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Hispanic link weekly report, November 28, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, November 28, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Florida Gov. Bob Martinez travels to Washington next month to meet with President-elect George Bush and plug Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez and several other distinguished Floridiansfor positions in the incoming administration... Mary Perez Johnson, an Orlando, Fla., city councilwoman, assumes Dec. 3 in Boston the presidency of Hispanic Elected Local Officials, a constituency group with the National League of Cities. She takes over from San Antonio City Councilwoman Maria Berriozdbal. . . Mary Provas Macias, 66, becomes the first female mayor of border city Nogales, Ariz... Paul Cejas, businessman, banker, accountant, hospital administrator and chairman of the Dade County, Fla., School Board for the last eiaht
years, retires Cejas, 45, was the first Hispamcrefectei tJ8ft§untywide position in Dade. . . Miami Auxiliary Bishop Agustin Roman and Miami Beach Mayor Alex Daoud, along with 38 other noted Miamians, agree to fast from one to three days to protest the dangers posed by pesticides to farm workers... Josue Gonzalez, head of bilingual education under former President Jimmy Carter, is named vice chancellor for planning, development and investigation for the City Colleges of Chicago. . . A federal district judge in New York City sentences John Mariotta, co-founder of Wedtech, a defense contracting firm, to eight years for his role in the Wedtech racketeering scandal. . . The Baseball Writer's Association of America names Oakland A’s outfielder Jose Canseco as the American League’s Most Valuable Player. He is the first player in 15 years to be a unanimous choice...

Youth Face ‘Economic Limbo9
Cavazos Retains Post, Bush Considers Lujan
The retention of Lauro Cavazos as U.S. Secretary of Education was officially announced Nov. 21 by President-elect George Bush, despite opposition from conservatives. The reappointment will not necessarily be the only fulfillment of Bush’s campaign pledge to appoint a Hispanic to the Cabinet, said Bush spokesperson David Prosperi.
“I hate to say definitively that it was Cavazos Bush had in mind” when he made the promise, Prosperi said.
Republican Manuel Lujan, 60, just retired as a U.S.
Representative from New Mexico, is being considered to head the Department of the Interior orthe Department of Energy, he said.
Cavazos, 61, was appointed Sept. 26 by President Reagaa He replaced outgoing William Bennett to become the first Hispanic Cabinet member. His vows to fight to increase financial aid and bilingual education funds, and to pay special attention to lowering the high school dropout rate have earned strong support from the education establishment and the Latino community.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Elected Latinos Now 128
Hispanics holding state legislative office in the United States number 128. Newly elected Connecticut Representative Juan Figueroa, a Democrat, was overlooked in a previous Weekly Report tally.
Figueroa, a Puerto Rican, won the District 3 seat in Hartford from incumbent Arthur Broullet Connecticut now has for the first time three Hispanic state representatives.
Frances Gomez, who was listed in Weekly Report as running unopposed for her Kansas state House seat was defeated. Massachusetts Representative Nelson Merced was omitted from last week’s tally.
Nearly half U.S. youth and young families are facing an “economic limbo” of unemployment, part-time jobs without benefits and poverty levels double those of 1967, found a report released Nov. 17 by the William T. Grant Foundation Commission on Youth and America’s Future.
The study, “The Forgotten Half: Pathways to Success for America’s Youth and Young Families,” said that the income of families headed by Hispanics under 25 years old, calculated in 1986 dollars, dropped 18.5% between 1973 and 1986. The figure for
blacks was worse - 46.7%.
“If non-college youth are the forgotten half, then non-college Hispanics... face double-jeopardy,” study director Samuel Halperin told Weekly Report.
The commission called for $5 billion a year in new funds to be spent on Head Start, the Job Training Partnership Act, the Job Corps and the Chapter I program which provides remedial education for disadvantaged children.
“The problems of this generation of Hispanics are worse than those of the last,” said Josue
continued on page 2
Rep. Robert Garcia, Wife Indicted
Less than three weeks after posting a resounding victory for his sixth term as representative for the 18th Congressional District of New York, Democrat Robert Garcia was indicted Nov. 21 on charges of receiving $185,000 in payoffs from the Wedtech Corp.
Also named in the seven-count indictment were Garcia’s wife of eight years, Jane Lee, 48, and Ralph Vallone, 41, a lawyer from Santurce, Puerto Rico.
The indictment of the 55-year-old, two-time Bronze Star recipient charged that beginning in mid-1984 he, his wife and Vallone engaged in a plot that netted them jewelry, interest-free loans and $86,000 in cash from Wedtech officials The bribes were paid, said the indictment, “to influence the defendant Robert Garcia’s performance of official public acts for and on behalf of Wedtech.”
Responding to the charges in a three-paragraph statement from his Washington office, Garcia said, “I note that despite an investigation which has lasted nearly two years and has scrutinized virtually every facet of my. . .life, the charges deal only
with the preposterous allegations of Mario Moreno, one of the most notorious felons of the 20th century.”
Moreno was an officer of the now-bankrupt Wedtech defense contracting firm who turned state’s evidence.
Garcia’s indictment came three days after Wedtech co-founder John Mariotta, a Latino, and former New York Congressman Mario Biaggi were sentenced to eight years apiece in the far-reaching scandal.
Luis Caban, associate executive director of the Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project’s office in New Jersey, praised Garcia as someone “who has championed the rights of Hispanics.” Caban, who lives in Garcia’s South Bronx district, has known Garcia since his days as a New York state senator.
Ruben Franco, president of the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund and also a resident of the 18th District, called Garcia “a person who’s dedicated himself to public life and our community.”
Franco expressed concern whether the district can continue to receive adequate representation if Garcia must devote his energies to his defense. “I hope that he takes it upon himself, if this diverts him, to do the proper thing.”
Garcia, his wife and Vallone are to appear for arraignment Dec. 1. _ p@//x Perez


Quakers File Lawsuit on IRCA’s Employer Sanctions
Two years after passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, a lawsuit and a series of actions critical of its employer sanctions provisions were initiated this month.
The American Friends Service Committee filed the first challenge to the provisions Nov. 22 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles Saying compliance would force it to discriminate against workers, the national Quaker organization seeks exemption from the provisions on religious grounds.
AFSC’s Washington, D.C., Director James Matlack said, “The issues raised in this lawsuit are... the only legal window we saw to challenge the law.” Matlack said the case will apply to all charitable and religious organizations, some 25 of which plan to file friendly briefs.
“We are in a dilemma - tense about (losing) our tax exempt status and feeling that employer sanction requirements are opposed to our values,” he said.
The nation’s Roman Catholic bishops also expressed strong opposition to I RCA. At a Nov. 17 conference in Washington, D.C., they vowed to fight the sanctions as well as other elements of the law, charging that the employer penalties lead to widespread discrimination against Hispanicsand “foreign looking” workers.
Since June, employers who “knowingly hire” persons who are not authorized to work in the United States face penalties ranging from $250 to $10,000. According to a GAO report released Nov. 16, in order to avoid such sanctions, about 528,000 employers, or 16% of 3.3 million surveyed, have started or increased the selective practice of asking foreign-looking applicants or those with accents for work authorization papers or have begun to hire only U.S. citizens.
The survey does not address whether those applicants were then denied work,
accounting for why the GAO report did not find a pattern of discrimination.
In New York, the 24-member State Task Force on New Americans, which addresses immigration issues, introduced a resolution Nov. 1 urging the U.S. Congress to terminate employer sanctions under a sunset provision on the basis of increased discrimination to authorized and non-authorized workers.
New York Gov. Mario Cuomo’s Task Force on Immigration Affairs reported Nov.4 finding “widespread discrimination” against legalized workers and persons who look foreign. It cited selective screening, rejection of valid residency documents and denial of jobs to those who had minor delays in providing documentation.
The GAO report is the second of three required under I RCA. If next year's report finds widespread discrimination, employer sanctions may be repealed.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Programs Sought for Latino Youth Marielito Prisoners
continued from page 1
Gonzalez, vice chancellor, City Colleges of Chicago, and a commission member. “The more acculturated they become, the more subjected they are to cross-cultural tugs.”
Gonzalez pointed to the city of Miami where, he said, young Cubans are not doing as well in secondary school as their parents or even students who attended 10 years earlier.
The two-year study of 16-to-24-year-olds found that only 5% of those eligible for federally funded job training actually receive it, and the amount allocated for them was much lower than that set aside for their college-bound counterparts.
Opportunities are much more limited today due to changes in technology and society, it said.
Halperin said racism, discrimination and immigration create even greater obstacles to success for those Hispanics who have not made it to college.
But Latinos do have some factors working in their favor. Gonzalez said he was most impressed with the study’s recommendation that stronger bonds be built between adults and young people. It reaffirms the importance of family- something Hispanics have always placed great value on, he said. “Things will be better for young people to the degree we can improve family life.”
Most of the study’s recommendations are tailored to the neighborhood. They include expansion of community support systems and improvement of employment and training opportunities.
The commission, headed by former U.S. Education Commissioner Harold Howe II, hopes to convince Congress to spend $1.25 billion for five-year, state-administered demonstration programs designed to increase access to post-high school education and training through financial aid, counseling and academic support. _ Sophia Nieves
Deportation Delayed
The fate of 13 Marielito detainees awaiting deportation to Cuba was postponed for another week Nov. 22 when a federal judge in Washington, D.C., transferred their case to U.S. District Court in Birmingham, Ala A hearing in the case is set for Nov. 29.
“Despite that most might lose, what we hope to accomplish is to ensure that each detainee have his case reviewed by a federal court,” said Gary Leshaw, a legal aid attorney based in Atlanta.
Leshaw is working closely with the Miami-based Task Force of Cuban Civic Organizations, a coalition which filed another suit in the Birmingham court Nov. 18. Leshaw and the Miami task force came to the aid of the detainees after the U.S. Justice Department announced Nov. 17 it would deport them soon. The deportation would be the first since Marielitos rioted last year.
The legal aid suit argues that the Administrative Procedure Act allows the detainees to have their asylum rejections reviewed on a case-by-case basis by a federal court. The task force suit seeks the postponement of any deportations until human rights are restored in Cuba. Restraining orders are sought in both suits to prevent the U.S. government from acting.
Panel to Resolve Dispute
A six-member panel was created Nov. 23 by Washington, D.C., Superintendent of Schools Andrew Jenkins to resolve a dispute with the Hispanic community over a planned dismantling of the Division of Bilingual Education.
The Latino contingent primarily seeks to have Jenkins postpone any change in bilingual services until a comprehensive report on bilingual education is completed. That is not expected until June.
Texas Restaurateur Feeds 18,000
Some 13,000 senior citizens, poor persons and the homeless were treated to a turkey dinner complete with giblet gravy, cranberry sauce and candied yams by San Antonio restaurateur Raul Jimenez as part of his ninth annualThanksgiving bash. Too big for the family’s restaurant there, it was staged at the city’s convention center.
Another 5,000 people were given Thanksgiving dinner at the Jimenez restaurant in Fort Worth, where the event was overseen by Raul Jr.
The dinner has been a tradition in Fort Worth since 1972 when Jimenez, his wife and their two children opened the restaurant doors to about 300 people. In San Antonio, it has been held since 1979. Mayor Henry Cisneros and his wife, Mary Alice, regularly
attend,
The 56-year-old Jimenez cannot believe how the event has blossomed, he said. “It makes my heart content to see it, though.” He explained that he started it primarily for the benefit of senior citizens. “They contributed a lot in their lives. Now they need someone to take care of them.”
For the first three years, Jimenez was able to finance the five-hour celebration on his own. Now he is helped by Pepsi, AT&T and “everyone in the community.”
Chef Ernest Jimenez, no relation, is one who volunteers his time. It means the 64-year-old does not sit down to his own family dinner until 8 p.m., but he does not mind. “It’s a labor of love,” he said.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Antonio MejiasrRentas, guest columnist
The Forgotten Taino
On Nov. 19,1493, ChristopherColumbus landed on a Caribbean island know to its taino natives as Boriquen.
In Puerto Rico, as the island is known today, the date is celebrated as Dia del Descubrimiento - Discovery
Day. It is an important national holiday, for it marks the introduction of Hispanic culture to the island and the beginning of an era. Spain’s rule in Puerto Rico extended through 1898, when the island was ceded to the United States following the Spanish American War.
Historians record that upon Columbus’ landing in Boriquen, he encountered a well-established native civilization. In his 1983 book “Puerto Rico: A Political and Cultural History,” Dr. Arturo Morales Carrion describes the tainos as “a peaceful, sedentary people... adept at hunting and agriculture,.. .expert canoe makers and good sailora .
That Morales Carrion devotes less than five pages of his lengthy book to the history prior to 1493 indicates how little of the tamo legacy remains today.
The conquest of Puerto Rico, fueled by the Spanish crown’s fervor to spread Catholicism, followed a pattern well known to the natives of South, Central and North America.
SIGNIFICANT IMPRINT REMAINS
On his landing, Columbus renamed the island San Juan Bautista In 1508, Juan Ponce de Leon, the crown’s appointed governor, established a settlement there. The island became a valuable asset to Spain, not only because of the gold found in its rivers, but because its strategic location provided the perfect defense for its other possessions in the Americas.
By the end of the 16th century, the tainos had been annihilated by forced labor, European diseases and war. Nevertheless, they left what Morales Carrion describes as a “significant imprint on the Puerto Rican culture.”
The memory of the taino produces a strange combination of pride and sorrow in modern-day Puerto Ricans, who romantically call the island by the Hispanicized Borinquen, and themselves boricuas. Many of the island’s municipalities, like Mayaguez and Caguas, retain their native names. Several taino nouns were adopted by Spanish, like hamaca and huracan, and eventually by English as well (hammock, hurricane).
REASSESS SPANISH PRESENCE
As the world’s attention is turning toward the 500th anniversary of Columbus’ voyage, Puerto Ricans must question Spain’s role in our history. Why, in the name of Christianity, was our taino past destroyed? Why were the “peaceful and sedentary” natives pushed aside, and what was really accomplished by fourcenturies of Spanish colonization?
This dilemma is not uniquely Puerto Rican. The outrage expressed by Native American and Hispanic groups in California overthe recent beatification of Father Jumpero Serra is based on a similar need to reassess the history of the Spanish presence in the so-called New World.
Like most U.S. Hispanics, Puerto Ricans are proud of the Spanish influence inourculture. Our adherence to the Spanish language and to the Catholic faith are just two examples of how highly we prize that part of our heritage.
But as 1992 approaches, it is appropriate to examine the price we paid.
At the very least, our attitude should shift from the celebration of a “discovery” to the commemoration of an “encounter” of cultures. A much greater emphasis needs to be placed on the contribution of the peoples who lived here before the Spanish arrived.
The Columbus Quincentennial should be a period of reconciliation as much as a time for international celebration.
(Antonio Mejias-Rentas mites regularly for Hispanic Link News Service and other publications.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sfn pelos en la lengua
IF YU NU SUNUNU LIKE I NO SUNUNU (LListo, old-timers? Sing it to the tune of “If You Knew Susie Like I Know Susie.”): It has always been our understanding that there were fewer Hispanics in the whole state of New Hampshire than there were in one city block of the South Bronx.
So a few years back, when John Sununu was elected governor of the Granite State, we were startled to read that he was born in Havana, Cuba. For a Weekly Report election edition, we called his office to ask whether we should include him in our count of Hispanic elected officials.
No way, his staff assured us. Sununu’s daddy was a U.S. businessman who just happened to be working in Havana when Juanito was born.
Staffers with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials made similar inquiries in the past and were similarly discouraged from referring to him as Latino.
So we raised an eyebrow on Nov. 16 when Univision’s Noticiero Nacional led off its newscast by introducing Sununu as a Cuban American who was about to become the first-ever Hispanic chief of staff in the White House.
On Nov. 17, we lowered the eyebrow again. That night Noticiero Nacional was careful not to call Sununu Hispanic. It identified him only as born in Cuba of Lebanese parents.
Three days later we were reading The Washington Post and guess what? John Sununu was Hispanic after all.
The paper quoted him as saying he was a third-generation American, a Lebanese American, an Arab American, and “part Greek American and part Hispanic American.”
Not only was he born in Cuba, he said, but his mother, Victoria Dada, was born in El Salvador. “Ifs a varied heritage, and I’m proud of it,” he boasted.
Amazing how pluralistic one becomes when one leaves New Hampshire.
IF YU NU CAVAZOS LIKE THEY NO CAVAZOS: Chances that the administration’s real Hispanic, Democrat Lauro Cavazos, would hang onto his Secretary of Education post ranged somewhere between none and zero, according to Eastern press speculation right up to his Nov. 21 appointment.
The word was that he had effectively eliminated himself from consideration in late October when he refused to tape a TV commercial endorsing Republican candidates.
Cavazos was a special target of capital conservatives. “His education positions are outrageous,” The Washington Times quoted one Heritage Foundation leader Nov. 16.
Describing Cavazos as a man “held in low regard by conservatives and some members of the Bush inner circle,” it went on to quote a Bush aide as saying that Cavazos declined to campaign for the Republicans in Texas “because he did not want to offend Lloyd Bentsen, who is a close friend of his.”
The article added: “In a directive sent out by his undersecretary, Mr. Cavazos ordered all of the department’s political appointees-most of them brought in by former Education Secretary William Bennett - to submit their resignations.
“ ‘Either (Cavazos) expects to be gone, or he intends to use this as a way to get rid of the Bennett people,’ said a senior department official who declined to be named.”
No Cabinet appointment could have more meaning or more value to Latinos than Secretary of Education. And no individual appears more committed to make George Bush live up to his campaign promise of becoming an “education president.”
We give our new president a high mark for that one.
DEBATE DUNKED: Juan Gonzalez and Angelo Falc6n won’t face off in New York next month. What happened? Tune* in next week.
- Kay Barbaro
Nov. 28, 1988


COLLECTING
BOOK ON ESCALANTE: “Escalante: The Best Teacher in America” is a 305-page book by Washington Post reporter Jay Mathews on celebrated East Los Angeles math teacher Jaime Escalante. Hardcover copies are $19.95. For information on howto order, call Henry Holt& Co. at 1-800-247-3912.
IMMIGRATION REFORM: A 101-page report by the General Accounting Office is the second of three required under the Immigration Reform and Control Act. It looks at the effects of IRCA’s employer sanctions provisions. Specify GAO/GGD 8916 Nov. 15 with request for a free copy. Write Distribution Center, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877(202)275-6241.
FORGOTTEN HALF: “The Forgotten Half: Pathways to Success for America’s Youth and Young Families” is a 208-page report which concludes a great portion of the nation’s 16-24-year-olds who are not college bound face bleak futures. For a free copy, write Youth and America’s Future, 1001 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 301, Washington, D.C. 20036-5541.
PUERTO RICAN ORGANIZATION SUPPORT: “United Way Support to Puerto Rican Organizations: An Assessment’ is an 18-page report by the National Puerto Rican Coalition which concludes that U nited Way agencies are underfunding organizations that serve Puerto Ricans in nine cities. For a copy send $7.50 to NPRC, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 500, Washington, D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915.
ELDERLY: “Hispanic Elderly in Transition: Theory, Research, Policy and Practice,” a 252-page book, is a series of essays on the economic, social, cultural and health issues that face elderly Hispanics. For a copy send $39.95 to Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Box 5007, Westport, Conn. 06881 (203) 226-3571.
PTA PUBLICATIONS: The National Parent -Teacher Association offers a number of free, Spanish-language pamphlets covering a range of topics, including howto start a PTA chapter and tips for latchkey children. For more information send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to NPTA, 700 N. Rush St., Chicago, III. 60611-2571 (312) 787-0977.
RESEARCH PROPOSALS SOUGHT: The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council are accepting research proposals on Latinos in four areas: at-risk youth, culture and economic behavior, political organization and empowerment, and national policy and its impact. Deadline is Jan. 16, and grants are worth up to $35,000. For information contact SSRC, 605 Third Ave., New York, N.Y. 10158 (212) 661-0280.
CONNECTING
TRAINING SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS
Seeking to stem the shortage of Hispanic and black school principals and “master teachers,” the Henry Luce Foundation has given a $150,000 grant to Columbia University's Teachers College for training fellowships, it announced this month.
The Minority Leadership Fellows program will select five to six people for its first class in fall 1989. Depending on whether the fellow is currently teaching and unable to break away full time, the program lasts from one to two years. The program is open to applicants from all professions as well as recent college graduates. Fellows, to be chosen from the Northeastern United States, will receive financial aid.
No deadline for applications has been set. For further information write Judith Berman Brandenburg, Dean, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027.
COLLEGE ENROLLMENT EFFORT UNDERWAY
The Michigan State Board of Education has put out a call for volunteer residents and community leaders to help in its Achieve a College Education program, designed to increase the number of Hispanic, black and Native American students who go on to college.
Announced this month, the program- ACE- is aiming its statewide recruitment effort at community organizations, leaders and residents Volunteers will then receive orientation on academic course selection, admissions tests and financial aid procedures ACE volunteers will target students in 35 school districts.
While 15% of the state’s students are minority, oniy 9% of college freshmen enrollment is and 6% of its college graduates are. For more information contact Galen Anderson, ACE Team Project Coordinator, Office of Minority Equity, 600 W. St. Joseph, Lansing, Mich. 48933 (517) 334-6275.
BITS AND PIECES
University of California at Riverside Chancellor Rosemary Schraer appoints Alfredo Miranda, a professor of sociology and ethnic studies, as chair of the university’s Ethnic Studies Program... Philadelphia’s Hispanic Association of Contractors and Enterprises and Episcopal Hospital receive approval from the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department to construct a senior citizens building. HUD has set aside $5.9 million for the building... Ideas from students nine to 17 years old are being sought for a one-hour TV special on what is special or unique about the United States. For information and an entry form, write The American Dream Contest, 8306 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 14, Los Angeles, Calif. 90211.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
MEDIA CONFERENCE Chicago Nov. 30
The Latino Committee on the Media will sponsor a daylong conference with workshops on the following topics: Spanish-language media, effective use of the media, women in the media, media and politics. Keynote speaker will be Henry Cisneros.
Elizabeth Burke (312) 247-0707
WORLD AIDS DAY Various cities Dec. 1
The Pan American Health Organization and the Red Cross will be sponsoring this effort to focus on prevention of AIDS and the plight of AIDS sufferers. Bob Riccio (202) 639-3200
BENEFIT RECEPTION AND DANCE New York Dec. 2 4
The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy will hold a sixth anniversary benefit reception and dance featuring Johnny Pacheco and Pete “El Conde" Rodriguez, and Ray Barretto and Orchestra. Gerson Borrero(212) 564-1075
ENGLISH PLUS MEETING Washington, D.C. Dec. 2
English Plus Information Clearinghouse will hold a meeting which will include an update and analysis of the November elections in Florida, Arizona and Colorado and a discussion on what to expect in the states and Congress next year in light of recent turmoil within U.S. English.
Mary Carol Combs (202) 544-0004
HISPANIC SCHOLARSHIP SYMPOSIUM Kearney, Neb. Dec. 3
Kearney State College School of Education will be holding a symposium on financial means available for Hispanics pursuing post-high school education, including two-year programs, trade schools, specialized schools and universities. Activities will also include discussion of college entrance examinations, resume preparation, scholarships and financial aid. Nov. 28,1988
Benjamin Avila (308) 234-8502
REFUGEE HEALTH CARE Washington, D.C. Dec. 4-7
Refugee health providers and public health experts will meet to identify problems in refugee relief, discuss ways to improve health care delivery, communicate research on disease and identify ethical dilemmas in refugee health care.
Theodore Li (202) 687-1049
COMING SOON
HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM Georgetown University Washington, D.C. Dec. 10 Robert Drinan (202) 662-9000
Calendarwill publish free announcements regarding events of interest to the Hispanic community. Information should be received at least two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report. 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
DIRECTOR OF CHICANO STUDIES
The University of Texas at El Paso
The University of Texas at El Paso seeks candidates for the position of Director of the Chicano Studies Program with a joint faculty appointment in an academic department. Rank and salary are open and commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Required qualifications: Earned doctorate in liberal arts, science, education, nursing and/or allied health, business, and engineering; strong record of teaching, scholarly activity, and administrative experience; ability to work with various academic units and community groups; fluent in Spanish and knowledgeable of the demographics of the Chicano population.
Duties: Responsible for course and program development; initiates and coordinates research and publication efforts; organizes lecture series and cultural performances, often in collaboration with community organizations and regional universities; teaching and student advising; the director reports directly to the Vice President for Academic Affairs.
Chicano Studies offers an interdisciplinary BA and selected minor areas of academic concentration. The program facilitates research, publications, and cultural services of importance to the Chicano community.
The position is available after June 1,1989. A letter of application, curriculum vitae, three letters of recommendation, and publication samples must be submitted by December 7,1988 to: Dennis J. Bixler-M&rquez, Chicano Studies Director Search Committee, Chicano Studies Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0563 Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. The University of Texas at El Paso is an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer.
GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS
Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities in 1989 may be offered in the following fields:
Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician Attorney/Law Clerk Technical Information Specialist Administrative Assistant
The program consists of 90- or 120-day appointments to professional work assignments interspersed with orientations and seminars about the Library, its mission, and operations. Sessions for 1989 will be offered January-April and June-September. Individuals interested in the January-April session must submit their applications by December 3,1988. Upon completion of the 90- to 120-day experience, individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional 13-month appointment.
Eligibility includes possession of a graduate degree, received within one year of appointment, in one of the fields designated for the program, or full-time graduate study in one of these fields. To compete for this opportunity, send a completed Standard Form 171, Application for Employment, indicating one of the above fields, to Carmen M6ndez, Coordinator, Hispanic Employment Program, Library of Congress, James Madison Memorial Bldg., LM 647, Washington, D.C. 20540.
For additional information, contact Carmen M6ndez, at (202) 707-5620.
M
A
R
K
E
T
DIRECTOR
CLINICAL TRAINING
The Department of Psychology at Eastern Michigan University has a tenure-track opening at the Associate/Full Professor level for a Ph.D. clinical psychologist to function as Director of Clinical Training effective September 1989.
Qualifications: Demonstrated competence and interest in administering the clinical master’s degree programs, advising graduate students, and working with clinical faculty of both behavioral and psychodynamic orientations; record of research publications consistent with a senior level clinical position at the university level. Expertise in a specialty area such as gerontology, family/group psychotherapy or child-clinical highly desirable. Applicants must be eligible for full licensure in the State of Michigan.
Send vita and letter outlining qualifications to: Chairperson. Search Committee. Position FAAA88Q35. 310 King Hall. Eastern Michigan University. Ypsilanti. Mich. 48197 bv February 1.1989.
(Early responses will receive consideration for interviews at COGDOP Conference )
WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPORTUNITY. MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED.
RIO HONDO COLLEGE
PURCHASING DIRECTOR requires previous experience in purchasing. Public agency background preferred. For information and application call Jean (213) 692-0921 ext. 309.
Office of Personnel Services, Rio Hondo College, 3600 Workman Mill Road, Whittier, Calif. 90608
ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
CABRILLO COLLEGE
INSTRUCTOR, HORTICULTURE, tenure track, 80% assignment. Requires eligibility for CCC instructor credential in ornamental horticulture. Apply by Jan. 5,1989.
LATINO CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION PROJECT
BILINGUAL CHILD ABUSE SPECIALIST ($29K) and PUBLIC EDUCATION COORDINATOR ($24K) for innovative Latino Child Abuse Prevention Project in Washington, D.C. For application information call Mima Zepeda (202) 939-8765.
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Arts & Entertainment
WEST COAST PREMIERES: The city-by-city, or “platform,” release of Break of Dawn continues this week in the San Francisco-Berkeley market
The film based on the life of Pedro J. Gonzalez - a popular Los Angeles radio personality who was falsely imprisoned because he spoke out against city corruption during the Depression- opens Dec. 2 at the Opera Plaza in San Francisco and the Shattuck in Berkeley.
Break of Dawn was written and directed by Isaac Artenstein and produced by Jude Pauline Eberhard for their Citiwest Productions company. The film, which picked up a Mesquite award at this year's San Antonio CineFestival, stars Oscar Chdvez, Marla Rojo, Tony Plana, Pepe Serna, Peter Henry Schroeder and Kamala Lopez.
Distribution plans for the film - which premiered in San Diego last August - include future openings in various San Francisco suburbs and a possible benefit premiere in Los Angeles.
Gonzalez, who is now 93, lives south of San Diego.
Meanwhile, the world premiere production of Stone Wedding also opens Dec. 2 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
The play- a collaborative project of LATC’s Latino Theatre Lab and playwright Milcha Sanchez-Scott- weaves elements of Aztec mythology with the story of a small U.S. Hispanic community devastated by the Korean War.
Directed by Jose Luis Valenzuela, Stone Wedding runs through Jan. 22. The play is co-produced by the LATC and AT&T- which is one of various corporate underwriters of the Great Lakes Theater Festival production of Federico Garcia Lorca’s Blood Wedding.
The Garcia Lorca play opened in October in Cleveland, plays through Dec. 4 at San Diego’s Old Globe and moves next to the Coconut Grove Playhouse in Miami.
A third West Coast premiere takes place Dec. 2. LA Dance Freeway, the latest entry into the new Latin music TV genre, begins airing this week on KDOC, Anaheim. Produced by Martin Macharino, the show will focus on “Latin hip-hop and Hispanic acts that crossover to the pop charts.” _ Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
CISNEROS RADIO SHOW: San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will lend his voice to radio commentary on 80 stations beginning in January, he announced Nov. 10.
The 11 /2- minute radio spots will be produced and distributed by Starstream Communications of Houston. Cisneros said the opinion pieces will be broadcast mostly by Spanish-language stations in large markets.
The subject matter will consist of “whatever is hoy he said. He also plans to create an asset management company and to write three books after stepping down as mayor in May.
Two are already in the works and will be published by Harper & Row and its Boston subsidiary, Barringer. The first expected out will take a look at successfully managed U.S. cities and analyze those in need of help. The second will be an autobiography. In the third, Cisneros will expound on changes he envisions for the country, based on demographics. There
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Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa. Sophia Nieves.
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is as yet no publishing contract for the latter book, but mayoral spokesperson Shirl Thomas said publishers are “clamoring to get it.”
OTHER RADIO NEWS: Radio Marti will expand programs which broadcast personal messages to Cuba until fire-damaged phone lines are restored in Havana. International lines have been cut off since a Nov. 13 fire caused $37 million in damages to the phone system there.
The messages air Sunday evenings from 7 to 8 p.m. on the Family Bridge program and during the “bridge” portion of the Dos a las Dos variety show, which airs Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 2 to 4 p.m.
While there is no guarantee that friends or relatives in Cuba will receive the notes, it is estimated, said Radio Marti spokesperson Mike Schoenfeld, that 86% of adult Cubans on the island listen to its programs.
To send a brief, personal message, call (800) 523-2639. Callers located in the Washington, D.C., metro area should phone (202) 485-8710.
TV BITS: There will be even more competition in the Spanish-language TV market come Jan. 1 with the onset of 24-hour cable broad-
casts from the Spanish Television News Network based in San Juan, Puerto Rico... Spanish-language KMEX-TV, channel34, in Los Angeles will broadcast the 17th annual Navidad en el Barrio telethon Dec. 4. The station expects to raise $350,000 for holiday food and toys for needy Latino families.
KUDOS AND MOVES: Elaine Ayala left her editorial writer spot at The Arizona Daily Star to join the editorial board of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland... Jesse Trevino, assistant state editor of the Austin American-Statesman, was promoted to the editorial board of the newspaper. . . Phil Garcia leaves his UPI reporting post in Washington, D.C., to become state legislative re porter for The Sacramento Bee. Garcia is president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C. . . . The California Chicano News Media Association was awarded $12,000 for its campaigns to increase the number of minorities in the newspaper business by the Sacramento-based McClatchy Newspapers. The chain owns the Bee newspapers in California, among others...
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
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Quakers File Lawsuit on I RCA's Employer Sanctions Two years after passage of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, a lawsuit and a series of actions critical of its employer sanctions provisions were initiated this month. The American Friends Service Committee filed the first challenge to the provisions Nov. 22 in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. Saying compliance would force it to discriminate against workers, the national Quaker organization seeks exemption from the provisions on religious grounds. AFSC'sWashington, D .C., Director James Matlack said, "The issues raised in this lawsuit are ... the only legal window we saw to challenge the law." Matlack said the case will apply to all charitable and religious organizations, some 25 of which plan to file friendly briefs. "We are in a dilemma -tense about (losing) our tax exempt status and feeling that employer sanction requirements are opposed to our values," he said. The nation's Roman Catholic bishops also expressed strong opposition to I RCA . At a Nov.17 conference in Washington, D.C., they vowed to fight the sanctions as well as other elements of the law, charging that the employer penalties lead to widespread discrimination against Hispanics and "foreign looking" workers. Since June, employers who "knowingly hire" persons who are not authorized to work in the United States face penalties ranging from $250 to $10,000. According to a GAO report released Nov. 16, in order to avoid such sanctions, about 528,000 employers, or 16% of 3.3 million surveyed, have started or increased the selective practice of asking foreign-looking applicants or those with accents for work authorization papers or have begun to hire only U .S. citizens. The survey does not address whether those applicants were then denied work, Programs Sought for Latino Youth continued from page 1 Gonzalez, vice chancellor, City Colleges of Chicago, and a commission member. "The more acculturated they become, the more subjected they are to cross-cultural tugs." Gonzalez pointed to the city of Miami where, he said, young Cubans are not doing as well in secondary school as their parents or even students who attended 10 years earlier. The two-year study of 16-to-24-year-olds found that only 5% of those eligible for federally funded job training actually receive it, and the amount allocated for them was much lower than that set aside for their college-bound counterparts. Opportunities are much more limited today due to changes in technology and society, it said. Halperin said racism, discrimination and immigration create even greater obstacles to success for those Hispanics who have not made it to college. But Latinos do have some factors working in their favor. Gonzalez said he was most impressed with the study's recommendation that stronger bonds be built between adults and young people . It reaffirms the importance of familysomething Hispanics have always placed great value on, he said. "Things will be better for young people to the degree we can improve family life . " Most of the study's recommendations are tailored to the neighborhood. They include expansion of community support systems and improvement of employment and training opportuni:ies. The commission, headed by former U.S. Education Commissioner Harold Howe II, hopes to convince Congress to spend $1.25 billion for five-year, state-administered demonstration programs designed to increase access to post-high school education and training through financial aid, counseling and academic support. Sophia Nieves Texas Restaurateur Feeds 18,000 2 Some 13,000 senior citizens, poor persons and the homeless were treated to a turkey dinner complete with giblet gravy, cranberry sauce and candied yams by San Antonio restaurateur Raul Jimenez as part of his ninth annual Thanksgiving bash. Too big for the family's restaurant there, it was staged at the city's convention center. Another 5,000 people were given Thanksgiving dinner at the Jimenez restaurant in Fort Worth, where the event was overseen by Raul Jr. The dinner has been a tradition in Fort Worth since 1972 when Jimenez, his wife and their two children opened the restaurant doors to about 300 people. In San Antonio, it has been held since 1979. Mayor Henry Cisneros and his wife, Mary Alice, regularly attend. The 56-year-old Jimenez cannot believe how the event has blossomed, he said . "It makes my heart content to see it, though." He explained that he started it primarily for the benefit of senior citizens. "They contributed a lot in their lives. Now they need someone to take care of them." For the first three years, Jimenez was able to finance the five-hour celebration on his own. Now he is helped by Pepsi, AT&T and "everyone in the community." Chef Ernest Jimenez, no relation, is one who volunteers his time. It means the 64year-old does not sit down to his own family dinner until 8 p.m., but he does not mind. "It's a labor of love," he said. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa accounting for why the GAO report did not find a pattern of discrimination. In New York, the 24-member State Task Force on New Americans, which addresses immigration issues, introduced a resolution Nov. 1 urging the U.S. Congress to terminate employer sanctions under a sunset provision on the basis of increased discrimination to authorized and non-authorized workers. New York Gov. Mario Cuomds Task Force on Immigration Affairs reported Nov. 4 finding "widespread discrimination" against legalized workers and persons who look foreign. It cited selective screening, rejection of valid residency documents and denial of jobs to those who had minor delays in providing documentation. The GAO report is the second of three required under IRCA. If next year's report finds widespread discrimination, employer sanctions may be repealed. -Darryl Lynette Figueroa Marielito Prisoners Deportation Delayed The fate of 13 Marielito detainees awaiting deportation to Cuba was postponed for another week Nov. 22 when a federal judge in Wash ington, D . C . , transferred their case to U.S. District Court in Birmingham, Ala. A hearing in the case is set for Nov. 29. "Despite that most might lose, what we hope to accomplish is to ensure that each detainee have his case reviewed by a federal court," said Gary Leshaw, a legal aid attorney based in Atlanta . Leshaw is working closely with the Miami based Task Force of Cuban Civic Organizations, a coalition which filed another suit in the Birmingham court Nov. 18. Leshaw and the Miami task force came to the aid of the detainees after the U .S. Justice Department announced Nov. 17 it would deport them soon. The deportation would be the first since Marielitos rioted last year. The legal aid suit argues that the Adminis trative Procedure Act allows the detainees to have their asylum rejections reviewed on a case-by-case basis by a federal court. The task force suit seeks the postponement of any deportations until human rights are restored in Cuba. Restraining orders are sought in both suits to prevent the U.S. government from acting. Panel to Resolve Dispute A six-member panel was created Nov. 23 by Washington, D .C., Superintendent of Schools Andrew Jenkins to resolve a dispute with the Hispanic community over a planned dismantling of the Division of Bilingual Education. The Latino contingent primarily seeks to have Jenkins postpone any change in bilingual services until a comprehensive report on bilingual education is completed. That is not expected until June. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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Antonio Mejias-Rentas, guest columnist The Forgotten Taino On Nov . 19, 1493, Christopher Columbus landed on a Caribbean island know to its taino natives as Boriqu{m. In Puerto Rico, as the island is known today, the date is celebrated as Dia del Descubrimiento -Discovery Day. It is an important national holiday, for it marks the introduction of Hispanic culture to the island and the beginning of an era. Spain ' s rule in Puerto Rico extended through 1898, when the island was ceded to the United States following the Spanish American War. Historians record that upon Columbus' landing in Boriquen, he encountered a well established native civilization. In his 1983 book" Puerto Rico : A Political and Cultural History," Dr . Arturo Morales Carrion describes the tainos as " a peaceful , sedentary people ... adept at hunting and agriculture, ... e xpert canoe makers and good sailors ... " That Morales Carrion devotes less than five pages of his lengthy book to the history prior to 1493 indicates how little of the taino legacy remains today. The conquest of Puerto Rico , fueled by the Spanish crown' s fervor to spread Catholicism, followed a pattern w e ll known to the natives of South, Central and North America . SIGNIFICANT IMPRINT REMAINS On his landing , Columbus renamed the island San Juan Bautista In 1508, Juan Ponce de Leon, the crown ' s appoint e d governor , established a settlement there. The island became a valuable asset to Spain , not only because of the gold found in its rivers , but because its strategi c location provided the perfect defense for its other possessions in the Americas. By the end of the 16th century, the tainos had been annihilated by forced labor, European diseases and war. Nevertheless, they left what Morales Carrion describes as a "significant imprint on the Puerto Rican culture. " The memory of the Iaino produces a strange c ombination of pride and sorrow in modern-day Puerto Ricans , who romantically call the island by the Hispanicized Borinquen , and themselves boricuas. Many of the island ' s municipalities, like Mayaguez and Caguas , retain their native names . Several taino nouns were adopted by Spanish , like hamaca and hurac{w, and eventually by English as well (hammock, hurricane) . REASSESS SPANISH PRESENCE As the world's attention is turning toward the 500th anniversary of Columbus' voyage , Puerto Ricans must question Spain's role in our history. Why, in the name of Christianity, was our taino past destroyed? Why were the "peaceful and sedentary" natives pushed aside , and what was really accomplished byfourcenturiesof Spanish colonization? This dilemma is not uniquely Puerto Rican . The outrage e x pressed by Native American and Hispanic groups in California over the recent beatification of Father Junipero Serra is based on a similar need to reassess the history of the Spanish presence in the so-called New World . Like most U . S . Hispanics, Puerto Ricans are proud of the Spanish influence in our culture. Our adherence to the Spanish language and to the Catholic faith are just two examples of how highly we prize that part of our heritage. But as 1992 approaches, it is appropriate to examine the price we paid . At the very least, our attitude should shift from the celebration of a "discove ry " to the commemoration of an "encounter" of cultures. A mu c h greater emphasis needs to be placed on the contribution of the peoples who lived here before the Spanish arrived . Th e Columbus Quincentennial should be a period of reconciliation as mu c h as a time for international celebration. (Antonio Mejias-Rentas writes regularly for Hispanic Link News S ervi ce and other publications.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua IF YU NU SUNUNU LIKE I NO SUNUNU ( i_Listo , old-timers? Sing it to the tune of"lf You Knew Susie Like I Know Susie. " ) : It has always been our understanding that there were fewer Hispanics in the whole state of New Hampshire than there were in one city block of the South Bronx . So a few years back, when John Sununu was elected governor of the Granite State, we were startled to read that he was born in Havana, Cuba. For a Weekly Report election edition, we called his office to ask whether we should include him in our count of Hispanic elected officials. No way, his staff assured us. Sununu' s daddy was a U . S . businessman who just happened to be working in Havana when Juanita was born . Staffers with the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials made similar inquiries in the past and were similarly discouraged from referring to him as Latino. So we raised an eyebrow on Nov.16 when Univision' s Noticiero Nacionalled off its newscast by introducing Sununu as a Cuban American who was about to become the first-ever Hispanic chief of staff in the White House. On Nov. 17, we lowered the eyebrow again. That night Noticiero Nacionalwas careful not to call Sununu Hispanic. It identified him only as born in Cuba of Lebanese parents. Three days later we were reading The Washington Post and guess what? John Sununu was Hispanic after all . The paper quoted him as saying he was a third-generation American , a Lebanese American, an Arab American, and "part Greek American and part Hispanic American." Not only was he born in Cuba , he said, but his mother, Victoria Dada, was born in El Salvador. " It ' s a varied heritage, and I'm proud of it," he boasted. Amazing how pluralistic one becomes when one leaves New Hampsh i re . IFYU NUCAVAZOS LIKE THEY NO CAVAZOS: Chances that the administration' s real Hispanic, Democrat Lauro Cavazos, would hang onto his Secretary of Education post ranged somewhere betwee n none and zero, a ccording to Eastern press speculation right up to his Nov. 21 appointment. The word was that he had effectively eliminated himself from consideration in late October when he refused to tape a TV commercial endorsing Republican candidates. Cavazos was a special target of capital conservatives. "His education positions are outrageous," The Washington Times quoted one Heritage Foundation leader Nov. 16. Describing Cavazos as a man " held in low regard by conservatives and some members of the Bush inner circle, " it went on to quote a Bush aide as saying that Cavazos declined to campaign for the Republicans in Texas "because he did not want to offend Lloyd Bentsen, who is a close friend of his. " The article added: " In a directive sent out by his undersecretary, Mr. Cavazos ordered all of the department's political appointeesmost of them brought in by former Education Secretary William Bennett-to submit their resignations. "'Either (Cavazos) expects to be gone, or he intends to use this as a way to get rid of the Bennett people,' said a senior department official who declined to be named . " No Cabinet appointment could have more meaning or more value to Latinos than Secretary of Education. And no individual appears more committed to make George Bush live up to his campaign promise of becoming an "education president. " We give our new president a high mark for that one. DEBATE DUNKED: Juan Gonzalez and Angelo Falc6n won' t face off in New York next month. What happened? Tun e in next week. Kay Barbaro Hi spanic Link Weekl y Report Nov. 28, 1988 3

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COLLECTING BOOK ON ESCALANTE: "Escalante: The Best Teacher in 1------C_O __ N_N __ E_C_T_I_N_G _____ _ America" is a 305-page book by Washington Post reporter Jay Mathews on celebrated East Los Angeles math teacher Jaime Escalante. Hardcover copies are $19.95. For information on how to order, call Henry Holt & Co. at 1-800-247-3912. IMMIGRATION REFORM: A 101-page report by the General Accounting Office is the second of three required under the Immigration Reform and Con_trol Act. It looks at the effects of IRCA's employer sanct1ons prov1s1ons . Specify GAO/GGD 8916 Nov. 15 with request for a free copy. Write Distribution Center, P . O . Box 6015, Gaithersburg , Md . 20877 (202) 275-6241. FORGOTTEN HALF: "The Forgotten Half: Pathways to Success for America's Youth and Young Families " is a 208-page report which concludes a great portion of the nation' s 16-24-year-olds who are not college bound face bleak futures. Fora free copy, write Youth and America's Future, 1001 Connecticut Ave . NW, Suite 301 , Washington , D . C . 20036-5541. PUERTO RICAN ORGANIZATION SUPPORT: "United Way Support to Puerto Rican Organizations: An Assessmenf' is an 18page report by the National Puerto Rican Coalition which concludes that United Way agencies are underfunding organizations that serve Puerto Ricans in nine cities. For a copy send $7.50 to NPRC, 1700 K St. NW , Suite 500, Washington, D . C . 20006 (202) 223-3915. ELDERLY: "Hispanic Elderly in Transition : Theory, Research , Policy and Practice," a 252-page book, is a series of essays on the economic, social , cultural and health issues that face elderly Hispanics. For a copy send $39.95 to Greenwood Press , 88 Post Road West , Bo x 5007, Westport, Conn. 06881 (203) 226-3571. PTA PUBLICATIONS: The National Parent -Teacher Association offers a number of free, Spanish -language pamphlets covering a range of topics, including how to start a PTA chapter and tips for latch key children. For more information send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to NPTA, 700 N . Rush St., Chicago, Ill. 60611-2571 (312) 787-0977. RESEARCH PROPOSALS SOUGHT: The Inter-University Program for Latino Research and the Social Science Research Council are accepting research proposals on Latinos in four areas : at-risk youth , culture and economic behavior , political organ : zation and empowerment, and national policy and its impact. D eadline is Jan. 16, and grants are worth up to $35,000. For information contact SSRC, 605 Third Ave . , New York, N.Y . 10158 (21 <:) 661-0280. TRAINING SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS Seeking to stem the shortage of Hispanic and black school principals and "master teachers," the Henry Luce Foundation has given a $150,000 grant to Columbia University's Teachers College for training fellowships, it announced this month. The Minority Leadership Fellows program will select five to six people for its first class in fall1989. Depending on whether the fellow is currently teaching and unable to break away full time, the program lasts from one to two years . The program is open to applicants from all professions as well as recent college graduates. Fellows, to be chosen from the Northeastern United States, will receive financial aid . No deadline for applications has been set. For further information write Judith Berman Brandenburg, Dean, Teachers College, Columbia University , New York , N . Y . 10027. COLLEGE ENROLLMENT EFFORT UNDERWAY The Michigan State Board of Education has put out a call for volunteer residents and community leaders to help in its Achieve a College Education program, designed to increase the number of Hispanic, black and Native American students who go on to college. Announced this month , the program-ACE-is aiming its statewide recruitment effort at community organizations, leaders and residents. Volunteers will then receive orientation on academic course selection , admissions tests and financial aid procedures. ACE volunteers will target students in 35 school districts. While 15% of the state's students are minority, oniy9% of college freshmen enrollment is and 6% of its college graduates are. For more information contact Galen Anderson, ACE Team Project Coordinator, Office of Minority Equity, 600 W. St. Joseph, Lansing, Mich. 48933 (517) 334-6275. BITS AND PIECES University of California at Riverside Chancellor Rosemary Schraer appoints Alfredo Mirande , a professor of sociology and ethnic studies, as chair of the university's Ethnic Studies Program. . . Philadelphia' s Hispanic Association of Contractors and Enterprises and Episcopal Hospital receive approval from the U . S. Housing and Urban Develop ment Department to construct a senior citizens building. HUD has set aside $5. 9 million for the building ... Ideas from students nine to 17 years old are being sought for a one-hour TV special on what is special or unique about the United States. For information and an entry form , write The American Dream Contest, 8306 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 14 , Los Angeles, Calif . 90211 . Calendar The Friends of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy will hold a sixth anniversary benefit reception and dan c e featuring Johnny Pacheco and Pete "EI Conde " Rodriguez , and Ray Barretto and Orchestra. Gers o n Borrero(212) 564-1075 Ben1amin Avila (308) 234 -8502 REFUGEE HEALTH CARE Wash ington, D . C . Dec. 4-7 Refug ee health providers and public health e xperts will meet t o identify problems in refugee relief, disc uss wa ys to improve health c are delivery, com municate re sea rch on disease and identify ethical dil e mmas in refugee health care. THIS WEEK MEDIA CONFERENCE Chicago Nov. 3 0 The Latino Committee on the Media will sponsor a daylong conference with workshops on the following topics: Spanish-language media , effective use of the media, women in the media , media and politics. Keynote speaker will be Henry Cisneros. Elizabeth Burke ( 3 12) 247-0707 WORLD AIDS DAY Various cities Dec. 1 The Pan American Health Organization and the Red Cross will be sponsoring this effort to focus on prevention of AIDS and the plight of AIDS sufferers. Bob Riccio (202) 639-3200 BENEFIT RECEPTION AND DANCE New York Dec. 2 4 ENGLISH PLUS MEETING Washington, D.C. Dec . 2 English Plus Information Clearinghouse will hold a meeting which will include an update and analysis of the November elections in Florida, Arizona and Colorado and a d isc ussion on what to e xpect in th e states and Congress ne x t year in light of recent turmoil within U.S. English. Mary Carol Combs (202) 544-0004 HISPANIC SCHOt:ARSHIP SYMPOSIUM Kearney , Neb. Dec. 3 Kearney State College School of Education will be holding a symposium on financial means available for Hispanics pursuing post-high school education, inc luding two-year programs , trade schools , special ized schools and universities. Activities will also 1nc lude discussion of college entrance examinations, resume p reparation, scholarships and financial aid . Nov . 28, 1988 Theodore Li (202) 687-1049 COMING SOON HUMAN RIGHTS SYMPOSIUM Georgetown University Washington, D .C. Dec. 1 0 Robert Drinan (202) 662-9000 Calendar will publish free announcements regarding events of interest to th e Hispanic community. Infor mation should be received at least two Fridays before publication date. Please include name, date, loca t io n , contact name and phone number. Address item s to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Re port. 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005. Hisp a ni c Link We ekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS DIRECTOR OF CHICANO STUDIES The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at El Paso seeks candidates for the posi tion of Director of the Chicano Studies Program with a joint facul ty appointment in an academic department. Rank and salary are open and commensurate with qualifications and experience . Required qualifications : Earned doctorate in liberal arts education, nursing and / or allied health , business , and en: gmeenng ; strong record of teaching, scholarly activity , and ad ministrative experience; ability to work with various academic units and community groups; fluent in Spanish and knowledge able of the demographics of the Chicano population . Duties: Responsible for course and program development; in itiates and coordinates research and publication efforts ; organizes lecture series and cultural performances, often in collaboration with community organizations and regi onal universities; teaching and student advising; the director reports directly to the Vice Presi dent for Academic Affairs . Chicano Studies offers an i nterdisciplinary BA and selected minor areas of academic concentrat i on. The program facil i tates res earch , publications, and cultural services of importance to the Chicano community . The po s ition is available after June 1 , 1989. A letter of applica tion, cur r iculum vitae, three letters of recommendation , and pub lication samples must be submitted by December 7, 1988 to : Dennis J. Bixler-Marquez , Chicano Studies Director Search Committee, Chicano Studies Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0563 Women and m i norities are encouraged to apply . The Univer sity of Texas at El Paso i s an equal opportunity , affirmative action employer . GRADUATE COOPERATIVE EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS Graduate Cooperative Education opportunities in 1989 may be offered in the following fields : Librarian/Library Technician Social Science Analyst/Research Assistant Economist/Economics Research Assistant Foreign Affairs Analyst/Research Assistant Copyright Specialist/Copyright Technician Attorney/Law Clerk Technical Information Specialist Administrative Assistant The program consists of 90or 120-day appointments to profes sional work assignments interspersed with orientations and semi nars about the Library , its mission, and operations. Sessions for 1989 will be offered January-April and June-September . In dividuals interested in the January April session must submit their applications by December 3 , 1988 . Upon completion of the 90to 120-day experience , individuals with completed master's degrees will be eligible for an additional13-month appointment. Eligibility includes possession of a graduate degree , received within one year of appointment , in one of the fields designat e d for the program, or full-time graduate study in one of these f i elds . To compete for this opportunity , send a completed Standard F orm 171, Application for Employment , indicating one of the above fields, to Carmen Mendez , Coordinator, Hispanic Employment Program , Library of Congress, James Madison Memorial Bldg., LM 647, Washington , D.C. 20540. For additional information, contact Carmen Mendez , at (202) 707-5620 . DIRECTOR CLINICAL TRAINING RIO HONDO COLLEGE CABRILLO COLLEGE The Department of Psychology at Eastern Michigan University has a tenure track opening at the Associate/Full Profes s or level for a Ph.D. clinical psychologist to function as Director of Clinical Training effective September 1989. Qualifications: Demonstrated com petence and interest in adm i nistering the clinical master's degree programs, advis ing graduate students , and working with clinical faculty of both behavioral and psychodynamic orientations; record of re search publications consistent with a senior level clinical position at the univer sity level. Expertise in a specialty area such as gerontology, family/group psychotherapy or child-clinical highly desirable . Applicants must be eligible for full licensure in the State of Michigan. Send vita and letter outlining qualifica tions to : Chairperson Search Committee . Position FAAA88035, 310 King Hall . Eastern Michigan Unjversjty. Ypsilanti, Mich. 48197 by February 1. 1989, (Early responses will receive considera tion for interviews at COGDOP Con ference.) WE TAKE PRIDE IN THE PURSUIT OF OUR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION OBJECTIVES AND ENCOURAGE QUALIFIED WOMEN AND MINORITIES TO CONSIDER THIS OPPORTUNITY. MULTICULTURAL EXPERIENCE DESIRED. Hi s pan i c Lin k Weekl y R eport PURCHASING DIRECTOR requires previous experience in purchasing. Public agency back ground preferred. For information and ap plication call Jean (213) 692 -0921 ext. 309. Office of Personnel Services, Rio Hondo Col lege, 3600 Workman Mill Road, Whittier, Calif . 90608 ENTRY LEVEL POSITIONS with Montgomery County, Md., are available on a continuous basis. Call (301) 251-2252 . PRINCE GEORGE' S COUNTY, MD., govern ment office on personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408 . INSTRUCTOR, HORTICULTURE, t e nur track, 80% assignment. Requires eligibility fo CCC instructor credential in ornamental hor ticulture . Apply by Jan . 5 , 1989 . LATINO CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION PROJECT BILINGUAL CHILD ABUSE SPECIALIS ($29K) and PUBLIC EDUCATIO COORDINATOR ($24K) for innovative Latin Child Abuse Prevention Project in Was hing to D . C . For application information call Mirn Zepeda (202) 939-8765 . DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C . 20005 or phone (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. Ordered by Organization ------------Street _ _________________ _ _ DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) City, State & Zip -----------$45 per column inch. Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

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Arts & Entertainment Gonzalez, who is now 93, lives south df San Diego. Meanwhile, the world premiere production of Stone Wedding also opens Dec. 2 at the Los Angeles' Theatre Center. WEST COAST PREMIERES: The city-by-city, or"platform," release of Break of Dawn contim.!es this week in the San Francisco-Berkeley market. The playa collaborative project ofLATC' s Latino Theatre Lab and playwright Milcha Sanchez-Scottweaves elements of Aztec mythology with the story of a small U.S . Hispanic community devastated by the Korean War . The film based on the life of Pedro J . Gonzaleza popular Los Angeles radio personality who was falsely imprisoned because he spoke out against city corruption during the Depression-opens Dec . 2 at the Opera Plaza in San Francisco and the Shattuck in Berkeley. Directed by Jose Luis Valenzuela, Stone Wedding runs through Jan . 22. The play is co-p roduced by the LATCand AT&T-which is one of various corporate underwriters of the Great Lakes Theater Festival production of Federico Garcia Lorca's Blood Wedding . Break of Dawn was written and directed by Isaac Artenstein and produced by Jude Pauline Eberhard for their Citiwest Productions company. The film , which picked up a Mesquite award at this year's San Antonio CineFestival , stars Oscar Chavez , Maria Rojo , Tony Plana, Pepe Serna, Peter Henry Schroeder and Kamala Lopez. The Garcia Lorca play opened in October in Cleveland, plays through Dec. 4 at San Diego' s Old Globe and moves next to the Coconut Grove Playhouse in Miami. A third West Coast premiere takes place Dec . 2 . LA Dance Freeway, the latest entry into the new Latin music TV genre, begins airing this week on KDOC , Anaheim . Produced by Martin Macharino, the show will focus on " Latin hip-hop and Hispanic acts that crossover Distribution plans for the filmwhich premiered in San Diego last Augustinclude future openings in various San Francisco suburbs and a possible benefit premiere in Los Angeles . to the pop charts." -Antonio Mejias-Rentas M edia Report CISNEROS RADIO SHOW: San Antonio Mayor Henry Cisneros will lend his voice to radio commentary on 80 stations beginning in January, he announced Nov. 10. The 1 1 /2-minute radio spots will be produced and distributed by Starstream Communica tions of Houston. Cisneros said the opinion pieces will be broadcast mostly by Spanish language stations in large markets. The subject matter will consis t of "whatever is hot," he said . He also plans to create an asset. management company and to write three books after stepping down as mayor in May. Two are already in the works and will be published by Ha rper & Row and its Boston subsid i ary, Barringer. The first expected out will take a look at successfully managed U.S. cities and analyze those in need of help. The second will be an autobiography. In the third, Cisneros will expound on changes he envisions fort he country , based on demographics . There HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A n a t io n a l p ubl icatio n of Hispani c Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-073 7 Publi s h er. Hector E r i cksen-Mendoza Editor. F e li x Per e z Report i n g : A n to ni o Mej ias-R e n tas , Darryl L yne tt e F igueroa Sophia Ni eves . No port ion of His p anic Link Weekly Repo rt may b e rep r oduced or broadcast i n any f o r m wi thout adva n ce p e r m i ssion. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORP O R ATE C L ASS IFIED : A d rates 90 cen t s per wor d . Dis play ads ar e $45 per colum n i nc h . Ads placed by Tues d ay wi ll r un i n Weekl y Report s mai led Fr iday o f sam e w e ek. M u lt ip l e use r a t es o n request . 6 is as yet no publishing contract for the latter book, but mayoral spokesperson Shirl Thomas said publishers are "clamoring to get it." OTHER RADIO NEWS: Radio Marti will expand programs which broadcast personal messages to Cuba until fire-damaged phone lines are restored in Havana . International lines have been cut off since a Nov . 13 f i re caused $37 million in damages to the phone system there. The messages air Sunday evenings from 7 to 8 p . m . on the Family Bridge program and during the "bridge" portion of the Dos a las Dos variety show , which airs Monday , Wednes day and Friday from 2 to 4 p . m . While there is no guarantee that friends or relatives in Cuba will receive the notes, it is estimated, said Radio Marti spokesperson Mike Schoenfeld, that 86% of adult Cubans on the island listen to its programs . To send a brief , personal message, call (800) 523-263 9 . Callers located i n the Wash ington, D.C . , metro area should phone (202) 485-8710. TV BITS: There will be even more competition in the Spanish-language TV market come Jan . 1 with the onset of 24-hourcable broadSffEDLIMii 55 MPH RED casts from the Spanish Television News Network based in San Juan , Puerto Rico ... Spanish-language KMEX-TV, channel34, in Los Angeles will broadcast the 17th annual Navidad en el Barrio telethon Dec. 4. The station e xpects to raise $ 350,000 for holiday food and toys for needy Latino families. KUDOS AND MOVES: Elaine Ayala left her editorial writer spot at The Arizona Daily Star to join the editorial board of The Plain Dealer in Cleveland . . . Jesse Trevino, assistant state editor of the Austin American-Statesman, was promoted to the editorial board of the newspaper. . . Phil Garcia leaves his UPI reporting post in Washington , D .C., to become state legislative reporter for The Sacramento Bee. Garcia is president of the Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C. . . . The California Chicano News Media Association was awarded $12,000 for its campaigns to increase the number of minorities in the newspaper business by the Sacramento-based McClatchy Newspapers. The chain owns the Bee newspapers in Cali fornia, among others ... Darryl Lynette Figueroa H ispanic Link Weekl y Report