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Hispanic link weekly report, November 21, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 21, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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Making The News This Week
USA Today mentions U.S. Rep. Manuel Luj6n (R-N.M.) as a top candidate to head the U.S. Department of Interior in the incoming George Bush administration. Lujan did not run for re-election... With the election loss of U.S. Rep. Fernand St Germain (D-R.l.), Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) becomes the next in line to head the powerful House Banking Committee... San Diego Mayor Maureen O’Connor appoints Andrea Skorepa to chair the Mayor’s Latino Advisory Committee... Refugee Carlos Vaquerano unveils in Los Angeles what he says is a death-threat letter addressed to him and three other Salvadoran activists by right-wing death squads from El Salvador. . . Sacramento, Calif., police arrest landlady Dorothea
Montalvo Puente, 59, after finding seven unide^^d^odiesbgried in the yard of her rooming house. Police speculate sne anoa male accomplice killed the elderly boarders for their Social Security checks... Panamanian American Laffit Pincay becomes only the second jockey ever to win 7,000 races after achieving two victories at Hollywood Park in California . . Dr. Rafael Tavares, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in Hispanic mental health problems and developed educational programs to stem the spread of AIDS, particularly among Hispanics* dies of a heart attack Nov. 8. He was 44 years old... Elizabeth Ramos, who in January won a $750,000 award in the nation’s first AIDS malpractice case, dies Nov. 4. Ramos, a former bookkeeper who said she contracted the disease from a former boyfriend, was originally diagnosed as having asthma and imaginary ailments...

FBI Investigating Into Polling-Place Guards
The FBI is looking into charges that uniformed security guards posted at Orange County, Calif., polling places by the Republican Party Nov. 8 intimidated voters.
County Democratic Party officials have claimed that the move was designed to keep Hispanics away from the polls in Latino areas. Guards carried signs in Spanish and English that read, “If you’re not a citizen, don’t vote.” No signs are allowed within 100 feet of a voting booth, according to Orange County Registrar Don Tanney.
Without their presence to discourage illegal voting, Curt Pringle, the Republican victor over Christian Thierbach in the 72 nd state Assembly District race, said he may have lost his bid for re-election. He won by 671 votes out of 73,167 cast.
State Legislators Increase to 127
The number of Hispanic state legislators grew slightly from 1986 to 1988, going from 119 to 127, found a tally by Weekly Report conducted after the Nov. 8 elections.
The biggest single increase came in New Mexico, where there are 43 Latino lawmakers as compared with 39 two years earlier. The state accounts for34% of the nation’s Hispanic officials holding state-level office. Fourteen are senators and one sits on the Supreme Court
The other states that accounted for the increase over the two-year period were Colorado, which jumped from seven to 10, and Texas, which added one legislator to wind up at 27.
The two states that dropped from one to no representatives were Hawaii, where Alfred Lardizabal resigned his state House position to become the state’s personnel director, and Oregon, where one-term incumbent Rocky
IRCA Full of Loopholes, Says Study
“Gaping loopholes” in the Immigration Reform and Control Act have made it possible for employers and undocumented migrant workers to maintain the labor status quo, according to a study conducted by the University of California at San Diego.
Employers can skirt the Jaw by ignoring the use of fake papers by undocumented workers, who are increasingly making use of such papers, said the report.
Ana Garcia, a research associate at the Center for U.S. -Mexican Studies, which will formally present the report early next month, said, “(Employers) know they won’t be penalized as long as they requested documentation (from prospective employees).”
Among 300 undocumented, non-agricultural workers interviewed for the study, 41% ac-
only 22% said they feel they will have to return to their countries because of IRCA.
The flow of undocumented persons over the Mexico border continues largely unabated She mentioned that the public perception of migrant workers has shifted from worry that they take jobs from domestic workers to the feeling that “they will drain social services.” She said that the fear is unfounded.
One major change among large firms that are not immigrant dependent is increased employer discrimination against legal resident Hispanics or employees who look foreign, says the report.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Barilla lost 49% to 51%.
Despite there not yet being firm data to bear it out Hispanic voter registration experts agree that Latinos eligible to vote turned out in equal or greater numbers than they did in recent past elections. Nearly 45% of voting-age Hispanics cast ballots in 1984’s presidential race, reported the U.S. Census Bureau. The overall turnout for this year's presidential contest was 49% of the eligible voters while in 1984 it was 53%, according to the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate.
Overall, the percentage of all eligible voters who voted this year dropped in every state save for New Hampshire and Nevada
People wrongly concluded “that because the general population was disenchanted (with the candidates), the Hispanic population was,” said Bob Brischetto, director of the Southwest Voter Research Institute, headquartered in San Antonio. Non-Hispanics “unfortunately let the polls drive their enthusiasm. This was not the case for Hispanics,” he added.
Juan Andrade, director of the Chicago-based Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration and Education Project, said that patriotism and civic duty play a large part in the Hispanic turnout. “The Hispanic vote doesn’t rely entirely or significantly on the quality of the campaign,” he said.
Brischetto’s and Andrade’s organizations are expected to release voter turnout figures for key states from their exit polls this month or next.
Mike Zamba, a policy analyst for the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, pointed to the language initiatives
continued on page 2
HISPANIC STATE LEGISLATORS: 1984, 1986, 1988
knowledged purchasing or borrowing fraudulent ’84 ’86 ’88 ’84 ’86 ’88 ’84 ’86 ’88
documents. Ariz. 12 9 9 Kans. 3 3 3 Pa. 1 1 1
Consequently, immigrant-dependent indus- Calif. 7 7 7 La. 1 1 2 R.I. 1 1 1
tries - the garment industry, low-skill service Colo. 8 7 10 Minn. 1 0 0 Texas 24 26 27
sector jobs* the electronics field, among others- Conn. 1 1 2 Mont. 2 1 1 Utah 1 0 0
have not suffered an anticipated labor shortage. Fla 7 9 9 N.J. 1 0 0 Wash. 1 1 1
The report concludes that “an underclass Hawaii 1 1 0 N.M. 39 39 43 TOTALS
of unamnestied illegal immigrants” is being III. 2 3 3 N.Y. 7 7 7
created. Among undocumented workers who Ind. 1 1 1 Ore. 0 1 0 121 119 127
did not qualify or did not apply for amnesty, - Chart by Weekly Report


U.S. English LeaderSaysState Initiatives Will Continue
U.S. English plans to focus its efforts on more state initiatives, as well as English proficiencyclassesand bilingual education reform, according to the acting director for the organization, Stanley Diamond.
Responding Nov. 15 to the recommendations of recently resigned president Linda Ch&vez that the organization move from what she called devisive initiatives toward education, Diamond said the five-year-old group will not be moving radically from its current course following the passage of official-English ballot measures in Florida, Colorado and Arizona.
“The three victories give us the momentum to go ahead... with initiatives and programs,” said Diamond. He also indicated that one of his goals is a Hispanic leadership that represents the best interests of the country’s Hispanics.
Diamond described approval by Florida’s Cuban voters of the English initiative as “a repudiation of Hispanic political leadership.”
He indicated, however, that it was critical for a healing process to take place with “Hispanics and other leadership!’ that opposed the measures.
Diamond said in the next year U.S. English may lend support to English initiatives to be introduced in at least 20 states which could include Washington, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Texas.
The Texas and New Jersey legislatures must vote to put such measures on their ballot. Washington’s legislature can put the measure on the ballot or voters can do it through the initiative process Massachusetts uses solely the voter initiative method.
The group's acting director said he expected follow-up legislation in the Florida and Colorado state houses that would determine the application of the newly passed initiatives to areas such as bilingual education and ballots
U.S. English currently contracts with the Cambria Institute in Southern California to
provide English-language instruction and plans to expand the program to Washington, D.C., and Colorado, enlarging that portion of the budget from $700,000 spent in 1988 to $2 million, Diamond said.
Despite the success of all three ballot measures opponents of the official-language laws vow to fight official-English advocates at every turn.
The leader of an anti-official English Arizona group, Tom Espinoza, pointed to a positive by-product of that state’s bitter language battle. “There is now a great deal of cam-raderie between the Hispanic, Asian and Jewish communities,” said Espinoza, a real estate developer in Phoenix.
Richard Castro, director of the Denver City and County Human Rights and Community Relations agency, said another plus resulting from the initiative is that residents can now use it to lobby the state legislature and ask, “Where are the programs to increase English fluency?” - Sophia Nieves
Federal Cutbacks Hurt Latinos More
Federal government budget cutbacks in programs for low-income families are a significant part of the reason that Hispanics are the only ethnic or racial group whose poverty rates have not declined since the recession of the early 1980s, according to a report released by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Nov. 3.
“Since Hispanics are more likely to be poor, they are more heavily affected by reductions,” said Robert Greenstein, director of the center. Since 1982, he said, Latinos have made up only half the income losses suffered during the recession.
The report, “Shortchanged: Recent Developments in Hispanic Poverty, Income and Employment” is based on U.S. Census Bureau figures. It indicates that in 1978,21.6% of Hispanics lived below the poverty line. By last year that number had increased by one third to 28.2%.
In the decade between 1978 and 1987, the number of Hispanic married-couple families
Military Measures AIDS
Hispanic male military applicants from October 1985 through March 1988 were nearly three times as likely to be infected with the AIDS virus as were white ones, according to a Nov. 11 report by the Centers for Disease Control.
The prevalence rates per every 1,000 applicants among the groups surveyed were:
HISPANIC Tested Positive Rate
Male 63,448 144 2.3
Female WHITE 7,781 4 0.5
Male 978,519 753 0.8
Female BLACK 138,219 39 0.3
Male 228,142 1,024 4.5
Female 58,220 96 1.6
living in poverty soared from 11.9% to 18.1 %. The rate forchildren also increased by half so that in 1987 39.6% of Hispanic children- two in five - were poor. Rates were highest for Puerto Ricans in each of these categories.
The study also supports the importance of education in wage-earning Among Hispanics over 25 years old without a high school diploma, the poverty rate jumped from 25.3% in 1978 to 36.3% in 1987.
Initiatives Increase Voters
continued from page 1
in Arizona, Colorado and Florida as another reason why Hispanic voter participation may have risen.
In other election related news:
• Joseph Baca, a district court judge in Albuquerque, N.M., wins a seat on the state Supreme Court
• Ralph Acosta is re-elected to his third term in Pennsylvania’s House District 180.
• Lorenzo Delgado did not win a seat in New York’s state Senate as reported in last week's issue.
- Felix Perez
Fla Lawmakers Ensure State Speaker Victory
Cuban American legislators in Florida broke away from their Republican colleagues to support state Rep. Tom Gustafson (D-Fort Lauderdale) as the next House speaker and are being credited by many as ensuring his victory.
Dissident Democrat Carl Carpenter needed the support of the legislature’s 47 Republicans and 13 Democrats to beat Gustafson, who was speaker designate. But with the seven errant Republican Latinos and a majority of the House’s 120 members, Gustafson won the post, which he will assume Nov. 22.
The conservative Carpenter is the most vocal of those who say that the seven Latinos held the key in the close race.
Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Ballart would not take such credit but said they preferred Gustafson because, “We know him. He listens to us.”
Now they hope that Gustafson will create a special legislative office for Hispanics, though it was insisted no deal was cut.
Gustafson has indicated that he would be amenable to setting up such an office, as well as another for the black population.
D.C. Sleepout Protest Seeks Shelter
Fifteen Hispanic organizations banded together Nov. 14 in Washington, D.C., to announce a request that Mayor Marion Barry open a 200-bed shelter for the Hispanic homeless before winter. Within the city, Spanish-speaking persons in need of shelter are estimated to number at least 200.
In an effort to draw attention to inadequate temporary shelter, about 30 people slept on the steps of a church in the largely Hispanic Adams-Morgan area. Groups supporting the effort included the Central American Refugee Center, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of Hispanic Women and National Image.
According to Juana Martin, director of Shelter for the Homeless, a culturally sensitive shelter run by a non-profit organization would help the Hispanic homeless avail themselves of city services. Martin characterized them as male heads of households fleeing wartime situations. With the inability to find work, she said, comes despondence and problems such as alcoholism.
A spokesperson for the D.C. Commission on Social Services did not comment on the specific request, but indicated contractors employed by the city to provide shelters will be checked to ensure they have bilingual staff members. - Sophia Nieves
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Jay Mathews, guest columnist
Chronicling Jaime Escalante
When Jaime Escalante welcomed me into his remote third-floor classroom at East Los Angeles’ Garfield High School six years ago, I had no idea what an adventure we were both about to begin.
He had a problem with the Educational Testing Service, which had questioned the Advanced Placement scores of 14 of his 18 calculus students. I had wanted to ask about that, but I was even more interested in discovering how he had managed to find any calculus students in a school known principally for poverty, low test scores and occasional gang fights.
For the next several years, I watched and listened and talked to him and his students. As I probed deeper into his method and results, encountering surprise after surprise, he continued to build Garfield’s advanced mathematics program to a level that, by 1987, exceeded anything that had ever been done in an inner-city school.
That year, 129 Garfield students took the AP calculus examination, more than all but three public schools in the entire country.
Fewer than 2% of U.S. students ever tried the difficult test, yet two thirds of the Garfield students received grades high enough for calculus credit in the nation’s finest universities.
Today Escalante, a rumpled, balding 57-year-old Bolivian immigrant, has become a national hero. His name is praised in the presidential debates. Senators and education secretaries visit his classroom.
In my new book, “ Escalante: The Best Teacher in America,” I try to explain how this came about and what this hero is really made of.
Despite repeated suggestions that he cut down his teaching load and give himself up to the lecture circuit, Escalante arrives at school by 7:30 a.m. every day and is rarely gone by 5 p.m. He is uncomfortable with his celebrity status. He hates the subtitle of my book.
I have my reasons for nominating Escalante as the nation’s best teacher. But we both realize, as the book explains, how many other people had a role in his success and how very many people are needed to fight for his methods and ideas, still far from being widely accepted despite his new fame.
Educators, parents and politicians who want to do what Escalante has done should know something about the unsung heroes behind the Garfield story:
Henry Gradillas- He was Garfield’s principal from 1981 to 1987 when Escalante’s program took off. He fought ferociously for more space and equipment for mathematics, and forced up academic standards throughout the school. No principal in Los Angeles has ever had such success introducing difficult courses to an inner-city school, yet school district administrators appeared so leery of his aggressive methods that they assigned him headquarters work coordinating asbestos removal when he returned this year from a sabbatical. State education officials, appalled at this, are trying to arrange other work for him.
Ben Jimenez - A quiet young teacher born in East Los Angeles, Jimenez altered Escalante’s methods to fit his own methodical, less colorful style. In the last two years, Jimenez’s calculus students have scored even better than Escalante’s, proving that teachers with very different temperaments and backgrounds can do what Escalante has done.
Maria Tostado- She is Garfield’s current principal and has had to continue defending the right of underprivileged students to be as challenged in school as affluent students are. Recently she has heard more of the old complaints Escalante remembers from his first years at Garfield: Students shouldn’t be forced to take such difficult courses. The school should ease up.
Tostado shakes her head at this. She vows to continue, and she wonders why everyone has not yet learned the lesson of Jaime Escalante.
(Jay Mathews is a reporter with The Washington Post.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
SLEEPING GIGANTE? Coral Gables* Fla, Mayor George Corrigan is up for re-election next year and already he’s got his campaign theme. In the Nov. 12 Miami Herald, Corrigan explained that next April’s race will be a“Hispanic vs. Anglo campaign” and he is more qualified because his opponent, Commissioner Ratil Valdes-Fauli, is Latino.
Said the dead-serious Corrigan: “We know that Hispanics don’t like to get up early. When we have our commission meetings, he’s the last to arrive.”
LANGUAGE BARRIER: Yet another Anglo politician in Florida, Democratic challenger Dick Anderson, stirred up a storm a week before election day when he charged that state Sen. Javier Souto “can’t even speak English.”
Responding to negative reaction, Anderson called The Miami Herald to “clarify” his remark: “Some of the people that have worked closely with him in the past have said to me that he thinks in Spanish and interprets into English and it doesn’t come out so good as if he thought in English.”
Later, he tried again, to a WTVJ reporter “He can speak English but I think he has a problem making his points.”
Souto answered the charge in seven words, asking the same reporter “Do you understand me? Are we communicating?”
Apparently, Senate District 40 voters thought Souto communicated just fine. He was elected by a 5,500 vote margin, 53%-47%.
WHO’S ASLEEP IN ARIZONA? When we checked with the Democratic Party in Arizona to confirm whether state Sen. Jaime Gutierrez was running this year, we were informed that he was retiring.
When we double checked with Gutierrez’s office, we were told, “No, he is not! But he’s running unopposed.”
With such dynamic support from his own party, lucky he was.
LIFE’S EMBARRASSING FLASHBACKS: Last June, introducing “ Henry C,” a cologne advertised as the “scent of success for the natural man,” San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros splashed some on his neck for reporters and announced, “I need all the help I can get”
I wonder how it’s selling these days?
NOT FUNNY: Estela Esparza, president of Dallas’s Taller Bilingue, sent us a “Bizarro” cartoon cut from the Times Herald there. It shows customers lined up at a tamale wagon under a garish neon sign advertising “Fresh Hot Tamales - Mmmm! They’re Good!”
The vendor explains to the reader “I find that if you sink enough into advertising, people will buy just about any garbage you want to sell them.”
- Kay B&rbaro
Quoting_________________
HARRY BRITT, San Francisco County Supervisor, commenting on injuries to United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta allegedly inflicted by police at an anti-Bush demonstration there Sept. 14:
“Dolores Huerta didn’t provoke this. She would no more do that than she would eat grapes.”
JUAN GONZALEZ, New York Daily News columnist, reacting to the low voter turnout on election day:
"For the next year, I am committing myself to giving half a day for one Saturday each month to register New Yorkers to vote. I will concentrate in different poor, black and Hispanic communities of the city in this nonpartisan effort I urge Daily News readers and community leaders to do likewise and spur a mass volunteer effort... Sooner or later, the other half will be heard.”
Nov. 21,1988
3


Antonio Stevens* Arroyo, guest columnist Marta Salinas, guest columnist
Miracle on Morse Street
It happened on Morse Street in North Philadelphia, but it just as easily could have been any barrio in Chicago, New York, Detroit or Newark Once it was an area filled with Slavic, Hungarian and German workers for the textile mills and clothing factories that provided jobs and upward mobility. Now the silent smokestacks of idle factories cast long shadows over barren lots of rubble and boarded-up buildings. Most of the people who still live here are black and Puerto Rican, but all of them are poor.
T(ie streets belong to the drunks, the muggers and the addicts; family people lock themselves inside at dusk. Philadelphia’s Morse Street in the cold of winter is a soulless, frightening place, not unlike Dicken’s London.
The tale I tell centers on la vieja, as she was called. The Old Woman. In her 80s, stooped and frail, she was a relic of the Hungarian past of Morse Street. Asaspinster, she had inherited her father's house and her mother's obsession for fine appearance.
When they died, she stayed on. Because she spoke little English and kept to herself, she represented strangeness to the families who moved in.
The Puerto Rican mothers found her cold and aloof, and the children came to believe she was a witch. Worst of all, the junkies mugged her with impunity, constantly breaking into her house.
Enter Josefina Josefina had been born into a Puerto Rican family that had moved to Philadelphia years ago. Married to an americano, she still exudes the vibrancy and passion of the tropics.
She first came to Morse Street because she was taking care of another old Hungarian woman who wanted to visit her childhood friend. When Josefina saw the conditions on Morse Street, her latina compassion rose to the challenge. She got the police to trap the thieves who broke into la viejats house. She had security gates installed on the windows and got her sons to repair the interior.
The concern was contagious. The able men left on the block told the junkies to backoff. The mothers began to watch and then to wave and to smile as the old woman trudged to and from the grocery store. The children discovered the tastiness of Hungarian baking as the old woman took delight in sharing cookies with the youngsters who knocked on her door.
Two years ago, the day before Thanksgiving, Josefina wanted to invite the old woman home to a family meal. She drove to Morse Street and knocked on la viejals door, but there was no answer.
As she stood in the twilight, softly calling for the old woman, the neighbors came out into the street. “ I haven’t seen her all day,” said a woman, clutching at her coat. “HerTVs been on since last night,” said another.
The police were called; they found an open window. Everyone expected the worst
Once the door was open, Josefina burst inside, impatient to see what had happened to her friend. The old woman had died as she tried to rise from her bed and now lay on the cold floor with the sheet hanging over her body like a shroud. “Como una pajarita, caida de su nido" I was told later. Like a little bird, fallen from her nest.
The house on Morse Street stands alone now. The old woman wanted it given to the church, but- along with her meager belongings - it has little value. What is memorable is the spirit of concern that was reborn because one latina dared to care.
This holiday season, I think of Josefina and the “miracle on Morse Street” I feel that if latinos could show more of our rich religious and cultural roots, we would make the Morse Streets of this country neighborhoods once again. This is the lesson I have learned from what I saw, and it is one I shall not forget. After all, Josefina is my mother.
(Antonio Stevens-Arroyo is director of the Department of Puerto Rican Studies of Brooklyn College, City University of New York.)
The Thanksgiving Box
America is still a land of nostalgia. Even in the ’80s, computers and videos don’t replace memory - that special moment, an unexpected gift, the way humanity reaches out and pulls us back into the circle of love.
That moment came for my family one foggy November in the midst of bleakness. My father had just been diagnosed with ankylosis spondylitis, a rare form of arthritis. He had been a farmer all his life and had no skills or education for anything else.
Mam? stretched the last of our savings without a word to any of us, so my three brothers, four sisters and I were unaffected at first. Then one day the cupboards went dry. Just like old Mother Hubbard.
“Mama?” Was that trembly voice mine? Mother began to cry.
I shook her shoulders. “Mama, why isn’t there any food?"
Finally, she told me. Papi was not going to work. Ever. And - Mama paused - Papi refused to apply for any assistance or free food.
My father was lying in the darkened bedroom with a wet kitchen towel on his forehead.
That meant he had another of his bad headaches, but that didn't stop me. I shook his arm.
“Papi, you can’t let us all starve. You have to go to Welfare.”
My father sat up and looked at me. Gone was his usual grin.
“It’s not charity, Papi. I studied U.S. government. You’ve paid for it by working ail these years. And it’s for emergencies like these.”
Papi turned away to stare at the wall. I didn’t know then what it must be like to be the head of your household and lose your earning power.
I only felt my stomach growling and saw my mothers tears.
“Okay, Papi, you just lie there while we starve quietly.” I slammed the door on my way out
Five minutes later he emerged. “I can’t fight you all,” was ail he said as he headed for the station wagon. Later that evening my parents came home with boxes of cheese and butter, a couple of USDA honey jugs and a sack each of flour, rice and beans.
The next day in the middle of English class, I had to be excused to go see the school nurse. I felt like I had a fever but the main thing that hurt was my heart I had been rude to my father and I had helped my mother force him to do something he didn’t believe in.
The day before Thanksgiving, there was a knock on the door.
A lady in a pretty gray coat stood there with a big box in her arms. “Here,” she said with a big smile. “This is for you and your family. Happy Thanksgiving.” She walked quickly down the steps to her car.
I peeked in the box and saw a huge turkey and cans of pumpkin and a sack of yams. There was Brownie mix and some cranberry sauce.
“Excuse me ma’am-who do we thank?” I called afterthe lady. She stopped, her hand on the car door. “Noone, honey. It’s justfrom folks who care.”
i dragged the box into the kitchen.“Mama, look what a lady brought us.” It was all there, even the whipping cream for the pies. Mama’s brown fingers, twisted from working the crops since she was little, touched each item lovingly before she placed it on the table.
“Did she say what church she was from?”
“Nope, just said it was from people who cared.”
I wanted there to be someone I could thank and hug and tell what a difference they had made in our lives. We had been low on more than just food and Thanksgiving fixings. Hope for the future had run out with Papfs job.
I believe that even he started thinking things would work out when he saw Mama bustling around in the kitchen making the dressing that night The smell of baking pies was better than a bedtime story.
We never did find out who the caring folks were, but every year at this time I remember the Thanksgiving box and breathe a silent thank you. Caring folks, wherever you are, here’s a warm, belated thank-you hug.
(Marta Salinas is a migrant labor camp nurse in Woodburn, Ore.)
4
Nov. 21,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


COLLECTING
MIGRANT WORKERS: A 19-page report titled “The Role of Mexican Labor in the North American Economy of the 1990s” discusses the impact of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 on the flow of Mexican migrant workers and on immigrant-dependent industries in Southern California. For a free copy, write U.S.-Mexican Studies, D-010, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, Calif. 92093.
AIDS AMONG MILITARY APPLICANTS: The Nov. 11 issueofthe Centers for Disease Control’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report contains an article on AIDS among military applicants according to gender, race and ethnicity. For a copy send $1 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
CITIZENSHIP HANDBOOK: “HandbookforCitizenship” isa104-page guide to prepare folks for the U.S. citizenship exam. It includes commonly asked questions as well as overviews of the areas covered in the exam. For a copy, send $6.96 to Alemany Press, 2501 Industrial Parkway West, Hayward, Calif. 94546 (415) 887-7070.
HISPANIC ELDERLY: “The Hispanic Elderly: A Cultural Signature” is a 278-page collection of 10 essays based on research by the National Hispanic Council on Aging. For a copy send $20.45 to NHCoA, 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 745-2521.
CONGRESSIONAL VOTING RECORD: To obtain a free voting record of Congress members on higher education issues during the 100th session, send a self-addressed mailing label to the American Council on Education, Division on Governmental Relations, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D.C. 20036.
CITY, COUNTY DATA: The U.S. Census Bureau’s “County and City Data Book, 1988” offers 964 pages of statistics, including racial and ethnic composition, on 3,139 counties and 952 cities. To order a copy, send $36 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783-3238.
GRADUATE ENGINEERING FELLOWSHIPS: The National Consortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering is accepting applications for its 1989 fellowship competition. Each of the 150 fellowships pays tuition, fees and a stipend, as well as provides summer employment. Deadline is Dec. 1. For information write GEM, P.O. Box 537, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556 (219) 239-7183.
DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS: “Como Actuar: Escuelas Sin Drogas” is an 80-page Spanish-language booklet by the U.S. Department of Education with guidance on action against drug abuse in our schools. For free copies write U.S. Dept, of Ed., Office for Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, 400 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington, D.C. 20202 (202) 732-5700.
CONNECTING
MUSEUM TO GO MULTICULTURAL
The Boston Children’s Museum will receive a $100,000 grant from the Washington, D.C. -based Hitachi Foundation to develop multicultural education programs, it announced this month.
The three-year grant will allow the museum to use the programs in public schools in Boston and its suburbs. The curriculum generated by the museum will be used to teach the students and help them appreciate the cultural and linguistic differences among ethnic groups. In addition to Hispanics, the curriculum will key on blacks, Southeast Asians, East Asians, Native Americans and Europeans.
The Multicultural Curriculum Development Project will use 40 teachers and members from each ethnic group to develop materials on each group’s history before coming to the United States, reasons for emigrating, integration into U.S. society and an overview of language, customs and family life.
AIDS TELECONFERENCES II SET
The second Pan American Teleconference on AIDS, to be broadcast live from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to more than 25 countries in the Americas from Dec. 12-14, will give health care professionals, researchers, educators and the media the latest information on the fatal disease.
Sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization, a group headquartered in Washington, D.C., the teleconference will be transmitted in Spanish, English, French and Portuguese. Last year's teleconference reached45,OCX) people, PAHO estimated. Information on the spread of the disease, its diagnosis, treatment and clinical management will be presented by experts from around the world. There will be panels this year on AIDS among minorities and transmission from mothers to children. Debates will also be held on blood and sexual transmission.
For further information contact Ronald St John, M.D., Health Situation and Trend Assessment Program Coordinator, PAHO, 523 23rd St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20037 (202) 861-3459.
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES
As part of its effort to involve Hispanics and other minorities in its management California First Bank names Herman Gallegos as a director of its newly acquired Union Bank in Los Angeles. Gallegos is a San Francisco management consultant who also is a director of Pacific Telesis Group... The Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp. announces that Linda Valencia Martinez, the executive director of the New Mexico Council on Vocational Education in Albuquerque, is one of 10 finalists for its 21 st Century Woman Award...
Calendar
THIS WEEK
COURT INTERPRETER CONFERENCE Edison, N.J. Nov. 21,22
A conference designed to improve the skills of court interpreters will be sponsored by the New Jersey Office of the Courts. Topics to be covered in workshops include the effects of dialectical differences on communication, Caribbean dialects, and training and credentialing of court interpreters. Martha Queen (609) 633-8107
BOOK FAIR
Guadalajara, Mexico Nov. 23-Dec. 4 The Guadalajara International Book Fair will feature books from most Latin American countries, focusing on Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South America The program includes workshops on buying for institutions and new technologies for book production
and design.
Emmanuel Carballo 011-52-36-25-28-17 LATIN JAZZ
Washington, D.C. November 25, 26 The National Museum of American History will feature Eddie Palmieri and his Latin Jazz Octet as part of its “All American Music” performance series. Palmieri is a five-time Grammy award-winning band leader and a leading figure in the “Machito” big band style.
Public Information (202) 357-2700
COMING SOON
MEDIA CONFERENCE Latino Committee on the Media Chicago Nov. 30 Elizabeth Burke (312) 247-0707
BENEFIT RECEPTION AND DANCE The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy New York Dec. 2 Gerson Borrero(212) 564-1075 Nov. 21,1988
ENGLISH PLUS MEETING English Plus Information Clearinghouse Washington, D.C. Dec. 2 Mary Carol Combs (202) 544-0004
HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP SYMPOSIUM Kearney State College School of Education Kearney, Neb. Dec. 3 Benjamin Avila (308) 234-8502
HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM Georgetown University Washington, D.C. Dec. 10 Robert Drinan (202) 662-9000
Calendar will publish free announcements regarding events of interest to the Hispanic community. Information should be received at least two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
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DIRECTOR OF CHICANO STUDIES
The University of Texas at El Paso
The University of Texas at El Paso seeks candidates for the position of Director of the Chicano Studies Program with a joint faculty appointment in an academic department. Rank and salary are open and commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Required qualifications: Earned doctorate in liberal arts, science, education, nursing and/or allied health, business, and engineering; strong record of teaching, scholarly activity, and administrative experience; ability to work with various academic units and community groups; fluent in Spanish and knowledgeable of the demographics of the Chicano population.
Duties: Responsible for course and program development; initiates and coordinates research and publication efforts; organizes lecture series and cultural performances, often in collaboration with community organizations and regional universities; teaching and student advising; the director reports directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Chicano Studies offers an interdisciplinary BA and selected minor areas of academic concentration. The program facilitates research, publications, and cultural services of importance to the Chicano community.
The position is available after June 1,1989. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and publication samples must be submitted by December 7,1988 to:
Dennis J. Bixler-M&rquez, Chicano Studies Director Search Committee, Chicano Studies Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0563
Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer.
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities in 1989 may be offered in the following fields:
Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician Attorney/Law Clerk Technical Information Specialist Administrative Assistant
The program consists of 90- or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments interspersed with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission, and operations. Sessions for 1989 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the January-April session must submit their applications by December 3,1988. Upon completion of the 90- to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master’s degrees will be eligible for an additional 13-month appointment.
Eligibility includes possession of a graduate degree, received within one year of appointment, in one of the fields designated for the program, or full-time graduate study in one of these fields. To compete for this opportunity, send a completed Standard Form 171, Application for Employment, indicating one of the above fields, to Carmen Mendez, Coordinator, Hispanic Employment Program, Library of Congress, James Madison Memorial Bldg., LM 647, Washington, D.C. 20540.
For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, at (202) 707-5620.
EDITOR/JOURNALIST/
RESEARCHER
Need bilingual editor-journalist-researcher preferably knowledgeable about Mexico. Resume. Mexico-United States Institute, 50 E St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003.
LATINO CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION PROJECT
BILINGUAL CHILD ABUSE SPECIALIST ($29K) and PUBLIC EDUCATION COORDINATOR ($24K) for innovative Latino Child Abuse Prevention Project in Washington, D.C. For application information call Mirna Zepeda (202) 939-8765.
GRAPHIC DESIGN
BARRIO GRAPHICS/CENTRO DE ARTE in Washington, D.C. offers graphic design services: Design • Typesetting • Layout • Illustration.
Barrio Graphics/Centro de Arte 1470 Irving Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-7755
JOURNALISTS/CREATIVE WRITERS: Submissions are welcome for Weekly Report’s “guest columnist” feature. Approx 500 words For writer’s guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to: Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
IHBRY\NT HI COLLEGE
------------------- PRESIDENT
BRYANT COLLEGE
The Board of Trustees of Bryant College invites nominations and applications for the position of president. The new president will assume office on August 1,1989.
The College, celebrating its 125th anniversary, is located in the rolling hills of New England on a 300-acre suburban campus in the greater Providence-Boston area, close to Newport. Some 300 day students are enrolled in this thriving, independent, residential business college which awards undergraduate and graduate degrees. Another 2,600 evening and graduate students complete their programs on a part-time basis.
The College also provides extensive professional continuing education and business services to the community.
The President is the chief executive officer of the College, accountable primarily to the Board of Trustees for overall academic, administrative, financial, organizational and community affairs. The President is actively involved in external institutional advancement activities.
The successful candidate must have a strong commitment to private higher education and provide evidence of decisive leadership and financial acumen. He or she must have a record of working effectively with various constituencies and be able to implement the strategic mission and goals of the College. The successful candidate should also possess a commitment to the development of student values and student abilities to assume business leadership. Finally, he or she must have acceptable academic qualifications, with an earned doctorate preferred.
The formal review of nominations and applications will begin immediately and will continue until the position is filled. Candidates are encouraged, however, to submit vitae by December 23,1988. Please send materials to:
BRYANT COLLEGE PRESIDENT SEARCH COMMITTEE P.O. Box 43 450 Douglas Pike Smithfield, Rl 02917-1284
Bryant College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.
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Nov. 21,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
Lewis&Clark
PRESIDENT
The Board of Trustees of Lewis and Clark College invites nominations and applications for the position of President.
Lewis and Clark is a private coeducational institution, dedicated to the liberal arts, with a strong 121-year-old tradition of independence and academic innovation. It encompasses three divisions.
The undergraduate College of Arts and Sciences enrolls 1,920 students in 30 Bachelor’s degree majors which grow out of a fully integrated core curriculum and strong interdisciplinary programs in international studies, gender studies, and the relation of science and technology to society and its values.
The Graduate School of Professional Studies enrolls more than 600 students in five degree programs at the Master’s level.
The Law School enrolls 650 students in day and evening programs leading to the Juris Doctor degree and the LL.M. degree in Environmental and Natural Resources Law.
The college is located on a beautiful 130-acre campus seven miles from downtown Portland, which is the center of a metropolitan area with a population of nearly 1.3 million.
Candidates for the Presidency will show a demonstrated commitment to the values of liberal arts education, interest and ability in major fund- raising activities, the capacity for rigorous leadership on a continuing basis, and effectiveness in relating to all segments of a diversified college community and in representing that community to external constituencies.
Leading candidates will be seasoned and successful leaders of academic organizations. An earned doctoral degree or its equivalent is strongly preferred.
Although nominations and applications will be accepted until the position is filled, those submitted by December 15 are best assured of receiving full consideration. All inquiries, nominations, and applications will be held in strictest confidence, and should be sent to:
John R. Faust, Jr. Chairman President, Search Committee Lewis and Clark College 0615 SW Palatine Hill Ftoad Portland, OR 97219
Lewis and Clark College is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer.
Nominations of and applications from women and minorities are especially encouraged.
DIRECTOR
OFFICE OF MINORITY CONCERNS
The American Council on Education is currently accepting applications and nominations for the position of Director for its Office of Minority Concerns. The Director will collaborate with other ACE offices, member institutions, and other higher education groups in studying and illuminating issues and problems of particular concern to minority groups, including ACE’s Special Minority Initiatives. The Director will also convene meetings of the Commission on Minorities on Higher Education; sponsor national forums, seminars and conferences on relevant issues; and provide leadership in the development of inter-association efforts to address minority concerns in higher education.
Candidates should have considerable executive experience in minority affairs, extensive knowledge of higher education, and demonstrated project management skills. Excellent written and verbal communication skills are required. Some knowledge of development and fund-raising is preferred but not essential.
Nominations and/or letters of application should be directed to:
Director of Minority Concerns Search American Council on Education
One Dupont Circle, NW, Room 804 Washington, D.C. 20036
RIO HONDO COLLEGE
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL FACILITIES. Must have five years related maintenance experience AND three years supervisory experience in maintenance. For information and application, call Jean (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whitter, Calif. 90608. eoe/aa.
BILINGUAL
(ENGLISH/SPANISH)
SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST
Small, busy office in downtown Washington, D.C., seeks responsible "front desk" individual to answer phones and perform general office duties. Excellent phone skills; written and verbal skills in English and Spanish; excellent typing skills; IBM/pc experience. Must be able to work under pressure and maintain composure. EOE. Non-Smoker. $16,000 -$18,000 negotiable.
PLEASE NO TELEPHONE CALLS OR VISITS. Send resumes to: Hispanic Designers Inc., 1000 16th St. NW, #504, Washington, D.C. 20036.
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Arts & Entertainment
MORE FROM THE FILM FESTIVAL FILE: The first National Latino Film and Video Festival concludes this week, bringing to a close the longest ever season of Hispanic film festivals in the country.
Hosted by New York’s El Museo del Barrio, the new festival closes Nov. 23 with the screening of its winner in the feature-film length category - Juan Jos6 Jusicfs Made in Argentina - and The Milagro Beanfield War.
More than 60 film and video projects will have been screened throughout the festival. Several of them were also screened this year at the 13th annual San Antonio CineFestival, which closed Nov. 13.
Nearly 90 films and videos were seen at this year's CineFestival, which gave its“special jury” Premio Mesquite award to Isaac Artenstein’s Break of Dawn. Mesquites were also given in four other categories.
This year's CineFestival - staged at San Antonio’s Guadalupe Theatre - held a symposium titled Who Needs a Film Festival,
Anyway? which brought together the directors of the nation’s five Hispanic film festivals.
The nation’s Hispanic film festival season began in the summer in Chicago. San Francisco and San Juan, Puerto Rico, hosted Latino film fests last month.
Top films from the New York festival will travel this week to the International Centerof Photography in New York for screenings Nov. 24 to Jan. 8. Award-winning titles from the festival will also be screened at the Neighborhood Film Project, in Philadelphia, Nov. 30 to Dec. 4.
SING FOR YOUR BEER: Brewer Anheuser-Busch will sponsors national Hispanic music talent search that is expected to hold local contests in some 20 U.S. cities.
The Budweiser Gran Concurso Musical is being conducted in conjunction with Spanish-language radio stations. Local winners get $1,000; regional winners get $2,000, a recording contract with a major label and the chance to record a Budweiser radio commercial.
A regional playoff already has taken place in Chicago, with local band Los Supersonicos taking first place.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
TV AND RADIO INTERNS: NBC is accepting applications from college juniors, seniors and graduate students for non-paying spring internship positions in its Washington, D.C., TV and radio stations - WRC-TV and WKYS-FM.
All NBC stations offer internships in the news and sports divisions, as well as minority fellowship programs for college students going on to graduate school. Internships are also offered during the summer and fall.
For further information, contact the internship coordinator at the employee relations division of your local NBC office. Following is a list of phone numbers for NBC’s major offices: Washington, D.C. (202) 885-4058; Burbank, Calif. (714) 634-4444; New York (212) 664-4444; Chicago (312) 861-5555; Cleveland (216) 344-3333.
JOB BANKS: Among the job referral services available to journalists around the country
are these:
The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, based In Washington, D.C, offers Job Exchange, a computerized service free to members. Non-members pay a $20 fee. Contact Jocelyn Cdrdova at (202) 783-6228.
JOB/NET is offered free by the Institute for Journalism Education in Berkeley, Calif. Contact Jeff Rivers at (415) 642-8287.
Job Bank is an independent referral service exclusively for journalists. It is not limited to minorities and recently began to offer listings for free. Contact Jenny Wostendiek in Cin-naminson, N.J. (609) 786-1910.
The New England Newspaper Association has a free news and non-news job bank based in Salem, Mass. Contact Dan Murphy at (508) 744-8940.
The California Chicano News Media Association offers JOBank. A fee is optional. Contact Mike Castro in Los Angeles at (213) 743-7158.
AN PA NEWS: The December issue of Presstime, the journal put out by the American Newspaper Publishers Association, will
contain a four-page list of journalism fellowships and other programs geared primarily to journalism professionals. For a copy, send $8.33 to Presstime or call author Rolf Rykken at The Newspaper Centerin Reston, Va.(703) 648-1109.
ANPA is also developing a manual for newspaper managers on supervising a multicultural staff. Suggestions are requested on methods to counter stereotyping, racism, culture and ethnic jokes, among otherthings. Send ideas to Terri Dickerson-Jones, Minority Affairs Manager.
Write ANPA Foundation or Presstime, The Newspaper Center, Box 17407, Dulles Airport, Washington, D.C. 20041.
PLUS: The Latino Committee on the Media will hold its third annual conference Nov. 30 in Chicago. Henry Cisneros is scheduled to speak. Call (312) 247-0707...
ECO, the Spanish-language 24-hour news service broadcast on the Galavision cable network, has expanded its programming to six days a week coverage to include Saturdays - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H&ctor Ericksen* Mendoza Editor F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report maybe reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
Personal $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
8
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Making The News This Week USA Today mentions U.S. Rep. Manuel Lujan (RN.M.) as a top candidate to head the U .S. Department of Interior in the incoming George Bush administration. Lujan did not run for re-election . . . With the election loss of U . S . Rep. Fernand St. Germain (DR.I.), Rep . Henry Gonzalez (DTexas) becomes the next in line to head the powerful House Banking Committee ... San Diego Mayor Maureen O'Connor appoints Andrea Skorepa to chair the Mayor's Latino Advisory Committee ... Refugee Carlos Vaquerano unveils in Los Angeles what he says is a death-threat letter addressed to him and three other Salvadoran activists by right-wing death squads from El Salvador . . . Sacramento, Calif. , police arrest landlady Dorothea Montalvo Puente, 59, after finding seven un ide • '19,;dloflitlGh!!\ ried in the yard of her rooming house. Police speculate sfie b n tfh''l'hale accomplice killed the elderly boarders for their Social Security checks. .. Panamanian American Lafflt Plncay becomes only the second jockey ever to win 7,000 races after achieving two victories at Hollywood Park in California ... Dr. Rafael Tavares, a New York psychiatrist who specialized in Hispanic mental health problems and developed educational programs to stem the spread of AIDS, particularly among Hispanics, dies of a heart attack Nov . 8 . He was 44 years old ... Elizabeth Ramos, who in January won a $750,000 award in the nation's first AIDS malpractice case , dies Nov. 4 . Ramos, a former bookkeeper who said she contracted the disease from a former boyfriend, was originally diagnosed as having asthma and imaginary ailments . . . FBI Investigating Into Polling-Place Guards The FBI is looking into charges that uni formed security guards posted at Orange County , Calif, polling places by the Republican Party Nov. 8 intimidated voters. County Democratic Party officials have claimed that the move was designed to keep Hispanics away from the polls in Latino areas . Guards carried signs in Spanish and English that read , "If you ' re not a citizen, don't vote. " No signs are allowed within 100 feet of a voting booth, according to Orange County Registrar Don Tanney. Without their presence to discourage illegal voting, Curt Pringle, the Republican victor over Christian Thierbach in the 72 nd state Assembly District race, said he may have lost his bid for re-election . He won by 671 votes out of 73,167 cast. State Legislators Increase to 127 The number of Hispanic state legislators grew slightly from 1986 to 1988, going from 119 to 127, found a tally by Weekly Report conducted after the Nov . 8 elections. The biggest single increase came in New Mexico, where there are 43 Latino lawmakers as compared with 39 two years earlier. The state accounts for34% of the nation's Hispanic officials holding state-level office . Fourteen are senators and one sits on the Supreme Court. The other states that accounted for the increase over the tw
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.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------, 1 U.S. English Leader Says State Initiatives Will Continue U.S . English plans to focus its efforts on more state initiatives, as well as English proficiency classes and bilingual education reform, according to the acting director for the organization, Stanley Diamond. Responding Nov . 15 to the recommend ations of recently resigned president linda Chavez that the organization move from what she called devisive initiatives toward education, Diamond said the five-year-old group will not be moving radically from its current course following the passage of official-English ballot measures in Florida, Colorado and Arizona . "The three victories give us the momentum to go ahead. .. with initiatives and programs," said Diamond. He also indicated that one of his goals is a Hispanic leadership that re presents the best interests of the country's Hispanics. Diamond described approval by Florida's Cuban voters of the English initiative as " a repudiation of Hispanic political leadership." He indicated, however, that it was critical for a healing process to take place with "Hispanics and other leadership" that opposed the measures. Diamond said in the next year U . S . English may lend support to English initiatives to be introduced in at least 20 states which could include Washington, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Texas. The Texas and New Jersey legislatures must vote to put such measures on their ballot. Washington's legislature can put the measure on the ballot or voters can do it through the initiative process. Massachusetts uses solely the voter initiative method . The group's acting director said he ex pected follow-up legislation in the Florida and Colorado state houses that would de termine the application oft he newly passed initiatives to areas such as bilingual education and ballots. U.S. English currently contracts with the Cambria Institute in Southern California to provide English-language instruction and plans to expand the program to Washington , D.C., and Colorado, enlarging that portion of the budget from $700,000 spent in 1988 to $2 million, Diamond said. Despite the success of all three ballot measures, opponents of the officiaHanguage laws vow to fight official-English advocates at every turn. The leader of an anti-official English Arizona group, Tom Espinoza, pointed to a positive by-product of that state's bitter language battle . "There is now a great deal of cam raderie between the Hispanic , Asian and Jewish communities," said Espinoza , a real estate developer in Phoenix. Richard Castro , director of the Denver City and County Human Rights and Com munity Relations agency, said another plus resulting from the initiative is that residents can now use it to lobby the state legislature and ask, " Where are the programs to increase English fluency? " -Sophia Nieves Federal Cutbacks Hurt Latinos More Fla Lawmakers Ensure i State Speaker Victory Federal government budget cutbacks in pro grams for low-income families are a significant part of the reason that Hispanics are the only ethnic or racial group whose poverty rates have not declined since the recession of the early 1980s, according to a report released by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Nov . 3. "Since Hispanics are more likely to be poor, they are more heavily affected by reductions," said Robert Greenstein , director of the center . Since 1982, he said, Latinos have made up only half the income losses suffered during the recession . The report, "Shortchanged: Recent Develop ments in Hispanic Poverty, Income and Employ ment," is based on U . S . Census Bureau figures. It indicates that in 1978, 21. 6% of Hispanics lived below the poverty line . By last year that number had increased by one third to 28.2%. . In the decade between 1978 and 1987, the number of Hispanic married-couple families 2 Military Measures AIDS Hispanic male military applicants from October 1985 through March 1988 were nearly three times as likely to be infected with the AIDS virus as were white ones, according to a Nov . 11 report by the Centers for Disease Control. The prevalence rates per every 1 ,000 applicants among the groups surveyed were : Tested Positive Rate HISPANIC Male 63,448 144 2 . 3 Female 7,781 4 0.5 WHITE Male 978,519 753 0.8 Female 138,219 39 0.3 BLACK Male 228,142 1,024 4 . 5 Female 58,220 96 1.6 living in poverty soared from 11.9% to 18 . 1 %. The rate for children also increased by half so that in 1987 39.6% of Hispanic children-two in five were poor. Rates were highest for Puerto Ricans in each of these categories . The study also supports the importance of education in wage-earning. Among Hispanics over 25 years old without a high school diploma, the poverty rate jumped from 25 . 3% in 1978 to 36.3% in 1987. Initiatives Increase Voters continued from page 1 in Arizona, Colorado and Florida as another reason why Hispanic voter participation may have risen . In other election related news: • Joseph Baca, a d istrict court judge in Albuquerque, N.M., wins a seat on the state Supreme Court . • Ralph Acosta is re-elected to his third term in Pennsylvania's House District 180. • Lorenzo Delgado did not win a seat in New York's state Senate as reported in last week's issue . Felix Perez Cuban American legislators in Florida broke I away from their Republican colleagues to support state Rep . Tom Gustafson (D-Fort Lauderdale) as the next House speaker and are being credited by many as ensuring his victory . Dissident Democrat Carl Carpenter needed the support of the legislature's 47 Republi cans and 13 Democrats to beat Gustafson , who was speaker designate. But with the seven errant Republican Latinos and a majority of the House's 120 members, Gustafson won the post, which he will assume Nov. 22. The conservative Carpenter is the most vocal of those who say that the seven Latinos held the key in the close race . Rep . Lincoln Diaz-Ballart would not take such credit, but said they preferred Gustafson because, " We know him. He listens to us . " Now they hope that Gustafson will create a special legislative office for Hispanics, though it was insisted no deal was cut. Gustafson has indicated that he would be amenable to setting up such an office , as well as another for the black population . D.C. Sleepout Protest Seeks Shelter Fifteen Hispanic organizations banded together Nov . 14 in Washington, D .C., to announce a request that Mayor Marion Barry open a 200-bed shelter for the Hispanic homeless before winter. Within the city, Spanish-speaking persons in need of shelter are estimated to number at least 200. In an effort to draw attention to inadequate temporary shelter, about 30 people slept on the steps of a church in the largely Hispanic Adams-Morgan area. Groups supporting the effort included the Central American Refugee Center, the League of United Latin American Citizens, the National Council of Hispanic Women and National Image. According to Juana Martin , director of Shelter for the Homeless , a culturally sensitive shelter run by a non-profit organization would help the Hispanic homeless avail themselves of city services . Martin characterized them as male heads of households fleeing wartime situations . With the inability to find work, she said, comes despondence and problems such as alcoholism. A spokesperson for the D .C. Commission on Social Serv ices did not comment on the specific request, but indicated contractors employed by the city to provide shelters will be checked to ensure they have bilingual staff members. -Sophia Nieves Hispani c Link Weekly Report

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Jay Mathews, guest columnist Chronicling Jaime Escalante When Jaime Escalante welcomed me into his remote third -floor classroom at East Los Angeles' Garfield High School six years ago, I had no idea what an adventure we were both about to begin . He had a problem with the Educational Testing Service, which had questioned the Advanced Placement scores of 14 of his 18 calculus students. I had wanted to ask about that, but I was even more interested in discovering how he had managed to find any calculus students in a school known principally for poverty, low test scores and occasional gang fights. For the next several years, I watched and listened and talked to him and his students. As I probed deeper into his method and results , encountering surprise after surprise, he continued to build Garfield's advanced mathematics program to a level that, by 1987, exceeded anything that had ever been done in an inner-city school . That year, 129 Garfield students took the AP calculus examination , more than all but three public schools in the entire country. Fewer than 2% of U . S . students ever tried the difficult test, yettwothirdsoftheGarfield students received grades high enough for calculus credit in the nation's finest universities. Today Escalante, a rumpled, balding 57year-old Bolivian immigrant , has become a national hero . His name is praised in the presidential debates. Senators and education secretaries visit his classroom. In my new book, " Escalante: The Best Teacher in America," I try to explain how this came about and what this hero is really made of. Despite repeated suggestions that he cut down his teaching load a n d give himself up to the lecture circuit, Escalante arrives at school by7:30 a . m . every day and is rarely gone by5 p . m . He is uncomfortable with h i s celebrity status. He hates the subtitle of my book . I have my reasons for nominating Escalante as the nation's best teacher. But we both realize, as the book explains, how many other people had a role in his success and how very many people are needed to fight for his methods and ideas, still far from being widely accepted despite his new fame . Educators , parents and politicians who want to do what Escalante has done should know something about the unsung heroes behind the Garfield story: Henry Gradillas-He was Garfield's principal from 1981 to 1987 when Escalante ' s program took off . He fought ferociously for more s pace and equipment for mathematics , and forced up academic s t andards thro'ughout the school . No principal in Los Angeles has e ver had such success introducing difficult courses to an inner-city school, yet school district administrators appeared so leery of his aggressive methods that they assigned him headquarters work coord i nating asbestos removal when he returned this year from a sabbatical . State education officials, appalled at this, are trying to arrange other work for him . Ben Jimenez-A quiet young teacher born in East Los Angeles, Jimenez altered Escalante's methods to fit his own methodical , less colorful style . In the last two years, Jimenez's calculus students have scored even better than Escalante 's, proving that teachers with very different temperaments and backgrounds can do what Escalante has done. Maria TostadoShe is Garfielcfs current principal and has had to continue defending the right of underprivileged students to be as challenged in school as affluent students are . Recently she has heard more of the old complaints Escalante remembers from his first yea r s at Garfield : Students shouldn't be forced to take such difficult courses. The school should ease up. Tostado shakes her head at this. She vows to continue, and she w ond e rs why everyone has not yet the lesson of Jaime E s calante. (Jay Mathews is a reporter with The Washington Post . ) Sin pelos en Ia lengua SLEEPING GIGANTF? Coral Gables, Fla, Mayor George Corrigan is up for re-election next year and already he's got his campaign theme. In the Nov . 12 Miami Herald , Corrigan explained that next April's race will be a "Hispanic vs . Anglo campaign" and he is more qualifi ed because his opponent, Commissioner Raul ValdesFaull, is Latino. Said the dead-serious Corrigan : "We know that Hispanics don't like to get up early . When we have our commission meetings, he's the last to arrive." LANGUAGE BARRIER: Yet another Anglo politician in Florida , Democratic challenger Dick Anderson, stirred up a storm a week before election day when he charged that state Sen. Javier Souto " can ' t even speak English." Responding to negative reaction, Anderson called The Miami Herald to "clarify" his remark: " Some of the people that have worked closely with him in the past have said to me that he thinks in Spanish and interprets into English and it doesn't come out so good as if he thought in English . " Later, he tried again, to a WTVJ reporter. " He can speak English but I think he has a problem making his points." Souto answered the charge in seven words , asking the same reporter. " Do you understand me? Are we communicating? " Apparently , Senate District 40 voters thought Souto com municatedjustfine. He was elected bya5,500 vote margin,53%-47% . WHO'S ASLEEP IN ARIZONA? When we checked with the Democratic Party in Arizona to confirm whether state Sen . Jaime Gutierrez was running this year , we were informed that he was retiring . When we double checked with Gutierreis office, we were told, "No, he is not! But he's running unopposed." With such dynamic support from his own party, lucky he was. LIFE ' S EMBARRASSING FLASHBACKS: Last June , introducing "Henry C," a cologne advertised as the "scent of success for the natural man, " San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros splashed some on his neck for reporters and announced, " I need all the help I can get. " I wonder how ifs selling these days? NOT FUNNY: Estela Esparza, president of Dallas ' s Taller Bilingue , sent us a " Bizarro " cartoon cut from the Times Herald there . It shows customers lined up at a tamale wagon under a garish neon sign advert i sing " Fresh Hot Tamales Mmmm! They're Good! " The vendor explains to the reader. "I find that if you sink enough into advertising , people will buy just about any garbage you want to sell them . " Kay Barbaro Quoting ... HARRY BRITT, San Francisco County Supervisor , commenting on injuries to United Farm Workers Vice President Dolores Huerta allegedly inflicted by police at an anti-Bush demonstration there Sept. 14: " Dolores Huerta d i dn ' t provoke this . She would no more ao that than she would eat grapes." JUAN. GONZALEZ, New York Daily News columnist, reacting to the low voter turnout on election day: " For the next year, I am committing myself to giving half a day for one Saturday each month to register New Yorkers to vote . 1 will concentrate in different poor, black and Hispanic communities of the city i n this nonpartisan effort I urge Daily News readers and community leaders to do likewise and spur a mass volunteer effort ... Sooner or later, the other half will be heard . " Hi spani c Link W eekl y R e p o rt Nov. 21, 1988 3

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Antonio Stevens-Arroyo, guest columnist Miracle on Morse Street It happened on Morse Street in North Philadelphia, but it just as easily could have been any barrio in Chicago, New York, Detroit or Newark. Once it was an area filled with Slavic, Hungarian and Geri'Tlan workers for the textile mills and clothing factories that provided jobs and upward mobility. Now the silent smokestacks of idle factories cast long shadows over barren lots of rubble and boarded-up buildings. Most of the people who still live here are black and Puerto Rican , but all of them are poor. Tf"le streets belong to the drunks, the muggers and the addicts; family people lock themselves inside at dusk. Philadelphia's Morse Street in the cold of winter is a soulless, frightening place, not unlike Dicken's London. The tale I tell centers on Ia vieia. as she was called. The Old Woman . In her 80s, stooped and frail, she was a relic of the Hungarian past of Morse Street. As a spinster, she had inherited her father's house and her mother's obsession for fine appearance. When they died, she stayed on. Because she spoke little English and kept to herself, she represented strangeness to the families who moved in . The Puerto Rican mothers found her cold and aloof, and the children came to believe she was a witch . Worst of all, the junkies mugged her with impunity, constantly breaking into her house. Enter Josefina Joseflna had been born into a Puerto Rican family that had moved to Philadelphia years ago. Married to an america no , she still exudes the vibrancy and passion of the tropics. She first came to Morse Street because she was taking care of another old Hungarian woman who wanted to visit her childhood friend. When Josefina saw the conditions on Morse Street, her latina compassion rose to the challenge . She got the police to trap the thieves who broke into Ia viejcis house. She had security gates installed on the windows and got her sons to repair the interior. The concern was contagious. The able men left on the block told the junkies to back off. The mothers began to watch and then to wave and to smile as the old woman trudged to and from the grocery store . The children discovered the tastiness of Hungarian baking as the old woman took delight in sharing cookies with the youngsters who knocked on her door. Two years ago, the day before Thanksgiving, Josefina wanted to invite the old woman home to a family meal. She drove to Morse Street and knocked on Ia viejcis door, but there was no answer. As -she stood in the twilight, softly calling for the old woman, the neighbors came out into the street. "I haven't seen her all day," said a woman, clutching at her coat. "HerTVs been on since last night," said another. The police were called; they found an open window. Everyone expected the worst. Once the door was open, Josefina burst inside, impatient to see what had happened to her friend. The old woman had died as she tried to rise from her bed and now lay on the cold floor with the sheet hanging over her body like a shroud. " Como una pajarita. caida de su nido," 1 was told later. Like a little bird, fallen from her nest. The house on Morse Street stands alone now. The old woman wanted it given to the. church, butalong with her meager belongings -it has little value. What is memorable is the spirit of concern that was reborn because one latina dared to care. This holiday season, I think of Josefina and the "miracle on Morse Street. " 1 feel that if Iatinos could show more of our rich religious and cultural roots, we would make the Morse Streets of this country neighborhoods once again. This is the lesson I have learned from what 1 saw, and it is one I shall not forget. After all, Josefina is my mother. (Antonio Stevens-Arroyo is director of the Department of Puerto Rican Studies of Brooklyn City University of New York.) Marta Salinas, guest columnist . The Thanksgiving Box America is still a land of nostalgia . Even in the '80s, computers and videos don't replace memory that special moment, an unexpected gift, the way humanity reaches out and pulls us back into the circle of love. That moment came for my family one foggy November in the midst of bleakness. My father had just been diagnosed with ankylosis spondylitis, a rare form of arthritis . He had been a farmer all his life and had no skills or education for anything else. stretched the last of our savings without a word to any of us , so my three brothers, four sisters and I were unaffected at first. Then one day the cupboards went dry. Just like old Mother Hubbard. "Mama?" Was that trembly voice mine? Mother began to cry. I shook her shoulders. "Mama, why isn't there any food?" Finally , she told me. Papi was not going to work. Ever. And Mama paused Papi refused to apply for any assistance or free food. My father was lying in the darkened bedroom with a wet kitchen towel on his forehead. That meant he had another of his bad head aches, but that didn't stop me . I shook his arm. " Papi, you can't let us all starve. You have to go to Welfare . " My father sat up and looked at me . Gone was his usual grin . "lfs not charity, Papi. I studied U.S. government. You ' ve paid for it by working all these years . And ifs for emergencies like these." Papi turned away to stareatthewall. I didn't know then what it must be like to be the head ofyourhousehold and lose your earning power. I only felt my stomach growling and saw my mother's tears. "Okay, Papi, you just lie there while we starve quietly." I slammed the door on my way out. Five minutes later he emerged. "I can't fight you all, " was all he said as he headed for the station wagon. Later that evening my parents came home with boxes of cheese and butter, a couple of USDA honey jugs and a sack each of flour, rice and beans . The next day in the middle of English class, I had to be excused to go see the school nurse. I felt like I had a fever but the main thing that hurt was my heart . I had been rude to my father and I had helped my mother force him to do something he didn't believe in . The day before Thanksgiving, there was a knock on the door. A lady in a pretty gray coat stood there with a big box in her arms . "Here, " she said with a big smile. "This is for you and your family. Happy Thanksgiving." She walked quickly down the steps to her car. I peeked in the box and saw a huge turkey and cans of pumpkin and a sack of yams. There was Brownie mix and some cranberry sauce. "Excuse me rna' am-who do we thank?" I called after the lady. She stopped, her hand on the car door. "Noone, honey. lfsjustfrom folks who care." I dragged the box into the kitchen. "Mama, look what a lady brought us." It was all there, even the whipping cream for the pies . Mama's brown fingers, twisted from working the crops since she was little, touched each item lovingly before she placed it on the table. "Did she say what church she was from?" "Nope, just said it was from people who cared. " I wanted there to be someone I could thank and hug and tell what a difference they had made in our lives . We had been low on more than just food and Thanksgiving fixings. Hope for the future had run out with Paprs job. I believe that even he started thinking things would work out when he saw Mama bustling around in the kitchen making the dressing that night. The smell of baking pies was better than a bedtime story. We never . did find out who the caring folks were, but every year at this time I remember the Thanksgiving box and breathe a silent thank you . Caring folks, wherever you are, here's a warm , belated thankYO!J hug . (Marta Salinas is a migrant labor camp nurse in Woodburn, Ore.) 4 Nov .21,1988 1-iispanic link Weekly Report

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COLLECTING MIGRANT WORKERS: A 19-page report titled "The Role of Mexican Labor in the North American Economy of the 1990s" discusses the impact of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 on the flow of Mexican migrant workers and on immigrant dependent industries in Southern California . For a free copy, write U.S . Mexican Studies, D-010, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, Calif . 92093. AIDS AMONG MILITARY APPLICANTS: The Nov .11 issue of the Centers for Disease Control's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report contains an article on AIDS among military applicants according to gender, race and ethnicity. For a copy send $1 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S . Government Printing Office, Washington, D . C . 20402 (202) 783. CITIZENSHIP HANDBOOK: "HandbookforCitizenship" isa104 page guide to prepare folks for the U.S. citizenship exam. It includes commonly asked questions as well as overviews of the areas covered in the exam. For a copy, send $6.95 to Alemany Press, 2501 Industrial Parkway West , Hayward, Calif. 94545 (415) 887. HISPANIC ELDERLY: "The Hispanic Elderly: A Cultural Signature" is a 278-page collection of 10 essays based on research by the N'at 1 onall:rlspan1c Council on Agi'ng . For a copy-send $20.45 to NHCoA, 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. (202) 745. CONGRESSIONAL VOTING RECORD: To obtain a free voting record of Congress members on higher education issues during the 1 OOth session , send a self-addressed mailing label to the American Council on Education, Division on Governmental Relations, 1 Dupont Circle, Washington, D . C . 20036. CITY, COUNTY DATA: The U.S. Census Bureau's "County and City Data Book, 1988" offers 964 pages of statistics, including racial and ethnic composition, on 3,139 counties and 952 cities. To order a copy, send $36 to Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 783. GRADUATE ENGINEERING FELLOWSHIPS: The National Con sortium for Graduate Degrees for Minorities in Engineering is accepting applications for its 1989 fellowship competition. Each of the 150 fellowships pays tuition, fees and a stipend, as well as provides summer employment. Deadline is Dec . 1 . For information write GEM, P .O. Box 537, Notre Dame, Ind. 46556 (219) 239. DRUG FREE SCHOOLS: "Como Actuar: Escuelas Sin Drogas" is an 80-page Spanish -language booklet by the U . S . Department of Education with guidance on action against drug abuse in our schools. For free copies write U.S. Dept. of Ed., Office for Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, 400 Maryland Ave . SW , Washington, D . C . 20202 (202) 732. and design. CONNECTING MUSEUM TO GO MULTICULTURAL The Boston Children's Museum will receive a $100,000 grant from the Washington, D.C . based Hitachi Foundation to develop multi cultural education programs, it announced this month. The three-year grant will allow the museum to use the programs in public schools in Boston and its suburbs. The curriculum generated by the museum will be used to teach the students and help them appreciate the cultural and linguistic differences among ethnic groups. In addition to Hispanics, the curriculum will key on blacks, Southeast Asians, East Asians, Native Americans and Europeans. Th _ e Multicultural Curriculum Development Project will use 40 teachers and members from each ethnic group to develop materials on each group's history before coming to the United States, reasons for emigrating, integration into U.S. society and an overview of language, customs and family life . AIDS TELECONFERENCES II SET The second Pan American Teleconference on AIDS, to be broadcast live from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to mo -re-than 25 countries in the Americas from Dec. 12, will give health care professionals, researchers, educators and the media the latest information on the fatal disease. Sponsored by the Pan American Health Organization, a group headquartered in Washington, D . C . , the teleconference will be trans mitted in Spanish , English, French and Portuguese. Last year's teleconference reached45,000 people, PAHO estimated. Information on the spread of the disease, its diagnosis, treatment and clinical management will be presented by experts from around the world. There will be panels this year on AIDS among minorities and transmission from mothers to children. Debates will also be held on blood and sexual transmission . For further information contact Ronald St. John, M.D., Health Situation and Trend Assessment Program Coordinator, PAHO, 523 23rd St. NW, Washington, D .C. 20037 (202) 861. OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES As part of its effort to involve Hispanics and other minorities in its management, California First Bank names Herman Gallegos as a director of its newly acquired Union Bank in Los Angeles. Gallegos is a San Francisco management consultant who also is a director of Pacific Telesis Group ... The Ortho Pharmaceutical Corp. announces that Linda Valencia Martinez, the executive director of the New Mexico Council on Vocational Education in Albuquerque, is one of 10 finalists for its 21st Century Woman Award . . . ENGLISH PLUS MEETING Calendar Emmanuel Carballo 011 52-36-25-28-17 English Plus Information Clearinghouse Washington, D . C . Dec . 2 THIS WEEK COURT INTERPRETER CONFERENCE Edison , N.J . Nov. 21, 22 A conference designed to improve the skills of court interpreters will be sponsored by the New Jersey Office of the Courts Topics to be covered in workshops include the effects of dialectical differ ences on communication, Caribbean dialects, and training and credentialing of court interpreters. Martha Queen (609) 633-8107 BOOK FAIR Guadalajara , Mexico Nov. 23-Dec. 4 The Guadalajara International Book Fair will feature books from most Latin American countries , focusing on Me x ico , the Caribbean, Central and South America The program includes workshops on buying for institutions and new technologies for book production Hi s pani c Link Weekly Report LATIN JAZZ Washington , D .C. November 25, 26 The National Museum of American History will feature Eddie Palmieri and his Latin Jazz Octet as part of its " All American Music" performance series . Palmieri is a five-time Gram my award-winning band leader and a leading figure in the "Mach ito" big band style . Public Information (202) 357-2700 COMING SOON MEDIA CONFERENCE Latino Committee on the Media Chicago Nov. 30 Elizabeth Burke (312) 247 BENEFIT RECEPTION AND DANCE The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy New York Dec. 2 Gerson Borrero(212) 564 Nov. 21, 1988 Mary Carol Combs (202) 544-0004 HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP SYMPOSIUM Kearney State College School of Education Kearney, Neb . Dec. 3 Benjamin Avila (308) 2348502 HUMAN_ RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM Georgetown University Washington, D.C. Dec . 1 0 Robert Drinan (202) 662 Calendar will publish free announcements re garding events of interest to the Hispanic community . Information should be received at least two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005. 5

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6 DIRECTOR OF CHICANO STUDIES The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at El Paso seeks candidates for the posi tion of Director of the Chicano Studies Program with a joint facul ty appointment in an academic department. Rank and salary are open and commensurate with qualifications and experience. Required qualifications: Earned doctorate in liberal arts, science, education, nursing and/or allied health, business, and en gineering; strong record of teaching, scholarly activity, and ad ministrative experience; ability to work with various academic units and community groups; fluent in Spanish and knowledge able of the demographics of the Chicano population. Duties: Responsible for course and program development; in itiates and coordinates research and publication efforts; organizes lecture series and cultural performances, often in collaboration with community organizations and regional universities; teaching and student advising; the director reports directly to the Vtee Presi dent for Academic Affairs . Chicano Studies offers an interdisciplinary BA and selected minor areas of academic concentration . The program facilitates research, publications, and cultural services Of importance to the chicano community. - • The position is available after June 1, 1989. A letter of applica tion, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and pub lication samples must be submitted by December 7, 1988 to : Dennis J. Bixler-Marquez, Chicano Studies Director Search Committee, Chicano Studies Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0563 Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The Univer sity of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity , affirmative action employer . EDITOR/JOURNALIST/ RESEARCHER ril!iBRYANT lEI COlLEGE GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities in 1989 may be offered in the following fields: Ubrarian/Ubrary Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician Attorney/Law Clerk Technical Information Specialist Administrative Assistant The program consists of 90or 120-day appointments to profes sional work assignments interspersed with orientations and sem i nars about the Ubrary, its mission, and operations. Sessions for 1989 will be offered January-April and June-September . Individuals interested in the January-April session must submit their applications by December 3, 1988. Upon completion of the 90to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional 13-month appointment. Eligibility includes possession of a graduate degree, received within one year of appointment, in one of the fields designated for the program, or full-time graduate study in one of these fields . To compete for this opportunity, send a completed Standard Form 171, Application for Employment, indicating one of the above fields, to Carmen Mendez, Coordinator, Hispanic Employment Program, Ubrary of Congress, James Madison Memorial Bldg. , LM 647, Washington, D.C . 20540 . For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez, at (202) 707-5620. PRESIDENT BRYANT COLLEGE Need bilingual editor-journalist-researcher preferably knowledgeable about Mexico. Resume. Mexico-United States Institute, 50 E St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003. The Board of Trustees of Bryant College invites nominations and applications for the posi tion of president. The new president will assume office on August 1, 1989. LATINO CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION PROJECT BILINGUAL CHILD ABUSE SPECIALIST ($29K) and PUBLIC EDUCATION COORDINATOR ($24K) for innovative Latino Child Abuse Prevention Project in Washington, D.C. For application information call Mirna Zepeda (202) 939-8765. BARRIO GRAPHICS/CENTRO DE ARTE in Washington, D.C. offers g r aphic design ser vices: Design • Typesetting • Layout • Il lustration. Barrio Graphics/Centro de Arte 1470 Irving Street, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20010 (202) 483-n55 JOURNALISTS/CREATIVEWRITERS: Sub missions are welcome for Weekly Report's "guest columnisf' feature. Approx. 500 words. For writer's guidelines, send self-addressed, stamped envelope to : Guest Column, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington , D.C. 20005 . The College, celebrating its 125th anniversary, is located in the rolling hills of New England on a 300-acre suburban campus in the greater Providence-Boston area, close to Newport . Some 300 day students are enrolled in this thriving, independent, residential business col lege which awards undergraduate and graduate degrees. Another 2,600 evening and graduate students complete their programs on a part-time basis . The College also provides and busin !lSS services to the community. The President is the chief executive officer of the College, accountable primarily to the Board of Trustees for overall academic, administrative, financial, organizational and com munity affairs. The President is actively involved in external institutional advancement ac tivities. The successful candidate must have a strong commitment to private higher education and provide evidence of decisive leadership and financial acumen. He or she must have a record of working effectively with various constituencies and be able to implement the strategic mission and goals of the College. The successful candidate should also possess a commit ment to the development of student values and student abilities to assume business leader ship. Finally, he or she must have acceptable academic qualifications, with an earned doctorate preferred. The formal review of nominations and applications will begin immediately and will con tinue until the position is filled. Candidates are encouraged, however, to submit vitae by December 23, 1988. Please send materials to: BRYANT COLLEGE PRESIDENT SEARCH COMMITTEE P.O. Box43 450 Douglas Pike Smithfield, Rl 02917-1284 Bryant College is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Nov. 21 , 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS Lewis&Clark PRESIDENT The Board of Trustees of Lewis and Clark College invites nominations and applications for the position of President. Lewis and Clark is a private coeducational institution, dedicated to the liberal arts, with a strong 121-year-old tradition of independence and academic innovation. It encompasses three divisions. The undergraduate College of Arts and Sciences enrolls 1 ,920 students in 30 Bachelor's degree majors which grow out of a fully integrated core curriculum and strong interdiscipli nary programs in international studies, gender studies, and the relation of science and tech nology to society and its values . The Graduate School of Professional Studies enrolls more than 600 students in five de gre e programs at the Master's level. The Law School enrolls 650 students in day and evening programs leading to the Juris Doctor degree and the LL.M. degree in Environmental and Natural Resources Law. The is located on a beautiful 130-acre campus seven miles from downtown Portland, which is the center of a metropolitan area with a population of nearly 1.3 million. Candidates for the Presidency will show a demonstrated commitment to the values of liberal arts education, interest and ability in major fundraising activities, the capacity for rigorous leadership on a continuing basis, and effectiveness in relating to all segments of a diversified college community and in representing that community to external constituen cies. Leading candidates will be seasoned and successful leaders of academic organizations . An earned doctoral degree or its equivalent is strongly preferred . Although nominations and applications will be accepted until the position is filled, those submitted by December 15 are best assured of receiving full consideration . All inquiries, nominations, and applications will be held in strictest confidence, and should be sent to: John R . Faust, Jr. Chairman President, Search Committee Lewis and Clark College 0615 sw Palatine Hill Road Portland, OR 97219 Lewis and Clark College is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer. Nominations of and applications from women and minorities are especially encouraged. DIRECTOR OFFICE OF MINORITY CONCERNS The American Council on Education is currently accepting applications and nominations for the position of Director for its Office of Minority Concerns. The Direc tor will collaborate with other ACE offices, member institutions, and other higher education groups in studying and il luminating issues and problems of particular concern to minority groups, including ACE's Special Minority Initia tives. The Director will also convene meet ings of the Commission on Minorities on Higher Education; sponsor national forums, seminars and conferences---on relevant issues; and provide leadership in the development of inter association ef forts to address minority concerns in higher education. Candidates should have considerable executive experience in minority affairs, extensive knowledge of higher education, and demonstrated project management skills. Excellent written and verbal com munication skills are required. Some knowledge of development and fund-rais ing is preferred but not essential. Nominations and/or letters of applica tion should be directed to: Director of Minority Concerns Search American Council on Education One Dupont Circle, NW, Room 804 Washington, D.C. 20036 RIO HONDO COLLEGE ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF PHYSICAL FACILITIES. Must have five years related maintenance experience AND three years supervisory experience in maintenance. For information and application, call Jean {213) 692-0921 ext. 309. Office of Personnel Services Rio Hondo College 3600 Workman Mill Road Whitter, Calif. 90608 . eoe/aa. BILINGUAL (ENGLISH/SPANISH) SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST Small, busy office in downtown Washington, D . C . , seeks responsible "front desk" individual to answer phones and perform general office duties . Excellent phone skills; written and verbal skills in English and Spanish; excellent typing skills; IBM/pc experience. Must be able to work under pressure and maintain composure. EOE. Non-Smoker. $16,000 $18,000 negotiable . DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone (202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. PLEASE NO TELEPHONE CALLS OR VISITS. Send resumes to: Hispanic Designers Inc., 1000 16th St. NW, #504, Washington, D.C. 20036. H ispa ni c Link Weekly Reporl CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch. Ordered by Organization Street __________________________ ___ City, State & Zip ____________ _ Area Code & Phone ________________ __ 7

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Arts & Entertainment Anyway? which brought together the directors of the nation's five Hispanic film festivals. The nation's Hispanic film festival season began in the summer in Chicago. San Francisco and San Juan, Puerto Rico, hosted Latino film tests last month. MORE FROM THE FILM FESTIVAL FILE: The first National Latino Film and Video Festival concludes this week, bringing to a close the longest ever season of Hispanic film festivals in the country. Top films from the New York festival will travel this week to the International Center of Photography in New York for screenings Nov. 24 to Jan. 8. Award-winning titles from the festival will also be screened at the Neighborhood Film Project, in Philadelphia, Nov. 30 to Dec. 4. Hosted by New York's El Museo del Barrio, the new festival closes Nov. 23 with the screening of its winner in the feature-film length category-Juan Jose Jusids Made in Argentina-and The Milagro Beanfield War. More than 60 film and video projects will have been screened throughout the festival. Several of them were also screened this year at the 13th annual San.Antonio CineFestival, which closed Nov. 13. SING FOR YOUR BEER: Brewer Anheuser-Busch will sponsor a national Hispanic music talent search that is expected to hold local contests in some 20 U.S. cities. Nearly 90 films and videos were seen at this year's CineFestival, which gave its" special jury" Premio Mesquite award to Isaac Artenstein's Break of Dawn . Mesquites were also given in four other categories. The Budweiser Gran Concurso Musical is being conducted in conjunction with Spanish-language radio stations. Local winners get $1 ,000; regional winners get $2,000, a recording contract with a major label and the chance to record a Budweiser radio commercial. This year's CineFestival -staged at San Antonio' s Guadalupe Theatre held a symposium titled Who Needs a Film Festival, A regional playoff already has taken place in Chicago, with local band Los Supers6nicos taking first place. Media Report TV AND RADIO INTERNS: NBC is accepting applications from college juniors, seniors and graduate students for non-paying spring internship positions in its Washington, D.C., TV and radio stations-WRC-TVand WKY5-FM. All NBC stations offer internships in the news and sports divisions, as well as minority fellowship programs for college students going on to graduate school. Internships are also offered during the summer and fall. For further information, contact the internship coordinator at the employee relations division of your local NBC office. Following is a list of phone numbers for NBC's major offices: Washington, D.C. (202) 885-4058; Burbank, Calif. (714) 634-4444; New York (21 2) 664-4444; Chicago (31 2) 861-5555; Cleveland (216) 344-3333. JOB BANKS: Among the job referral services available to journalists around the country HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 ' N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publisher. Hector EricksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias. Rentas. Danyl Lynette Figueroa. Sophia Nieves. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports maiJed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. 8 are these: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, based In Washington, D.C., offers Job Exchange, a computerized service free to members . Non-members pay a $20 fee. Contact Jocelyn Cordova at (202) 783-6228. JOB/NET is offered free by the Institute for Journalism Education in Berkeley, Calif . Contact Jeff Rivers at (415) 642-8287. Job Bank is an independent referral service exclusively for journalists. It is not limited to minorities and recently began to offer listings for free. Contact Jenny Wostendiek in Cin naminson, N.J. (609) 786-1910. The New England Newspaper Association has a free news and non-news job bank based in Salem, Mass. Contact Dan Murphy at (508) 7 44-8940. The California Chicano News Media As sociation offers JOBank. A fee is optional. Contact Mike Castro in Los Angeles at (213) 743-7158. ANPA NEWS: The December issue of Presstime, the journal put out by the American Newspaper Publishers Association, will -Antonio Mejias-Rentas contain a four-page list of journalism fellow ships and other programs geared primarily to journalism professionals. For a copy, send $8.33 to Presstime or call author Rolf Rykken atThe Newspaper Center in Reston, Va.(703) 648-1109. ANPA is also developing a manual for news paper managers on supervising a multicultural staff. Suggestions are requested on methods to counter stereotyping; racism, culture and ethnic jokes, among other things. Send ideas to Terri Dickerson-Jones, Minority Affairs Manager. Write ANPA Foundation or Presstime, The Newspaper Center, Box 17407, Dulles Airport, Washington, D . C . 20041. PLUS: The Latino Committee on the Media will hold its third annual conference Nov. 30 in Chicago. Henry Cisneros is sched uled to speak. Call (312) 247-0707 ... ECO, the Spanish-language 24-hour riews service broadcast on the Galavision cable network, has expanded its programming to six days a week coverage to include Saturdays. Darryl Lynette Figueroa 'cTne se BOAT PEOPLE cah sure throw a party f '' Hispanic Link Weekly Report