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Hispanic link weekly report, December 12, 1988

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 12, 1988
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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REC'D. HR/CR
Making The News This Week
Ricardo Bofill, head of the Cuban Committee for Human Rights, visits with President Reagan at the White House to thank him for his work on behalf of human rights in Cuba... U.S. Rep. E. Kika de la Garza (D-Texas) attends the inauguration of Mexico President Carlos Salinas de Gortari... U.S. Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) and his wife, Jane Lee, plead not guilty to federal bribery and extortion charges... California Gov. George Deukmejian appoints S. James Otero, 36, as a municipal court judge for the Los Angeles Judicial District... Dagmar Celeste, wife of Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste, fasts for three days in support of the United Farm Workers’ table grape boycott...
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Chicago Alderman Juan Soliz says he is consiaerincrrunmng for mayor. . . Michael Huerta, 32, becomes San Francisco’s port director. He is the first Hispanic to hold the $100,000-a-year job... A federal court jury orders Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates to personally pay $170,000 to Jesse Ldrez and his family. Larez’snose was broken and his house ransacked by police officers in an unsuccessful search for a murder weapon used in a gang killing... A federal appeals court panel in Atlanta holds that Hillsborough County, Fla., school officials cannot isolate 7-year-old Eliana Martinez in a glass booth unless they prove her AIDS poses a threat to her classmates. The case was remanded to the lower court... Milwaukee resident Maria del Carmen Herndndez, 60, wins $1 million in Wisconsin’s second million dollar lottery drawing...
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Texas Border Health Falls Short
FBI Receives Setback in Discrimination Suit
The FBI illegitimately used a federal grand jury to secure a subpoena against a Hispanic agent who had filed a discrimination lawsuit against the agency, a federal district judge in Midland, Texas, ruled Dec. 2.
Judge Lucius Bunton held that the FBI failed to justify its request for the subpoena, issued some three weeks after special agent Bernardo Perez filed a complaint. Agency officials contended they needed the subpoena to look at the phone records of Perez to determine whether he was lying i n connection with the criminal investigation of another agent in an unrelated matter.
“To deny that there was not a close causal relationship between the grand jury subpoena and the filing of the complaint is to fly in the face of reason,” stated Bunton in his 17-page opinion.
Bunton’s ruling is another blow to the nation’s number one law enforcement agency. The judge held in September that the FBI had discriminated against Hispanic agents in promotions and assignments. Bunton is expected to determine damages in the class-action suit early next year.
House Posts Go to
With his Dec. 6 election as chairman of the powerful House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee, U.S. Rep. Henry Gonzalez (D-Texas) will become the second Hispanic to head a legislative committee in the 101 st Congress. Rep. E. Kikade la Garza (D-Texas), who retained the chairmanship of the Committee on Agriculture, is the other.
The previous day, Rep. Tony Coelho (D-Calif.) was unanimously re-elected as majority whip, the third highest ranking position in the House.
The 72-year-old Gonzalez won his seat with a 200-16 vote by the House Democratic Caucus. As the senior Democrat on the banking committee, he had been in line for the spot left open by Rep. Fernand St Germain (D-R.l.), who lost his re-election bid.
The press began in recent weeks to take a longer than usual look at Gonzalez when it became clear he might head the 50-member
Residents of the 16 Texas counties along the Mexico border suffer from a high incidence of tuberculosis and other communicable diseases, coupled with poor access to health care, according to a federal government study of an area that is 73% Hispanic.
“ Because of our proximity to the border, we have diseases you don’t normally see,” said Charles Wilson, medical director of the Hidalgo County Health Department. “We have 100 cases of leprosy in Texas, 50 of them in Hidalgo County.”
He said that in Hidalgo County, which has five hospitals, 40% of the residents live below the poverty level and many people cannot afford to see a doctor.
Overall, 1.5 million people live in the Texas border region.
Other diseases reported to occur at a higher rate than in the rest of Texas and the United States included hepatitis, gastrointestinal diseases, and syphilis, said the U.S. General Accounting Office study released Nov. 29.
The occurrence of hepatitis not specified as either A or B was seven times higher along the state’s border than in the United States.
Gonzalez, Coelho
committee with jurisdiction over such complex problems as the savings and loan crisis and Third World and Latin American debt.
In the days before his election, Gonzalez held a flurry of meetings with such financial leaders as Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady and his Senate counterpart Donald Riegle (D-Mich.).
In a statement released after the vote, Gonzalez said an agenda would be announced separately. “It promises to be the busiest, toughest agenda in decades,” he added. Setting the agenda is the main role of the committee chairman.
The San Antonio Express-News reported that Gonzalez will also seek to retain the chairmanship of the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, overseen by the banking committee.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
In nine of the 16 counties studied in “Health Care: Availability in the Texas-Mexico Border Area,” no obstetricians were available, although the counties were home to 15,364 women of child-bearing age.
continued on page 2
DISEASE RATES ALONG TEXAS-MEXICO BORDER
(per 100,000)
U.S. Tex. Border
Hepatitis A 9.7 14.4 18.3
Hepatitis B 11.0 9.2 9.8
Hepatitis 2.0 6.6 13.3
(unspecified) Tuberculosis 9.3 10.5 15.5
Amebiasis* 1.7 2.1 6.2
Campylobacteriosis* ’k’k 4.5 6.5
Salmonellosis* 24.0 14.9 16.4
Shigellosis* 7.1 12.8 17.6
* These are gastrointestinal diseases. Amebiasis is a parasitic infestation, campylobacteriosis and shigellosis are bacterial infections. Salmonellosis is transmitted through food. Hepatitis and gastrointestinal rates reflect 1985-86 incidence. Tuberculosis rates are for 1987.
** Indicates data is unavailable.
Source: U.S. General Accounting Office’s “Health Care: Availability in the Texas-Mexico Border Area.”
Senators Hit English Only
Gearing up for U.S. English’s upcoming effort to make English the Lone Star state’s official language, two state senators announced they have the votes to block any such legislative measure in the Texas Senate.
Sens. Carlos Truan (D-Corpus Christi) and Chet Edwards (D-Duncanville) said at a press conference in San Antonio Nov. 22 that they have secured the signatures of 11 other senators - five of them Hispanic - to vote down any official-language proposals.
Eleven is the number of votes needed in the 31-member Senate to stop a bill.
The announcement followed by six weeks the success of ballot initiatives in Florida, Arizona and Colorado. Sixteen states now have laws declaring English their official language.


LULAC Weighs U.& Constitution Amendment on English
The League of United Latin American Citizens is exploring the possibility of recommending its own constitutional amendment to Congress that recognizes the importance of English, according to Arnold Torres, LULAC’s legislative adviser. Torres suggested the action at a meeting in Washington, D.C., attended by a coalition of Latino and other groups to devise strategies to combat official English.
“There has been no attempt to introduce legislation to stop this movement,” said Torres. “If members of Congress don’t think this has a chance of passing, then we’ll try something else.”
Hearings on the issue are expected to be
held by the House Civil and Constitutional Rights Subcommittee, chaired by Don Edwards (D-Calif.).
The proposal, made to representatives attending a meeting of the English Plus Information Clearinghouse steering committee, was poorly received.
“It was a slap in the face to the people who have been working day in and day out on this one issue,” said Jim Lyons, counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education. “Arnold talked glibly about safeguarding people’s rights (in the bill). In terms of statutory law, there are few safeguards for language minorities.”
Torres told Weekly Report Dec. 5 that
losses in heavily Hispanic states such as California, Arizona and Florida indicate a new course of action is needed. He said the bill would acknowledge the importance of English, but wouldn’t provide a license to step on other cultures and languages.
Groups ranging from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund to the American Civil Liberties Union had met to discuss new strategies for opposing official English.
“There could be something that none of us thought about in Arnold’s suggestion. Maybe that was the reason he wasn’t physically assaulted,” said Lyons.
- Sophia Nieves
Three Border Counties Have No Doctor
continued from page 1
Court Clears the Path for More Deportations
A federal district court in Birmingham, Ala, cleared the way Dec. 5 for the deportation of four more Mariel detainees to Cuba when it denied their stay of deportation request. Three days earlier, five Marielitos were flown from Birmingham to Havana after having unsuccessfully appealed their deportation order all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court
The nine Marielitos, all of whom have been convicted of serious crimes since arriving in the United States aboard the 1980 Mariel boatlift, are part of a group of 15 who were ordered deported Nov. 17 by the U.S. Justice Department.
Groups frantically fighting on behalf of the detainees argue that they should remain in the United States until human rights abuses are halted in the island nation. The groups filed an appeal with the 11 th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta Dec. 7 but held out little hope of stopping the repatriations.
The United States and Cuba reopened an immigration pact in 1987. The deportations are the first of 2,500 planned by this country.
A 26-year-old Latino postal worker was discharged from a New York hospital Dec. 6 following 10 days of recuperation after being shot by an off-duty police officer, an incident which has incited outrage among some Latinos.
The Latino Coalition for Racial Justice circulated a statement Nov. 30 condemning transit police officer Christopher Huwer, 30, for his Nov. 26 shooting of Carlos Sanchez, who it says was unarmed. Huwer also shot himself in the wrist. He was released from the same hospital Nov. 29.
Brooklyn District Attorney Elizabeth Holtz-man was roundly criticized for not charging the four-year police veteran with attempted murder. “Police officers... are allowed to shoot and/or kill unarmed Latinos and African-Americans in New York City with impunity,”
The executive director of the U.S. - Mexico Border Health Association pointed out that malpractice insurance for an obstetrician can cost thousands of dollars yearly.
“You can’t go to a small town and not deal with obstetrics. These doctors say they can’t take a chance with malpractice,” said Herbert Ortega
Ortega added that one brain-damaged child delivered by a midwife could cost taxpayers more than $1.5 million over 30 years, but policymakers are not looking at saving money by taking preventive measures.
Three of the border counties - Culberson, Hudspeth and Terrell - have no doctors. Two counties have no dentist, eight have one dentist and one county has two.
Of the 82 pediatricians practicing in the 1,000-mile-long border area, none worked in 10 counties which have a total of 36,482 children.
The report, requested bySen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas), follows the passage of a border health bill in October sponsored by Bentsen
the group charged.
According to several reports, the men were driving home from night shifts Nov. 25 when they became involved in a traffic dispute. The argument persisted as they parked under the Manhattan Bridge and escalated to the firing of three shots by Huwer. One hit S&nchez in the arm, another in the abdomen.
Huwer would not comment, following the advice of his lawyer. No criminal charges have been brought against either man. The transit police internal affairs division is investigating the matter, as is Holtzman's office. Her spokesperson, Louis Haber, would not comment on the charges leveled against Holtzman by the Latino group, saying only, “We will take appropriate action.”
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
and Rep. Jack Brooks (D-Texas). The bill authorized the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to provide grants to medical schools to establish Border Education Centers where students can learn and provide needed medical services.
“The next step will be to get the program funded in the 101 st Congress,” said a Bentsen aide. “It’s going to be tough because of the overall budget situation, but$24 million is not a huge amount of money.”
Wilson said the area is sorely in need of the help the bill would provide. “ Medically, we do have a problem. It would be a big shot in the arm for the whole border area.”
Ortega had reservations regarding the effectiveness of such a bill. “I don’t think it (the border area) needs a Band-Aid. Unless we look at it in a comprehensive way, we’re not going to have things we need - like employment and housing. Health is just one.”
In 1986 and 1987, Texas led the nation in hospital closings, with 24 of them in rural areas. A spokesperson for the Texas Hospital Association attributed the closings to the crippled Texas economy.
- Sophia Nieves
HELO Elects President
Orlando, Fla., Councilmember Mary P6rez Johnson was elected president of the Hispanic Elected Local Officials group at its Dec. 3 annual meeting in Boston. She succeeds San Antonio Councilmember Maria Berrio-zabal, who retains a seat on the board of directors as immediate past president.
HELO, a division of the National League of Cities, also elected Norwalk, Calif., Mayor Marcial Rodriguez as first vice president and Santa Fe, N.M., Councilmember Peso Chavez as second vice president Sitting on the new board as secretary/treasurer will be Adolf Olivas, vice mayor of Hamilton, Ohio.
Education issues were at the forefront of the groups’ discussion on next year's agenda. HELO participants will produce a case study book on education success stories among Hispanic youth.
New York Shooting Incites Outrage
2
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Guarione Diaz, guest columnist
Why Miami, Cubans Are‘Different
Understanding Cubans may be hard at times, particularly in Miami.
Not long ago, I heard a well-meaning Miamian say that “Americans here feel left out.” My initial reaction
brought images of fellow Cubans speaking Spanish in an elevator, or failing to give directions in English to a lost explorer of Little Havana.
I wondered, too, if the speaker reflected a national view that some ethnic immigrants are not “American,” even though they have lived for almost three decades in the United States. Most important, I ended up asking myself, “Why is it that ‘Americans’ feel left out?”
This led me to consider two possibilities.
First, anyone who has lived in Miami for 20 or more years must be overcome by its explosive population growth and the byproducts of urbanization. Noise, pollution, traffic jams, and crime are hard to adjust to-even for a racially and ethnically stable “American” community. Massive immigration, the ubiquitous presence of a new language and a growing concern for international issues has made the adjustment twice as difficult.
NUMBERS ALONE DON’T DO IT
This is not true for “American” newcomers. They do not know traditional Miami and thus have less to miss. They come from large urban areas facing problems similar to ours. They more or less expect the rewards and punishment found in our community. One might even say that these recent newcomers see themselves as forces in the shaping of a future Miami rather than as victims of the many changes that we have undergone in the last two decades.
The Cuban presence in Miami has not fit conventional molds of immigrant settlement patterns, even when compared with other Hispanic populations elsewhere in the country.
What makes Miami Cubans different is not the numbers alone, for several other cities such as New York and San Antonio have a larger number or proportion of Hispanics. Nor is it the presence of Spanish media, for they exist as well in other cities.
While Miami has a sizable number of Cuban-American elected officials, other cities and states have many Hispanic elected officials, too - as we find in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona And even Hispanic-owned businesses, so well noted in Miami, exist in higher numbers in the Los Angeles-Long Beach metropolitan area.
What is it, then, that makes Miami unique?
It is a combination of all of the above in one single, geographically concentrated, young, open, and changing community.
PORTRAYED AS CRIMINALS, ENTREPRENEURS
The average “American” understands and accepts short-term political exiles and refugees seeking freedom. He admires immigrants pursuing the American dream and enjoys visiting Chinatowns and Little Italies with their lore, memories and pride.
It may be harder to understand a community that is at once actively exile, immigrant, economically aggressive, and proudly ethnic but dispersed beyond historic cultural neighborhoods.
Members of the Cuban community are perceived to be politically unyielding, both as revolutionaries and as growing participants in partisan U.S. politics; in just two decades, they have been portrayed as both criminals and entrepreneurs.
None of the above represents an insurmountable obstacle to mutual understanding. Cuban Americans need not abandon any of their concerns, but they must be sensitive about the salient role they play in this American metropolis of the 21 st century.
Non-Cubans, in turn, may better understand Cuban Americans by pondering on this nation’s ability to change while remaining continuously and essentially “American.”
(Guarione Diaz is president of the Cuban American National Council inc., a social-service agency based in Miami.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
TRUTH IS STRANGER THAN FICTION: A sampling of recent news confirms it beyond a doubt
REVENGE OF THE JIFFY JOHNS: The heading on a short story in the Dec. 4 New York Times informs us: “WORKER KILLED BY TOILET.”
The unfortunate victim was 23-year-old Ram6n Jos6 Rodriguez, a construction worker. A portable toilet blew off the fourth level of a building he was working on in Miami and crushed him.
MORE STRANGE AND TERRIBLE STUFF: In California, according to an item in the Nov. 25 Los Angeles Times, the state Commission on Teacher Credentialing revoked the credential of Joyce Ferrer, a 43-year-old first-grade bilingual education teacher.
It charged that the 16-year veteran maestra pushed kids’ heads toward a toilet bowl and threatened to flush them down, stuffed them in garbage cans and banged on the lids, and advised one talkative boy that she planned to cut out his tongue with scissors and stitch his mouth shut.
The story failed to indicate whether she made the threats in English, Spanish or both.
‘IF I ONLY HAD A BRAIN’: The Dec. 1 Washington Post reported that House Majority Whip Tony Coelho recently underwent a routine PET scan, which measures metabolic brain activity, at UCLA’s Nuclear Medicine and Biophysics lab.
This month, Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Coelho, who has epilepsy, received a framed electronic photograph of the scan and a letter assuring him that he did indeed have a working brain.
He is the only member of Congress with “hard data to prove this,” the lab advised him. “ For the rest, it is yet to be determined.”
AS THE PRESS SEES OUR OTHER LEADERS: While Lauro Cavazos has generally received flattering reviews from the national press for his performance as Secretary of Education to date, The Wall Street Journal sicked its book editor on him Nov. 21.
In an editorial page piece headed “Education President Flunks His First Test,” David Brooks accused President-elect George Bush of selecting a man who was fast becoming a slave of the “education lobby.”
An ardent admirer of William Bennett, Brooks mocks Cavazos’ placement of the dropout issue on the top of his agenda and responds to Cavazos’ contention that education could solve the world’s problems of hunger and pestilence by grunting: “ It was the type of goopy rhetoric that hasn’t been heard at the Department of Education for some time.”
Meanwhile, Henry Gonzftlez?s rise to chair the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee drew repeated media references to his “hot temper” and “maverick” ways. But they pointed out that the 72-year-old San Antonio legislator gets good marks for integrity.
His predecessor was defeated in a re-election bid after Justice Department allegations that he accepted thousands of dollars in entertainment and meals from Savings and Loan lobbyists.
-Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
DARYL GATES, Los Angeles police chief, speaking to reporters after testifying in a lawsuit in which six of his officers were charged with breaking the nose of Jesse L4rez, ransacking his home and roughing up his family members. Gates was later ordered to personally pay $170,000 to L4rez and his family:
"He’s (Larez) probably lucky thafs all he had... You’ll probably print that. It shows my cocky attitude."
V a.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Dec. 12,1988
3


COLLECTING
CUSTOM CHRISTMAS CARDS: La Galeria Gonzalez in Dallas offers custom-designed, full-color, bilingual Christmas and other specialty cards reflecting the Hispanic culture. Discounts are available on bulk orders. To order contact Barbara Renaud Gonzalez, La Galeria Gonzalez, P.O. Box 180982, Dallas, Texas 75218 (214) 328-SI 90.
OUTSTANDING MATH, SCIENCE TEACHERS: Junior and senior high school science and mathematics teachers are being sought as candidates for the 1989 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching. The awards carry a $7,500 grant to the teachers’ schools, a presidential citation and a host of other honors. Deadline is March 1, 1989. For information write PAESMT, National Science Teachers Association Special Projects, 5112 Berwyn Road, Third Floor, College Park, Md. 20740.
LATINA AND BLACK DROPOUTS: The Women s Research and Education Institute’s “The American Woman,” a 443-page book, includes two chapters on the educational outlook for Hispanic and black women. For a paperback copy, send $11.95 to WREI, 1700 18th St NW, Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20009.
REFERENCE BOOKS: “Spanish-Language Reference Books: An Annotated Bibliography” is a 45-page book with 117 citations. For a copy send $10 to Chicano Studies Library Publications Unit, 3405 Dwinelle Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, Calif. 94720.
BORDER HEALTH: A 53-page report issued by the U.S. General Accounting Office, “Health Care: Availability in the Texas-Mexjco Border Area,” looks at the incidence of disease and the availability of health care. Send requests to the U.S. General Accounting Office, P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md. 20877. The first five copies are free. Additional copies are $2 each.
BORICUA CALENDAR: The Soy Boricua 1989 Pocket Calendar, with traditional Puerto Rican holidays, important dates in the history of Puerto Ricans in the island and mainland and a listing of national Puerto Rican organizations, is now available. To order send $3.50 to the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite 804, New York, N.Y. 10001-4512.
HISPANIC ELDERLY: “Demographic Characteristics of the Older Hispanic Population: 1988” is a 20-page report with statistics on numbers, income, employment, health, housing and education. Fora free copy, contact National Association for Hispanic Elderly, 2727 W. Sixth St., Suite 270, Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213) 487-1922.
CONNECTING
MAYORS FUND AIDS PROJECTS
Ten organizations, stretching from Bakersfield, Calif., to New York, will share $379,617 in federal grants to develop educational programs that are directed wholly or in part to Hispanics, the U.S. Conference of Mayors announced Dec. 5.
Among some of the activities funded are the distribution of a bilingual pamphlet to 17,000 Hispanic-surnamed homes in Austin, Texas; the canvassing of Hispanic migrant workers in Kansas City, Kans., and Hendersonville, N.C., through workshops, public service announcements and health fairs; and the production of audio tapes on AIDS in Spanish and the distribution of condoms, bleach and educational materials in Lawrence, Mass.
The grants represent the seventh round of the U.S. Conference of Mayors’ AIDS prevention programs. For more information contact Matthew Murguia at (202) 293-7330
FIRM AWARDS $35 MILLION
In one of the largest grants of its kind, General Electric Co. announced Nov. 28 that it has established a $35 million program to help prepare minority students for college and increase the number of minority and female engineering teachers at the university level.
Most of the grant - $20 million - will go toward tutoring minority high school students, preparing them for test-taking, purchasing equipment and providing scholarships at selected schools.
The other $15 million will go toward the goal of adding 500 Hispanics and blacks and 100 women to the engineering teaching ranks by the end of the century.
POSTER CONTEST UNDERWAY
Actor Edward James Olmos will be the celebrity spokesperson for Mothers Against Drunk Driving’s third annual nationwide poster/essay contest. For the first time in its three-year history, the contest will accept entries in Spanish as well as English.
The “DRIVE SOBER - DRIVE SMART’ contest, where students in grades first through 12th can compete for more than $13,000 in cash awards, seeks to emphasize the dangers of drinking and driving to the nation’s youth. The number one killer of teen-agers, according to MADD, is liquor consumption and driving.
The seven first-place national winners will win $1,000 and be provided an expense-paid trip to New York to an awards ceremony. All entries must be postmarked by Feb. 13,1989. For more information call (817) 268-6233.
Calendar
To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include name, date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
AIDS SERVICE, EDUCATION Washington, D.C. Dec. 14
The National Community AIDS Partnership will host a national advisory committee meeting on the status of current government AIDS prevention initiatives and the future for privately funded service and education programs. The Partnership has $9 million to award to communities on a matching basis.
Susan Garbose (202) 466-7590
ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Chicago Dec. 14
Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer will attend the program and reception honoring the Chicago Commission on Latino Affairs, which is celebrating its fifth anniversary.
Marta Ayala (312)744-4404
HURRICANE VICTIMS’ BENEFIT Los Angeles Dec. 15
The Los Angeles Valley College Associated Student Union will sponsor a benefit concert - with performances by six groups - to aid the victims of the recent hurricane in Nicaragua.
Juan Morillo (818) 781-1200 Ext. 361
SPANISH ENVOY LECTURE Washington, D.C. Dec. 15 A lecture in Spanish, part of a series dealing with Hispanic America’s contribution to U.S. independence, will deal with the topic of the first Spanish envoy before the U.S. Congress of 1784-1789. The speaker at this Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans event is Enrique Ferndndez y Fernandez, Dec. 12,1988
professor of Spanish and literature at Eastern College of Pennsylvania
Pedro de Mesones (703) 866-1578
COMING SOON
MINORITY STUDENT RETENTION
Ohio State University, Division of Student Affairs
Columbus, Ohio Jan. 10,11
Carmen Alvarez-Breckenridge (614) 292-2917
PUBLICATIONS CONVENTION National Association of Hispanic Publications Las Vegas Jan. 12-14 Eddie Escobedo (703) 384-1514
EDUCATION MEETING American Council on Education San Diego Jan. 18-21 Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Feb. 15-18 Lollie Reyes (714) 397-4552
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
TESTING ANNOUNCEMENT CALIFORNIA STATE LOTTERY | ^ MARKETING SPECIALIST ($3,011 - $3,633/mo)
TM
POSITION: Marketing Specialists complete implementation of test plans; coordinate game design implementation with other departmen ts, consumer promotion program design and execution, and ensure budgetary control.
MINIMUM QUALIFICAITONS: (Experience and Education) Bachelor of Science with a specialization in Marketing or a closely related technical area AND three years of progressively responsible experience performing professional or technical duties in consumer marketing management and services such as new product development and analysis and advertising, promotion, research market sales, forecasting, consumer-oriented public relations, or closely related areas. OR Masters in Business Administration with specialization in marketing and two years of experience performing the duties in consumer marketing management services, such as new product development and analysis and advertising, promotion, research, market and sales forecasting, consumer-oriented public relations, or closely related areas.
FELONY DISQUALIFICATION: Pursuant to Government Code 8800.71, persons convicted of a felony or any gambling related offense are disqualified from employment with the CSL and your application for this examination will not be accepted.
FINAL FILING DATE: State Applications or Resumes must be POSTMARKED no later than January 12, 1989.
California State Lottery Personnel Office P.O. Box 1359 Broderick, CA 95605-1359
For more information call (916) 322-0007 An Equal Opportunity Employer
FREE-LANCE RADIO JOURNALIST
NPR's Latin File seeks experienced free-lance journalist from Los Angeles, Miami, and other communities with a significant Hispanic population. Reporters will produce weekly features and news spots.
Submit r6sum6 and audio tape to Judy Moore-Smith, NPR’s Latin File, National Public Radio, 2025 M St., Washington, D.C. 20036.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY, MD., government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408.
INDIANA UNIVERSITY
Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School
Indiana University seeks applications for the position of Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. This position reports to the Vice President/IU-Bloomington Chancellor, a university-wide officer who reports to the President. Indiana University is a comprehensive research institution with over 3,400 faculty and 82,000 students on eight campuses. In 1987-88 it had 328 advanced-degree programs and awarded 1,151 doctoral and 2,975 master's degrees. As one of the nation's centers of academic excellence, IU continually seeks to enhance its research and teaching. Responsibilities of the Associate Vice President/Dean include:
• Coordinating and enhancing all research degree programs of lU’s university-wide Graduate School.
This entails maintaining quality of current programs, reviewing proposed programs, fostering interdisciplinary programs, appointing graduate faculty, and working with the graduate divisions of each school or campus.
• Serving as chief research administrator of the main campus (Bloomington). This entails overseeing research policies, grant-seeking, relations with funding agencies, Internal research funding, research centers, publications, and support personnel.
• Promoting high-quality faculty research programs on all of Ill’s eight campuses.
• Enhancing lU’s business and industry relationships through the Industrial Research Liaison Program, and catalyzing research aimed at assisting Indiana's economic development.
e Overseeing a centralized office for information about research, economic development, and graduate education.
• Raising funds for research, graduate, and economic-development programs in collaboration with university administrators and development officers.
• Acting as spokesperson for research and graduate education with various external agencies.
• Coordinating development efforts for graduate student support.
Applicants should have a record of distinguished academic achievement and commitment to research and graduate education; experience in administration at a relatively high level; evidence of creativity and success in obtaining external research funding; knowledge of business and industry and the realtionship between the University and the private sector; and an understanding of large, multi-site universities. NOTE: The successful candidate will be appointed a tenured professor in the appropriate academic department.
Applications, including a r£sum6 and names, telephone numbers, and addresses of references, should be received by January 31,1989, and should be addressed to:
Associate Vice President/Dean Search Committee Room 197, Smith Research Center Indiana University Bloomington, Indiana 47405
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Dec. 12,1988
5


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT
EL PASO
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN ART HISTORY - Can-didate should have the ability to teach a range of art history and appreciation courses. As the only faculty art historian, the responsibilities are broad. A specialization in Contemporary or Latin American would be preferred but not mandatory, /applicant should have a Ph.D. Date of appointment is 09-01-89. Salary is commensurate with experience. Tenure track position.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PAINTING/DRAWING -- MFA/painting to head painting area and teach both undergraduate and graduate. Excellent schedule/exotic location with outstanding weather. Date of appointment is 09-01-89. Salary is commensurate with experience. Tenure track position.
The Department of Art at U.T. El Paso is a growing and strong department. The facility is outstanding with 29 studios and excellent equipment. The Fox Fine Arts Center on campus is only 200 yards from the border with Mexico and this provides for a unique cultural experience.
Application Procedure: Submit a letter of application, r6sum6, and three letters of recommendation. The deadline for receipt of applications is 02/28/89. Correspondence & inquiries to: Charles Fensch, Chairman, Department of Art, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, Texas 79968-0548.
The University is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer.
WOMEN’S STUDIES PROGRAM DIRECTOR THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO
Applications & nominations are invited for the position of Women’s Studies Director. The Director will administer an interdisciplinary program in Women’s Studies which reports to the VPAA and will have teaching responsiblities and a research base in an academic department. Earned doctorate, teaching experience and research and publication record required; administrative experience preferred. Reid of study is open.
The University enrolls 15,000 students of whom a majority are Hispanic.
Initial screenings will begin 02/01/88,for Fall Placement,with acceptance of applications until the position is filled. Send a letter of interest, curriculum vita, and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references to: Professor Kathy Staudt, Assistant Dean of Liberal Arts, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0525.
The University is an EEO/AA employer.
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California State University, Bakersfield
9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099
The University invites applications for tenure-track faculty appointments in the following areas:
School of Arts & Sciences
Biology: (1) Professor/Chair of Biology and (1) Assistant Professor, Microbiology
English/Communicatlons: (1) Associate or Professor, Communications-Telecommunications and (1) Assistant or Associate Professor, Com-munications-Journalism/Print Media
Mathematics: (1) Associate Professor, Remedial Math; (1) Assistant Professor, Statistics; and (2) Assistant Professors in an area such as algebra, geometry/topology, foundations, graph theory/cominatorics; however, all areas considered.
Nursing: Assistant or Associate Proessor, Pediatrics Physics/Geology: Assistant Professor, Petroleum Geology/Petroleum Engineering or Hydrology/Water Chemistry Sociology/Anthropology: Assistant Professor, Archaeology
Contact: Either the chair of the appropriate department or Dr. Manuel A. Esteban, Dean, School of Arts and Sciences (805) 664-2221. Application deadlines vary according to department, but most are open until mid-January or until positions are filled.
School of Business and Public Administration Accounting: Rank Open. Areas include managerial, financial, auditing, taxation
Management: Rank Open. Major areas include business and society, legal environment. Other areas could include principles of management, operations research
Public Administration: Assistant Professor, Health Care Administration
Contact: Dr. Michael Carrell, Dean, School of Business and Public Administration (805)664-2157
Application Deadline: January 30,1989, or until positions are filled.
School of Education
Art Education: Assistant Professor — courses include art education and possibly computer-based education; supervision of student teachers Counselor Education: Assistant or Associate Professor — graduate courses in counselor education; supervision of internships Educational Administration: Rank Open. Graduate courses in educational administration for both elementary and secondary; supervision of culminating activities and fieldwork
Elementary Education/Reading and Language Arts: Assistant or Associate Professor — courses include reading and language arts methods; supervision of student teachers
Elementary Education/Science: Assistant Professor — courses in science education and possibly computer-based education; supervision of student teachers
Elementary/Secondary Education/Math/CBE: Assistant or Associate professor — courses: in math education and computer-based education; supervision of student teachers
Secondary Education: Assistant or Associate Professor — Coordinator of field experiences; supervision of student teachers
Contact: Dr. Adria F. Klein, Dean, School of Education (805) 664-2219 Application Deadline: January 27,1989, or until positions are filled.
In addition, this University continues to seek applicants for temporary faculty appointments in the areas listed above as well as other areas of the fine arts, behavioral and social sciences, sciences and professional programs (nursing, criminal justice, publicadministration, health science).
CSUB is the youngest of the nineteen campuses of the California State University System. The campus is located in the City of Bakersfield which has a metropolitan population of roughly 250,000 and it serves a diverse population of about 700,000, located primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley.
CSUB is firmly committed to achieving the goals of equal opportunity and Affirmative Action and welcomes applications from women, ethnic minorities, and the handicapped. CSUB fostersand appreciates ethnic and cultural diversity among its faculty and students.
6
Dec. 12,1988
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION
MEMBER BENEFITS SPECIALIST
(# 590)
The NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) is seeking a talented professional with a bachelor's degree in Business Administration with additional training in the areas of insurance and/or risk management OR the equivalent working experience. In addition, the successful applicant must possess a minimum of five years professional experience in business operations with responsibility for assisting in the administration of a full range of services in the areas of group insurance, membership benefits and discount programs, risk management practices and in the development and implementation of contracts and other memoranda of understanding. The applicants should possess proficient writing and oral skills. Writing samples are required. Master’s degree in Business Administration or other advanced degree in a related field and/or professional insurance or benefits designation, i.e. ARM and CEBS are all a plus.
NEA offers excellent benefits. Starting salary $39,271 to $45,165 depending on current salary history and benefits package.
SENIOR SYSTEMS ANALYST
(#563)
The NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) is seeking a talented data processing professional with experience in computer systems analysis, design, development, testing, implementation and documentation.
The position requires a bachelor's degree in Computer Sciences or related field OR the equivalent working experience. In addition, the successful applicant must possess a minimum of six years of systems analysis and design experience including batch and on-line systems. This experience must have included two years of programming using COBAL in an IBM 370 environment. The applicants should have experience with database management systems; coordinating the development of projects from inception through implementation; and possess excellent written and oral communication skills at the technical/non-technical levels. (Samples of written work and outlines or materials prepared for oral presentations will be required). Experience with Microsoft Word, Lotus 1-2-3, dBase, Crosstalk and SNA Exchange, and knowledge of fourth generation languages are all a plus.
NEA offers excellent benefits. Starting salary $39,271 to $45,165 depending on current salary history and benefits package.
TECHNICAL EDITOR (WRITER)
(#325)
The NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) is seeking a talented professional with experience in technical editing and writing for its research publications and materials.
The position requires a bachelor's degree in Journalism or English OR equivalent experience. In addition, the successful applicant must possess a minimum of three years of professional technical writing and editing experience in a constituency-based research environment. Experience must have included the handling of the production/printing process and experience with automated production equipment such as ATEX and desktop publishing. Direct experience editing and writing research and statistical publications is a plus. Samples of work are required.
NEA offers excellent benefits. Starting salary $35,063 to $40,327 depending on current salary history and benefits package.
Qualified applicants should send current r6sum6 to
EMPLOYMENT MANAGER National Education Association
1201 16th Street, NW, Room 221 Washington, D.C. 20036 EEO/M/F/H
THE 1989 FUTURO AWARDS:
$1,900 in prizes
A competition (English and Spanish divisions) for writers of tomorrow -- open to all Washington,D.C., area high school students, grades 9 through 12.
This year's essay topic: The English-Only movement. Length: 750 words.
Sponsors: The Washington Post and Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C.
Deadline: Dec. 19,1988
Applications and information: Call Hispanic News Media Association, Sophia Nieves, secretary (202) 234-0280
UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA
The following two positions are with the University of Northern Iowa.
ENGLISH: Composition/TESOL, tenure-track. Required: Doctorate. Desired: College teaching experience.
JOURNALISM: Two positions, Assistant/As-sociate Professors, tenure-track. Required: Ph.D. or near term ABD. Desired: College teaching/journalism experience.
Send vita, three recommendations and self-addressed postcard to Dr. Robert J. Ward, Head, English Department, University Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614 by Jan. 16, 1989.
UNI is an AA/EOP employer. It actively seeks the candidacies of minorities and women. Members of protected classes may identify themselves for purposes of AA.
CABRILLO COLLEGE
INSTRUCTOR, HORTICULTURE, tenure track, 80% assignment. Requires eligibility for CCC instructor credential in ornamental horticulture. Apply by Jan. 5,1989.
For application and information, contact Cabrillo College, Personnel Dept., 6500 So-quel Drive, Aptos, Calif. 95003 (408) 479-6217.
AA/EOE
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a National pool of Latino executive professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234 0737 or (202) 234 0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: Ads with borders, varied type sizes $45 per column inch..
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
7


Arts & Entertainment
THEATERS GET MONEY: Two Latino theater companies at opposite ends of the country recently received three-year grants from the Ford Foundation.
New York’s Puerto Rican Travelling Theater received a $275,000 grant to augment its marketing and fund-raising efforts, computerize operations and increase bilingual programs.
The 21 -year-old company presents plays in English and Spanish at its permanent location near the Broadway district and tours the city with summer productions.
The Latino Theater Lab of the Los Angeles Theatre Center received a $200,000 grant to hire an administrator/marketing manager and commission 11 new plays. Three of the new works are to be created by Lab members collectively with director Jose Luis Valenzuela and playwrights to be selected.
Funding at LATC will also support the training of another Latino director. Begun in 1979, the Latino Theatre Lab provides intensive
training of professional actors, playwrights and directors, and develops Latino plays produced at LATC.
The Ford Foundation is the nation’s leading private funder of Hispanic theater. Other grants announced this year funded Teatro Meta at San Diego’s Old Globe Theatre and the Hispanic Playwrights Project at the South Coast Repertory, in Costa Mesa, Calif.
‘TIS THE SEASON: Hispanic actors are featured in various December film releases.
Ricardo Montalban is in The Naked Gun (a Paramount Pictures release); Raul Julia and Efraln Figueroa in Tequila Sunrise (Warner Bros.); Tahnee (Raquel’s daughter) Welch in Cocoon: The Return (20th Century Fox); and Martin Ferrero in High Spirits (Tri-Star Pictures).
And Cheech Marin’s voice is featured in Walt Disney Pictures’ animated Oliver & Company in the role of a Chihuahua. Marin and singer Ruben Blades are featured in the film’s soundtrack.
ONE LINER: Author Martin Cruz Smith will reportedly earn an advance in excess of $1 million from publisher Random House for Polar Star, the sequel to his best-selling Gorky Park, due out in the spring... _ Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
$25,000 LATINO AD: Advertising Age and Vista magazine have announced their sponsorship of an award of $25,000 for the best print ad targeting the Latino market. The winner will be announced in October 1989. | Vista PublisherArturoVillarsaid his publication is putting up all the award money, with Ad Age responsible for managing the competition. Other aspects of the trade-off are greater neutrality in the award and the prestige Ad Age will lend to the effort, he said. “Joining with them, we can get the kind of attention that Vista on its own might not get.”
The first-time award is also meant to highlight Latino-targeted print media, an area that captured only 9% of advertisers’ expenditures on Hispanics this year, according to Hispanic Business magazine.
“We still need to establish Hispanic print (media) as viable,” said Villar. “We have had two battles to fight: to convince advertisers
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420‘N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher H6ctor Ericksen-Mendoza Editor F6lix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl Lynette Figueroa, Sophia Nieves.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
Personal * $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
that they can reach Hispanics in English and that they can do it in print.”
English- and Spanish-language ads in print between June 1,1988, and May31,1989, will be considered. Other details, such as who will sit on the five-member panel that will select the winner, will be decided next week, said Villar.
INTERNSHIPS, AWARD NOMINATIONS AND SUCH: The Dec. 31 issue of Editor & Publisher carries the journal’s annual directory of journalism awards and fellowships. Nonsubscribers may send $3 to Sandra Smith, E & P Co., Circulation, 11 W. 19th St., New York, N.Y. 10011(212)675-4380.
National Public Radio is accepting applications through Jan. 4 for its Washington, D.C., residency program. Seven applicants will be selected to spend a month from February to August reporting news for such shows as Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Four music producers and arts reporters will be chosen to contribute to NPR’s Performance Today show for two weeks, followed by two weeks placement at a member station. Ap-
plicants must have three years of professional experience. Contact Elaine Salazar, NPR, Training Office, 2025 M St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-2734.
The High School Journalism Institute at Indiana University seeks nominations through Feb. 1 for its minority recruitment award. The third annual award will be presented to a person or organization known to contribute significantly to placing and keeping minority high school students fn journalism programs. Contact Jack Dvorak, School of Journalism, Ernie Pyle Hall 200, Indiana University, Bloomington, Ind. 47405 (812) 335-0865.
NOTES: TheDec.5 issue of Time magazine includes full-page stories on U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos and on the official-English movement. . . Marla Escobar was promoted to controller at El Diaro-La Prensa in New York. She was formerly assistant controller.. . Herberto Gutierrez has been named general manager of Spanish-language KWEX-TV in San Antonio. He was previously general sales manager of the Univision affiliate. .. - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
8
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


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REC'D. HR/CR Making The News This Week Chicago Alderman Juan Soliz says he is for mayor . . . Michael Huerta, 32, becomes San Francisco's port director. He is the first Hispanic to hold the $1 OO,OOOayear job . .. A federal court jury orders Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates to personally pay $170,000 to Jesse Larez and his tam ily. Larez' s nose was broken and his house ransacked by police officers in an unsuccessful search for a murder weapon used in a gang killing ... A federal appeals court panel in Atlanta holds that Cou _ nty, Fla., school officials cannot isolate 7-yearold Eliana Martmez m a glass booth unless they prove her AIDS poses a threat to her classmates. The case was remanded to the lower court ... Milwaukee resident Maria del Carmen Hernandez, 60, wins $1 million in Wisconsin ' s second million dollar lottery drawing . . . Ricardo Bofill, head of the Cuban Committee for Human Rights , visits with President Reagan at the White House to thank him for his work on behalf of human rights in Cuba . . . U.S. Rep. E . Kika de Ia Garza (D Texas) attends the inauguration of Mexico President Carlos Salinas de Gortari . .. U.S. Rep . Robert Garcia (DN.Y . ) and his wife, Jane Lee, plead not guilty to federal bribery and extortion charges . .. California Gov . George Deukmejian appoints S. James Otero, 36, as a municipal court judge for the Los Angeles Judicial District. .. Dagmar Celeste, wife of Ohio Gov . Richard Celeste, fasts for three days in support of the United Farm Workers' table grape boycott. .. Vol. 6 No. 49 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL Dec.12,1988 FBI Receives Setback in Discrimination Suit Texas Border Health Falls Short Th e FBI illegitimately used a federal grand jury to secure a subpoena against a Hispanic agent who had filed a discrimination lawsuit against the agency, a federal district judge in Midland , Texas , ruled Dec. 2 . Judge Lucius Bunton held that the FBI failed to justify its request for the subpoena, issued some three weeks after special agent Bernardo Perez filed a complaint. Agency officials contended they needed the sub poena to look at the phone records of Perez to determine whether he was lying in connection with the criminal investigation of another agent in an unrelated matter. "To deny that there was not a close causal relationship between the grand jury subpoena and the filing of the complaint is to fly in the face of reason," stated Bunton in his 17-page opinion. Bunton's ruling is another blow to the nation ' s number one law enforcement agency. The judge held in September that the FBI had discriminated against Hispanic agents in pro motions and assignments . Bunton is expected to determine damages in the class-action suit early next year. Residents of the 16 Texas counties along the Mexico border suffer from a high incidence of tuberculosis and other communicable di seases , coupled with poor access to health care , according to a federal government study of an area that is 73% Hispanic . "Because of our proximity to the border , we have diseases you don ' t normally see," said Charles Wilson , medical director of the Hidalgo County Health Department. " We have 100 cases of leprosy in Texas, 50 of them in Hidalgo County." He said that in Hidalgo County, which has five hospitals, 40% of the residents live below the poverty level and many people cannot afford to see a doctor. Overall, 1 . 5 million people live in the Texas border region . Other diseases reported to occur at a higher rate than in the rest of Texas and the United States included hepatitis, gastrointestinal diseases, and syphilis, said the U . S . General Accounting Office study released Nov. 29. The occurrence of hepatiti s not specified as either _ A or B was seven times higher along the state' s border than in the United States . House Posts Go to Gonzalez, Coelho With his Dec. 6 election as chairman of the powerful House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee, U.S . Rep. Henry Gonzalez (DTexas) will become the second Hispanic to head a legislative committee in the 101 st Congress. Rep. E. Kika de Ia Garza ( D Texas), who retained the chairmanship of the Com mittee on Agriculture, is the other. The previous day, Rep. Tony Coelho (D Calif . ) was unanimously re-elected as majority whip, the third highest ranking position in the House. The 72-yearold Gonzalez won his seat with a 200 vote by the House Democratic Caucus. As the senior Democrat on the banking committee, he had been in line for the spot left open by Rep . Fernand StGermain (D R.I.), who lost his re-election bid . The press began in recent weeks to take a longer than usual look at Gonzalez when it became clear he might head the 50 member committee with jurisdiction over such complex problems as the savings and loan crisis and Third World and Latin American debt. In the days before his election, Gonzalez held a flurry of meetings with such financial leaders as Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan, Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady and his Senate counterpart Donald Riegle (DMich.). In a statement released after the vote, Gonzalez said an agenda would be announced separately. "It promises to be the busiest, toughest agenda in decades," he added. Setting the agenda is the main role of the committee chairman. The San Antonio Express-News reported that Gonzalez will also seek to retain the chairmanship of the Subcommittee on Housing and Community Development, overseen by the banking committee. Darryl Lynette Figueroa In nine of the 16 counties studied in" Health Care : Availability in the Texas-Mexico Border Area," no obstetricians were available , although the counties were home to 15,364 women of child-bearing age. continue d on p age 2 DISEASE RATES ALONG TEXA8-MEXICO BORDER Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis (unspe c ified) (per _1 00,000) u.s. 9.7 11. 0 2 . 0 Tex. 14.4 9 . 2 6 . 6 Border 18. 3 9 . 8 13.3 Tuberculosis 9 . 3 1 0 . 5 15.5 Amebiasis * 1 . 7 2 . 1 6.2 Campylobacteriosis* ** 4.5 6.5 Salmonellosis* 24. 0 14. 9 16.4 Shigellosis* 7 . 1 12. 8 17. 6 • These are gas t ro int es tin a l dis eases. Ame biasis is a par as it ic infe s t a ti o n , ca mpyloba c t erio sis a nd s higell o sis are bac t eria l infecti o ns. Salm o nellosi s i s transmitte d through food . H epatitis a nd g a strointestina l rat es refle c t t 9 8 5 86 in c iden ce. Tub e r c ul o si s r a t es a r e f o r 1987 . .... Indi c at es d a ta i s un ava ilable. Sourc e : U.S. General Accounting Offi c e's" Health Care: A v ailabil i t y in the T ex as-Mex ico Borde r Area." Senators Hit English Only Gearing up for U .S. English' s upcoming effort to make English the Lone Star state's official language, two state senators an nounced they have the votes to block any such legislative measure in the Texas Senate . Sens . Carlos Truan (D Corpus and Chet Edwards (D Duncanville) said at a press conference in San Antonio Nov. 22 that they have secured the signatures of 11 other senators-five of them Hispanic-to vote down any official-language proposals. Eleven is the number of votes needed in the 31-member Senate to stop a bill . The announcement followed by si x weeks the success of ballot initiatives in Florida, Arizona and Colorado. Sixteen states now have laws declaring English their official language.

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LULAC Weighs U.S. Constitution Amendment on English The League of United Latin American Citizens is exploring the possibility of re commending its own constitutional amend ment to Congress that recognizes the im portance of English , according to Arnold Torres , LULAC's legislative adviser . Torres suggested the action at a meeting in Wash ington , D.C. , attended by a coalition of Latino and other groups to devise strategies to combat official English. " There has been no attempt to introduce legislation to stop this movement, " said Torres. "If members of Congress don't think this has a chance of passing, then we 'll try something else. " Hearings on the issue are expected to be held by the House Civil and Constitutional Rights Subcommittee, chaired by Don Edwards (D-Calif.) . The proposal, made to representatives attending a meeting of the English Plus Information Clearinghouse steering commit tee , was poorly received. "It was a slap in the face to the people who have been working day in and day out on this one issue," said Jim Lyons, counsel for the National Association for Bilingual Education . " Arnold talked glibly about safe guarding people's rights (in the In terms of statutory law, there are few safe guards for language minorities." Torres told Weekly Report Dec. 5 that losses in heavily Hispanic states such as California, Arizona and Florida indicate a new course of action is needed . He said the bill would acknowledge the importance of English, but wouldn't provide a license to step on other cultures and languages. Groups ranging from the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund to the American Civil Liberties Union had met to discuss new strategies for opposing official English . " There could be something that none of us thought about in Arnold's suggestion. Maybe that was the reason he wasn't physi cally assaulted," said Lyons . Sophia Nieves Court Clears the Path for More Deportations Three Border Counties Have No Doctor A federal district court in Birmingham, Ala, cleared the way Dec . 5 for the deportation of four more Mariel detainees to Cuba when it denied their stay of deportation request. Three days earlier, five Marielitos were flown from Birmingham to Havana after having un successfully appealed their deportation order all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court . The nine Marielitos, all of whom have been convicted of serious crimes since arriving in the United States aboard the 1980 Mariel boatlift , are part of a group of 15 who were ordered deported Nov . 17 by the U . S . Justice Department. Groups frantically fighting on behalf of the detainees arguethat they should remain in the United States until human rights abuses are halted in the island nation . The groups filed an appeal with the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta Dec. 7 but held out little hope of stopping the repatriations. The United States and Cuba reopened an immigration pact in 1987. The deportations are the first of 2,500 planned by this country. continued from page 1 The executive director of the U.S. -Mexico Border Health Association pointed out that malpractice insurance for an obstetrician can cost thousands of dollars yearly . "You can't go to a small town and not deal with obstetrics. These doctors say they can ' t take a chance with malpractice, " said Herbert Ortega . Ortega added that one brain-damaged child delivered by a midwife could cost taxpayers more than $1.5 million over 30 years, but policymakers are not looking at saving money by taking preventive measures . Three of the border counties-Culberson, Hudspeth and Terrellhave no doctors. Two counties have no dentist, eight have one dentist and one county has two. Of the 82 pediatricians practicing in the 1 ,000-mile-long border area, none worked in 10 counties which have a total of 36,482 children. The report , requested by Sen. Lloyd Bentsen (D-Texas) , follows the passage of a border health bill in October sponsored by Bentsen New York Shooting Incites Outrage 2 A 26-year-old Latino postal worker was discharged from a New York hospital Dec. 6 following 10 days of recuperation after being shot by an off-duty police officer, an incident which has incited outrage among some Latinos. The Latino Coalition for Racial Justice circulated a statement Nov . 30 condemning transit police officer Christopher Huwer, 30, for his Nov . 26 shooting of Car1os sanchez, who it says was unarmed. Huwer also shot himself in the wrist. He was released from the same hospital Nov. 29. Brooklyn District Attorney Elizabeth Holtz man was roundly criticized for not charging the four-year police veteran with attempted murder. "Police officers ... are allowed to shoot and/or kill unarmed Latinos and African Americans in New York City with impunity," the group charged . According to several reports, the men were driving home from night shifts Nov. 25 when they became involved in a traffic dispute. The argument persisted as they parked under the Manhattan Bridge and escalated to the firing of three shots by Huwer. One hit Sanchez in the arm, another in the abdomen. Huwer would not comment, following the advice of his lawyer. No criminal charges have been brought against either man. The transit police internal affairs division is in vestigating the matter, as is Holtzman ' s office . Her spokesperson, Louis Haber, would not comment on the charges leveled against Holtzman by the Latino group, saying only, "We will take appropriate action." Darryl Lynette Figueroa and Rep. Jack Brooks (D-Texas). The bill authorized the U . S . Department of Health and Human Services to provide grants to medical schools to establish Border Educat i on Centers where students can learn and provide needed medical services . "The next step will be to get the program funded in the 101 st Congress," said a Bentsen aide. "lfs going to be tough because of the overall budget situation, but$24 million is not a huge amount of money." Wilson said the area is sorely in need of the help the bill would provide . " Medically, we do have a problem . It would be a big shot in the arm for the whole border area. " Ortega had reservations regarding the ef fectiveness of such a bill. " I don ' t think it (the border area) needs a Band-Aid. Unless we look at it in a comprehensive way , we're not going to have things we need-like employ ment and housing . Health is just one . " In 1986 and 1987, Texas led the nation in hospital closings , with 24 of them in rural areas. A spokesperson for the Texas Hospital Association attributed the closings to the crippled Texas economy. Sophia Nieves H ELO Elects President Orlando, Fla., Councilmember Mary Perez Johnson was elected president of the Hispanic Elected Local Officials group at its Dec . 3 annual meeting in Boston . She succeeds San Antonio Councilmember Maria Berrio zabal , who retains a seat on the board of directors as immediate past president. HELO, a division of the National League of Cities, also elected Norwalk, Calif., Mayor Marcial Rodriguez as first vice president and Santa Fe , N .M., Council member Peso Chavez as second vice president. Sitting on the new board as secretary/treasurer will be Adolf Olivas , vice mayor of Hamilton , Ohio . Education issues were at the forefront of the groups ' discussion on next year's agenda. HELO participants will produce a case study book on education success stories among Hispanic youth. Hisp a n ic Link Weekl y R e p o rt

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Guarione Diaz, guest columnist Why CubansAre'Differenf Understanding Cubans maybe hard at times, particularly in Miami. Not long ago, I heard a well-meaning Miamian say that "Americans here feel left out." My initial reaction brought images of fellow Cubans speaking Spanish in an elevator, or failing to give directions in English to a lost explorer of Little Havana. I wondered, too, if the speaker reflected a national view that some ethnic immigrants are not " American, " even though they have lived for almost three decades in the United States. Most important, I ended up asking myself, "Why is it that 'Americans' feel left out?" This led me to consider two possibilities. First , anyone who has lived in Miami for 20 or more years must be overcome by its explosive population growth and the by products of urbanization . Noise, pollution, traffic jams, and crime are hard to adjust toeven for a racially and ethnically stable " American" community. Massive immigration, the ubiquitous presence of a new language and a growing concern for international issues has made the adjustment twice as difficult. NUMBERS ALONE DON'T DO IT This is not true for "American" newcomers. They do not know traditional Miami and thus have less to miss . They come from large urban areas facing problems similar to ours. They more or less expect the rewards and punishment found in our community. One might even say that these recent newcomers see themselves as forces in the shaping of a future Miami rather than as victims of the many changes that we have undergone in the last two decades. The Cuban presence in Miami has not fit conventional molds of immigrant settlement patterns, even when compared with other Hispanic populations elsewhere in the country. What makes Miami Cubans different is not the numbers alone, for several other cities such as New York and San Antonio have a larger number or proportion of Hispanics . Nor is it the presence of Spanish media, for they exist as well in other cities. While Miami has a sizable number of Cuban-American elected officials , other cities and states have many Hispanic elected officials, too-as we find in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona . And even Hispanic-owned businesses, so well noted in Miami, exist in higher numbers in the Los Angeles-Long Beach metropolitan area. What is it, then, that makes Miami unique? It is a combination of all of the above in one single, geographically concentrated, young, open, and changing community. PORTRAYED AS CRIMINALS, ENTREPRENEURS The average " American" understands and accepts short-term political exiles and refugees seeking freedom. He admires immigrants pursuing the American dream and enjoys visiting Chinatowns and Little ltalies with their lore, memories and pride. It may be harder to understand a community that is at once actively exile, immigrant, economically aggressive, and proudly ethnic but dispersed beyond historic cultural neighborhoods. Members of the Cuban community are perceived to be politically unyielding, both as revolutionaries and as growing participants in partisan U.S . politics; in just two decades, they have been portrayed as both criminals and entrepreneurs. None of the above represents an insurmountable obstacle to mutual understanding. Cuban Americans need not abandon any of their concerns, but they must be sensitive about the salient role they play in this American metropolis of the 21st century. Non-Cubans, in turn , may better understand Cuban Americans by pondering on this nat!on's ability to change while remaining continuously and essentially" American . " (Guarione Diaz is president of the Cuban American National Council Inc., a social-service agency based in Miami . ) Sin pelos en Ia lengua TRUTH IS STRANGER THAN FICTION: A sampling of recent news confirms it beyond a doubt. REVENGE OF THE JIFFY JOHNS: The heading on a short story in the Dec.4 New York Times informs us : " WORKER KILLED BY TOILET." The unfortunate victim was 23-year-old Ram6n Jose Rodriguez, a construction worker. A portable toilet blew off the fourth level of a building he was working on in Miami and crushed him . MORE STRANGE AND TERRIBLE STUFF: In California, according to an item in the Nov. 25 Los Angeles Times, the state Commission on Teacher Credentialing revoked the credential of Joyce Ferrer, a 43-year-old first-grade bilingual education teacher. It charged that the 16-year veteran maestra pushed kids' heads toward a toilet bowl and threatened to flush them down, stuffed them in garbage cans and banged on the lids, and advised one talkative boy that she planned to cut out his tongue with scissors and stitch his mouth shut. The story failed to indicate whether she made the threats in English, Spanish or both. 'IF I ONLY HAD A BRAIN': The Dec. 1 Washington Post reported that House Majority Whip Tony Coelho recently underwent a routine PET scan, which measures metabolic brain activity, at UCLA' s Nuclear Medicine and Biophysics lab. This month, Congressional Hispanic Caucus member Coelho, who has epilepsy, received a fram ed electronic photograph of the scan and a letter assuring him that he did indeed have a working brain . He is the only member of Congress with "hard data to prove this, " the lab advised him. "For the rest, it is yet to be determined." AS THE PRESS SEES OUR OTHER LEADERS: While Lauro Cavazos has generally received flattering reviews from the national press for his performance as Secretary of Education to date, The Wall Street Journal sicked its book editor on him Nov. 21. In an editorial page piece headed "Education President Flunks His First Test," David Brooks accused President-elect George Bush of selecting a man who was fast becoming a slave of the "education lobby." An ardent admirer of William Bennett, Brooks mocks Cavazos' placement of the dropout issue on the top of his agenda and responds to Cavazos' contention that education could solve the world's problems of hunger and pestilence by grunting: "It was the type of goopy rhetoric that hasn ' t been heard at the Department of Education for some time. " Meanwhile, Henry Gonzalez's rise to chair the House Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs Committee drew repeated media references to his "hot temper" and "maverick'' ways. But they pointed out that the 72-year-old San Antonio legislator gets good marks for integrity. His predecessor was defeated in a re-election bid after Justice Department allegations that he accepted thousands of dollars in entertainment and meals from Savings and Loan lobbyists. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... DARYL GATES, Los Angeles police chief, speaking to reporters af_ter in a lawsuit in which six of his officers were charged wtth breakmg the nose of Jesse Larez, ransacking his home and roughing up his family members. Gates was later ordered to personally pay $170,000 to Larez and his family: "He's(Larez) probably lucky thars all he had ... You'll probably print that .It shows my cocky attitude. " H is panic Link Weekly Report Dec. 12, 1988 3

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COLLECTING CUSTOM CHRISTMAS CARDS: La Galeria Gonzalez in Dallas offers custom-designed, full-color, bilingual Christmas and other specialty cards reflecting the Hispanic culture. Discounts are available on bulk orders. To order contact Barbara Renaud Gonzalez, La Galeria Gonzalez , P.O. Box 180982, Dallas, Texas 75218 (214) 3285190. OUTSTANDING MATH, SCIENCE TEACHERS: Junior and senior high school science and mathematics teachers are being sought as candidates for the 1989 Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching. The awards carry a $7,500 grant to the teachers' schools, a presidential citation and a host of other honors. Deadline is March 1, 1989. For information write PAESMT, National Science Teachers Association Special Projects, 5112 Berwyn Road, Third Floor, College Park , Md . 20740. LATINA AND BLACK DROPOUTS: The Women's Research and Education Institute' s "The American Woman," a 443-page book, includes two chapters on the educational outlook for Hispanic and black women. For a paperback copy, send $11 .95 to WREI, 1700 .18th St. NW, Suite 400, Washington, D.C. 20009. REFERENCE BOOKS: "Spanish-Language Reference Books : An Annotated Bibliography' ' is a 45-page book with 117 citations. For a copy send $10 to Chicano Studies Library Publications Unit, 3405 Dwinelle Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, Calif . 94720. BORDER HEALTH: A 53-page report issued by the U . S. General Accounting Office, "Health Care : Availability in the Texas-Mexico Border Area," looks at the incidence of disease and the availability of health care. Send requests to the U . S. General Accounting Office, P . O . Box 6015, Gaithersburg, Md . 20877. The first five copies are free. Additional copies are $2 each. BOR/CUA CALENDAR: The Soy Boricua 1989 Pocket Calendar, with traditional Puerto Rican holidays, important dates in the history of Puerto Ricans in the island and mainland and a listing of national Puerto Rican organizations, is now available . To order send $3.50 to the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy, 286 Fifth Ave., Suite 804, New York, N .Y. 1 0001. HISPANIC ELDERLY: "Demographic Characteristics of the Older Hispanic Population: 1988" is a 20-page report with statistics on numbers, income, employment, health, housing and education. For a free copy, contact National Association for Hispanic Elderly, 2727 W. Sixth St., Suite 270, Los Angeles, Calif . 90057 (213) 487. CONNECTING MAYORS FUND AIDS PROJECTS Ten organizations, stretching from Bakersfield, Calif. , to New York, will share $379,617 in federal grants to develop educational programs that are directed wholly or in part to Hispanics, the U . S. Conference of Mayors announced Dec . 5 . Among some of the activities funded are the distribution of a bilingual pamphlet to 17,000 Hispanic-surnamed homes in Austin , Texas ; the canvassing of Hispanic migrant workers in Kansas City, Kans., and Hendersonville, N.C., through workshops, public service announcements and health fairs ; and the production of audio tapes on AIDS in Spanish and the distribution of condoms, bleach and educational materials in Lawrence, Mass. The grants represent the seventh round of the U . S. Conference of Mayors ' AIDS prevention programs. For more information contact Matthew Murguia at (202) 293-7330 FIRM AWARDS $35 MILLION In one of the largest grants of its kind , General Electric Co . announced Nov . 28 that it has established a $35 million program to help prepare minority students for college and increase the number of minority and female engineering teachers at the university level. Most of the grant$20 millionwill go toward tutoring minority high school students, preparing them for test-taking, purchasing equipment and providing scholarships at selected school s . The other $15 million will go toward the goal of adding 500 Hispanics and blacks and 100 women to the engineering teaching ranks by the end of the century. POSTER CONTEST UNDERWAY Actor Edward James Olmos will be the celebrity spokesperson for Mothers Against Drunk Driving's third annual nationwide poster/essay contest. For the first time in its three-year history, the contest will accept entries in Spanish as well as English . The" DRIVE SOBERDRIVE SMART' contest, where students in grades first through 12th can compete for more than $13,000 in cash awards , seeks to emphasize the dangers of drinking and driving to the nation's youth. The number one killer of teen-agers, according to MADD , is liquor consumption and driving. The seven first-place national winners will win $1,000 and be provided an expense-paid trip to New York to an awards ceremony. All entries must be postmarked by Feb . 13 , 1989. For more informat i on call (817) 268. Calendar Susa . n Garbose (202) 4667590 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Chicago Dec . 14 professor o f Spanish and lite rature at E astern College of Pennsylvania . Pedro de Mesones (703) 866-1578 To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization' s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include name , date, location , contact name and phone number. Address items to : Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report , 1420 N St. NW , Washington, D . C . 20005. THIS WEEK AIDS SERVICE, EDUCATION Washington, D . C . Dec . 14 The National Community AIDS Partnership will host a national advisory committee meeting on the status of current government AIDS prevention initiatives and the future tor privately funded service and education programs . The Partnership has $9 million to award to communities on a matching basis. 4 Chicago Mayor Eugene Sawyer will attend the program and reception honoring the Chicago Com mission on Latino Affairs , wh ic h is celebrating its fifth anniversary . Marta Ayala (312) 7 44-4404 HURRICANE VICTIMS' BENEFIT Los Angeles Dec . 15 The Los Angeles Valley College Associated Student Union will sponsor a benefit concert-with perfor mances by si x groups -to aid the victims of the recent hurricane in Nicaragua. Juan Morillo (818) 781-1200 Ext. 361 SPANISH ENVOY LECTURE Washington , D .C. Dec. 1 5 A lecture in Spanish , part of a series dealing with Hispanic America ' s contribution to U.S. independence , will deal with the topic of the first Span i sh envoy before the U.S. Congress of 1784-1789. The speaker at this Foundation for the Advancement of Hispanic Americans event is Enrique Fernandez y Fernandez , Dec . 12,1988 COMING SOON MINORITY STUDENT RETENTION Ohio State University , Division of Student Affairs Columbus, Ohio Jan . 10, 11 Carmen Alvarez-Breckenridge (614) 292-2917 PUBLICATIONS CONVENTION National Association of Hispan ic Publication s Las Vegas Jan . 12 Eddie Escobedo (703 ) 384-1514 EDUCATION MEETING American Council on Education San Diego Jan. 18-21 Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Edu cation Anaheim , Calif . Feb . 1 5 -18 Lollie Reyes (714) 397-4552 Hi s p a ni c Link Weekly R eport

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS TESTING ANNOUNCEMENT CALIFORNIA STATE LOTTERY MARKETING SPECIALIST ($3,011 $3,633/mo) POSITION: Marketing Specialists complete implementation of test plans; coordinate game design implementation with other departments, consumer promotion program design and execution, and ensure budgetary control. MINIMUM QUALIFICAITONS: (Experience and Education) Bachelor of Science with a specialization in Marketing or a closely related technical area AND three years of progressively responsible experience performing professional or technical duties in consumer marketing management and services such as new product development and analysis and advertising, promotion , research market sales, f orecasting, consumer-oriented public relations, or closely related areas . OR Masters in Business Administration with specialization in marketing and two years of experience performing the duties in consumer marketing management services, such as new product development and analysis and advertising, promotion, research, market and sales forecasting , consumer-oriented public relations, or closely related areas . FELONY DISQUALIFICATION: Pursuant to Government Code 8800.71, persons convicted of a felony or any gambling related offense are disqualified from employment with the CSL and your application for this examinat i on will not be accepted . FINAL FILING DATE: State Applications or Resumes must be POSTMARKED no later than January 12, 1989. California State Lottery Personnel Office P ,.O. Box 1359 Broderick, CA 95605-1359 For more information call (916) 322-0007 An Equal Opportunity Employer FREE-LANCE RADIO JOURNALIST NPR's L ati n File seeks experienced freelance journalist from Los Angeles, Miami , and other communities with a signif i cant Hispanic population . Reporters will produce weekly features and news spots. Submit resume and audio tape to Judy Moore-Smith, NPR's Latin File, National Public Radio , 2025 M St., Washington, D . C . 20036. PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY, MD., government office of personnel has a JOB hotline (301) 952-3408. INDIANA UNIVERSITY Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School Indiana University seeks applications for the position of Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. This position reports to the Vice President/IU-Bioomington Chancellor, a university-wide officer who reports to the President. Indiana Univer sity is a comprehensive research institution with over 3 , 400 faculty and . 82,000 students on eight campuses . In 1987-88 it had 328 ad vanced-degree programs and awarded 1,151 doctoral and 2,975 master 's degrees . As one of the nation's centers of academic ex cellence , IU continually seeks to enhance its research and teaching . Responsibilities of the Associate Vice President/Dean include : • Coordinating and enhancing all research de gree programs of IU's university-wide Graduate School. This entails maintaining quality of current programs , review ing proposed programs, fostering interdisciplinary programs , appointing graduate faculty, and working with the graduate divisions of each school or campus . • Serving as chief research administrator ofthe main campus (Bloomington). This entails overseeing re search policies, grant-seeking , relations with funding agen cies, internal research funding, research centers, publications , and support personnel. • Promoting high-qualit}' faculty research programs on all of IU' s eight campuses. • Enhancing IU's business and industry relationships through the Industrial Research Liaison Program, and catalyzing research aimed at assisting Indiana's economic development. • Overseeing a centralized office for informa tion about research, economic development, and graduate education. • Raising funds for research, graduate, and economic-development programs in collaboration with university administrators and development officers . • Acting as spo!
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6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ELPASO ASSISTANT PROFESSOR IN ART HISTORY-Can didate should have the ability to teach a range of art history and appreciation courses. A$ the only faculty art historian, the respon sibilities are broad. A specialization in Contemporary or Latin American would be preferred but not mandatory. Applicant should have a Ph.D. Date of appointment is 09-01-89. Salary is commen surate with experience. Tenure track position. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR PAINTING/DRAWING -MFNpainting to head painting area and teach both under graduate and graduate. Excellent schedule/exotic location with outstanding weather . Date of appointment is 09-01-89 . Salary is commensurate with experience . Tenure track position. The Department of Art at U . T . El Paso is a growing and strong department. The facility is outstanding with 29 studios and excel lent equipment. The Fox Fine Arts Center on campus is only 200 yards from the border with Mexico and this provides for a unique cultural experience. Application Procedure: Submit a letter of application, resume, and three letters of recommendation. The deadline for receipt of applications is 02/28/89. Correspondence & inquiries to : Charles Fensch, Chairman, Department of Art, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave. , El Paso, Texas 79968-0548 . The University is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM DIRECTOR THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO Applications & nominations are invited for the position of Women's Studies Director. The Director will administer an interdis ciplinary program in Women's Studies which reports to the VPAA and will have teaching responsiblities and a research base in an academic department. Earned doctorate, teaching experience and research and publication record required; administrative ex perience preferred. Field of study is open. The University enrolls 15,000 students of whom a majority are Hispanic. Initial screenings will begin 02/01/SS,for Fall Placement,with ac ceptance of applications until the position is filled. Send a letter of interest, curriculum vita, and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of three references to: Professor Kathy Staudt, A$sistant Dean of Liberal Arts, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Avenue, El Paso, Texas 79968-0525. The University is an EEO/AA employer. M_,cr a =========== t9t4t919 California State University, Bakersfield 9001 Stockdale Highway Bakersfield, California 93311-1099 The University invites applications for tenure-track faculty appointments in the following areas : School of Arts & Sciences Biology: (1) Professor / Chair of Biology and (1) Assistant Professor , Microbiology English/Communications : (1) Associate or Professor, Communications Telecommunications and (1) Assistant or Associate Professor , Com munications-Journalism / Print Media Mathematics: (1) Associate Professor , Remedial Math ; (1) Assistant Pro fessor , Statistics; and (2) Assistant Professors in an area such as algebra , geometry/topology, foundations , graph theory / cominatorics ; however , all areas considered. Nursing: Assistant or Associate Proessor, Pediatrics Physics/Geology: Assistant Professor , Petroleum Geology / Petroleum Engineering or Hydrology / Water Chemistry Sociology/Anthropology : Assistant Professor , Archaeology Contact: Either the chair of the appropriate department or Dr . Manuel A . Esteban , Dean , School of Arts and Sciences (805) 664-2221 . Application deadlines vary according to department, but most are open until mid January or until positions are filled . School of Business and Public Administration Accounting: Rank Open . Areas include managerial , financial , auditing, taxation Management: Rank Open. Major areas include business and society , legal environment. Other areas could include principles of managem ent, operations research Public Administration : Assistant Professor , Health Care Administrat i on Contact: Dr. Michael Carrell, Dean, School of Business and Public Administration (805) 664-2157 Application Deadline: January 30, 1989, or until positions are filled . School of Education Art Education: Assistant Professor-courses include art education and possibly computer-based education ; supervision of student teachers Counselor Education: Assistant or Associate Professor graduate courses in counselor education; supervision of internships Educational Administration: Rank Open . Graduate courses in educational administration for both elementary and secondary; supervision of culminating activities and fieldwork Elementary Education/Reading and Language Arts: Assistant or Associate Professor-courses include reading and language arts methods ; super vision of student teachers Elementary Education/Science: Assistant Professor-courses in science education and possibly computer-based education ; supervision of student teachers Elementary/Secondary Educatlon/Math/CBE: Assistant or Associate pro fessor courses in math education and computer-based education ; supervision of student teachers Secondary Education : Assistant or Associate Professor-Coordinator of field experiences; supervision of student teachers Contact: Dr . Adria F . Klein, Dean, School of Education (805) 664-2219 Application Deadline: January 27, 1989, or until positions are filled . In addition, this University continues to seek applicants fo r temporary faculty appointments in the areas liste . d above as well as other areas of the fine arts, behavioral and social sciences, sciences and professional programs (nursing, criminal justice , publicadministration, health science) . CSUB is the youngest of the nineteen campuses of the California State University System . The campus is located in the City of Bakersfield which has a metropolitan population of roughly 250 , 000 and it serves a diverse population of about 700,000 , 1ocated primarily in the Southern San Joaquin Valley . CSUB is firmly committed to achieving the goals of equal opportunity and Affirmative Action and welcomes applications from women , ethnic minorities, and the handicapped. CSUB fosters and appreciates ethnic and cultural diversity among its faculty and students. Dec. 12, 1988 Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION MEMBER BENEFITS SPECIALIST (# 590) The NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) is seeking a talented professional with a bachelor's degree in Business Administration with additional training in the areas of in surance and/or risk management OR the equivalent working experience . In addition, the successful applicant must possess a minimum of five years professional experience in busi ness operations with responsibility for assisting in the administration of a full range of ser vices in the areas of group i nsurance, membership benefits and discount programs, risk management practices and in the development and implementation of contracts and other memoranda of understanding. The applicants should possess proficient writing and oral skills . Writing samples are required. Master's degree in Business Administration or other advanced degree in a related field and/or professional insurance or benefits designation , i.e . ARM and CEBS are all a plus. NEA offers excellent benefits. Starting salary $39,271 to $45,165 depending on current salary history and benefits package . SENIOR SYSTEMS ANALYST (#563) The NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) is seeking a talented data processing professional with experience in computer systems analysis, design, development , testing, implementation and documentation. The position requires a bachelor's degree in Computer Sciences or related field OR the equivalent working experience. In addition, the successful applicant must possess a mini mum of six years of systems analysis and design experience including batch and on-line systems . This experience must have included two years of programming using COBAL in an IBM 370 environment. The applicants should have experience with database manage ment systems ; coordinating the development of projects from inception through implemen tation; and possess excellent written and oral communication skills at the technical/non-technical levels. (Samples of written work and outlines or materials prepared for oral presentations will be required) . Experience with Microsoft Word, Lotus 1-2-3, dBase, Crosstalk and SNA Exchange, and knowledge of fourth generation languages are all a plus . NEA offers excellent benefits . Starting salary $39,271 to $45,165 depending on current salary history and benefits package . TECHNICAL EDITOR (WRITER) (#325) The NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION (NEA) is seeking a talented professional with e x perience in technical editing and writing for its research publications and materials. The position requires a bachelor's degree in Journalism or English OR equivalent ex perience . In addition, the successful applicant must possess a minimum of three years of professional technical writing and editing experience in a constituency-based research en v i ronmen t. Experience must have included the handling of the production/printing process and e x perience with automated production equipment such as ATEXand desktop publish ing . Direct experience editing and writing research and statistical publications is a plus . Samples of work are required. NEA offers excellent benefits. Starting salary $35,063 to $40,327 depending on current salary history and benefits package . Qualified applicants should send current resume to H is p a n ic Lin k W ee kl y R e p o rt EMPLOYMENT MANAGER National Education Association 1201 16th Street, NW, Room 221 Washington, D . C . 20036 EEO/M/F/H A competition (English and Spanish divisions) for writers of tomorrow-open to all Washington,D.C., area high school students, grades 9 through 12 . This year's essay topic : The English-Only movement. Length : 750 words . Sponsors : The Washington Post and Hispanic News Media Association of Washington, D.C. Deadline : Dec . 19, 1988 Applications and information : Call H i spanic News Media Association, Sophia Nieves, secretary (202) 234-0280 UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA The following two positions are with the University of Northern Iowa . ENGLISH : Composition/TESOL, tenure track . Required: Doctorate . Desired : College teaching experience. JOURNALISM: Two positions, Assistant/As sociate Professors, tenure-track . Required : Ph. D . or near term ABO. Desired : College teaching/journalism experience . Send vita, three recommendations and self addressed postcard to Dr. Robert J. Ward, Head, English Department, University North ern Iowa , Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614 by Jan . 16, 1989 . UNI is an AA/EOP employer . It actively seeks the candidacies of minorities and women . Members of protected classes may identify themselves for purposes of AA. CABRILLO COLLEGE INSTRUCTOR, HORTICULTURE , tenure track, 80% assignment. Requires eligibility for CCC instructor credential in ornamental hor ticulture. Apply by Jan. 5, 1989. For application and information, contact Cabrillo College, Personnel Dept., 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos, Calif. 95003 (408) 479-6217 . AA!EOE DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a National pool of Latino executive profes sionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Unk Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington,D.C. 20005 (202) 234 0737 or (202) 234 0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week . CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request. . DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES Ads with bor ders, varied type sizes $45 per column inch .. 7

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Arts & Entertainment training of professional actors, playwrights and directors, and develops Latino plays produced at LATC . The Ford Foundation is the nation's leading private funder of Hispanic theater. Other grants announced this year funded Teatro Meta at San Diego's Old Globe Theatre and the Hispanic Playwrights Project at the South Coast Repertory, in Costa Mesa, Calif. THEATERS GET MONEY: Two Latino theater companies at opposite ends of the country recently received three-year grants from the Ford Foundation. New York's Puerto Rican Travelling Theater received a $275,000 grant to augment its marketing and fund-raising efforts, computerize operations and increase bilingual programs. 'TIS THE SEASON: Hispanic actors are featured in various December film releases. The 21-yearold company presents plays in English and Spanish at its permanent location near the Broadway district and tours the city with summer productions. Ricardo Montalban is in The Naked Gun (a Paramount Pictures release); Raul Julia and Efrain Figueroa in Tequila Sunrise (Warner Bros.) ; Tahnee (Raquel ' s daughter) Welch in Cocoon: Th. e Return (20th Century Fox); and Martin Ferrero in High Spirits (TriStar Pictures). The Latino Theater Lab of the Los Angeles Theatre Center received a $200,000 grant to hire an administrator/marketing manager and commission 11 new plays. Three of the new works are to be created by Lab members collectively with director Jose Luis Valenzuela and playwrights to be selected. And Cheech Marin ' s voice is featured in Walt Disney Pictures' animated Oliver & Company in the role of a Chihuahua. Marfn and singer Ruben Blades are featured in the film's soundtrack. ONE LINER: Author Martin Cruz Smith will reportedly earn an advance in excess of $1 million from publisher Random House for Polar Star, the sequel to his best-selling Gorky Park, due out in the Funding at LATC will also support the training of another Latino director. Begun in 1979, the Latino Theatre Lab provides intensive spring ... Media Report $25,000 LATINO AD: Advertising Age and Vista magazine have announced their sponsorship of an award of $25,000 for the best print ad targeting the Latino market. The winner will be announced in October 1989. ' Vista Publisher Arturo Villar said his public ' ation is putting up all the award money, with Ad Age responsible for managing the com petition. Other aspects of the trade-off are greater neutrality in the award and the prestige Ad Age will lend to the effort, he said . "Joining with them, we can get the kind of attention that Vista on its own might not get." The first-time award is also meant to highlight Latino-targeted print media, an area that captured only9% of advertisers' expenditures on Hispanics this year, according to Hispanic Business magazine . "We still need to establish Hispanic print (media) as viable," said Villar. "We have had two battles to fight: to convince advertisers HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D . C . 20005 (202) 234 or 234 Publisher. Hector Eri c ksenMendoza Editor. Felix Perez Reporting : Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Darryl L y nette Figueroa Sophia Nieves . No portion of Hispani c Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118 Pe;sonal • $1 08 Trial (13 issues) $30 that they can reach Hispanics in English and that tl')ey can do it in print." Englishand Spanish-language ads in print betweenJune 1 ,1988, and May31 , 1989, will be considered. Other details, such as who will sit on the five-member panel that will select the winner, will be decided next week, said Villar . INTERNSHIPS, AWARD NOMINATIONS AND SUCH: The Dec. 31 issue of Editor & Publisher carries the journars annual directory of journalism awards and fellowships . Non subscribers may send $3 to Sandra Smith, E & P Co., Circulation , 11 W. 19th St. , New York , N .Y. 10011 (212) 675-4380. National Public Radio is accepting applica tions through Jan . 4 for its Washington, D.C., residency program. Seven applicants will be selected to spend a month from February to August reporting news for such shows as Morning Edition and All Things Considered . Four music producers and arts reporters will be chosen to contribute to NPR's Performance Today show for two weeks , followed by two weeks placement at a member station . Ap-Antonio Mejias-Rentas plicants must have three years of professional experience. Contact Elaine Salazar, NPR , Training Office, 2025 M St. NW, Washington , D . C . 20036 (202) 822. The High School Journalism Institute at Indiana University seeks nominations through Feb. 1 for its minority recruitment award . The third annual award will be presented to a person or organization known to contribute significantly to placing and keeping minority high school students In journalism programs . Contact Jack Dvorak, School of Journalism, Ernie Pyle Hall200, Indiana University, Bloom ington, Ind . 47405 (812) 335. NOTES: The Dec . 5 issue of Time magazine includes full-page stories on U .S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos and on the official English movement. . . Marfa Escobar was promoted to controller at El Diaro-La Prensa in New York. She was formerly assistant controller. . . Herberto Gutierrez has been named general manager of Spanish-language KWEXTV in San Antonio. He was previously general sales manager of the Univision affil iate . . . -Darryl Lynette Figueroa CORPORATE CLASSIFIED : Ad rates 90 ce nt s per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch . Ads pla ce d by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request. (See Collecting) , 8 I Hispani c Link Weekly Rep o rt