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Hispanic link weekly report, October 23, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 23, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Making The News This Week
U.S. Reps. Kika de la Garza (D-Texas) and lleana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) vote against legislation that would allow the federal government to pay for abortions for poor women whose pregnancies result from rape or incest. The House passed the legislation, 216-206...The Florida legislature, in a special session, kills proposals by Gov. Bob Martinez to restrict and regulate abortions...The U.S. Justice Department obtains at least a month’s delay in the Iran-contra trial of former CIA Costa Rica station chief Joseph Fernandez to decide howto deal with secrecy issues...The San Antonio City Council names Antonio Rigual, president of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, to its Commission on Literacy...New York mayoral candidate
David Dinkins, considered the race’s front-runner, appoints Ida Castro, former special counsel to Hostos Community College’s president, as a deputy campaign manager.. .The National Association of Secondary School Principals selects Elizabeth Lebrdn, principal of Castle Park Middle School in Chula Vista, Calif., as the top school administrator in California...Mu Alpha Theta, the national student honor mathematics society, selects Joseph del Toro, a senior last year at Miami Sunset Senior High School, as the nation’s best high school math student...San Diegan Kenneth Kozelove, 18, pleads guilty to two first-degree murder counts in what are described as random, racially motivated shooting deaths last year of newly legalized immigrants Hilario Salgado Castaneda, 18, and Matilde de la Sancha, 18. Also charged is Dennis Bencivenga, 19...
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Grads Kindle Hispanic Alumni Group Surge
By Rhonda Smith
Coast to coast, Latino college graduates are renewing ties to their alma maters. They are tapping personal resources to launch a new campus phenomenon - Hispanic alumni associations. And in the process, they are helping to improve student retention, scholarship and career opportunities.
While the oldest Hispanic alumni association was established at the University of Southern California in 1972, a Weekly Report survey shows the majority of the nearly 30 such associations recognized on college campuses today are between one and five years old.
Traditional alumni associations were established to provide college graduates and universities an official structure to maintain mutually beneficial, lifelong ties. Today, as universities compete for top candidates and ethnically diverse student bodies representative of society, alumni associations are viewed as essential public relations arms to the nation’s growing communities of color.
INS to Use U.S. Marines
In thefirst such move of its kind, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will use Marines to help patrol the U.S.-Mexico border to halt the entry of undocumented immigrants and fight drug trafficking, the agency announced Oct. 12.
Called Joint Task Force 6, the agreement provides for upto 50 Marine officers at one time to conduct training and surveillance operations, inspect cargo and transport drug enforcement agents on raids along the border.
"This is the first time we’ve had active military,’’ said INS spokesman Duke Austin.
The agreement stipulates the Marines may not pursue or arrest suspects. While their activities must be restricted to federal property, there is little private property in the area.
U.S. Census Bureau figures indicate there were 994,000 Latino college graduates nationwide in 1988. The previous year, of the 991,260 bachelor’s degrees awarded in the country, 26,990 went to Latinos.
Why, some ask, did it take so long for Hispanic alumni associations to come into being?
“After obtaining our degrees, many of us left the campus and returned to our communities. We were more concerned with becoming a force there. Alumni associations were hot an honor badge for us then like they were for Anglos,” explains Delia Casillas Tamayo,
By Danilo Alfaro
Two months after voting to withhold city funds from social service agencies that aid undocumented immigrants, the Costa Mesa, Calif., City Council voted Oct. 2 to urge Congress to include the undocumented in the 1990 census.
The five-member board, which represents the Orange County city of93,000, split 3-2 on the issue.
In 1980, according to the census, the city was 10% Latino. The percentage is believed to have increased since then and to include many residents who lack papers.
"Costa Mesa has been bold in its tendency to deny services to the undocumented community,” said Nativo Ldpez, director of Santa Ana, Calif.-based Hermandad Mexicana Nacional. "But they still want to receive federal money that is allocated based on the number of residents.”
Neither the mayor - who supported both measures - nor city council members would return Weekly Report’s calls.
The resolution came after a Sept. 29 U.S. Senate vote barring undocumented immigrants from the census. The House of Representatives has since rejected a similar proposal. The issue is currently in a House-
founder of Stanford University’s Chicano Alumni Club.
Many Hispanic alumni still question the associations’ efficacy.
Vanessa Pegueros, president of the Chi-cano/Latino Alumni Club at the University of California, Berkeley, adds, "I have to convince Latino alumni that our group is much more than a rah-rah club.”
For Hispanics, belonging to an ethnic-specific alumni group means they must play an advocacy role, Tamayo says. Race problems, for example, remain a key concern.
continued on page 2
Senate conference committee.
Last month the council voted to make compliance voluntary with its August ordinance.
Latina to Succeed Koop
President Bush nominated Oct. 17 Puerto Rico-born Dr. Antonia Novello, deputy director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to succeed Dr. C. Everett Koop as U.S. Surgeon General.
Pending Senate confirmation, Novello, 45, would be the first Hispanic and the first woman to hold the 118-year-old position.
A graduate of the University of Puerto Rico Medical School, NOVELLO Novello, a pediatrician, has held her current job since 1986.
Her anti-abortion stance is said to have been key in gaining Bush’s support.
The Surgeon General is the principal adviser to the nation on health matters.
Council Wavers on Undocumented Issue


Sweeping Chicago School Plan Succeeds With Voters
By Danilo Alfaro
Described as the nation’s worst, Chicago’s ailing public schools received a shot in the arm Oct. 11 and 12 as more than 313,000 voters turned out to elect neighborhood councils to run the city’s 540 schools.
Six parents, two teachers and two community residents were elected to serve with the principal for each school. Each group will be headed by a parent and have the authority to approve budgets, recommend
books and curiculum, and hire and fire principals.
“It’s a fantastic accomplishment for His-panics in this city,” said Dan Solis, executive director of the United Neighborhood Organization, which lobbied for the reform plan.
Although the percentage of seats won by Hispanics was not immediately available, Solis estimated that it was in excess of the 25% Hispanic student population.
There were 17,256 candidates for the 5,400 positions. People aged 18 or older, including non-citizens, were eligible to vote and run for office.
Solfs estimated Latino turnout at between 35-40% of those eligible, compared with 20-25% for non-Hispanics.
Solfs said campaigns spearheaded by UNO in Spanish-language media urging Latinos to vote and to volunteer as candidates were especially effective.
Alumni Establish Links to Communities
continued from page 1
“When I look around the campus, I see the same things happening today that were happening when I attended Stanford 15 years ago,” says Tamayo. “Back then I left without having one Anglo friend. That’s sad. Today, students are still racially isolated.”
At Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Francisco Alcocer, who helped establish Los Hacheros, the Hispanic alumni association there, finds the Hispanic identity issue ticklish. Many Latinos feel they have been accepted by society and don’t want to risk losing that, he suggests.
Raymond Palacios, president of the University of Houston’s Mexican American Alumni Association, adds, ‘We constantly tell students, ‘You do not have to be mainstreamed to succeed. You can retain your sense of heri- PALACIOS tage and tradition.’ ” Retain heritage
But the cultural link addinite distinction, explains Alcocer. “There are many students here who appreciate their difference in culture and language and the ambiance that comes from that.”
Vfctor Quintana, executive director of the Latin American Massachusetts Institute of Technology Alumni, or LAMITA, in Boston, says he and other Latinos pooled their resources and formed LAMITA “to make a positive, collective contribution to our community. “For us the movie Stand and Deliver was very inspirational. It emphasized how one can utilize math tools to give students skills they can use later in life.”
Finding funds and tracking graduates are two of the largest obstacles for young Hispanic alumni groups. But to Radi Vargas, who heads USC's Mexican American Alumni Association, these are welcome challenges. Founded in 1972 by eight Latinos, MAAA has 700 members and a full-time staff. It has granted more than $2 million in scholarships to 1,900 Hispanic students.
Vargas sees an alumni group’s success depending on networking, raising funds and maintaining strong ties with the university
administration. With matching funds, corporate contributions, endowments and donations, he says MAAA will offer between 210 and 225 scholarships this year. The university matches the group’s funds two to one.
University officials recognize that Hispanic alumni associations offer them business as well as cultural benefits. “By supporting the Hispanic alumni association,...we are demonstrating we admire and respect their culture,” explains University of Colorado Chancellor James Corbridge. “The association is also the strongest link we have with incoming Hispanic students nationwide.”
Even though the newer alumni groups may not be receiving matching funds, universities assist them in other ways. “At Princeton they’ve been very responsive by giving us support in-kind,” explains Nellie Gorbea-Dfaz, secretary of the executive committee of the Latino Alumni Association of Princeton. The university’s support includes such services as sponsoring Hispanic campus events, assisting with the group’s four-page newsletter and covering mass-mailing costs.
'BOSTON LIKE A FOREIGN COUNTRY’
For Latino students on the East Coast, Hispanic alumni groups are also the best source for moral support. Quintana, who came to MIT from the Southwest, says, “For me, coming to Boston was like moving to a foreign country.”
Aztlan East is another welcome option for East Coast Latinos. This alumni group is made up of Hispanic students from Ivy League and other East Coast schools. Its membership is open to alumni, faculty and administrators, as well as to non-Latinos.
In her fall newsletter to Berkeley alumni, Pegueros emphasizes the bottom line for Hispanic alumni group members: ‘With 21.8% of this year’s incoming freshmen being Latino, I want the alumni to understand there are many contacts and resources aval able through our association. We have this huge potential of Latino talent coming out today.”
She challenges members of her group by telling them, “...our club must become more like a business...not about making money, but about our community and ourselves.”
South and Midwest Top Nation’s Voter Activity
Eligible Hispanic voters in the Midwest and South were more likely to register and cast ballots in the presidential election of last November than their peers in other sections of the country; according to a report released Oct. 18 by the U.S. Census Bureau.
Midwest Latinas had the highest registration rate, 64%. At 53%, Hispanas there also had the largest voter turnout.
Southern Hispanic males led their counterparts in registration and voting. Sixty percent were registered, and 48% voted.
LATINO VOTERS
November 1988 (in millions)
Registered Voted
Total
Male 56% 2,143 46% 1,753
Female 57 2,431 46 1,958
Midwest
Male 59% 164 46% 128
Female 64 216 53 178
Northeast
Male 48% 320 42% 279
Female 53 473 47 415
South
Male 60% 822 48% 659
Female 62 910 48 701
West
Male 55% 836 45% 687
Female 54 831 43 664
Teachers Disclose Vote
The United Teachers Los Angeles’ Chi-cano/Latino Education Committee announced Oct. 17 that its referendum in support of bilingual education was approved by the union’s members, 5,561-3,952. The action was in response to the UTLA board of directors’ move not to reveal the results until arbitration on an earlier referendum opposing bilingual education bonuses is completed.
Mark Meza-Overstreet, chairperson of the Chicano committee, said, “The members of the board are not responding to the Latino community’s needs.”
Katherine Carey, a UTLA spokeswoman, responded that the union’s attorney advised the board to withhold the results. The earlier referendum goes to arbitration the first week of November. The arbitrator then has 60 daya
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
2
Oct 23,1989


Juan Gonzdlez
New York’s Rivera Joins New Breed of Labor Leaders
Outside Mount Sinai Hospital on New York’s Upper East Side this month, members of the Hospital and Health Care Workers’ Local 1199 were busy popping champagne bottles.
“We love you, Dennis, we love you,’’ shouted three female workers as their 39-year-old president emerged from the building following a lunch time rally of 500 members in the cafeteria. He carried a single long-stemmed rose someone had given him.
It was Wednesday and Dennis Rivera had slept only two hours since Sunday night, but his members’ smiles told him all the frenzied months of planning and organizing had paid off.
The slender, soft-spoken leader did what many say is impossible nowadays. Rivera "took a badly splintered union of 100,000 members and made it strong again. He led a brilliantly conceived contract fight against GONZALEZ
the most powerful health institutions in New York City and won a big wage hike - all without a protracted strike.
With the victory, this native of Aibonito, Puerto Rico, who still speaks English with an accent after 12 years in New York, confirmed his standing as one of the nation’s most powerful labor leaders.
NEW GENERATION OF URBAN LABOR CHIEFS
Following decades when “Latino union leader” and the United Farm Workers’ C6sar Chavez were synonymous and lonely, voices of a new generation of urban Hispanic labor chiefs are being heard and recognized. They range from Cuban American Jack Otero, president of of the Labor Council on Latin American Advancement in Washington, D.C., to Maria Elena Durazo, the Chicana daughter of immigrant farm workers who was installed in May, at age 36, as president of Los Angeles’ 14,000-member Hotel and Restaurant Employees Local 11.
For New York’s Rivera, this was the sweetest in a year of victories.
All around us are skeletons of strikes broken by bosses who welcome walkouts like hunters at the start of deer season. The tugboat workers. Eastern Air Lines. Now the telephone workers are into their second month of the kind of marathon strike that giant companies find easier to withstand than unions.
Rivera remembers a disastrous 47-day strike that nearly decimated his union. In setting his strategy, he searched for a battle plan, one that union-busting lawyers from Harvard and Yale hadn’t studied.
“We met every goal we set for ourselves at the beginning,” Rivera said after the rally. His eyes were glazed. His body was drained after round-the-clock talks, but the adrenalin kept flowing as he described the plan.
First, he consolidated his members. Years of internal fights had weakened a once-proud union. A 90% vote for his slate in union elections last spring proved he’d accomplished that.
Second, he threw the union’s resources into major political campaigns, increasing the activism of its members and at the same time winning the support of major leaders. In 1988with the Jesse Jackson presidential campaign, then this year with David Dinkins’ fight in the mayoral primary, his union became the cog in organized labor’s election efforts. When Jackson and Dinkins won the city, Local 1199 members started thinking like winners.
Jackson and Dinkins reciprocated by rallying behind the union’s membership when the contract with the League of Voluntary Hospitals expired July 1.
Third, he worked to win public sympathy by holding dozens of community hear- RIVERA
ings on the city’s health care crisis, by successfully mobilizing the union to oppose state cuts in Medicaid funding and by convincing most of the city’s press corps that his members deserved a good raise. A series of marches in different boroughs and several short strikes kept the issue of the contract in the public’s mind without risking a full-blown walkout.
HOSPITALS FELL IN LINE, ONE BY ONE
Fourth, he turned management’s divide-and-conquer tactics around on the hospital heads by seeking individual contracts with those hospitals the union believed sympathized most with the union’s low-paid members.
“The settlement with the Catholic Hospitals was very important because it established a model contract and because of Cardinal O’Connor’s moral authority,” Rivera said.
After the Catholic hospitals, the union turned to those in the league whose directors were black or Hispanic. One by one, Interfaith in Brooklyn, North General in Harlem and Bronx Lebanon broke ranks with the bigger institutions. Then, when Columbia-Presbyterian, one of the city’s biggest, broke ranks, it sparked a stampede of settlements.
Atthe lunchtime victory rally, even doctors and non-union workers smiled as Rivera talked not only about the contract but the future. He said every American has the right to decent, affordable health care, that his union is ready for that fight, too.
Late in the afternoon, rose still in his hand, Dennis Rivera decided to get some rest.
(Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with The New York Daily News.)
Sin pelos en la lengua
GOOD NEWS FROM FAR-OUT PLACES: Not all Hispanics live in New York, South Florida or the Southwest. And sometimes what’s going on elsewhere is downright cheery:
STUDENT POWER: In Idaho's rural Marsing High School (student pop. 129), a group of adult fans thought it was funny to shout “Stupid Mexican!” whenever a Chicano player missed a tackle or dropped a pass. The tension grew until last month the 10 Latinos on the 21-member squad boycotted practice in protest.
Then linebacker Ernesto Villareal, 16, went before the school board to air his frustration, and the student council in the 25% Hispanic school voted to crack down on the racist language.
At Marsing’s homecoming game this month, students read a statement blasting “bigots” and “big idiots” over the loudspeaker and handed out printed statements to the crowd of 600.
People cheered their action, the redneck shouting ceased, and Marsing defeated rival Notus, 50-6.
WILL POWER: Kansas Gov. Mike Hayden, who’s leading a Drug-Free Kansas campaign, addressed the Hispanic Heritage Week Fiesta '89 luncheon, followed by a black-tie ball that night. The events were co-sponsored by the Kansas Advisory Committee on Hispanic Affairs. Noted KACHA Director Celso Ramirez, all events were alcohol-free in support of the guv’s initiative.
WORD POWER: When Clark Atlanta University radio station WCLK dropped its Latino jazz and salsa program this summer, musician Hassan Ortiz tried and failed to register a personal complaint with the station manager. So he followed with a letter to Thomas Cole, the university’s president.
Cole responded by setting up a community advisory board for the station and approving a cable program, P6ginas Latinas, that will start next month. Its host? Hassan Ortiz.
-Kay Birbaro
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 23,1989
3


HISPANIC ALUMNI ORGANIZATIONS
The following are contacts fora partial list of Hispanic alumni organizations and some of their activities.
Arizona State University, Los Diablos, ASU Alumni Association, 215 E. Seventh St., Tempe, Ariz. 85287. Contact: Frank Hidalgo, Asst. V.P. of Univ. Relations, (602) 965-8889. Goals: satellite chapters, developing a leadership institute, mentoring and internship programs. Offers scholarships.
Aztlan East Inc., P.O. Box 729, Kendall Square, Cambridge, Mass. 02142. Contact: Mario Murillo, Executive Director, (617) 924-1893. Goals: Developing a Hispanic alumni organization with individuals from Ivy League and other East Coast schools. Did a selective survey of East Coast schools for the 1987-88 academic year on recruitment, financial aid, curriculum and support systems for Latino students and faculty.
California State University, Bakersfield, Hispanic Alumni Chapter, 5904Sunland St., Bakersfield, Calif. 93304. Contact: Nora Marin, Cofounder, (805) 397-5505. Goals: Working with Hispanic secondary school students to promote college attendance. Offers scholarships.
Latin American Massachusetts Institute of Technology Alumni (LAMITA), c/o MIT Alumni Association, Attn: Nancy Barber, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Bldg. 10-140, Cambridge, Mass. 02139. Contact: Victor Quintana, Executive Director, (617) 577-3851. Goals: Assist in recruiting students to MIT, building alumni membership.
Latino Alumni Association of Princeton (LAAP), 15 W. 43rd St., Box 61, New York, N.Y. 10036. Contact: Nellie Gorbea-Dfaz, Executive Committee Secretary, (609) 292-1343. Goals: Assist in recruiting Latino students to Princeton.
Northern Arizona University, LosHacheros Hispanic Alumni, P.O. Box 6034, Flagstaff, Ariz., 86011. Contact: Francisco Alcocer, Coordinator of Special Projects, (602) 523-9103. Goals: Opening affiliate chapters in Yuma, Tucson and Northern Arizona, fund-raising. Offers scholarships.
Stanford University Chicano Alumni Club of Northern California, 304 Kaines Ave., San Bruno, Calif. 94066. Contact: Miguel Martinez, President, (415) 589-5998. Sponsors a Stanford student in a public
service position. Holds conference each May.
Texas A&l University, Hispanic Alumni Association, 118S. Eighth St., Kingsville, Texas 78363. Contact: Horacio Castillo, Chairman, (512)592-6744. Goals: Working to expand higher educational opportunities for Hispanics in South Texas.
University of California, Berkeley, Chicano/Latino Alumni Club, P.O. Box 187, Berkeley, Calif. 94704. Contact: Vanessa Pegueros, President, (415) 823-4248. Goals: Continue developing support for Chicano alumni and students, provide mentorship opportunities.
University of California, Los Angeles, Council of Support Organizations, West Alumni Center, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90024. Contact: Ramona Garza, Alumni Association Representative, (213) 206-5058.
University of Colorado, Boulder, Hispanic Alumni Association, Koenig Alumni Center, Boulder, Colo. 80309-0459. Contact: Rocky Garcia, Assistant Director of Minority Alumni Relations, (303) 492-6563. Goals: Establishing a mentorship program, fund-raising for Hispanic student scholarships, networking state and nationwide. Offers scholarships.
University of Houston, Mexican American Alumni Association, P.O. Box 231033, Houston, Texas 77223-1033. Contact: TatchoMendiola, Professor in Mexican American Studies Program, (713) 749-7386. Goals: Establishing a mentorship program, continuing work with Hispanic high school and college students. Offers scholarships.
University of Michigan Hispanic Alumni Council (UMHAC), Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 1220 S.A.B., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Contact: Eduardo Torres, (313)747-1462. Goals: Developing Hispanic scholarship opportunities and Latino leadership potential.
University of Southern California, Mexican American Alumni Association (MAAA), Office for Mexican American Programs, Parkview Bldg., Room 203, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1228. Contact: Raul Vargas, Executive Director, (213) 743-2456. Goals: To continue providing scholarship opportunities for USC Hispanic undergraduates and expand scholarship program to include professional and graduate schools.
Cajendar_________________________
THIS WEEK UNITY BREAKFAST Los Angeles Oct. 26
The Institute for Social Justice’s impacto-2000, an initiative to increase ties between Mexican Americans and Mexico, will have a breakfast with representatives from both sides.
Armando Navarro (714) 888-0207
BILINGUAL ED CONFERENCE Austin, Texas Oct. 26-28
The Texas Association for Bilingual Education is holding its 18th annual conference.
Frank Campos (512) 385-3750
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Providence, R.I. Oct. 27
The Hispanic Social Services Association of Rhode Island will host its fifth annual conference on Hispanic concerns. Samuel Betances, professor of sociology at Northeastern Illinois University, will deliver the keynote speech.
Marta Martinez (401) 951-4470 4
SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Los Angeles Oct. 27
The Mexican American Grocers Association is holding its 1989 scholarship banquet.
Gloria Alvarez (213) 227-1565
SALUTE TO EDUCATORS Rockville, Md. Oct. 27
The Maryland tri-county chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women is hosting a salute to Hispanic educators.
Dora Diaz Strope (301) 381-4929
ALUMNI REUNION Ann Arbor, Mich. Oct. 27,28 The Hispanic Alumni Council of the Alumni Association of the University of Michigan is holding its second annual reunion.
Eduardo Torres (313) 764-0384
LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 27-29
The Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project is sponsoring its annual Hispanic Leadership Conference. Exhibits, workshops and assemblies, with distinguished national leaders, are included.
Oct 23, 1989
Juan Andrade (312) 427-8683
HOMECOMING Los Angeles Oct. 28
The University of Southern California’s Mexican American Alumni Association will sponsor a mari-achi band and a ballet folklorico group .
Glenn Rodriguez (213) 743-2456
BANQUET Boston Oct. 28
The Latino Democratic Committee is holding its annual banquet. Democratic National Committee Chairman Ronald Brown will be the guest speaker. F<§lix Arroyo (617) 787-2354
MANA CONFERENCE Santa Ana, Calif. Oct 28
The Orange County, Calif., chapter of the Mexican American Women’s National Association is holding its second annual conference.
Lisa Penaloza (714) 647-7581
DINNER/DANCE New York Oct. 28
The Center for Migration Studies is holding its silver anniversary gala dinner/dance.
Matilda Raffa Cuomo (718) 351-8800
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
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Please designate #0443, National Image Inc. for your gift to the Combined Federal Campaign.
National Hispanic Organization seeks Resource Development Coordinator. Responsible for coordinating fundraising activities, grant writing and management. Strong writing and editing skills. Computer literacy. Salary $25k-$33k depending on experience. Send resume to:
Susan Herrera, VP of Administration, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002.
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics in Philanthropy
DUTIES: Organize educational and organizational programs, develop and facilitate grantseeker training programs, identify and obtain necessary funding, oversee publication of periodic reports and HIP’s quarterly newsletter.
QUALIFICATIONS: Administrative and fundraising experience in nonprofit corporation. Strong interpersonal and communications skills. Extensive working knowledge of Latino community issues in the U.S. Excellent report and proposal writing skills. Demonstrated ability to work cooperatively in a professional capacity with boards of directors, funding sources, and other, diverse individuals and organizations.
EMPLOYMENT: Compensation includes a starting salary commensurate with experience, and standard fringe benefits. The starting salary may be adjusted following a six-month performance review, and following annual reviews thereafter. The appointment is full-time at HIP’s office in San Francisco. Extensive travel is required.
APPLICATION: Letters of application should be sent with resumes to: Chair, Executive Director Search Committee, Hispanics in Philanthropy, 116 New Montgomery St., Suite 742, San Francisco, Calif. 94105-3607. Please submit names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least three professional references, and a brief salary history.
Applications will be closed on October 31, 1989.
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS
1) CHANGE Counselor. Requires: Master’s degree and professional commitment to the special educational needs of minority students. Bilingual/bicultural (Spanish/ English), with effective communication skills. Preferred: Experience in counseling within a diverse population of minority/academically underprepared students.
Deadline: November 24, 1989.
2) CHANGE Counselors (3 positions available). Requires: Master’s degree in related area (i.e., counseling or student personnel), verifiable counseling experience at youth, high school or college level. Experience in counseling within a diverse population of minority/academically underprepared students. Effective communication skills needed.
Deadline: November 24, 1989.
For all positions, anticipated starting date: January 8, 1990.
To apply, send resume, letter of application, and three recent letters of reference to:
Ms. Carmen N. Col6n
Associate Director of CHANGE Educational Services and Programs NIU DeKalb, III. 60115.
Northern Illinois University is strongly committed to the principles of Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, Title IX, Section 504.
RADIO REPORTER KERA-Dallas
Serious committed radio news operation seeks experienced reporter. Will produce news and feature reports for daily news program, must generate story Ideas, research, interviews, and use standard broadcast equipment to produce reports. Minimum 2 years broadcast news experience required. Must have strong writing, interviewing, and journalistic skills plus mature, credible announcing style. Degree preferred. Send letter, r6sum6, non returnable tape and salary expectations to: James Horn, Personnel Director, KERA, 3000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75201 (214)871-1390.
EEO
project director
COSSMHO
COSSMHO is seeking a full-time professional to ^Icohot and other drug abuse projects. Master's in social ^irk, public health or related field preferred. Candidates should have experi-P-erice in program management ©be areas of : substance abuse, ybutb and family, juvenile delin-• quehcy, and professional writing skis, Bilingual/ bicultural preferred. Salary negotiable. Send f^um^tdiPauidSrdenas, COSSMHO, 103015th St. NW, Suite:1053, Washington, D.C: 20005.
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 23, 1989


Arts & Entertainment
ON THE STAGE: An evening of one-act plays at Los Angeles’ Plaza de la Raza this week marks the culmination of the cultural center’s first play competition, L.A. Chicano TheatreWorks.
The winning plays - being performed Oct. 27 at Plaza's Margo Albert Theatre -- are Evelina Fernandez’s How Else Am I Supposed To Know I’m Still Alive? and Richard Gutierrez’s At Least She's Still a Virgin.
The two plays were chosen from among 60 scripts submitted this year by Chicano writers throughout California. Six of the plays were given public readings before the final selection was made. Two other finalists -- December, by Nancy de los Santos, and The Taco of Death, by Bob Herrera - will be developed in a two-week workshop at Plaza de la Raza that begins Nov. 4.
TheatreWorks raised some community complaints over the fact that non-Chicano Hispanic writers in California were banned from submitting entries and that one of the winners, Fernandez, is married to one of the competition’s three judges, theater director Jos6 Luis Valenzuela.
Both Valenzuela and Ferndndez are members of the Latino Theatre Lab at the Los Angeles Theatre Center.
Fernandez and Valenzuela - along with actors Robert Beltr&n, E. J. Castillo and Lupe Ontiveros and playwrights Eduardo Machado and Milcha Sdnchez Scott - were recently named artistic associates at LATC. They will be involved in ‘‘informal quarterly meetings to share ideas and engage in creative dialogue” and be invited to opening night performances at the four-theater complex.
In other theater news, \h\sy ear's Latino Play Discovery Series at San Diego’s Old Globe Theater comes to a close with performances Oct. 27-29 of Mercedes Rein and Jorge Curi’s Death and the Blacksmith...And Hugo Medrano, producing director of Gala Hispanic Theatre in Washington, D.C., is cast in ja production of Richard Nelson’s Prin-cipia Scriptoriae at that city’s Studio Theatre....
ONE LINER: Art of the Americas, an exhibition of paintings and sculptures by Latino artists from the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Colombia, Chile and Peru, continues at Gump’s Gallery in San Francisco through Oct. 28...
-- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
ASNE URGES DISCLOSURE: By a 20-0 vote, the board of directors of the American Society of Newspaper Editors decided Oct. 12 to publish the names of consenting newspapers when it conducts its next survey of minorities in the nation’s daily newsrooms.
The identification will be accomplished through a box that can be checked on the survey form indicating that the respondent paper wishes to divulge its identity. While participants will not be obligated to disclose their names, not to do so ‘‘will imply that they have something to hide,” ASNE Minorities Committee Chairman Mervin Aubespin told Weekly Report.
ASNE has conducted the survey since 1962. In recent years organizations such as the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and the National Association of Black Journalists have pressured ASNE to disclose the names of the participating newspa-
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pers. NAH J conducted its own survey of the nation’s 30 largest newspapers earlier this year, publicizing the records of the 23 papers that responded.
‘‘I was surprised that the ASNE vote was unanimous,” said Aubespin, editor of the Courier Journal in Louisville, Ky. “I hopethis can create a less adversarial relationship between ASNE and the leadership of minority organizations.”
Evelyn Hernandez, president of NAHJ and a New York Newsday reporter, told Weekly Report she was “delighted” with the decision. ‘‘It’s hypocritical that in a business where we demand similar information from other industries, the news media shouldn’t be held to the same standard. But it’s fairto say that until we have minorities holding positions that qualify them for membership in ASNE and its board of directors, we still have a problem and the adversarial element will remain.”
Aubespin said that even though the disclosure will be optional, he felt that a “consider-
able” number of newspapers would agree to be named. He cited the board’s unanimous vote, the fact that board members are required to make public minority hiring information at their newspapers, and the fact that some newspapers have already indicated that their records are open.
BUYING AND SELLING: Los Angeles radio station KRTH-AM will switch from oldies rock to Spanish-language music as the result of its purchase by Santa Ana, Calif.-based Liberman Broadcasting Inc. Announced Oct. 4, the deal brings to seven the number of Spanish-language radio stations in the area.
Chicago Spanish-language daily newspaper Diario El Manana has been acquired by Midwest Spanish Publications. Gorki Tellez, the newspaper’s present owner, will be a coowner of the new company and continue as its publisher and director general. Attorney and Chicago Sun-Times columnist George Munoz is an investor.
- Danilo Alfaro


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Making The News This Week David Dinkins, considered the race's front-runner , appoints Ida Castro, former special counsel to Hostos Community College's president, as a deputy campaign manager ... The National Association of Secondary School Principals selects Elizabeth Lebr6n, principal of Castle Park Middle School in Chula Vista, Calif., as the top school administrator in California ... Mu Alpha Theta, the national student honor mathematics society, selects Joseph del Toro, a senior last year at Miami Sunset Senior High School, as the nation's best high school math student. .. San Diegan Kenneth Kozelove, 18, pleads guilty to two first-degree murder counts in what are described as random, racially motivated shooting deaths last year of newly legal ized immigrants Hilario Salgado Castaneda, 18, and Matllde de Ia Sancha, 18. Also charged is Dennis Bencivenga, 19 ... U.S. Reps. Kika de Ia Garza (D-Texas) and Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fia.) vote against legislation that would allow the federal govern ment to pay for abortions for poor women whose pregnancies result from rape or incest. The House passed the legislation, 216-206 ... The Florida legislature, in a special session, kills proposals by Gov. Bob Martinez to restrict and regulate abortions ... The U.S. Justice Depart ment obtains at least a month's delay in the Iran-contra trial of former CIA Costa Rica station chief Joseph Fernandez to decide how to deal with secrecy issues ... The San Antonio City Council names Antonio Rig ual, president of the His panic Association of Colleges and U niver sities, to its Commission on Literacy ... New York mayoral candidate Grads Kindle Hispanic Alumni Group Surge By Rhonda Smith Coast to coast, Latino college graduates are renewing ties to their alma maters. They are tapping personal resources to launch a new campus phenomenon --Hispanic alumni associations. And in the process, they are helping to improve student retention, schol arship and career opportunities. While the oldest Hispanic alumni associa tion was esablished at the University ci South ern California in 1972, a Weekly Report sur vey shows the majority of the nearly 30 such associations recognized on college campuses today are between one and five years old. Traditional alumni associations were es tablished to provide college graduates and universities an official structure to maintain mutually beneficial, lifelong ties. Toqay, as universities compete for top candidates and ethnically diverse student bodies representa tive of society, alumni associations are viewed as essential public relations arms to the na tion's growing communities of color. INS to Use U.S. Marines lnthefirstsuch move of its kind, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will use Marines to help patrol the U.S. Mexico border to halt the entry of undocu mented immigrants and fight drug traf ficking, the agency announced Oct. 12. Called Joint Task Force 6, the agree ment provides for up to 50 Marine officers at one time to conduct training and sur veillance operations, inspect cargo and transport drug enforcement agents on raids along the border. "This is the first time we've had active military," said INS spokesman Duke AL5tin. The agreement stipulates the Marimes may not pursue or arrest suspects. While their activities must be restricted to fed eral property, there is little private prop erty in the area. U.S. Census Bureau figures indicate there were 994,000 Latino college graduates na tionwide in 1988. The previous year, of the 991 ,260 bachelor's degrees awarded in the country, 26,990 went to Latinos. Why, some ask, did it take so long for His panic alumni associations to come into being? "After obtaining our degrees, many of us left the campus and returned to our commu nities. We were more concerned with becom ing a force there. Alumni associations were hot an honor badge for us then like they were for Anglos," explains Delia Casillas Tamayo, founder of Stanford University's Chicano Alumni Club. Many Hispanic alumni still question the associations' efficacy. , Vanessa Pegueros, president of the Chi cano/Latino Alumni Club at the University of California, Berkeley, adds, "I have to con vince Latino alumni that our group is much more than a rah-rah club." For Hispanics, belonging to an ethnic-spe cific alumni group means they must play an advocacy role, Tamayo says. Race prob lems, for example, remain a key concern. contiflJed on page 2 Council Wavers on Undocumented Issue By Dani/o Alfaro Two months after voting to withhold city funds from social service agencies that aid undocumented immigrants, the Costa Mesa, Calif., City Council voted Oct. 2 to urge Con gress to include the undocumented in the 1990 census. The five-member board, which represents the Orange County city of 93,000, split 3-2 on the issue. In 1980, according to the census, the city was 1 0% Latino. The percentage is believed to have increased since then and to include many residents who lack papers. "Costa Mesa has been bold in its tendency to deny services to the undocumented com munity," said Native L6pez, director of Santa Ana, Calif. -based Hermandad Mexicana Nacional. "But they still want to receive fed eral money that is allocated based on the number of residents." Neither the mayor --who supported both measures-nor city council members would return Weekly Report's calls. The resolution came after a Sept. 29 U.S. Senate vote barring undocumented immi grants from the census. The House of Repre sentatives has since rejected a similar pro posal. The issue is currently in a HouseSenate conference committee. Last month the council voted to make compliance voluntary with its August ordi nance. Latina to Succeed Koop President Bush nominated Oct. 17 Puerto Rico-born Dr. Antonia Novello, deputy di rector of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, to suc ceed Dr. C. Everett Koop as U.S. Surgeon General. Pending Senate confinnation, Novello, 45, would be the first Hispanic and the first woman to hold the 1 n . p H 1 1 118-year -old position. ..... . . . ...... ..... . ..... ...... A graduate of the .. University of Puerto Rico Medical School, NOVELLO Novello, a pediatri-dan, hac:; held her CLr rent job since 1986. Her anti-abortion stance is said to have been key in gaining Bush's support. The Surgeon General is the principal adviser to the nation on health matters.

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Sweeping Chicago School Plan Succeeds With Voters By Danilo Alfaro Described ac; the nation's worst, Chicago's ailing public schools received a shot in the arm Oct. 11 and 12 as more than 313,000 voters turned out to elect neighborhood councils to run the city's 540 schools. Six parents, two teachers and two com munity residents were elected to serve with the principal for each school. Each group will be headed by a parent and have the au thority to approve budgets, recommend books and curiculum, and hire and fire prin cipals. "It's a fantastic accomplishment for His panics in this city," said Dan Solfs, executive director of the United Neighborhood Or ganization, which lobbied for the reform plan. Although the percentage of seats won by Hispanics was not immediately available, Solfs estimated that it was in excess of the 25% Hispanic student population. Alumni Establish Links to Communities continued from page 1 "When I look around the campus, I see the administration. With matching funds, corpo same things happening today that were rate contributions, endowments and dona happening when I attended Stanford 15 years tions, he says MAAA will offer between 210 ago," says Tamayo. "Back then I left without and 225 scholarships this year. The univer, having one Anglo friend. That's sad. Today, sity matches the group's funds two to one. students are still racially isolated." University officials recognize that Hispanic At Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, alumni associations offer them business as Francisco Alcocer, who helped establish Los well as cultural benefits. "By supporting the Hacheros, the Hispanic alumni association Hispanic alumni association, ... we are damthere, finds the Hispanic identity issue tickonstrating we admire and respect their cul lish. Many Latinos feel they have been acture," explains University of Colorado Chan cepted by society and cellar James Corbridge. "The association is don't want to risk losing also the strongest link we have with incoming that, he suggests. Hispanic students nationwide." Raymond Palacios, Even though the newer alumni groups may president of the Univernot be receiving matching funds, universities sity of Houston's Mexican assist them in other ways. "At Princeton American Alumni Associathey've been very responsive by giving us tion, adds, 'We constantly support in-kind," explains Nellie Gorbea-Dfaz, tell students, 'You do not secretary of the executive committee of the have to be mainstreamed Latino Alumni Association of Princeton. The to succeed. You can re-university's support includes such services tain your sense of heriPALACIOS as sponsoring Hispanic campus events, tage and tradition.' " Retain heritage assisting with the group's four -page newsletBut the cultural link addinite distinction, ter and covering mass-mailing costs. explains Alcocer. "There are many students 'BOSTON LIKE A FOREIGN COUNTRY' here who appreciate their difference in cuiFor Latino students on the East Coast, ture and language and the ambiance that Hispanic alumni groups are also the best comes from that." source for moral support. Quintana, who VIctor Quintana, executive director of the came to MIT from the Southwest, says, "For Latin American Massachusetts Institute of me, coming to Boston was like moving to a Technology Alumni, or LAMITA, in Boston, foreign country." says he and other Latinos pooled their re-Aztlan East is another welcome option for sources and formed LAMITA "to make a East Coast Latinos. This alumni group is positive, collective contribution to our com-made up of Hispanic students from Ivy League munity. "For us the movie Stand and Deliver and other East Coast schools. Its member was very inspirational. It emphasized how ship is open to alumni, faculty and adminis one can utilize math tools to give students trators, as well as to non-Latinos. skills they can use later in life." In her fall newsletter to Berkeley alumni, Finding funds and tracking graduates are Pegueros emphasizes the bottom line for two of the largest obstacles for young HisHispanic alumni group members: 'With 21.8% panic alumni groups. But to Raul Vargas, c1 this year's incoming freshmen being Latino, who heads USC's Mexican American Alumni Association, these are welcome challenges. I want the alumni to understand there are Founded in 1972 by eight Latinos, MAAA has many cortacts Clld resources avalable through 700 members and a full-time staff. It has our association. We have this huge potential granted more than $2 million in scholarships of Latino talent coming out today." to 1 ,900 Hispanic students. She challenges members of her group by Vargas sees.,an alumni group's success telling them, " ... our club must become more depending on networking, raising funds and like a business ... not about making money, maintaining strong ties with the university but about our community and ourselves." 2 Oct 23, 1989 . There were 17,256 candidates for the 5,400 positions. People aged 18 or older, includ ing non-citizens, were eligible to vote and run for office. Solfs estimated Latino turnout at between 35-40% of those eligible, compared with 2025% for non-Hispanics. Solfs said campaigns spearheaded by UNO in Spanish-language media urging Lati nos to vote and to volunteer as candidates were especially effective. South and Midwest Top Nation's Voter Activity Eligible Hispanic voters in the Midwest and South were more likely to register and cast ballots in the presidential election of last November than their peers in other sections of the country, according to a report released Oct. 18 by the U.S. Census Bureau. Midwest Latinas had the highest registra tion rate, 64%. At 53%, Hispanas there also had the largest voter turnout. Southern Hispanic males led their counter parts in registration and voting. Sixty percent were registered, and 48% voted. LATINO VOTERS November 1988 (in millions) Registered Voted Total Male 56% 2,143 46% 1,753 Female 57 2,431 46 1 ,958 Midwest Male 59% 164 46% 128 Female 64 216 53 178 Northeast Male 48% 320 42<>A> 279 Female 53 473 47 415 South Male 60% 822 48% 659 Female 62 910 48 701 West Male 55% 836 45% 687 Female 54 831 43 664 Teachers Disclose Vote The United Teachers Los Angeles' Chicano,/Latino Education Comnittee announced Oct. 17 that its referendum in support of bilingual education was approved by the union's members, 5,561-3,952. The action was in response to the UTL..A board of direc tors' move not to reveal the results until arbitration on an earlier referendum opposing bilingual education bonuses is completed. Mark Meza-Overstreet, chairperson of the Chicano committee, said, ''The members of the board are not responding to the Latino community's needs." Katherine Carey, a UTL..A spokeswoman, responded that the union's attorney advised the board to withhold the results. The earlier referendum goes to arbitration the first week cJ November. The arbttrator then hac; 00 days. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Juan Gonzalez New York's Rivera Joins New Breed of Labor Leaders Outside Mount Sinai Hospital on New York's Upper East Side this month, members of the Hospital and Health Care Workers' Local1199 were busy popping champagne bottles. "We love you, Dennis, we love you," shouted three female workers as their 39-year -old president emerged from the building following a lunch time rally of 500 members in the cafeteria. He carried a single long-stemmed rose someone had given him. It was Wednesday and Dennis Rivera had slept only two hours since Sunday night, but his members' smiles told him all the frenzied months of planning and organizing had paid off. The slender, soft-spoken leader did what & many say is impossible nowadays. Rivera took a badly splintered union of 100,000 members and made it strong again. He led a brilliantly conceived contract fight against GONZALEZ the most powerful health institutions in New York City and won a big wage hike -all without a protracted strike. With the victory, this native of Aibonito, Puerto Rico, who still speaks English with an accent after 12 years in New York, confirmed his standing as one of the nation's most powerful labor leaders. NEW GENERATION OF URBAN LABOR CHIEFS Following decades when "Latino union leader" and the United Farm Workers' Cesar Chavez were synonymous and lonely, voices of a new generation of urban Hispanic labor chiefs are being heard and recognized. They range from Cuban American Jack Otero, president of of the Labor Council on Latin American Advancement in Washington, D.C., to Marfa Elena Durazo, the Chicana daughter of immigrant farm workers who was installed in May, at age 36, as president of Los Angeles' 14,000-member Hotel and Restaurant Employees Local 11. For New York's Rivera, this was the sweetest in a year of victories. All around us are skeletons of strikes broken by bosses who wel come walkouts like hunters at the start of deer season. The tugboat workers. Eastern Air Lines. Now the telephone workers are into their second month of the kind of marathon strike that giant companies find easier to withstand than unions. Rivera remembers a disastrous 47-day strike that nearly decimated his union. In setting his strategy, he searched for a battle plan, one that union-busting lawyers from Harvard and Yale hadn't studied. "We met every goal we set for ourselves at the beginning," Rivera said after the rally. His eyes were glazed. His body was drained after round-the-clock talks, but the adrenalin kept flowing as he described the plan. Sin pelos en Ia lengua GOOD NEWS FROM FAR-OUT PLACES: Not all Hispanics live in New York, South Florida or the Southwest. And sometimes what's going on elsewhere is downright cheery: STUDENT POWER: In Idaho's rural Marsing High School (student pop. 129), a group of adult fans thought it was funny to shout "Stupid Mexican!" whenever a Chicano player missed a tackle or dropped a pass. The tension grew until last month the 1 0 Latinos on the 21member squad boycotted practice in protest. Then linebacker Ernesto Villareal, 16, went before the school board to air his frustration, and the student council in the 25% Hispanic school voted to crack down on the racist language. At Marsing's homecoming game this month, students read a statement blasting "bigots" and "big idiots" over the loudspeaker and handed out printed statements to the crowd of 600. First, he consolidated his members. Years of internal fights had weakened a once-proud union. A 90% vote for his slate in union elections last spring proved he'd accomplished that. Second, he threw the union's resources into major political campaigns, increasing the activism of its members and at the same time winning the support of major leaders. In 1988 with the Jesse Jackson presidential campaign, then this year with David Dinkins' fight in the mayoral pri mary, his union became the cog in organized labor's election efforts. When Jackson and Dinkins won the city, Local 1199 members started thinking like winners. Jackson and Dinkins reciprocated by ral lying behind the union's membership when the contract with the League of Voluntary Hospitals expired July 1. Third, he worked to win public sympathy by holding dozens of community hearRIVERA ings on the city's health care crisis, by successfully mobilizing the union to oppose state cuts in Medicaid funding and by convincing most of the city's press corps that his members deserved a good raise. A series of marches in different boroughs and several short strikes kept the issue of the contract in the public's mind without risking a full-blown walkout. HOSPITALS FELL IN LINE, ONE BY ONE Fourth, he turned management's dMde-and-conquer tactics around on the hospital heads by seeking individual contracts with those hospitals the union believed sympathized most with the union's low paid members. "The settlement with the Catholic Hospitals was very important because it established a model contract and because of Cardinal O'Connor's moral authority," Rivera said. After the Catholic hospitals, the union turned to those in the league whose directors were black or Hispanic. One by one, Interfaith in Brooklyn, North General in Harlem and Bronx Lebanon broke ranks with the bigger institutions. Then, when Columbia-Presbyterian, one of the city's biggest, broke ranks, it sparked a stampede of settle ments. At the lunchtime victory rally, even doctors and non-union workers smiled as Rivera talked not only about the contract but the future. He said every American has the right to decent, affordable health care, that his union is ready for that fight, too. Late in the afternoon, rose still in his hand, Dennis Rivera decided to get some rest. (Juan Gonzalez is a columnist with The New York Daily News.) People cheered their action, the redneck shouting ceased, and Marsing defeated rival Notus, 50-6. WILL POWER: Kansas Gov. Mike Hayden, who's leading a Drug-Free Kansas campaign, addressed the Hispanic Heritage Week Fiesta '89 luncheon, followed by a black-tie ball that night. The events were co-sponsored by the Kansas Advisory Commit tee on Hispanic Affairs. Noted KACHA Director Celso Ramirez, all events were alcohol-free in support of the guv's initiative. WORD POWER: When Clark Atlanta University radio station WCLK dropped its Latino jazz and salsa program this summer, musician Hassan Ortiz tried and failed to register a personal complaint with the station manager. So he followed with a letter to Thomas Cole, the university's president. Cole responded by setting up a community advisory board for the station and approving a cable program, Paginas Latinas that will start next month. Its host? Hassan Ortiz. ' --Kay Barbaro Hispanic Link Weekly Report Oct. 23, 1989 3

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The following are contacts for a partial list of Hispanic alumni organi zations and some of their activities. Arizona State University, Los Diablos, ASU Alumni Association, 215 E. Seventh St., Tempe, Ariz. 85287. Contact: Frank Hidalgo, Asst. V.P. of Univ. Relations, (602) 965-8889. Goals: satellite chapters, de veloping a leadership institute, mentoring and internship programs. Offers scholarships. Aztlan East Inc., P.O. Box 729, Kendall Square, Cambridge, Mass. 02142. Contact: Mario Murillo, Executive Director, (617) 924-1893. Goals: Developing a Hispanic alumni organization with individuals from Ivy League and other East Coast schools. Did a selective survey of East Coast schools for the 1987-88 academic year on recruitment, financial aid, curriculum and support systems for Latino students and faculty . . California State University, Bakersfield, Hispanic Alumni Chapter, 5904 Sunland St., Bakersfield, Calif. 93304. Contact: Nora Marfn, Co founder, (805) 397-5505. Goals: Working with Hispanic secondary school students to promote college attendance. Offers scholarships. Latin American Massachusetts Institute of Technology Alumni (LAMITA), c/o MIT Alumni Association, Attn: Nancy Barber, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Bldg. 10-140, Cambridge, Mass. 02139. Con tact: Vfctor Quintana, Executive Director, (617) 577-3851. Goals: Assist in recruiting students to MIT, building alumni membership. Latino Alumni Association of Princeton (LAAP), 15 W. 43rd St., Box61, NewYork, N.Y. 10036. Contact: NellieGorbea-Dfaz, Executive Committee (609) 292-1343. Goals: Assist in recruiting Latino students to Princeton. Northern Arizona University, Los Hacheros Hispanic Alumni, P.O. Box 6034, Flagstaff, Ariz., 86011. Contact: Francisco Alcocer, Coor dinator of Special Projects, (602) 523-9103. Goals: Opening affiliate chapters in Yuma, Tucson and Northern Arizona, fund-raising. Offers scholarships. Stanford University Chicano Alumni Club of Northern California, 304 Kaines Ave., San Bruno, Calif. 94066. Contact: Miguel Martfnez, President, (415) 589-5998. Sponsors a Stanford student in a public service position. Holds conference each May. Texas A&l University, Hispanic Alumni Association, 118 S. Eighth St., Kingsville, Texas 78363. Contact: Horacio Castillo, Chairman, (512) 592-67 44. Goals: Working to expand higher educational oppor tunities for Hispanics in South Texas. University of California, Berkeley, Chicano/Latino Alumni Club, P.O. Box 187, Berkeley, Calif. 94704. Contact: Vanessa Pegueros, President, (415) 823-4248. Goals: Continue developing support for Chicano alumni and students, provide mentorship opportunities . University of California, Los Angeles, Council of Support Organi zations, West Alumni Center, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, Calif. 90024. Contact: Ramona Garza, Alumni Association Representative, (213) 206-5058. University of Colorado, Boulder, Hispanic Alumni Association, Koenig Alumni Center, Boulder, Colo. 80309-0459. Contact: Rocky Garcfa, Assistant Director of Minority Alumni Relations, (303) 492-6563. Goals: Establishing a mentorship program, fund-raising for Hispanic student scholarships, networking state and nationwide. Offers scholar ships. University of Houston, Mexican American Alumni Association, P. 0. Box231033, Houston, Texas77223-1033. Contact: Tatcho Mendiola, Professor in Mexican American Studies Program, (713) 749-7386. Goals: Establishing a mentorship program, continuing work with Hispanic high school and college students. Offers scholarships. University of Michigan Hispanic Alumni Council (UMHAC), Of fice of Undergraduate Admissions, 1220 S.A.B., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Contact: Eduardo Torres, (313) 747-1462. Goals: Developing Hispanic scholarship opportunities and Latino leadership potential. University of Southern California, Mexican American Alumni Asso ciation (MAAA), Office for Mexican American Programs, Parkview Bldg., Room 203, Los Angeles, Calif. 90089-1228. Contact: Raul Vargas, Executive Director, (213) 743-2456. Goals: To continue providing scholarship opportunities for USC Hispanic undergraduates and expand scholarship program to include professional and graduate schools. Calendar SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET Los Angeles Oct. 27 Juan Andrade (312) 427-8683 HOMECOMING THIS WEEK UNITY BREAKFAST Los Angeles Oct. 26 The Institute for Social Justice's lmpacto-2000, an initiative to increase ties between Mexican Ameri cans and Mexico, will have a breakfast with repre sentatives from both sides. Armando Navarro (714) 888-0207 BILINGUAL ED CONFERENCE Austin, Texas Oct. 26-28 The Texas Association for Bilingual Education is holding its 18th annual conference. Frank Campos (512) 385-3750 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Providence, R.I. Oct. 27 The Hispanic Social Services Association of Rhode Island will host its fifth annual conference on His panic concerns. Samuel Betances, professor of sociology at Northeastern Illinois University, will deliver the keynote speech. Marta Martinez (401) 951-4470 4 The Mexican American Grocers Association is holding its 1989 scholarship banquet. Gloria Alvarez (213) 227-1565 SALUTE TO EDUCATORS Rockville, Md. Oct. 27 The Maryland tri-county chapter of the National Conference of Puerto Rican Women is hosting a salute to Hispanic educators. Dora Diaz Strope (301) 381-4929 ALUMNI REUNION Ann Arbor, Mich. Oct. 27, 28 The Hispanic Alumni Council of the Alumni Asso ciation of the University of Michigan is holding its second annual reunion. Eduardo Torres (313) 764-0384 LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE Chicago Oct. 27-29 The Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Educa tion Project is . sponsoring its annual Hispanic Lead ership Conference. Exhibits, workshops and as semblies, with distinguished national leaders, are included. Oct. 23, 1989 Los Angeles Oct. 28 The University of Southern California's Mexican American Alumni Association will sponsor a mariachi band and a ballet folklorico group. Glenn Rodriguez (213) 743-2456 BANQUET Boston Oct. 28 The Latino Democratic Committee is holding its annual banquet. Democratic National Committee Chairman Ronald Brown will be the guest speaker. Felix Arroyo (617) 787-2354 MANA CONFERENCE Santa Ana, Calif. Oct 28 The Orange County, Calif., chapter of the Mexican American Women's National Association is holding its secon(j annual conference. Lisa Penaloza (714) 647-7581 DINNER/DANCE New York Oct. 28 The Center for Migration Studies is holding its silver anniversary gala dinner/dance. Matilda Raffa Cuomo (718) 351-8800 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE HELP! #0443 111_1age Inc. needs your contribution to prov1de support to Hispanic Ameri-cans in the areas of Education, Employment and Civil Rights. , NATIONAL :it ... MCNl.Xtl 810 First Street NE Third Floor Washington, D.C. 20002 WeAre • The Largest Pan Hispanic Organization. • A source of scholarships, technical assistance, train ing and leadership. • Open to all persons who support equality of opportunity in education, employ ment and civil rights for Hispanic Americans. Please designate #0443, National Image Inc. for your gift to the Combined Federal Cam-. pa1gn. National Hispanic Organization seeks Resource Development Coordinator. Responsible for coordinating fundraising activities, grant writing and management. Strong writing and editing skills. Computer literacy. Salary $25k-$33k depending on experience. Send resume to: .. Susan Herrera, VP of Administration, National Council of La Raza, 810 First St. NE, Suite 300, Washington, D.C. 20002. EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics in Philanthropy DUTIES: Organize educational and organizational programs, develop and facilitate grantseeker training programs, identify and obtain necessary funding, oversee publication of periodic reports and HIP's quarterly newsletter. QUALIFICATIONS: Administrative and fund raising experience in nonprofit corporation. Strong interpersonal and communications skills. Extensive working knowledge of Latino community issues in the U.S. Excellent report and proposal writing skills. Demonstrated ability to work cooperatively in a professional capacity with boards of directors, funding sources, and other, diverse individuals and organi zations. EMPLOYMENT: Compensation includes a starting salary com mensurate with experience, and standard fringe benefits. The starting salary may be adjusted following a six-month performance review, and following annual reviews thereafter. The appointment is full-time at HIP's office in San Francisco. Extensive travel is required. APPLICATION: Letters of application should be sent with resumes to: Chair, Executive Director Search Committee, Hispanics in Philan thropy, 116 New Montgomery St., Suite 742, San Francisco, Calif. 94105-3607. Please submit names, addresses and telephone num bers of at least three professional references, and a brief salary history. Applications will be closed on October 31, 1989. CLASSIFIEDS NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY EDUCATIONAL SERVICES AND PROGRAMS I 1) CHANGE Counselor. Requires: Master's degree and professional commitment to the special educational needs of minority students. Bilingual/bicultural (Spanish/ English), with effective communication skills. Preferred: Experience in counseling within a diverse population of minority/academically underprepared students. Deadline: November 24, 1989. 2) CHANGE Counselors (3 positions available). Re quires: Master's degree in related area (i.e., counseling or student personnel), verifiable counseling experience at youth, high school or college level. Experience in coun seling within a diverse population of minority/academi cally underprepared students. Effective communication skills needed. Deadline: November 24, 1989. For all positions, anticipated starting date: January 8, 1990. To apply, send resume, letter of application, and three recent letters of reference to: Ms. Carmen N. Col6n Associate Director of CHANGE Educational Services and Programs NIU DeKalb, Ill. 60115. Northern Illinois University is strongly committed to the principles of Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action, Title IX, Section 504. RADIO REPORTER KERA-Dallas Serious committed radio news operation seeks experi enced reporter. Will produce news and feature reports for daily news program, must generate story ideas, research, interviews, and use standard broadcast equipment to produce reports. Minimum 2 years broadcast news expe rience required. Must have strong writing, interviewing, and journalistic skills plus mature, credible announcing style. Degree preferred. Send letter, resume, non return able tape and salary expectations to: James Horn, Per sonnel Director, KERA, 3000 Harry Hines Blvd., Dallas, Texas 75201 (214) 871-1390. EEO Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Oct23, 1989

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Arts & Entertainment Both Valenzuela and Fernandez are members of the Latino Theatre Lab at the Los Angeles Theatre Center . . ON THE STAGE: An evening of one-act plays at Los Angeles' Plaza de Ia Raza this week marks the culmination of the cultural center's first play competition, L.A. Chicano TheatreWorks. Fernandez and Valenzuela-along with actors Robert Beltran, E.J. Castillo and Lupe Ontiveros and playwrights Eduardo Machado and Milcha Sanchez Scott--were recently named artistic associates at LA TC. They will be involved in "informal quarterly meetings to share ideas and engage in creative dialogue" and be invited to opening night performances at the four -theater complex. The winning plays-being performed Oct. 27 at Plaza's Margo Albert Theatre-are Evelina Fernandez's How Else Am I Supposed To Know I'm Still Alive? and Richard Gutierrez's At Least She's Still a Virgin. The two plays were chosen from among 60 scripts submitted this year by Chicano writers throughout California. Six of the plays were given public readings before the final selection was made. Two other finalists --December, by Nancy de los Santos, and The Taco of Death, by Bob Herrera -will be developed in a two-week workshop at Plaza de Ia Raza that begins Nov. 4. In other theater news, thisyear'sLatino Play Discovery Series at San Diego's Old Globe Theater comes to a close with performances Oct. 27-29 of Mercedes Rein and Jorge Curi's Death and the Blacksmith ... And Hugo Medrano, producing director of Gala Hispanic Theatre in Washington, D.C., is cast production of Richard Nelson's Prin cipia Scriptoriae at that city's Studio Theatre .... Theatre Works raised some community complaints over the fact that non-Chicano Hispanic writers in California were banned from submit ting entries and that one of the winners, Fernandez, is married to one of the competttion's three judges, theater director Jose Luis Valenzuela. ONE LINER: Art of the Americas, an exhibition. . of paintings and sculptures by Latino artists from the United States, Mexico, Cuba, Colombia, Chile and Peru, continues at Gump's Gallery in San Francisco through Oct. 28 ... --Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report ASNE URGES DISCLOSURE: By a 20-0 vote, the board of directors of the American Society of Newspaper Editors decided Oct. 12 to publish the names of consenting news papers when it conducts its next survey of minorities in the nation's daily newsrooms. The identification will be accomplished through a box that can be checked on the survey form indicating that the respondent paper wishes to divulge its identity. While participants will not be obligated to disclose their names, not to do so "will imply that they have something to hide," ASNE Minorities Committee Chairman Mervin Aubespin told Weekly Report. ASNE has conducted the survey since 1982. In recent years organizations such as the National Association of Hispanic Journal ists and the National Association of Black Journalists have pressured ASNE to dis close the names of the participating newspaHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 •N• Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED$: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. pers. NAHJ conducted its own survey of the nation's 30 largest newspapers earlier this year, publicizing the records of the 23 papers that responded. "I was surprised that the ASNE vote was unanimous," said Aubespin, editor of the Courier Journal in Louisville, Ky. "I hope this can create a less adversarial relationship between ASNE and the leadership of minority organizations." Evelyn Hernandez, president of NAHJ and a New York Newsday reporter, told Weekly Report she was "delighted" with the decision. "It's hypocritical that in a business where we demand similar information from other indus tries, the news media shouldn't be held to the same standard. But it's fair to say that until we have minorities holding positions that qualify them for membership in ASNE and its board of directors, we still have a problem and the adversarial element will remain." Aubespin said that even though the disclo sure will be optional, he felt that a "considerable" number of newspapers would agree to be named. He cited the board's unanimous vote, the fact that board members are required to make public minority hiring informa tion at their newspapers, and the fact that some newspapers have already indicated that their records are open. BUYING AND SELLING: Los Angeles radio station KRTH-AM will switch from oldies rock to Spanish-language music as the result of its purchase by Santa Ana, Calif.-based Uberman Broadcasting In. Announced Oct. 4, the deal brings to the number of Spanish-language radio stations in the area. Chicago Spanish-language daily newspa per Diarlo El Manana has been acquired by Midwest Spanish Publications. Gorki Tellez, the newspaper's present owner, will be a co owner of the new company and continue as its publisher and director general. Attorney and Chicago SunTimes columnist George Munoz is an investor. Danilo Alfaro . . . . . -... It says, "Se habla Nahuatl only."