A commitment to excellence in teaching and advising students and doing research and committee work essential. The position is available after June 1, 1989 . A letter of application , curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and publication samples must be submitted by December 7, 1988 to : Dennis J. Bixler-Mluquez, Chicano Studies Director Search Committee , Chicano Studies Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0563 Women and minorities are encouraged to apply . The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity , affirmative action employer. To apply (note dates on each) , send let ter of interest , detailed resume with 3 references to: Chair-Search Committee, Position FA80 , 310 King Hall, EAST ERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY, Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197 . BILINGUAL (ENGLISH/SPANISH) SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST Small , busy office in downtown Washington, D .C. seeks responsible "front desk " individual t o answer phones and perform general office duties . Excellent phone skills; written and verbal skills in English and Spanish ; excellent typing skills; IBM/pc experience . Must be able to work under pressure and maintain composure . EOE. Non-Smoker. $16,000 . PLEASE NO TELEPHONE CALLS OR VISITS. Send resumes to 1000 16th St. NW, #504, Washington, D .C. 20036 . STATEWIDE CONFERENCE ON THE RETENTION OF MINORITY STUDENTS: SETTING THE OHIO AGENDA FOR THE 21ST CENTURY January 1 0-11, 1989 Columbus, Ohio Keynote Speakers Vincent Tinto Elsa Nunez-Wormack Sponsored by The Ohio State University Office of Student Life University College For more information contact: The Ohio State University Department of Conferences & Institutes P .O. Box 21878 Columbus, Ohio 43221 (614) 292-8571 Hi spa ni c Link Weekl y Report EDITOR/JOURNALIST I RESEARCHER Need bilingual editor-journalist-researcher preferably knowledgeable about Mexico . Resume . Mexico-United States Institute, 50 ESt. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. We take pride in the pursuit of our af firmative action objectives and encourage qualified women and minorities to con sider this opportunity . Multicultural ex perience desired . Girl Scouts of The U.S.A. has the following job opportunities : PERSONNEL CONSULTANTS Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the areas of ANEOE planning , per formance management, recruitment, legislation, etc ... Candidate should have at least 3-5 years solid generalist background, ability to train & interface with all levels of management. Travel approx . 40-50%. Salary $30's. MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS Provide technical assistance to outbased locations in the total management function, in cluding needs identification and problem solving. Candidates should have at least 5 years broad management experience , knowledge of strategic & tactical planning, financial opera tions and fund development. Travel approx. 75%. Salary to $40's . For immediate consideration, send resume' to: Janice Jacobs, Senior Employm ent Specialist, Girl Scouts of the U .S.A., 830 Third Avenue, New York , N.Y. 10016 ANEOE M/F/H/V DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p .m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _ ________ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _ 7

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COLLECTING HISPANIC POVERTY: "Shortchanged: Recent Developments in Hispanic Poverty, Income and Employment" is a 40page report looking at these three areas between 1978 and 1987. To obtain a copy, send a check for $6 to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, 236 Massachusetts Avenue NE, Suite 305, Washington, D . C . 20002. STUDENTS' DEFINITION OF SUCCESS: "High School and Beyond " is a study that found that most students felt job success is more important than making lots of money . For a free copy of the report contact the National Center for Education Statistics , Education Department, 555 New Jersey Ave . NW, Room 300, Washington, D.C. 20208 (202) 357. Calendar THIS WEEK THE SPANISH IN FLORIDA Tampa , Fla . Nov. 14 This program , sponsored by the Florida Endowment for the Arts to mark the quincentenary of Columbus' arrival to North America , will include presentations about the f i rst Spaniards and the mark they left. This will also be the first step tor a traveling Columbus e x hibit. Gary Mormino (813 ) 272-3473 THE INDEPENDENT SECTOR San Francisco Nov . 1416 The Institute of Non-Profit Organization Management will hold a conference designed to fo c us on the role of Hispanic non-profit organizations in helping further the cause of Latinos. Among the topics to be considered are the historical develop ment of these o rganizations and thei r roles in con temporary society. Michael 0 ' Neill (415) 666 EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY POLITICS . New York Nov. 15 Panel discussions on education' s role in community empowerment will be held as part of Puerto Rican Heritage Month. Speakers include Diana Caballero of the Puerto Rican and Latino Education Roundtable and Julio Rivera of A SPIRA, an education advocacy group. Carlos Sanabria (212) 772 TRADE SHOW AND EXPO HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publi ca ti o n o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher. Hector Eri c k s enMendoza Edit or. Feli x Perez R epo rting: Antoni o M e jias-R e ntas, Darryl L y n e tt e Figueroa, S ophi a Nie ves. N o porti o n of Hisp anic Link Weekly Report may be repr o duced or broadcast in a n y f o rm without adva n ce p e rmis s ion. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 C ORPORATE CLA S SIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display a d s are $ 4 5 p e r co lumn i n c h . Ad s pla c ed b y Tu es da y will run in W e ekly Reports mailed Frida y of same week. Multiple use rate s on request. 8 New York Nov. 1518 A three-part conference sponsored by Hispanic Business magazine on marketing to the U . S . His panic consumer will include seminars , a media expo and an awards banquet Information will be available on advertising techniques and marketing strategies . Diana Castro (805) 682 SCHOLARSHIP FUND-RAISER Los Angeles Nov. 16 The National Hispanic Scholarship Fund will hold a fund-rais i ng dinner. Money raised will be used to further the education of Hispanic graduate and undergraduate students throughout the country. Mary B r ooks (818) 448 THE FAMILY AND LITERACY Immaculata, Pa. Nov. 16 Immaculata College Bicultural/Bilingual Studies Mastel's Program will sponsor a colloquium on the family's role in developing literacy . Jose Silva, director of the Center tor Family Literacy in Perth Amboy , N.J. , will be among those giving a presentation . Emily Kirsch (215) 647 TECHNICAL AND CAREER CONFERENCE Washington , D .C. Nov. 17 The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers will hold a conference that will include an award ceremony , technical workshops and a job fair . Workshop topics include government policy and technical careers , engineering for space and mentoring. Orlando Gutierrez (301) 552 CHURCH LEADERSHIP Minneapolis/ St. Paul, Minn . Nov . 17 World Vis i on and Twin Cities Urban Resourcing Network will sponsor a conference bringing together community leaders, pastors and others to determine Pffective way s to develop a n e w generation of Christian leaders from inner-city neighborhoods. Speakers include Jesse Miranda, an e x pert in His panic church growth, and David Mendez, founder of Logos Bible College in San Diego . Art Erickson (612) 825 ANNIVERSARY EVENT Washington , D.C. Nov. 18 ASPIRA will hold a reception to celebrate the edu cation advocacy group' s 20th anniversary and the appointment of Janice Petrovich as executive director. lvelisse Rodriguez (202) 835 GOAL SETTING Trenton , N.J. Nov. 1 8 The Hispanic Women ' s Task Force of New Jersey will hold a seminar on strategy building and goal setting designed to help those attending to develop techniques for setting personal and organizational goals . Wanda Garcia (609) 757 HUMAN RIGHTS LAW CONFERENCE Los Angeles Nov. 19 The National Center tor Immigrants ' Rights will hold a human rights conference. The conference will include a presentation about petitions made to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights on Behalf of Political Prisoners. Speakers will include Clara " Zazi" Pope , legal coordinator, ' legal support network , Amnesty International. Peter Schey (213) 388 STARS AWARDS Washington , D.C. Nov. 19 The Hispanic Institute for the Performing Arts will hold an awards ceremony to honor individuals, art organizations or corporations that promote Hispanic arts . Myrna Torres (20 2 ) 289 THE HISPANIC SWING VOTE HOW W WE. W TtliN6J STAI2Tt:D'7 Hispanic Link Weekly Report