Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, December 19, 1988

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, December 19, 1988
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This Week
U.S. Sen. Paul Simon (D-lll.) writes a letter to President-elect George Bush requesting that he appoint a Hispanic or Asian American to head the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service... Seventy Congress members ask President Reagan to bestow the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, on Armando Valladares. Valladares, a former political prisoner in Cuba and an acclaimed author, is U.S. ambassadorto the U.N. Human Rights Commission... Denver Mayor Federico Pena honors Carlos Martinez, an employee with the city’s Department of Parks and Recreation, with the Outstanding City Employee with a Disability Award... The National Council of Ref use & Resist presents Courageous
REC’D. HR/CR
Resister Awards to Lydia and Sammy Cruzna mettle 6ftS^.son team who battled police brutality in Perth AmboyrlVjJanfc Lm&Olivares, a Los Angeles cleric who defies INS orders and extends sanctuary to Central American refugees... Roberto Batista, a Bronx elementary school principal renowned for his bilingual education teaching methods, wins one of the six 16th annual Fund for the City of New York public service awards... New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Green orders the dismissal of District 4 Superintendent Carlos Medina and the Board of Education removes board member Robert Rodriguez, also from District 4, for allegedly using school funds to pay for personal expenses. . . Sacramento, Calif., police charge handyman Ismael Carrasco FI6rez with being an accessory in the murder of a man linked to Dorothea Montalvo Puente, a non-Hispanic in whose yard seven bodies have been uncovered...
*>'8N° 5°(C^SPA^I^UNK WEEKI^^EPOF^jb)1 »■1988
Bounty Crop of Christmas Gifts Offers Latino Flavor
A bounty crop of Latino records, videos, books and art objects are available this season, in time to put a bit of Latino flavor into anyone’s Christmas celebration.
Most of the following gifts are available throughout the country, with enough choices to fit most budgets.
The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility announced Dec. 6 at its quarterly meeting in Miami the formation of a partnership with the McDonald’s Corp. to achieve parity for Latinos in its employment and business operations.
McDonald’s agreed to double the number of Hispanic suppliers to its7,800 restaurants, an increase worth $11 million to those businesses. The company also committed to increasing the number of Hispanic-owned franchises from 130 to 220. The current Latino franchises account for$160 million in sales.
HACER is a Washington, D.C.-based coalition of seven national Hispanic organizations. Spokesperson Susan Herrera said the partnership paves the way for successful Latino
Music gifts often take care of hard-to-please friends and relatives, and many new records, tapes and compact discs are released just in time for the holidays. The 1988 crop includes Ruben Blades’ “Antecedente,” a Spanish-language album in which the Panamanian singer returns to salsa, and ‘ Gipsy Kings,”
businesses. “If you can tell the bank you have such an arrangement waiting for you, you can get venture capital more easily.”
Additionally, the agreement gives impetus to an initiative already underway by McDonalcfs to increase its6.7% share of Hispanic employees to at least reflect the composition of Latinos in the national workforce. That figure, according to the Census Bureau, is 7.5%.
McDonald’s spokesperson Stephanie Skurdy said a special effort would be made to recruit Hispanics for management positions by working with Jerry Apodaca, HACER president, the National Council of La Raza, and the other groups that form HACER to identify potential applicants. Currently, 3.5% of the managers employed by McDonalcfs are Latino, said Herrera. - Darryl Lynette Figueroa
the album by the Spanish group of the same name that includes the international hit “Bamboleo.” Both albums, from Elektra, list under $10.
Fans of Carlos Santana will be delighted with “Viva Santana!,” a multiple-disc set from Columbia that lists at around $25. The set combines old Santana hits with some previously unreleased cuts and includes a 24-page booklet with a family tree of all the musicians who have been associated with the band.
Videos are increasingly popular Christmas gifts, and 1988 saw the release of several major studio productions with Latino themes. Videos, available at about $40 each, include “La Bamba" (RCA/Columbia), “Born in East L.A.” (MCA), “Stand and Deliver” and “Salsa" (Warner Home Video).
Those who yearn for the earlier days of Hollywood will be pleased to find a number of classic films featuring Latino stars. The original, 1926 “Ben Hur,” starring a silent Ramon Novarro, was released this year by MGM/UA.
Sports fans can be covered with a variety of video gifts. A new one on the market, for golfers, is “Chi Chi’s Bag of Tricks: In and Out of Trouble with Chi Chi Rodriguez.” It is
continued on page 2
McDonald’s, HACER Sign Business Pact
Teachers, 54%, Say 2nd Language Fluency Unimportant
Fifty-four percent of elementary and secondary school teachers surveyed nationwide do not believe students should become fluent in a second language, according to a report issued Dec. 11 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.
“The Condition of Teaching: A State by State Analysis, 1988” also indicates that the majority of the 22,000 teachers surveyed -63%- approve of putting students in programs or tracks geared to their perceived ability.
Critics of the tracking method say the minority child is often stereotyped when the placement decision is made, or the child is stuck in the program once he or she is classified.
“I don’t approve of it. It makes it easy to put language-minority kids in a situation where not much is expected of them,” said Killeen, Texas, teacher Sara Flores, immediate past
president of the Chicano-Hispano Caucus of the National Education Association.
The report said 2.4% of the Hispanic students and 2% of the black students were placed in gifted and talented programs versus 5.4% of white pupils. Ten percent of the nation’s public school students are Hispanic.
Although a study released earlier this year found that minority teachers have a higher level of job dissatisfaction, the survey was not broken down according to the ethnicity of respondents. Hispanics make up 2% of public school teachers.
Carnegie Foundation researcher Lane Mann said that the foundation did not see the necessity of such a breakdown. He said it would have been more expensive and would have required a much larger sample.
Mann indicated job dissatisfaction among
minorities seems to be tied to the greater prevalence of minority teachers in urban school systems. Previous Carnegie Foundation reports had indicated teachers in this setting have less opportunity for input regarding programs, texts and policy. - Sophia Nieves
Our Holiday Wish
This is Weekly Report’s 50th and final edition of 1988.
As we celebrate the holiday season with ourfamilies, we join in thanking you for your friendship and wishing you and your family una Feliz Navidad y Prospero Aho Nuevo.
Our next edition will be published Jan. 2, 1989.
Felix, Hector, Darryl, Sophia, Antonio y Kay


U.S. Rep. Shumway to Reintroduce Official-English Bill
Saying that it is vital to “stop the drift toward a multilingual society,” Congressman Norman Shumway (R-Calif.) announced at a Dec. 8 press conference on Capitol Hill that he will reintroduce legislation early in the 101st Congress to make English the official language of the United States. Participating in the press conference was U.S. English.
Pointing to the Nov. 8 victories of official English initiatives in Colorado, Arizona and Florida, Shumway said he felt the bill would have a better chance of passing this session, which convenes Jan. 6, than last, when it was given only one hearing by a House Judiciary subcommittee. Its chairman, Rep. Don Edwards (D-Calif.), has promised to hold another hearing this session.
The new bill differs from the old one in that it allows the use of minority languages
for English instruction, for public health and safety and for criminal proceedings, said Shumway spokesperson Tracy Smith. Smith added that the new language was the result of criticism leveled at the old bill.
Jose Rosenfeld, an aide to Rep. Albert Bustamante (D-Texas), called the addition “an improvement.”
Nonetheless, he said, “The latest thermometer reading was (President-elect) Bush is against it... We can count on his veto.”
Stanley Diamond, acting director for U.S. English, announced the 1989 legislative agenda for the organization, which includes support for alternative approaches to trans-sitional bilingual education such as English as a second language or English immersion.
Diamond said bilingual education programs that rely on students’ native languages have been shown to set children back three to
five years in learning English, but was forced to admit, under a reporter’s questioning, that other studies show they accelerate students’ progress.
Other items on its agenda are a program to teach English to adults using public and private funds, and continued lobbying for a national English-language amendment.
Diamond said after the briefing that U.S. English has not been unduly harmed by the resignations of Linda Chavez as president and Walter Cronkite as board member, though the group has received several calls about their departure. He felt the lack of a fallout was due to the pair’s continued support of the official-English movement. Both resigned in October following disclosure of a memorandum written by founder John Tanton, which sparked charges of racism.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Art and Entertainment Gifts Endure
continued from page 1
available for about $50 from CBS/Fox Video.
Books make ideal gifts, and various ones by well-known Latin American authors, translated to English, made the best-selling lists this year. They include Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “Love in the Time of Cholera” and Isabel Allende’s “Eva Luna” (both from Alfred A. Knopf, about $20). Fans of Carlos Fuentes might enjoy his “Old Gringo” (HarperS Row, $6.95 in paperback).
Books by home-grown Hispanics may be harder to find, but a search in Latino neighborhoods or university bookstores may yield a few treasures. Among many, you might find
Calderdn Bid Falls Short
California Assemblyman Charles Calderon (D-East Los Angeles) lost, 35-40, a firsttime bid Dec. 5 for the powerful position of speaker of the Assembly.
The three other Latinos in the Assembly supported eight-year incumbent speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco), who had never before been challenged. Three other assemblymen abstained and one was absent.
Brown won with Democratic backing while Calderdn garnered 30 of his votes from Republicans. He attributed the lack of Hispanic cohesion not to partisanship, but to a “historic” tendency for Hispanics “not to support one another."
According to senior Hispanic Assembly-man Peter Chacon (D-San Diego), political considerations accounted for the vote. Referring to his chairmanship of the Election, Reapportionment and Constitutional Amendment Committee, Chacon said, “I’d have been on the losing side when he lost.” The speaker of the Assembly appoints committee
chairmen. I ,, I ...
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
Jose Antonio Burciaga’s“Weedee Peepo” (Pan American University Press, $10.95) or Miguel Pinero’s award-winning play “Short Eyes” (Hill and Wang, $7).
The great works of art by Spanish and Latin American masters are reproduced in beautiful, oversized books for a fraction of the price tags on the originals. More than a dozen illustrated Picasso books are available this year, with prices ranging from $7 to $70.
The catalogs to two current, traveling Latino art shows make great “art” gifts. Both “The Latin American Spirit: Art and Artists in the United States, 1920-1970” (Harry N. Abrams) and “ H ispanic Art in the United States.’ (Abbeville Press) are available in hardbound editions for about $40.
Hispanic museums galleries and art centers in major U.S. cities have gift shops where unusual items are available for much less than one expects to pay for a gift at a department store. There one can find pieces by local and yet undiscovered artists-
Buying and giving Latino art and entertainment products is an easy way to remind ourselves of the cultural contributions of our people. Theirs are the gifts that endure long after the shiny wrappings are thrown away.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
A civil rights petition has been filed with Attorney General Richard Thornburgh requesting action be taken as a result of alleged intimidation of Hispanic voters at the polls Nov. 8 in California’s Orange County. Guards hired by the Orange County Republican Party carried signs in English and Spanish that read, “If you’re not a citizen, don’t vote.”
The petition, submitted Dec. 7 by the League of United Latin American Citizens’ Far West Region and the Latino Issues Forum, seeks an FBI investigation conducted by bilingual agents.
According to Anita Del Rio, LULAC’s Far
D.C. Panel Resolves a Bilingual Ed. Dispute
A six-member panel of Washington, D.C., bilingual education leaders and school district officials announced Dec. 9 that it had reached agreement on the bilingual education component of a reorganization plan that had put Superintendent of Schools Andrew Jenkins at odds with the Latino community.
The five-point agreement temporarily suspends the scheduled dismantling of the city’s Division of Bilingual Education. It callsforthe interim appointment of a special assistant, who will have authority over budget and programs for language-minority children.
The panel also resolved to have a team of local and national experts review the city’s bilingual programs, with input from parents and teachers.
The scope of the study will be set by Dec. 24. A March 31,1989, deadline was scheduled for delivery of the assessment team’s comprehensive restructuring plan.
Panel member Beatriz Otero, who spearheaded the campaign to have Jenkins reconsider his plans, was pleased with the groundwork laid by the panel. She said Jenkins approved it with no changes. “It’s been one hell of a struggle,” she sighed.
West Region national vice president, the group feared the FBI investigation underway would lead to a “whitewash.”
“Orange County is Reagan country,” she said.
Civil penalties against the Republican Party of Orange County are also suggested, including a requirement that the party deposit 20% of funds received over the next eight years into a voter education and registration fund.
“What better way to mend the kind of fear they imposed out there,” said John Gamboa, executive director of the Latino Issues Forum.
- Sophia Nieves
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Groups Ask Thornburgh to Order Probe
2


Frank Gomez, guest columnist
A Kinder, Gentler Nation
As a candidate, George Bush called fora“kinderand gentler nation.” Now elected, he has reached out to his critics and instructed his transition team to search for minorities and women to populate his administration.
How do the president-elects actions translate into opportunities for Hispanics? Will George Bush be more inclined toward achievements and less inclined toward rhetoric than his predecessors?
Even his harshest critics acknowledge his sincerity. Remarks about “the little brown ones” aside, since his early adulthood in West Texas, the president-elect has displayed sensitivity toward Hispanics. He has traveled often to Florida and Puerto Rico, spoken before Hispanic organizations, and put Hispanics on his campaign team.
Mr. Bush takes office in the twilight of a period once heralded as the “Decade of the Hispanic.” Yet, statistics show that the ’80s were not as kind or as gentle to us as we had hoped. The high dropout rate, scarcely mentioned in the campaign, is alarming. Hispanics have the nation’s highest incidence of AIDS. Housing shortages have increased, and Hispanics, like blacks, continue to face disproportionately high unemployment. The budget deficit suggests that bold initiatives to redress social ills are not on the horizon.
REASON TO HOPE
On the other hand, we have reason to hope that the ’90s could be kinder, particularly if new opportunities are seized.
There are several reasons for this view.
First, it seems that in addition to Education Secretary Lauro | Cavazos, Hispanics will be in visible, important positions in the new administration.
Second, the 1990 census will be followed by the creation of new congressional districts in areas with high concentration of minorities.
Third, the Quincentenary will stimulate reflection on Hispanic I contributions to our nation. Neglected facts in U.S. history will become better known, and Hispanics, already proud, will become prouder.
New immigrants will qualify for citizenship and, we hope, will assert themselves politically.
Finally, Hispanics are fast becoming the nation’s largest minority group.
NEW ADMINISTRATION - NEW OPPORTUNITIES
Hispanic leaders should see the dawn of a new administration and a new decade as opportunities. They should advocate not only for senior appointments, but also appointments to boards that, while perhaps not as visible, are very important.
Mr. Bush has reaffirmed Secretary Cavazos as his Education Secretary. But we await the first Hispanic trustees of the Kennedy Center and the Smithsonian Institution, and the first Hispanic trustees and board members of countless other institutions.
When all levels of government and the boards of trustees and | directors of tax-supported public institutions truly reflect the diversity of
! U.S. society, we will have advanced significantly toward becoming a kinder and gentler nation.
George Bush can make it happen.
(Frank Gomez is a free-lance writer who resides in the Washington, D.C., area.)
\ Quoting...
SUSAN HERRERA, spokesperson for the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility, on the monetary value of an agreement reached with McDonald’s on behalf of Hispanic suppliers to the j company:
“We're talking billions and billions of burgers.”
Sin pelos en la lengua
ONLY IN CALIFORNIA: I don’t know whether The Los Angeles Times even noticed, but its rival, the Herald-Examiner, gave it a five-column headline:
‘LAPD officer gets 7-day suspension for flatulent assaulf
Juan G6mez, a 24-year-old Los Angeles cop with a clean record in four years on the force, had his suspension upheld by the LAPD’s Board of Rights Dec. 6.
Juan, according to a news clip sent to us by Ruben Treviso, of the Whittier-based Veterans in Community Service, was charged with passing gas while standing less than a foot from defenseless, handcuffed Anthony L6pez.
The article said Juan called the incident “inadvertent,... caused by stomach problems.”
But Lopez and another arrestee told investigators that just before it happened, the officer had said, “Check this out.”
Treviso claims he and some fellow Vietnam veterans active in the American G.l. Forum are considering launching a “Juan Gomez Defense Fund” to carry the battle to higher authorities.
“Next they’ll be giving out three days for belching and one day for bad breath,” he says.
OVEN-BAKED POLLY: Also from California comes the report that Guadalupe Rodriguez, 25, was sentenced Dec. 5 to30 days in Los Angeles County Jail for baking her boyfriend’s yellowcheeked Amazon parrot, Ringo, following a lovers’ quarrel.
A DOG’S LIFE: In kinder, gentler Acushnet, Mass., Patricia Lopes, a pet groomer, showed greater animal compassion. She had just completed clipping the toenails of and bathing Escape, a 13-year-old greyhound, on Dec. 2 when the dog collapsed and showed no pulse.
Lopes immediately began performing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and after a few minutes, she said, “I heard a cough and then a gurgle.”
Escape is now recovering at home.
ODOR IN THE COURT: In Bell County, Texas, visiting Judge Wayne Bachus tried to restore order in his noisy courtroom. He rapped resident Judge Alfred Leal’s gavel and showered bystanders, including prosecutor Graciela Saenz, with 12-year-old bourbon.
Bachus’ mistake, explains a recent Associated Press story, was that he grabbed Judge Leal’s glass gag gavel.
MORE WARS OF WORDS: Reader Jessica Raimi complains in a letter to The New York Times that the newspaper's crossword puzzle is “guilty of serious linguistic bias” against Spanish.
She charges that it regularly includes “elitist, exclusive and passe French and Latin (spoken only by William F. Buckley Jr.)” while ignoring Spanish, which “is fast becoming our country’s second language.”
Lawyer James Chambers takes another view in the San Antonio Express-News. Reacting to a column by linguist Richard Santos opposing Official English, Chambers writes with passion and some confusion:
“To me, American English is the language of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address and the King James Bible.
“When I thinkof English, I thinkof those dark days in the summer of 1940... We heard the reports coming out of Europe. Belgium and Holland no longer existed as independent countries. France lay prostrate. Britain bled from the near-catastrophe of Dunkirk. The English-speaking people of Europe stood alone. And I mean alone.
“In those dark days, Churchill summoned the majesty and grandeur of the English language and sent it into battle. Day and night, his matchless prose - sparking like white-hot steel drawn from the forge - went out over the airwaves, giving renewed hope...
“It still stirs my blood... If for no other reason than what it did in those critical days, English should be made our official language...”
Feliz Christmas, everyone. _ Kay Barbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Dec. 19,1988
3


COLLECTING
WRITING CONTEST: The National Association for Bilingual Education is seeking students enrolled in bilingual education programs to submit essays on the topic “America: Our Unity Is Through Many Languages.” Submissions are broken into three categories: third through fifth grades, sixth through eighth, and high school. All first-place winners, one of their parents and their bilingual education teacher will be flown to the 1989 NABE conference and receive a $200 U.S. savings bond. Deadline is March 1, 1989. For more information, contact Jaime de la Isla, Coordinator, Department of Multilingual Programs, Houston Independent School District, 3830 Richmond Ave., Houston, Texas 77027 (713) 623-5126.
GERONTOLOGY MANAGEMENT FELLOWSHIPS: The National Hispanic Council on Aging has announced its competition for gerontology management fellowships. Selected fellows will work with private and public agencies that serve the elderly. Deadline is Jan. 1, 1989. For more information, contact Alfonso Aguilar, NHCoA, 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C. 20009 (202) 265-1288.
STUDENT MOTIVATION VIDEO: “Shooting for Success” is 322-minute video on the success of Garfield High School math teacher Jaime Escalante with a predominantly Hispanic student population. Copies can be borrowed free of charge from the National Education Association Communications, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7200.
TEACHER ATTITUDES: “The Condition of Teaching: AState-by-State Analysis, 1988” is a 104-page report by the Carnegie Foundation based on a survey of 22,000 public school teachers and what they see as their biggest problems. For a copy send $10.95 to Princeton University Press, 3175 Princeton Pike, Princeton, N.J. 08648 (609) 452-4900.
TV VIEWING AND EDUCATION: “The Impact on Childrens Education: Television’s Influence on Cognitive Development” finds that TV has little effect on a child’s intellectual development. For a free copy, contact U.S. Education Department, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, 555 New Jersey Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20208-5650 1-800-424-1616.
THE HISPANIC EXPERIENCE: “The Hispanic Experience in the United States” is a 280-page collection of essays with demographic and socioeconomic profiles of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and other Latino groups as well as material on their immigration and assimilation patterns. Price is$39.95. To order write Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Box 5007, Westport, Conn. 06881 (203)226-3571.
CONNECTING
PUBLISHING VENTURE UNDERWAY
Seeking to give community college educators - many of them Hispanic - an outlet to publish their technical and creative works, Massachusetts Bay Community College announced late last month that the inaugural volume of its first-of-its-kind press will be a critical study of the works of Rudolfo Anaya.
The book,“Rudolfo A. Anaya: Focus on Criticism,” will be published in the spring of 1989. It will be edited by Cesar Gonzalez-T., chairman of the Chicano Studies Department at San Diego Mesa College.
The press, the brainchild of Luis Alberto Urrea, an assistant to the president of MBCC, will publish at least one book yearly and two journals on a quarterly basis. One journal will be devoted to creative writing while the other will focus on research-oriented works. The press will also hand out one literary award per year to the author of what it considers the best book by a minority community college professional.
A committee has been set up to secure outside funding for the venture. In addition, Anaya and Gonzalez will donate the first 200 hardcover editions of their works to be sold at $50 to individuals and $100 to corporations The authors will also donate all royalties from their works.
To find out more about the press or to become involved in its advisory committee, contact Urrea at MBCC, 50 Oakland St, Wellesley Hills, Mass. 02181 (617) 237-1100.
STUDYING FAMILY STRATEGIES
Coping strategies used by the families of Mexican American high school students in Austin, Texas, who are labeled at risk of dropping out will be the subject of a three-year study by the University of Texas at Austin, it was announced Dec. 7.
Toni Falbo, a professor of psychology and acting director of UT Austin’s Population Research Center, and Harriet Romo, a research scientist at UTs Centerfor Mexican American Studies, were awarded $70,000 by UT System’s Hogg Foundation for Mental Health to conduct the study. The latest figures put the Hispanic dropout rate in Texas at 45%.
Falbo and Romo have sent out letters to 847 families of at-risk students. The students and their families will be followed over a three-year period to document the types of coping strategies used by those families whose children do not drop out. Among other things, the study will examine whether the strategies of U.S.- and Mexico-born children differ.
Calendar
To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization’s upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link’s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
HOLIDAY RECEPTION Washington, D.C. Dec. 21
The Washington, D.C., Council of Hispanic Community and Agencies will hold a holiday reception at the GALA Hispanic Theater.
Jassale Kohen (202) 328-9451 4
COMING SOON
MINORITY STUDENT RETENTION
Ohio State University, Division of Student Affairs
Columbus, Ohio Jan. 10,11
Carmen Alvarez-Breckenridge (614) 292-2917
PUBLICATIONS CONVENTION National Association of Hispanic Publications Las Vegas Jan. 12-14 Eddie Escobedo (703) 384-1514
EDUCATION MEETING American Council of Education San Diego Jan. 18-21 Marlene Ross (202) 939-9410
POLITICAL EMPOWERMENT Union del Barrio Riverside, Calif. Jan. 20 Juan Castellanos (619) 233-7279
ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 10,11
Dec. 19,1988
Dulce Cordero (213) 725-3970
BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif. Feb. 15-18 CABE (213) 946-1422
HISPANIC MARKET SYMPOSIUM The Marketing Institute New York Feb. 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883-1770
SPOTLIGHT
THREE KINGS DAY IN NEW YORK: A parade sponsored by El Museo del Barrio is one of the events planned in the city to commemorate the Epiphany. The parade features live camels, donkeys and sheep. The National Puerto Rican Forum will hold a benefit concert at Carnegie Hall featuring singer Danny Rivera Proceeds will go to NPRFs Educational Training Centers. For information about the parade, call Robert Abramowitz at (212) 889-2788. Contact Marta Garcia at (212) 685-2311 for information regarding NPRFs concert.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PLANT INSTRUMENTATION (|2) TECHNICIAN III
(Water Pollution Control Plant)
Ann. No. 2683-9A-DPW Salary Range: $27,458-$38,729
Skilled instrumentation maintenance and repair work. Repairs electronic pneumatic and mechanical wastewater treatment process control equipment; operates industrial test equipment; analyzes causes of instrument failure.
Requires four years experience in industrial process control instrumentation maintenance, calibration and repair, plus completion of two years of coursework or training in electronics technology acquired through vocational school, teaching, training, college or equivalent.
PLANT INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN II
Ann. No. 2682-8B-DPW Salary: $12.05 per hour
Skilled journey level instrumentation work. Maintains and repairs process control in-strumentation systems and equipment.
Requires graduation from a standard high school, vocational school or equivalent and one year of technical training in electronics, plus two years of experience in electrical, mechanical, pneumatic and/or optical systems, and/or repair and maintenance of process control instruments.
All applicants must submit an official Arlington County application form. R6sum6s submitted without a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted. Applications will be accepted for these positions until they are filled. To request application material please call (703) 358-3500 or TDD (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only).
ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT
#1 COURTHOUSE PLAZA SUITE 51 t
2 I OO CLARENDON BOULEVARD ARLINGTON. VIRGINIA 22201
OF NEW YORK
ASPIRAof New York, Inc. is presently accepting r£sum6s for various professional employment opportunities. Available positions include:
1. PROGRAM DIRECTOR
2. PROJECT COORDINATORS
3. ASPIRA CLUB FEDERATION COORDINATOR
4. COUNSELORS
5. FAMILY ASSISTANTS
6. SECRETARIES
Interested parties must be bilingual: English/Spanish and be available for work immediately. Salaries are commensurate with experience. All persons interested in applying for any vacant position are encouraged to submit an updated r6sum6 with a cover letter to:
Ms. Julia E. Rivera Executive Director ASPIRAof New York 332 East 149th Street Bronx, New York 10451
CABRILLO COLLEGE
INSTRUCTOR, HORTICULTURE, tenure track, 80% assignment. Requires eligibility for CCC instructor credential in ornamental horticulture. Apply by Jan. 5,1989.
For application and information, contact Cabrillo College, Personnel Dept., 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos, Calif. 95003 (408) 479-6217.
TRAFFIC SAFETY DIRECTOR
Opportunity for innovative, experienced traffic safety professional to develop and supervise programs for Dept, of State’s Office of Traffic Safety.
• Direct traffic safety operations;
• Serve as traffic safety liaison;
• Administer traffic safety programs;
• Supervise publications/materials.
Required: B.S. or B.A.; 2 years administrative experience, preferably in traffic safety; knowledge of governmental/legislative process.
Desired: Postgraduate traffic safety education or related experience; administrative work in traffic safety; research and analysis background.
Salary: $61-66,000. Send letter and r6sum6 by Jan. 1 to Michigan Dept, of State, Treasury Bldg., Lansing, Mich. 48918.
Equal Opportunity Employer
UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA
The following two positions are with the University of Northern Iowa.
ENGLISH: Composition/TESOL. tenure-track. Required: Doctorate. Desired: College teaching experience.
JOURNALISM: Two positions, Assistant/As-sociate Professors, tenure-track. Required: Ph.D. or near term ABD. Desired: College teaching/journalism experience.
Send vita, three recommendations and self-addressed postcard to Dr. Robert J. Ward, Head, English Department, University Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa 50614 by Jan. 16, 1989.
UNI is an AA/EOP employer. It actively seeks the candidacies of minorities and women. Members of protected classes may identify themselves for purposes of AA.
AA/EOE
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 or phone(202) 234-0737 or(202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 90 cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word). Multiple use rates on request.
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
Ordered by _ Organization Street_______
City, State & Zip___
Area Code & Phone
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
5


Arts& Entertainment
Following are highlights of the passing year:
FILM - Edward James Olmos portrayed Jaime Escalante in March’s Stand and Deliver. The actor was featured on the cover of Time in July.
The Milagro Beanfield War was released in March and Salsa in May. Break of Dawn premiered at Utah’s United States Film Festival in January. The film was an award winner at San Antonio’s CineFestival, which held its 13th anniversary run in November.
There were five Latino film fests in the fall. The others were held in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and San Juan.
TELEVISION - In the spring the Paul Rodriguez/Eddie V6lez sitcom Trial and Error was cancelled by CBS, and ABC axed the drama Juarez prior to its airing. Itsfirst episode-and pilots for Home Free (with the late Trini Silva) and The Cheech Show - aired in the summer.
Juarez lead Benjamin Bratt resurfaced in Knightwatch, the only
new fall program that featured a Hispanic. Three network shows with Latino leads returned - Family Ties, Falcon Crest and Miami Vice.
Competition between the Univision and Telemundo networks sparked the development of a dozen new Spanish-language television programs produced domestically.
THEATER- Hispanic theater got a boost from the Ford Foundation, which funded Latino programs at the Old Globe in San Diego, the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Calif., the Los Angeles Theater Center and New York’s Puerto Rican Travelling Theater.
In May, Miami’s Hispanic Theatre Festival went into its third year, as did Costa Mesa’s Hispanic Playwrights Project. New York’s Festival Latino celebrated its 12th anniversary in August.
MUSIC - Latinos received 34 Grammy nominations in January.
The band Los Lobos - nominated in the “record of the year'’ category for La Bamba-celebrated its 15th anniversary with the all-Spanish album La pistola y el corazon.
ART - The exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States had stops in Miami and Santa Fe, N.M., and The Latin Spirit: Art and Artist in the United States opened at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in October.
- Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report
HBO GOES SPANISH: Next month Home Box Office will offer some of its viewers the option of watching its movies in Spanish. The service will be introduced by HBO affiliate Qox Cable of San Diego.
Part of a major marketing plan targeting Latinos in California, Texas, Florida, New Jersey and New York, it will be accompanied by a Spanish-language direct mail campaign directed to more than 750,000 people.
To receive the Spanish-language signal, viewers with stereo television sets would access “second audio program,” which HBO says is available on all stereo TVs Other subscribers can attach a device available at electronics stores to their TVs for the same function. Some HBO affiliates will install them as part of their service to viewers.
NEW FOR COLLEGE: The Dallas Morning News is accepting selected college students attending Texas colleges and universities
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of
Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 ‘ N’ Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737
Publisher Hector ErickservMendoza Editor Felix P6rez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas. Darryl Lynette Figueroa Sophia Nieves.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscription (50 issues): Institutions/agencies $118
Personal * $108
Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIED: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. Ads placed by Tuesday will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of same week. Multiple use rates on request.
through mid-January for a recently created reporting program that allows them to work as campus correspondents.
Students earn professional experience, a $200 stipend from the News, and college credit, depending on the sponsoring school.
One of the first four students to participate in the project, which was created this fall, is MariCarmen Eroles, of Texas Christian University. The reporter-students are chosen by their colleges.
Assistant City Editor Dave Flick, who oversees the program, said interested students should contact the chairman of their school’s journalism department. School officials who are interested in participating should contact Flick at (214) 977-8222.
HIGH SCHOOL OUTREACH: The W.K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle Creek, Mich., has awarded $250,000 to the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities, which develops internships for the state’s minority high school students at local news outlets.
The institute has a four-year program which
places students in progressively more responsible jobs at newspapers, advertising agencies, public relations firms and broadcast stations each summer. Students receive tuition scholarships for their work.
For further, information contact Leslie Mertz at (313) 577-2150.
PROPOSALS SOUGHT: The Annenberg School of Communications and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting are accepting preliminary proposals through Dec. 27 for college-level telecourses, which use a combination of audio/video equipment and books, rather than relying on an instructor’s supervision. Contact The Annenberg/CPB Project at (202) 955-5100.
NOTE: Ana Veciana-SuareZ leaves her staff writer position at The Miami Herald Dec. 30. She will work on a sequel to Hispanic Media, USA published last year by The Media Institute in Washington, D.C., then move to the Palm Beach (Fla.) Post in April. Her husband, Leo Suarez, movesfrom the folding Miami News to the Post as a sports editor.
- Darryl Lynette Figueroa
j 6N6USH-SPEAKING | iSPANISH-SPLAKiNGl^
6
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

PAGE 1

REC'D. HR/CR Making The News This Week U.S . Sen . Paul Simon (D-Ill.) writes a letter to President-elect George Bush requesting that he appoint a Hispanic or Asian American to head the U . S . Immigration and Naturalization Service ... Seventy Congress members ask President Reagan to bestow the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation ' s highest civilian award, on Armando Valladares. Valladares , a former political prisoner in Cuba and an acclaimed author, is U.S. ambassador to the U .N. Human Rights Commission ... Denver Mayor Federico Peiia honors Carlos Martinez, an employee with the city's Department of Parks and Recreation, with the Outstanding City Employee with a Disability Award ... The National Council ofRefuse& Resist presents Courageous Resister Awards to Lydia and Sammy Cfl11r"llf1Q\hfl"illftd son team who battled police brutality in Perth t'MKblivares, a Los Angeles cleric who defies INS orders and extends sanctuary to Central American refugees ... Roberto Batista, a Bronx elementary school principal renowned for his bilingual education teaching methods, wins one of the six 16th annual Fund for the City of New York public service awards. . . New York City Schools Chancellor Richard Green orders the dismissal of District 4 Superintendent Carlos Medina and the Board of Education removes board member Robert Rodriguez, also from District 4 , for allegedly using school funds to pay for personal expenses. . . Sacramento, Calif., police charge handyman lsmael Carrasco Fl6rez with being an accessory in the murder of a man linked to Dorothea Montalvo Puente, a non Hispanic in whose yard seven bodies have been uncovered ... Vol. 6 No. 50 HISPANIC LINK WEEKL Bounty Crop of Christmas Gifts Offers Latino Flavor A bounty crop of Latino records, videos, books and art objects are available this season , in time to put a bit of Latino flavor into anyone' s Christmas celebration. Most of the following gifts are available throughout the country, with enough choices to fit mo s t budgets. Music gifts often tak e care of hard-to-please friends and relatives , and many new records , tapes and compact discs are released just in time for the holidays. The 1988 crop includes Ruben Blades ' " Antecedente, " a Spanishlanguage album in which the Panamanian singer returns to salsa, and 'Gipsy Kings , " McDonald's, HACER Sign Business Pact The Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility announced Dec. 6 at its quarterly meeting in Miami the formation of a partner ship with the McDonald's Corp. to achieve parity for Latinos in its employment and business operations. McDonald's agreed to double the number of Hispanic suppliers to its 7,800 restaurants, an increase worth $11 million to those busi nesses . The company also committed to increasing the number of Hispanic-owned franchises from 130 to 220. The current Latino franchises account for $160 million in sales. HAGER is a Washington , D.C. based coalition of seven national Hispanic organizations. Spokesperson Susan Herrera said the partner ship paves the way for successful Latino businesses. "If you can tell the bank you have such an arrangement waiting for you, you can get venture capital more easily. " Additionally, the agreement gives impetus to an initiative already underway by McDonalds to increase its6.7o/o share of Hispanic employees to at least reflect the composition of Latinos in the national workforce . That figure, accord ing to the Census Bureau , is 7 .5%. McDonalds spokesperson Stephanie Skurdy said a special effort would be made to recruit Hi s panics for management positions by work ing with Jerry Apoda ca, HAGER president, the Nat io nal Council of La Raza, and the other groups that form HAGER to identify potential applicants. Currently, 3.5% of the managers employed by M c Donalds are Latino, said Herrera. Darryl Lynette Figueroa the album by the Spanish group of the same name that includes the international hit " Bamboleo. " Both albums, from Elektra, list under $10. Fans of Carlos Santana will be delighted with " Viva Santana!," a multiple-disc set from Columbia that lists at around $25. The set combines old Santana hits with some previously unreleased cuts and includes a 24-page book let with a family tree of all the musicians who have been associated with the band . Videos are increasingly popular Christmas gifts, and 1988 saw the release of several major studio productions with Latino themes. Videos , available at about $40 each, include " La Bamba " (RCNColumbia), "Born in East L.A." (MCA), " Stand and Deliver' ' and " Salsa " (Warner Home Video) . Those who yearn for the earlier days of Hollywood will be pleased to find a number of classic films featuring Latino stars. The or i ginal, 1926 " Ben Hur," starring a silent Ramon Novarro, was released this year by MGM/UA. Sports fans can be covered with a variety of video gifts. A new one on the market, for golfers, is " Chi Chi ' s Bag ofT ricks: In and Out of Trouble with Chi Chi Rodriguez. " It is continued on page 2 Teachers, 54/o, Say 2nd Language Fluency Unimportant Fifty-four percent of elementary and second ary school teachers surveyed nationwide do not believe students should become fluent in a second language, according to a report issued Dec. 11 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. "The Condition of Teaching: A State by State Analysis, 1988" also indicates that the majority of the 22 ,000 teachers surveyed-63%-approve of putting students in programs or tracks geared to their perceived ability. Critics of the tracking method say the mino rity child is often stereotyped when the place ment decision is made, or the child is stuck in the program once he or she is classified. " 1 don' t approve of it. It makes it easy to put language-minority kids in a situation where not much is expected of them," said Killeen , Texas , tea cher Sara Flores , immediate past president of the Chicano-Hispano Caucus of the National Education Association . The report said 2.4% of the Hispanic students and 2 % of the black students were placed in gifted and talented programs versus 5.4 % of white pupils. Ten percent of the nation ' s public school students are Hispanic. Although a study released earlier this year found that minority teachers have a higher level of job dissatisfaction, the survey was not broken down according to the ethnicityof respondents. Hispanics make up 2% of public school teachers. Carnegie Foundation researcher Lane Mann said that the foundation did not see the necessity of such a breakdown. He said it would have been more expensive and would have required a much larger sample. Mann indicated job dissatisfaction among minorities seems to be tied to the greater prevalence of minority teachers in urban school systems. Previous Carnegie Foundation re ports had indicated teachers in this setting have less opportunity for input regarding programs, texts and policy. Sophia Nieves Our Holiday Wish This is Weekly Reporfs 50th and final edition of 1988. As we celebrate the holiday season with our families, we join in thanking you for your friendship and wishing you and your family una Feliz Navidad y Prospera Mio Nuevo. Our next edition will be published Jan. 2, 1989. Felix , Hector, Darryl , Sophia, Antonio y Kay

PAGE 2

U.S. Rep. Shumway to Reintroduce Official English Bill Saying that it is vital to "stop the drift toward a multilingual society," Congressman Norman Shumway (A-Calif . ) announced at a Dec. 8 press conference on Capitol Hill that he will reintroduce legislation early in the 101 st Congress to make English the official language of the United States. Participating in the press conference was U.S. English. Pointing to the Nov. 8 victories of official English initiatives in Colorado, Arizona and Florida, Shumway said he felt the bill would have a better chance of passing this session , which convenes Jan. 6 , than last , when it was given only one hearing by a House Judiciary subcommittee. Its chairman , Rep. Don Edwards (D-Calif . ) , has promised to hold another hearing this session. The new bill differs from the old one in that it allows the use of minority languages for English instruction, for public health and safety and for criminal proceedings, said Shumway spokesperson Tracy Smith . Smith added that the new language was the resu It of criticism leveled at the old bill. Jose Rosenfeld, an aide to Rep . Albert Bustamante (D-Texas) , called the addition "an improvement. " Nonetheless, he said, " The latest ther mometer reading was(President-elect) Bush is against it. . . We can count on his veto. " Stanley Diamond, acting director for U.S . English, announced the 1989 legislative agenda for the organization , which includes support for alternative approaches to transsitional bilingual education such as English asasecondlanguageor English immersion . Diamond said bilingual education programs that rely on students' native languages have been shown to set children back three to Art and Entertainment Gifts Endure continued from page 1 available for about $50 from CBS/Fox Video . Books make ideal gifts, and various ones by well-known Latin American authors, trans lated to English, made the best-selling lists this year . They include Gabriel Garcia Marqueis " Love in the Time of Cholera" and Isabel Allende' s " Eva Luna" (both from Alfred A . Knopf, about $20). Fans of Carlos Fuentes might enjoy his "Old Gringo" (Harper & Row, $6.95 in paperback) . Books by home-grown Hispanics may be harder to find , but a search in Latino neighbor hoods or university bookstores may yield a few treasures. Among many, you might find Calderon Bid Falls Short California Assemblyman Charles Calderon (D-East Los Angeles) lost, 35-40, a first time bid Dec. 5 for the powerful position of speaker of the Assembly. The three other Latinos in the Assembly supported eight-year incumbent speaker Willie Brown (D-San Francisco) , who had never before been challenged. Three other assemblymen abstained and on e w a s atr sent. Jose Antonio Burciaga's " Weedee Peepo " (Pan American University Press , $1 0 . 95) or Miguel Pinero's award-winning play "Short Eyes " (Hill and Wang, $7) . The great works of art by Spanish and Latin American masters are reproduced in beautiful , oversized books for a fraction of the price tags on the originals. More than a dozen illustrated Picasso books are available this year , with prices ranging from $7 to $70. The catalogs to two current, traveling Latino art shows make great "art" gifts. Both " The Latin American Spiri t Art and Artists in the United States, 1920-1970" (Har ry N . Abrams) and " Hispanic Art in the United States' ' (Abbeville Press) are available in hardbound editions for about $40. Hispanic museums, galleries and art centers in major U . S . cities have gift shops where unusual items are available for much less than one expects to pay for a gift at a department store. There one can find pieces by local and yet undiscovered artists. Buying and giving Latino art and entertainment products is an easy way to remind ourselves of the cultural contributions of our people. Theirs are the gifts that endure long after the shiny wrappings are thrown away . A .ntonio MejiasRentas five years in learning English, but was forced to admit, under a reporter's questioning, that other studies show they accelerate students' progress. Other items on its agenda are a prog r am to teach English to adults using public and private funds, and continued lobbying for a national English-language amendment. Diamond said after the briefing that U . S . English has not been unduly harmed by the resignations of Linda Chavez as president and Walter Cronkite as board member , though the group has received several calls about their departure. He felt the lack of a fallout was due to the pair's continued support of the official-English movement. Both resigned in October following disclosure of a memo randum written by founder John Tanton , which sparked charges of racism . Darryl Lynette Figueroa D.C. Panel Resolves a Bilingual Ed. Dispute A six-member panel of Washington, D . C . , bilingual education leaders and school district officials announced Dec . 9 that it had reached agreement on the bilingual education compo nent of a reorganization plan that had put Superintendent of Schools Andrew Jenkins at odds with the Latino community. The five-point agreement temporarily sus pends the scheduled dismantling of the city's Division of Bilingual Education. It calls fort he interim appointment of a special assistant, who will have authority over budget and programs for language-minority children. The panel also resolved to have a team of local and national experts review the city's bilingual programs, with input from parents and teachers. The scope of the study will be set by Dec . 24. A March 31, 1989, deadline was scheduled for delivery of the assessment team ' s compre hensive restructuring p l an . Panel member Beatriz Otero, who spear: headed the campaign to have Jenkins reconsider his plans , was pleased with the groundwork laid by the panel. She said Jenkins approved it with no changes. " It's been one hell of a struggle, " she sighed. Brown won with Democratic backing while Calderon garnered 30 of his votes from Republicans. He attributed the lack of Hispanic cohesion not to partisanship, but to a "historic" tendency for Hispanics "not to support one another. " Groups Ask Thornburgh to Order Probe 2 According to senior Hispanic Assembly man Pe ter Chacon (D-San Diego), political considerations accuunted for the vote. Referring to his chairmanship of the Election , Reapportionment and Constitutional Amend ment Committee, Chacon said, " I ' d have been on the losing side when he lost. " The speaker of the Assembly appoints committee chairmen. Darryl L y n e tt e Figueroa A civil rights petition has been filed with Attorney General Richard Thornburgh request ing action be taken as a result of alleged intimidation of Hispanic vo ters at the polls Nov . 8 in California' s Orange County. Guards hired by the Orange County Republican Party carried signs in English and Spanish that read , " If you ' re not a citizen, don't vote." The petition , submitted Dec . 7 by the League of United Latin American Citizens' Far West Region and the Latino Issues Forum , seeks an FBI investigation conducted by bilingual agents. According to Anita Del Rio, LULAC' s Far West Region national vice president, the group feared the FBI investigation underway would lead to a "whitewash." "Orange County is Reagan country," she said. Civil penalties against the Republican Party of Orange County are also suggested , including a requirement that the party deposit 20% of funds received over the next eight years into a voter education and registration fund. "What better way to mend the kind of fear they imposed out there," said John Gamboa, e x ecutive director of the Latino Issues Forum. -Sophia Nieves H i s pan i c Link Weekly Report

PAGE 3

l i ! I i Frank Gomez, guest columnist A Kinder, Gentler Nation As a candidate, George Bush called for a "kinder and gentler nation." Now elected, he has reached out to his critics and instructed his transition team to search for minorities and women to populate his administration. How do the president-elecfs actions translate into opportunities for Hispanics? Will George Bush be more inclined toward achievements and less inclined toward rhetoric than his predecessors? Even his harshest critics acknowledge his sincerity. Remarks about "the little brown ones" aside, since his early adulthood in West Texas, the president-elect has displayed sensitivity toward Hispanics . He has traveled often to Florida and Puerto Rico, spoken before Hispanic organizations, and put His panics on his campaign team . Mr. Bush takes office in the twilight of a period once heralded as the" Decade of the Hispanic." Yet , statistics show that the '80s were not as kind or as gentle to us as we had hoped. The high dropout rate , scarcely mentioned in the campaign , is alarming . Hispanics have the nation ' s highest incidence of AIDS . Housing shortages have increased , and Hispanics, like blacks , continue to face dis proportionately high unemployment. The budget deficit suggests that bold initiatives to redress social ills are not on the horizon. REASON TO HOPE On the other hand, we have reason to hope that the '90s could be kinder, particularly if new opportunities are seized . There are several reasons for this view . First , it seems that in addition to Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos, Hispanics will be in visible , important positions in the new administration. Second, the 1990 census will be followed by the creation of new congre ssional districts in areas with high concentration of minorities . Third, the Quincentenary will stimulate reflection on Hispani c contributions to our nation . Neglected facts i n U . S . history will become better known , and Hispanics, alr e ady proud , will be c ome p rouder. N e w immigrants will qualify for citizenship and , w e hope , will assert t hemselves politically . Finally , Hispanics are fast becoming the nation ' s largest minority group. NEW ADMINISTRATIONNEW OPPORTUNITIES Hispanic leaders should see the dawn of a new administration and a new decade as opportunities. They should advocate not only for senior appointments, but also appointments to boards that, while perhaps not as visible, are very important. Mr. Bush has reaffirmed Secretary Cavazos as his Education Secretary. But we await the first Hispanic trustees of the Kennedy Center and the Smithsonian Institution, and the first Hispanic trustees and board members of countless other institutions. When all levels of government and the boards of trustees and directors of tax-supported public institutions truly reflect the diversity of U.S. society, we will have advanced significantly toward becoming a kinder and gentler nation . George Bush can make it happen. (Frank Gomez is a free-lance writer who resides in the Washington , D.C., area.) Quoting. • • SUSAN HERRERA, spokesperson for the Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility, on the monetary value of an agreement reached with McDonald's on behalf of Hispanic suppliers to the company: "We're talking billions and billions of burgers. " Sin pelos en Ia lengua ONLY IN CALIFORNIA: I don ' t know whether The Los Angeles Times even noticed, but its rival, the Herald-Examiner, gave it a five-column headline : 'LAPD officer gets 7-day suspension for flatulent assault' Juan G6mez, a 24-year-old Los Angeles cop with a clean record in four years on the force, had his suspension upheld by the LAPD ' s Board of Rights Dec . 6 . Juan , according to a news clip sent to us by Ruben Treviso, of the Whittier-based Veterans in Community Service, was charged with passing gas while standing less than a foot from defenseless, handcuffed Anthony L6pez. The article said Juan called the incident" inadvertent, ... caused by stomach problems." But Lopez and another arrestee told investigators that just before it happened , the officer had said, "Check this out. " Treviso claims he and some fellow Vietnam veterans active in the American G . I. Forum are considering launching a "Juan Gomez Defense Fund " to carry the battle to higher authorities. "Next they'll be giving out three days for belching and one day fo r bad breath," he says . OVEN-BAKED POLLY : Also from California comes the report that Guadalupe Rodriguez, 25, was sentenced Dec . 5 to30 days in Los Angeles County Jail for baking her boyfriend' s yellow cheeked Amazon parrot, Ringo, following a lovers ' quarrel. A DOG'S LIFE: In kinder, gentler Acushnet, Mass. , Patricia Lopes, a pet groomer, showed greater animal compassion. She had just completed clipping the toenails of and bathing Escape, a 13-ye ar-old greyhound, on Dec. 2 when the dog collapsed and showed no pulse . Lopes immediately began performing mouth-to-mouth resusci tat i on and after a few minutes , she said , " I heard a cough and then a gurgle." Escape is now rec ov e ring at home. ODOR IN THE COURT: In Bell County, Texas , visiting Judge Wayne Bachus tried to restore order in his noisy courtroom. He rapped r es ident Judge Alfred Leal's gavel and showered bystand ers, including prosecutor Graciela Saenz, with 12-year-old bourbon . B achus' mistake , explains a recent Associated Press story, was that he grabbed Judge Leal ' s glass gag gavel. MORE WARS OF WORDS: Reader Jessica Raimi complains in a letter to The New York Times that the newspaper's c rossword pu z zle is "guilty of serious linguistic bias " against Spanish. She charges that it regularly in cludes "elitist, e x clusive and pas s e French and Latin (spoken only by William F . Buckley Jr. )" while ignoring Spanish , which "is fast becoming our country's second language. " Lawyer James Chambers takes another view in the San Antonio E x press-News . Reacting to a column by linguist Richard Santos opposing Official English, Chambers writes with passion and some confusion: " To me , American English is the language of the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution of the United States, Lincoln' s Gettysburg Address and the King James Bible . " When I think of English , I think of those dark days in the summer of 1940 ... We heard the reports coming out of Europe . Belgium and Holland no longer existed as independent countries. France lay prostrate. Britain bled from the near-catastrophe of Dunkirk. The English-speaking people of Europe stood alone. And 1 mean alone . " In those dark days, Churchill summoned the majesty and grandeur of the English language and sent it into battle. Day and night, his matchless prose-sparking like white-hot steel drawn from the forge-went out over the airwaves, giving renewed hope ... "It still stirs my blood ... If for no other reason than what it did in those critical days, English should be made our official language ... " Feliz Christmas, everyone. Kay Barbaro Hi s pan ic Link Weekly Report Dec . 19 , 1988 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING WRITING CONTEST: The National Association for Bilingual Education is seeking students enrolled in bilingual education programs to submit essays on the topic " America: Our Unity Is Through Many Languages. " Submissions are broken into three categories: third through fifth grades, sixth through eighth, and high school. All first place winners, one of their parents and their bilingual education teacher will be flown to the 1989 NABE conference and receive a $200 U.S. savings bond. Deadline is March 1 , 1989. For more information, contact Jaime de Ia Isla , Coordinator, Department of Multilingual Programs, Houston Independent School District, 3830 Richmond Ave., Houston, Texas 77027 (713) 623-5126. GERONTOLOGY MANAGEMENT FELLOWSHIPS: The National Hispanic Council on Aging has announced its competition for geron tology management fellowships. Selected fellows will work with private and public agencies that serve the elderly. Deadline is Jan. 1 , 1989. For more information, contact Alfonso Aguilar, NHCoA, 2713 Ontario Road NW, Washington, D.C . 20009 (202) 265-1288. STUDENT MOTIVATION VIDEO: "Shooting for Success" is a22-minute video on the success of Garfield High School math teacher Jaime Escalante with a predominantly Hispanic student population. Copies can be borrowed free of charge from the National Education Association Communications, 1201 16th St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 822-7200. TEACHER ATTITUDES: " The Condition of Teaching : A State-by State Analysis, 1988" is a 104page report by the Carnegie Foundation based on a survey of 22,000 public school teachers and what they see as their biggest problems. For a copy send $10.95 to Princeton University Press, 3175 Princeton Pike , Princeton, N.J . 08648 (609) 452-4900. TV VIEWING AND EDUCATION: " The Impact on Children ' s Education: Television ' s Influence on Cognitive Development" finds that TV has little effect on a child' s intellectual development. For a free copy, contact U.S. Education Department, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, 555 New Jersey Ave. NW, Washington, D.C . 20208-5650 1-800-424-1616. THE HISPANIC EXPERIENCE: " The Hispanic Experience in the United States" is a 280-page collection of essays with demographic and socioeconomic profiles of Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and other Latino groups as well as material on their immigration and assimilation patterns. Price is$39. 95. To order write Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Box 5007, Westport, Conn. 06881 (203)226-3571. CONNECTING PUBLISHING VENTURE UNDERWAY Seeking to give community college educators-many of them Hispanic-an outlet to publish their technical and creative works, Massachusetts Bay Community College announced late last month that the inaugural volume of its first-of-its-kind press will be a critical study of the works of Rudolfo Anaya. The book," Rudolfo A. Anaya : Focus on Criticism, " will be published in the spring of 1989. It will be edited by Cesar GonzalezT., chairman of the Chicano Studies Department at San Diego Mesa College. The press, the brainchild of Luis Alberto Urrea, an assistant to the president of MBCC, will publish at least one book yearly and two journals on a quarterly basis. One journal will be devoted to creative writing while the other will focus on research-oriented works. The press will also hand out one literary award per year to the author of what it considers the best book by a minority community college professional. A committee has been set up to secure outside funding for the venture . In addition, Anaya and Gonzalez will donate the first 200 hardcover editions of their works to be sold at $50 to individuals and $100 to corporations. The authors will also donate all royalties from their works. To find out more about the press or to become involved in its advisory committee , contact Urrea at MBCC , 50 Oakland St., Wellesley Hills, Mass . 02181 (617) 237-1100. STUDYING FAMILY STRATEGIES Coping strategies used by the families of Mexican American high school students in Austin , Texas , who are labeled at risk of dropping out will be the subject of a three-year study by the University of Te x as at Austin , it was announced Dec. 7. Toni Falbo, a professor of psychology and acting director of UT Austin ' s Population Research Center, and Harriet Romo, a research scientist at urs Centerfor Mexican American Studies, were awarded $70,000 by UT System's Hogg Foundation for Mental Health to conduct the study. The latest figures put the Hispanic dropout rate in Texas at 45%. Falbo and Romo have sent out letters to 847 families of at-risk students. The students and their families will be followed over a three-year period to document the types of coping strategies used by those families whose children do not drop out. Among other things, the study will examine whether the strategies of U . S.and Mex ico born children differ. COMING SOON Dulce Cordero (213) 725-3970 Calendar To Our Readers: To ensure information regarding your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link ' s Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear . There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to: Calendar Editor, His panic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK HOLIDAY RECEPTION Washington, D.C. Dec . 21 The Washington, D . C., Council of Hispanic Com munity and Agencies will hold a holiday reception at the GALA Hispanic Theater. Jassale Kohen (202) 328-9451 4 MINORITY STUDENT RETENTION Ohio State University, Division of Student Affairs Columbus , Ohio Jan . 10, 11 Carmen Alvarez-Breckenridge (614) 292-2917 PUBLICATIONS CONVENTION National Association of Hispanic Publications Las Vegas Jan. 12-14 Eddie Escobedo (703) 384-1514 EDUCATION MEETING American Council of Education San Diego Jan. 18-21 Marlene Ross (202) 939-941 0 POLITICAL EMPOWERMENT Union del Barrio Riverside , Calif . Jan . 20 Juan Castellanos (619) 233-7279 ENGINEERING CAREER CONFERENCE Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers Los Angeles Feb. 10, 11 Dec . 1 9 , 1988 BILINGUAL EDUCATION CONFERENCE California Association for Bilingual Education Anaheim, Calif . Feb . 15-18 CABE(213) 946-1422 HISPANIC MARKET SYMPOSIUM The Marketing Institute New York Feb. 27, 28 Conference Administrator (212) 883-1770 SPOTLIGHT THREE KINGS DAY IN NEW YORK : A parade sponsored by El Museo del Barrio is one of the events planned in the city to commemorate the Epiphany. The parade features live camels, donkeys and sheep . The National Puerto Rican Forum will hold a benefit concert at Carnegie Hall featuring singer Danny Rivera. Proceeds will go to NPRF's Educational Training Centers . For information about the parade, call Robert Abramowitz at (212) 889-2788. Contact Marta Garcia at (212) 685-2311 for information regarding NPRF's concert. Hispani c Link Weekly Report

PAGE 5

CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS 11:\ PLANT INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN Ill (Water Pollution Control Plant) Ann. No. 2683-9A-DPW Salary Range: $27,458-$38,729 Skilled instrumentation maintenance and repair work . Repairs electronic pneumatic and mechanical wastewater treatment process control equipment ; operates industrial test equipment ; analyzes causes of instrument failure . Requires four years e x per i ence i n industrial process control instrumentation maintenance , c a lib r ation and repa i r , plus completion of two years of coursework or training in electronics technology acquired through vocat i onal school, teaching , training, college or equivalent. PLANT INSTRUMENTATION TECHNICIAN II Ann. No. 2682-88-DPW Salary: $12.05 per hour Skilled journey level instrumentation work . Mainta ins and repairs process control in strumentation systems and equipment. Requires graduation from a standard high school , vocational school or equivalent and one y ear of technical training in electronics, plus two years of experience in electrical , mechani cal, pneumatic and / or optical systems, and / or repair and maintenance of process control ins t ruments . All applicants must submit an off i cial Arlington County application form. Resumes sub m i tte d w i thout a completed official Arlington County application form will not be accepted . Applications w ill be accepted for these posit i ons until they are filled . To request appl i cation m a terial please call (703) 358-3500 or TOO (703) 284-5521 (hearing impaired only) . ARLINGTON COUNTY, VIRGINIA PERSONNEL DEPARTMENT #I C OURT H O U S E PLAZA SUITE Sll 2100 CLARENDO N B OULEVARD ARLINGTO N , VIRGINI A 22201 OF NEW YORK ASPIRAof New York , Inc . is presently accept ing resumes for various professional employment opportunities . Available posi tions include: CABRILLO COLLEGE INSTRUCTOR , HORTICULTURE , tenure track , 80% assignment. Requires eligibility for CCC instructor credent ial in ornamental hor ticulture . Apply by Jan . 5, 1989. For application and informat i on , contact Cabrillo College, Personnel Dept., 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos , Cali f . 95003 (408) 479-6217 . AA/EOE TRAFFIC SAFETY DIRECTOR Opportunity for innovative, experienced traffic safety professional to develop and supervise programs for Dept. of State's Of fice of Traffic Safety . • Direct traffic safety operations ; • Serve as traffic safety liaison ; • Administer traffic safety programs; • Supervise publ i cations / materials . Required : B . S . or B.A.; 2 years administrative experience, preferably in traf fic safety; knowledge of governmental/legislative process . Desired : Postgraduate traffic safety education or related experience ; ad ministrative work in traffic safety ; research and analysis background . Salary: $61-66,000 . Send letter and resume by Jan . 1 to Michigan Dept. of State , Treasury Bldg. , Lansing , Mich . 48918. Equal Opportunity Employer UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN IOWA The following two positions are with the University of Northern Iowa . ENGLISH : Composition/TESOI,.. , tenure track . Required : Doctorate . Desired : College teaching experience . JOURNALISM : Two positions , Assistant/A s sociate Professors , tenure-track . Required : Ph. D . or near term ABO. Desired : College teaching/journalism experience . Send vita , three recommendations and self addressed postcard to Dr. Robert J . Ward, Head , English Department , Uni versity North ern Iowa , Cedar Falls , Iowa 50614 by Jan. 16, 1989. UNI is an AA/EOP employer. It actively seeks the candidacies of mino r ities and women . Members of protected classes may identify themselves for purposes of AA. 1. PROGRAM DIRECTOR 2 . PROJECT COORDINATORS 3 . ASPIRA CLUB FEDERATION COORDINATOR 4 . COUNSELORS 5. FAMILY ASSISTANTS 6 . SECRETARIES DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino executives and professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please complete and attach your ad copy and mail to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D . C . 20005 or phone' (202) 234 or(202) 234. Ad copy received(mail or phone) by 5 p . m . (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. Interested parties must be bilingual: English/Spanish and be available for work im mediately. Salaries are commensurate with e x perience . All persons interested in applying fo r any vacant position are encouraged to sub m i t an updated resume w ith a cover letter to : Ms. Julia E. Rivera E x ecutive Director ASP IRA of New York 332 East 149th Street Bronx, New York 10451 Hi s pa n ic Li nk Weekl y Report CLASSIFIED AD RATES go cents per word (city, state & zip code count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 word) . Multiple use rates on request. DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES (Ads with borders, varied type s i zes) $45 per column inch . Ordered by Organization Street _____________ _ City, State & Zip _________ _ Area Code & Phone ________ _ 5

PAGE 6

Arts & Entertainment new fall program that featured a Hispanic. Three network shows with Latino leads returned-Family Ties , Falcon Crest and Miami Vice. Competition between the Univision and Telemundo networks sparked the development of a dozen new Spanish-language television programs produced domestically. Following are highlights of the passing year : FILMEdward James Olmos portrayed Jaime Escalante in March ' s Stand and Deliver . The actor was featured on the cover of Time in July. THEATER-Hispanic theater got a boost from the Ford Foundation, which funded Latino programs at the Old Globe in San Diego, the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa, Calif., the Los Angeles Theater Center and New York's Puerto Rican Travelling Theater. The Milagro Bean field War was released in March and Salsa in May. Break of Dawn premiered at Utah ' s United States Film Festival in January. The film was an award winner at San Antonio' s CineFestival, which held its 13th anniversary run in November. There were five Latino film tests in the fall . The others were held in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and San Juan. In May, Miami' s Hispanic Theatre Festival went into its third year, as did Costa Mesa's Hispanic Playwrights Project. New York's Festival Latino celebrated its 12th anniversary in August. TELEVISION In the spring the Paul Rodriguez/Eddie Velez sitcom Trial and Error was cancelled by CBS, and ABC axed the drama Juarez prior to its airing. Its first episode-and pilots for Home Free (with the late Tri ni Si Iva) and The Cheech Showaired in the summer. MUSICLatinos received 34 Gram my nominations in January. The band Los Lobos -nominated in the "record of the year " category for La Bamba-celebrated its 15th anniversary with the all Spanish album La p istola y el coraz6n. ART-The exhibit Hispanic Art in the United States had stops in Miami and Santa Fe, N . M . , and The Latin Spirit: Art and Artist in the United States opened at the Bronx Museum of the Arts in October. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas Juarez lead Benjamin Bratt resurfaced in Knightwatch, the only Media Report HBO GOES SPANISH: Next month Home Box Office will offer some of its viewers the option of watching its movies in Spanish . The service will be introduced by HBO affiliate Cox Cable of San Diego. Part of a major marketing plan ta rgeting Latinos in California, Texas, Florida, New Jersey and New York, it will be accompanied by a Spanish-language direct mail campaign directed to more than 750,000 people. To receive the Spanish-language signal, viewers with stereo television sets would access "second audio program, " which HBO says is available on all stereo TVs. Other subscribers can attach a device available at electronics stores to their TVs for the same function. Some HBO affiliates will i nstall them as part of their service to viewers. NEW FOR COLLEGE: The Dallas Morning News is accepting selected college students attending Texas colleges and universities HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A nati o n a l publicati o n o f Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washingt_ol), D.C . 20005 (202) 234-0280 or 234-0737 Publi s her. Hector E• icksenMendoza Editor. Feli x Perez Reporting : Antonio Mej i as-Rentas. Darry l L yne tte Figueroa . Sophia Nieves. No portion of Hispan ic Link Weekly R eport may be reproduced or broadcast i n any form without advance permiss ion. Annual subscription (50 issues): lns.itutions/agencies $118 Personal ' $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CO RPORATE CLASS IFIED : Ad rates 90 cents per word . Displa y ads are $45 pe r column inch. Ads placed b y Tuesd ay will run in Weekly Reports m ailed Frida y o f same week. Multiple u se rates on request. 6 through mid-January for a recently created reporting program that allows them to work as campus correspondents. Students earn professional experience, a $200 stipend from the News, and college credit, depending on the sponsoring school . One of the first four students to participate in the project, which was created this fall , is MariCarmen Eroles , of Texas Christian Uni versity . The reporter-students are chosen by their colleges. Assistant City Editor Dave Flick, who oversees the program, said interested students should contact the chairman of their school ' s journalism department. School officials who are interested in participating should contact Flick at (214) 977-8222. HIGH SCHOOL OUTREACH: The W.K. Kellogg Foundation of Battle Creek, Mich., has awarded $250,000 to the Wayne State University Journalism Institute for Minorities, which develops internships for the state's minority high school students at local news outlets. The institute has a four-year program which • :EN6UStl-SPEAKING\ places students in progressively more res ponsible jobs at newspapers, advertising agencies, public relations firms and broadcast stations each summer. Students receive tuition scholarships for their work. For further. information contact Leslie Mertz at (313) 577-2150. PROPOSALS SOUGHT: The Annenberg School of Communications and the Cor poration for Public Broadcasting are ac cepting preliminary proposals through Dec . 27 for college-level telecourses, which use a combination of audio/video equipment and books , rather than relying on an instructor's supervision . Contact The Annenberg/CPB Project at (202) 955-51 00. NOTE: Ana Veciana-Suaret leaves her staff writer position at The Miami Herald Dec. 30. She will work on a sequel to Hispanic Media, USA, published last year by The Media Institute in Washington , D . C., then move to the Palm Beach (Fla . ) Post in April. Her husband, Leo Suarez , moves from the folding Miami News to the Post as a sports editor. Darryl Lynette Figueroa Hispanic Link Weekl y Report