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Hispanic link weekly report, October 31, 1989

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 31, 1989
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News This Week
Physicist Franklin Chang-Dfaz, 39, and four other astronauts touch down Oct. 24 at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of California after a six-day flight of the space shuttle Atlantis. It was Chang-Dfaz’s second shuttle mission...U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos names Thomas Topuzes, CEO of the First International Bank of Chula Vista, Calif., to the National Assessment Governing Board, the body that oversees the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is the first Hispanic to serve on the board..Adolph Coors Co. Chairman William Coors announces that former Univision and United Press International President Luis Nogales, 45, has been elected to the company’s board of directors. He is the first Latino to sit on the nine-member board... Jimmy Gurulb,38, a law
professor at Notre Dame Law School, takes over as president of the Hispanic National Bar Association at the group’s national convention in Washington, D.C. The group honored Sacramento, Calif., attorney Mario Obledo, past president of the League of United Latin American Citizens, with its Lifetime Achievement Award...Miami police buy 700 gas masks and make plans to deploy two armored trucks, if necessary, in preparation for the verdict in the trial of police officer William Lozano. Lozano is accused of fatally shooting a 23-year-old black man, Clement Lloyd. The killing touched off race riots in January...Justice Helen Freedman of the State Supreme Court in Manhattan, New York, rules that the City Hospital Center at Elmhurst can remove the one-month-old son of Luis and Carlotta Alvarado from life-support equipment. Doctors have declared the infant brain-dead. His parents plan to appeal...

Educators Fault School ‘Choice’
By Rhonda Smith
While parental choice is being touted as the centerpiece of the Bush administration’s educational reform initiative, many Latino officials say de facto segregation and a two-tier school system will be its end result.
Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos made the second stop in Minnesota Oct. 23-24 of a scheduled five-city, cross-country junket to rally support for the choice program. At his first stop, in New York, he ran head-on into parents irate over educational funding in the
Poverty Rate Drops
By Danilo Alfaro
The number of Hispanic families living in poverty dropped from 1.19 million in 1987 to
Census Hits New Hurdle
By Danilo Alfaro
The results of a planned census survey, to develop a formula to measure an undercount of minorities in 1990 and mandated by a July court settlement, may not be ready in time for redrawing state and federal election districts, a congressional researcher said Oct. 17.
Census officials admit that the 1980tally missed upto 6% of Hispanics. Some Hispanic organizations say there may have been an undercount as high as 10%.
As a result of a 1988 lawsuit, the bureau agreed to conduct a separate survey of 150,000 homes following the full census in April 1990. The results of the more intensive second survey, in August 1990, would then be reviewed by U.S. Commerce Secretary Robert Mosbacher to determine whether to adjust the final count.
But Daniel Melnick, a researcher with the Congressional Research Service, told a House subcommittee that by April 1991, when initial figures are released to states for reapportionment, the bureau may not have completed the surveys that would estimate the percentage of undercount.
East Harlem school district.
Educational choice gives parents the option to choose where their children will attend school. If a particular school is not meeting student needs, theoretically parents may move the child to another school. Choice is based on the premise that “market demands” will force the ailing school to improve or close. Opponents say choice favors the fittest.
Jack Klenk, director of the Secretary’s Choice Initiative, says, “Choice gives everyone access to better schools. With choice, we’re not
continued on page 2
Slightly from ’87-’88
1.16 million in 1988, concluded a report released Oct. 18 by the U.S. Census Bureau. Census officials called the change statistically insignificant.
Twenty-four percent of Hispanic families lived below the government poverty level in 1988, down two percentage points from 1987, stated the report, “Money Income and Poverty Status inthe United States: 1988.” About 5.4 million, or 27% of all Latinos, were poor in 1988, representing no change from 1987.
“We need to awaken the government and the private and corporate sectors as to the gravity of the poverty problem,” said Louis Nunez, president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition in Washington, D.C.
Annual per capita income for Hispanics in 1988 was $7,960, down $10 from 1987. Per capita income among whites rose $210 to $13,900 and among blacks it rose $310 to $8,270.
“One quarrel we have with the Census Bureau is that they lump all Hispanics together,” said Nunez. “The poverty rate for Puerto Ricans is about 39%. Butthesefigures are lost among the Hispanic figures.”
Reflecting the relative youth of the U.S. Hispanic population, the report found that 49% of poor Latinos in 1988 were 18 or younger.
The report noted that 90% of poor Latinos lived in metropolitan areas, compared with 78% of poor blacks and 70% of poor whites.
Jury Convicts Garcia and Wife of Extortion
By Felix P6rez
Robert Garcfa, who successfully took on New York City’s Democratic machine in 1978 to wrest control of the 18th Congressional District seat, saw his political career and personal freedom put in serious jeopardy Oct. 20 when a federal jury in Manhattan convicted him on two counts of extortion and one of conspiracy.
Found guilty on the same charges wash's wife, Jane.
The convictions arose from dealings with defunct military contractor Wedtech.
A U.S. District Court in Manhattan set sentencing for Rep. Garcfa, 56, and his wife, 48, for Jan. 5. They each face upto 45 years in prison and fines of $750,000.
The Garcias plan to appeal.
They were convicted of extorting some $170,000 in payoffs from Wedtech in return for help securing federal contracts.
U.S. Rep. Kika de la Garza (D-Texas), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said, “I’m saddened by the conviction not only of Garcfa, but his wife...Any illegal activity is not within the character of the Bobby Garcfa we know.”
Angelo Falcbn, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York, praised Garcfa’s work on census matters and immigration and his leadership of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus from 1978to 1982. But, Falcbn added, “...there have always been questions” about Garcfa’s effectiveness as a congressman.
Garcfe had not decided whether to resign at press time. New York state Assembly-man Jos6 Serrano is currently favored for the post, if vacated.


Dropout Report Concludes Needs Differ by Subgroup
By Danilo Alfaro
Programs aimed at staunching the Latino high school dropout rate may be ineffective or counterproductive if they treat Hispanic subgroups as a homogeneous class, according to a study released Oct. 23.
Age, grades, absenteeism and the number of parents at home also affect the dropout rate, the report found.
The study resulted from surveys in September 1986 of 706 Hispanic ninth-graders in Chicago, Miami, Milwaukee, Newark, N. j., and San Antonio by the Washington, D.C.-
based Aspira Institute for Policy Research.
"The responses of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Cuban American and Central American students showtheir perspectives differ,” said study director Ricardo Ferndndez, assistant vice chancellor atthe University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
He added that characteristics such as parents' educational attainment and expectations for a child’s education are linked to the tendency to drop out, and that these characteristics differ among the subgroups.
Foiiow-up interviews in September 1987
found 8% of the students had dropped out. Another 15% could not be located.
Among the study’s findings, Puerto Rican and Cuban American students discuss theirfuture plans with parents once or twice a week, while Mexican American and Central American students do so less than once a month.
More than 60% of respondents had no clear educational role model at home, because their parents did not graduate from high school or the students did not know whether their parents graduated.
Critics Say ‘Choice’ Offers Little Choice
Congress OKs Census Tally of Undocumented
By Adrienne R&bago
A U.S. House and Senate conference committee agreed Oct. 19 to use undocumented immigrants counted in the 1990 census for congressional redistricting.
Eight days prior the House rejected an attempt to exclude undocumented immigrants. The Senate voted Sept. 29 to bar the Census from counting undocumented immigrants.
"I am extremely pleased with the decision that Congress made,” said Arturo Vargas, census outreach coordinator for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. "Now we can go about the work of making sure everyone is counted.”
The move to bar undocumented immigrants was initiated by Northern states that stand to lose congressional seats. The U.S. Immigration ancl Naturalization Service estimates there are 4.5 million undocumented immigrants in the United States.
continued from page 1
segregating people any longer by income or political influence.”
Counters Arturo Madrid, president of the Tom£s Rivera Center in California, "The principal manifestation of choice at this point is magnet schools. And I think the evidence today concludes that magnet schools reinforce inequities and stratification. The most affluent and aggressive get into magnet schools, and the rest are left out.”
Critics worry that the choice initiative is too loosely defined. "Educational choice sounds reasonable,” explains Jim Lyons, executive director of the National Association for Bilingual Education, "but it's such an elastic term. The administration has not given it great content or defined it.” Lyons also says choice will be effective only if the federal government provides funds to sponsor educational programs.
Klenk replies: "For better or worse, the reality is that the federal government’s involvement in funding education is very, very small. The realistic role forthe federal govern-
ment is never going to be as a major funder for this kind of innovation.” State and local funding now pays 94% of the nation’s public education bill.
Opponents of choice see access as another major problem. "For us, access is more than just how to get there. It includes knowing the schools are there and being able to learn about them. And all of that is complicated by language,” explains Josu6 Gonzdlez, vice chancellor for planning, development and research of the City Colleges of Chicago.
He predicts, "Choice is going to take hold in different degrees in different places.” Currently, Minnesota, Arkansas, Iowa and Nebraska are the four states calling for open-enrollment options. Administration officials are using the Minnesota plan as a model.
But Madrid says: "Although Minnesota has implemented open enrollment, the economy, demography and political climate there are unique. It’s not going to be easily replicated anywhere else.
"An example I use is that all the children in Lake Wobegon are above average. One would assume that all the schools in that imaginary community are also above average. What meaning does choice have if all the schools in your community are mediocre? Or, if above-average schools are not readily accessible to you geographically?” Gonzdlez says, "Understandably, a lot of people want to send their kids to schools close to home. We still have Hispanics going to Hispanic schools. If we could have excellent schools of choice close to Hispanic communities, that might help. But they tend not to be located there.”
Another choice component is that market forces or competition will force mediocre schoolsto improve. But, says Lyons, "While good educational programs have to exist, competition isn’t necessarily going to create them any more than it made housing affordable, cars safe, or fuel efficient.”
Madrid concludes: "The real issues for us are making sure that we have small student/ teacher ratios, safe physical plants, substantive curricula, and teachers who have very high expectations for their Latino students.”
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report
Florida Latinos,23%, Report Prejudice
By Adrienne Rctbago
Nearly one-fourth of Florida Hispanics feel there is "a lot of prejudice” against Latinos in their communities, concludes a Florida International University survey released Oct. 19.
"There is atremendous amount of friction because the Anglos feel that we are taking over,” said Osvaldo Dfaz, chairman of the Miami-based Spanish American League Against Discrimination. "We want a share of the political, social and economic pow-
99
ers.
More than half the Hispanics surveyed
said their standard of living was closer to that of whites than it was 10 years ago.
Dfaz pointed out that 10 years ago there were approximately 150,000 newly arrived Mariel refugees. "Of course, people are better off than they were ten years ago.. .The refugees did not have a penny.”
Hispanics, blacks and Anglos from South Florida were in basic agreement with their counterparts in the rest of the state in most responses. However, more Anglos from South Florida, 67%, reported that Hispanics’ standard of living was closer to theirs than did Anglos from outside the area, 45%.
Is the Hispanic standard of living closer to that of whites than 10 years ago?
Florida Hispanics 53% South Florida Hispanics 58%
Blacks 45 Blacks 51
Anglos 45 Anglos 67
Is there “a lot of prejudice” against Hispanics in your community?
Florida Hispanics 23% South Florida Hispanics 22%
Blacks 22 Blacks 19
Anglos 20 Anglos 19
Oct 30,1988


Jose Vargas
How to Reduce Street Workers
In Southern California we have a phenomenon called “the day worker.” Hundreds of Latino males stand on street corners offering to do hard work for minimum wages.
Merchants and citizens complain about their presence and actions, accusing them of urinating on the street, whistling at females and scaring the daylights out of motorists who stop nearby.
The police in some cities try to get rid of the workers by enforcing every law or ordinance written by man. True, the workers’ stomachs are not always law abiding. When hunger calls, they obey the survival instinct that has protected mankind for ages.
I found a probable solution to their dilemma when my wife told me that my big panza, my beautiful gut, was not sexy anymore.
That morning i drove to the drug store. Immediately after I pulled into the parking lot, four young men jumped into my truck.
A patrol officer arrived and shouted at them to get out. They dismounted quietly.
Then the officer told me that if I hired undocumented workers, I could be subject to fines and other horrendous penalties. (How he determined they were undocumented was probably an ability a Border Patrolman would envy.)
REVOLUTIONS COULD BE PREVENTED
I walked into the drugstore and found the latest diet remedy. Gordo-B-Gone or something similar, with an ingredient guaranteed to appease my hunger for tacos for 24 hours. I left, thinking sexy.
All of sudden it hit me! One daily Gordo-B-Gone capsule for the workers and they would forget about standing on the corners. The reason for their hunger pangs would be removed.
If the capsules worked locally, why not send truckloads to poor countries? With the feeling of having afull belly, impoverished peasants would not think about heading for the USA. Revolutions could be prevented. People would say "/as penas con pan son menos.”
“iTengo la solucidn!” I yelled. To me, it made sense.
“That is the most stupid, harebrained idea I’ve heard in a long time,” my mate said.
Maybe she was right. If you give the workers a hard time, will they go away? Has any leader who recommended such a solution been hungry enough, or has he heard the cries of his own starving children, to realize that a point comes when the laws of men don’t count?
“Their numbers scare the customers,” complain local leaders. “They whistle at the women.” “The local citizens resent their cocky attitude.” “Crime goes up whenever they gather.”
A CRY FOR TORTILLAS 2,000 MILES AWAY
Don’t these sound like the same complaints brought about by any group of young men standing for hours in open spaces with no sanitary facilities and plenty of energy? The same calls could be received about servicemen on leave or college students on Easter vacation.
For God’s sake, if Los Angeles was able to provide toilets and other services for one million visitors during the last Olympic Games, why can’t acommunity dothe same thing for people who are willing to trade their sweat and abilities for minimum wages, an admirable trait?
How ironic that two blocks away, small-time dope dealers were in business, knowing the police were busy with the workers, probably against their will, obeying orders that originated above the department.
Some people really believe that law enforcement at the local level can stop the cry for tortillas 2,000 miles away.
By the way, I took all my diet pills and gained two pounds; at last count, there were many more workers on the street.
(Jos6 Vargas is a police officer in Southern California.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la
FALLING: Bobby Garcia’s Oct. 20 conviction in the Wedtech scandal serves as a reminder that the line between good guys and bad guys in this political citadel is not only a fine one, but one that shifts like the Caribbean sands.
After the guilty verdict was announced, some supposed friends of the 56-year-old Bronx congressman were quick to distance themselves from him by reminding the inquisitive press of any frailties and flaws in his character that popped into their minds.
My memory of Congress’ only voting Puerto Rican member throughout the ’80s is of a man who fought for all Hispanics.
He devoted endless hoursto issues of Mexican Americans in the Southwest, immigration and census most prominent among them, i heard the comment more than once that his heart was more Chicano than the corazones of some of his Mexican American congressional colleagues.
On Hispanic issues, Garcfa always spoke sinpelosen la lengua. Whether talking among friends in the South Bronx, inspiring a group of visiting Latino students in the Capitol, or firing up a rally in the Midwest or Southwest, he preached unity with pulpit passion. He understood what makes political weight.
In so many ways Bobby Garcfa was a good guy, it will be hard to see him in any other light.
FALLEN: Last month the nation’s newspapers carried the obituary of Pepe San Rom£n. His suicide in Miami at age 58 wrote the epitaph to the Kennedy Administration’s hour of greatest frustration and shame, the Bay of Pigs.
It was San Romdn who at age 29 led the 1,500-member 2506 Brigade on the CIA-ordered invasion of Cuba in 1961. When the U.S. Air Force failed to provide promised support, the landing turned into a debacle.
San Rom^in spent 20 months in a Castro prison before being ransomed, with other brigade prisoners, by the White House for $50 million. In this country he served in the military, entered some business ventures, but never attained the promise he demonstrated in his youth - as an artist, an athlete, scholar and leader.
The Washington Post carried an extensive profile on San Rom&n Oct. 17, noting that among his effects when his body was found was a job r6sum6 listing his experience as Commander of the2506 Assault Brigade.
In the column “Reason for Leaving,” he had written, “Obvious.”
~Kay Barbaro
Quoting...
HENRY B. GONZALEZ, Texas congressman, in the October issue of Hispanic magazine, describing to writer Carlos Conde the bad old days in his home state:
"Things were so tough at one time that if a dog bit a Mexican, they’d kill the Mexican, send his head to Austin for analysis, and give the dog rabies shots.”
RICHARD ALATORRE, in the Oct. 22 Los Angeles Times Magazine, explaining why he left the California legislature to seek (and win) a seat on the Los Angeles City Council:
“To tell you the truth, I got tired of telling people that as an assembly-man I didn’t work for GM. No one knows what an assemblyman does. ”
EDUARDO PENA, Washington attorney, describing Pablo Sedillo, executive director of the Hispanic Secretariat, U.S. Catholic Conference, at the American G.l. Forum’s annual roast in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19:
“He’s so slow, it takes him an hour and a half to watch 1Sixty Minutes.”'
VARGAS
Oct. 30,1989
3


COLLECTING
INCOME AND POVERTY: “Money Income and Poverty Status in the United States: 1988“ is a 181-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that takes a detailed look at poverty status according to race and ethnicity. For a copy (specify Series P-60, No. 166) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
VOTING AND REGISTRATION: “Voting and Registration in the Election of November 1988“ is an 89-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that offers a breakdown of voting and registration patterns by race, gender and ethnicity, including data on Hispanic subgroups. For a copy (specify Series P-20, No. 435) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.)
HISPANICS IN PITTSBURGH: “Pittsburgh Hispanic“ is a free bimonthly newsletter by the Hispanic Association for Community Interests on happenings and personalities in the Pittsburgh area. To recieve it write HACI, P.O. Box 81853, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15217.
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES: The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities recently released a triennial report that finds that while higher education institutions with 25% or more Hispanic enrollment represent 3.5% of U.S. colleges and universities, they enroll 45% of Hispanic college students. In addition, the report contains a section on the history of HACU and profiles of its member institutions. To receive one of a limited number of copies, contact HACU, 411 S.W. 24th St., San Antonio, Texas 78207 (512) 433-1501.
ENGLISH PLUS INFORMATION: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials compiled two packets on English Plus - “English Plus: Legislative Packet for School Board Members,” 28 pages, and “English Plus: Legislative Packet for Municipal/County Officials,” 31 pages - that offer information on the movement’s origin and evolution, as well as background material on the language restric-tionist movement. Each packet costs $5. They can be ordered from NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536.
HISPANIC DROPOUTS: “Five Cities Dropout Study: Characteristics of Hispanic High School Students” tracks 706 Latino ninth-graders over one year. The 170-page report is available for $20 from the Aspira Institutefor Policy Research, 111216th St. NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 835-3600.
AIDS VIDEO: “At Risk!” is 30-minute video based on a play written by Carlos Morton on AIDS prevention for Hispanic youth. The VHS video is available at no cost to non-profit organizations by writing El Paso Community College, Center for Instructional Telecommunications, P.O. Box 20500, El Paso, Texas 79998.
CONNECTING
$574,000 GIVEN FOR CHILDREN The Family Place, a non-profit family resource center in Washington, D.C., that serves a 95% Hispanic clientele, has been awarded a $574,125 grant by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation to promote positive development of low-income children through health, social, parental and educational services.
Among the new programs to be implemented are two eight-session courses, Caring for Children and Baby Sitter/Child Care-Giver Training, aimed at improving the well-being of mothers and children at risk because of poverty. In addition, the agency will expand its prenatal, counseling, job skills and nutritional services. Last year 536 families received services from the eight-year-old Family Place, all at no charge.
LIVENING MATH, AIDING FARM WORKERS The Ford Foundation has announced a five-year, $10 million undertaking to help middle schools devise more creative ways to teach math to students from economically and educationally disadvantaged communities.
The initiative, Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achievement and Reasoning, will select five schools to participate during the 1989-90school year. The project will be used in classrooms in the 1990-91 school year, expanding to 10 more schools in 1991-92.
A committee composed of labor leaders, business executives, educators, community advocacy leaders and others will advise the project coordinator, the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Serving on the board are Isaura Santiago-Santiago, president of Hostos Community College in New York, and Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of LaRaza...
The Pesticide Education Center of San Francisco will receive a $101,343 grant over two years from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation to establish an education and training program for farm workers about pesticides, it was announced.
The center will develop educational materials and establish a national network to disseminate information to farm worker communities...
OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Susan Engeleiter, the administrator for the U.S. Small Business Administration, announces that Frank Ramos has been appointed the agency’s associate deputy administrator for management and administration. Ramos, a Californian, will oversee the agency’s budget, accounting, personnel and equal employment opportunity program...The board of directors of the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities elects Raul Cdrdenas, president of South Mountain Community College in Phoenix, Ariz., as its chairman...The Hispanic Association for Higher Education of New Jersey honors Elsa G6mez, president of Kean College in Union, N.J...
ship skills and self-esteem of high school girls. Lisa Penaloza (714) 647-7581 RECEPTION Bethesda, Md. Nov. 5
The Committee in Support of the Office of the League of United Latin American Citizens' National Vice President, Northeast Region, is holding a reception to honor Jess Quintero, who holds that office. Entertainment will be provided by El Trio Los Amigos.
San Garza (301) 907-0128
DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION San Francisco Nov. 5-7
The American Council on Education will hold its second conference on increasing minority participation in all aspects of higher education. An information exchange will enable participants to share materials on campus programs designed to integrate campuses.
Martha Morse Rawlings (202) 939-9393
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Calendar_____________________
TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be included in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publication date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Address items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005.
THIS WEEK
POVERTY Boston Nov. 2,3
The National Puerto Rican Coalition is holding its annual conference, which will gather community leaders, policy-makers and researchers to examine the circumstances of Puerto Rican poverty. 4
Participants will also attempt to identify effective policy areas and devise an action plan to implement those policies.
Jos6 Cruz (202) 223-3915
LAWYERS* CONVENTION San Francisco Nov. 3-5
The California La Raza Lawyers Association is hosting its annual convention. It will include an alumni reunion, dance, panel presentations, judges’ breakfast and seminar on leadership development
Edith Adame (415) 552-3152 YOUTH LEADERSHIP Santa Ana, Calif. Nov. 4
The Orange County chapter of the Mexican American Women’s National Association is sponsoring the youth leadership conference “Mujer Latina: A History of Creativity and Contribution.” It is designed to build the communications and leader-Oct 30,1989


Christmas Gifts With That Special
Artist John August Swanson, born in Los Angeles, is an American artist in the tradition of the primitive or native style. His narratives, often multi-framed stories such as THE TREE PLANTING, reflect the strong heritage of storytelling received from his Swedish father and his Mexican mother. His works are exhibited in galleries throughout the United States and Europe (England-France-Germany-and the Vatican museums.)
Poster: THE TREE PLANTING is simple and straightforward. The theme of work and harvest makes it an especially appropriate piece with which to celebrate ANPPM’s 15 years of efforts to bring about the day when all persons may enjoy the just fruits of their lifelong labor.
THE TREE PLANTING is printed on first-quality stock, size 27" by 21", $25.00 for an unsigned reproduction, $30 for a signed reproduction. Tax-deductible.
Christmas Cards: THE TRIPTYCH. Three-fold card with three vertical images: The Epiphany, The Shepherds, The Nativity, reproducing original serigraphs by artist John August Swanson. In color on heavy white stock. 4" x 111/8" folded. No message.
Cards with envelopes in packages of 10 for $15.00. California residents please add 6.5% tax.
PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE:
Asociacidn Nacional Pro Personas Mayores National Association for Hispanic Elderly 2727 West Sixth St., Suite 270 Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213) 487-1922
IMPORTED MEXICAN GIFTS
Mexican Flag T-Shirt (Puff) 100% Heavy Cotton
U.S.A. Black only $14.99 PPD S,M,L,XL.
Children’s Wood Chair-Straw Seat, Hand Painted
9" High Seat, with a 19" Back. Colors-Blue, Red, Orange, Pink $16.99 PPD.
Religious Wood Plaques-10“x12" Guadalupe with flag, SH Jesus, Last Supper, Footprints-Las Huelas $14.99 PPD.
Guatemala Worry Dolls-Box of 6 $2.00, Earrings Pierced $3.00, Pin $3.50, Beret 4.99, PPD.
Check or money order to:
A.D. Velasco E-14 Olvera Street Los Angeles Calif. 90012 Large variety of Mexican Party Decor. Sombreros, Serapes, Baskets, Spanish Fans, Flowers, Toys, Woven Placemats, Etc. For information call Mike Mariscal (213) 972-9541.
HISPANIC RESOURCES DIRECTORY
Hispanic Resources Directory. By A. Schorr. Foreword by Archbishop Ma-hony.... 347 pp.
Refugee & Immigrant Resource Directory 1990-91. By A. Schorr. Foreword by Congressman Solarz. Essay by Refugee Policy Group. 352 pp.
Each book is $37.50 plus $2.50 shipping.
Write for brochure.
THE DENALI PRESS Box 021535 Juneau, Alaska 99802 (907) 586-6014
COMIDA SABROSA Home-Style Southwestern Cooking
Irene Barraza S&nchez and Gloria S&nchez Yund
This cookbook includes instructions and drawings on how to string a ristra of red chiles ~ and how to roast green ones.
THE MEXICAN MURALIST IN THE UNITED STATES Laurance P. Hurlburt Foreword by David W. Scott This book analyzes the murals produced by “Los Tres Grandes” -Orozco, Rivera and Siqueirros, that were originally acclaimed but are now largely ignored.
Paper $10.95
Cloth $45.00
Available from your local bookseller, or call (505) 277-7564. You may also write to us - Attn: Dept. HLN9.
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO PRESS

Albuquerque, N.M. 87131
DRESS IN STYLE AND HELP A GOOD CAUSE
Make a minimum $25.00 contribution to the Hispanic Journlaists/Hispanic Link 1990 Journalism Intern Fund, and receive free a “Kay Barbara Is My Hispanic Link” T-Shirt.
T-Shirts are available in Powder Blue, Sunshine Yellow, Chile Red in sizes S,M,L,XL. Your contribution is tax deductible.
Send to: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
National Association of
To celebrate LULAC's 60th Anniversary, Coca-Cola has produced a 10oz commemorative Coca-Cola Bottle.
Own a little LULAC history while your $10.00 tax deductible contribution goes to the LULAC National Scholarship Fund.
Send your requests to: LULAC National Educational Service Center, 400 First St. NW, Suite 716, Washington, D.C. 20001 (202) 347-1652.
H
Ol
L
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A
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M A R K El T F L Al I Cl
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Oct 30,1989
5


S CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF
THE COUNCIL ON LEGAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY The Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) administers pre-law academic summer institutes and scholarship programs which are designed to assist educationally and economically disadvantaged students in entering and succeeding in law school.
CLEO is jointly sponsored by the American Bar Association, Law School Admission Council and the National Bar Association.
The Executive Director should be either an experienced legal educator ora lawyer with administrative experience. A law degree is required and bar membership expected. Upon appointment, residence in the Washington, D.C., area will be required.
Salary: $40,000-$60,000 based upon qualifications. Application deadline: November 30,1989 or until position filled.
Submit letter and r6sum6 to:
Council on Legal Education Opportunity 1800 M St. NW, Suite 290 North Lobby Washington, D.C. 20036 Attn: Search Committee
SPACE AVAILABLE
AND IT HAS YOUR NAME ON IT!
There is always space available for bright, motivated people at Ross Roy. Were Michigan’s largest independent advertising agency and were looking for people to fill a variety of positions in our Bloomfield Hills headquarters office.
If you’re enthusiastic about the advertising business, send your resume and a brief description of the kind of space you’d like to fill, to our Vice President—Director of Human Resources.
ROSS ROY
Ross Roy Group • Bloomfield Hills Parkway Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48013
MEDIA RELATIONS Arlington, Va.
MEDIA RELATIONS SPECIALIST : Management consulting firm seeks a media relations specialist with strong writing skills to conduct public awareness program directed at small disadvantaged businesses throughout the U.S.
Will require developing a media strategy, news releases, editing newsletter, and developing public service announcements. Will also be responsible for research and preparation of effective coverage for seminars, conferences, new programs & contractors. Four to five years prior experience required.
$25,000-$30,000/yr., dependent on experience. Please send r£sum 6 and salary history to:
M. McGunnigle META Inc.
2000 N. 15th St., Suite 407 Arlington, Va. 22201
f ■■■ ,■ — = : = ■■ ...". . • ^
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNlVeRSlfV
jj Student Programming Coordinator
UNIVERSITY RESOURCES FOR LATINOS: Student Programming Coordinator. Responsibilities; Underthe Director's supervision, ttie Program Coordinator wiif : assist in Latino student recruitment efforts and student retention activities; wilt organize and oversee the office’s participation in student course registration; yvili • advise Hispanic student organizations associated with the office; willassist in the coordination of office-sponsored Latino cultural activities; will be availableto Latino students for personal counseling; will perform such other duties as the Director may assign. Vlosf^ • £;
| Minimum Qualifications: Earned Bachelor’s degree required; earned Master’s degreje preferred; Ability^ ip writing ip-ix^;:
: Ingiish and Spanish: Bicultufial; Experience in wqrjkiriig; effectively Witfi Latirio students in a university setting:
; • • ^ridSiiiSis Of Employment: full-time, twelve month appoints.
ment. Entry level position. ••
:|||Ap!catipn' Procedures;:Sendletterofap>plicdtfon, tfir^e
letters ofrecommendation fe^gjGeorge’ Giiitter&z£ Re-
sources for Latinbs;:NIU, DeKalb, ill. 60115.
Deadlinei^ir^Ai^^tiipMlOil^ .
NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNfttERSlTY f$ AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITYjAEfJRMATfVE ACTION EMPLOYER. J§||^
6
Oct 30. 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


!
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-RIVER FALLS TENURE TRACK POSITION
Applications are invited for a tenure track position beginning in September 1990 at the Instructor or Assistant Professor level for a specialist in American Government.
All department members teach the introductory course in American Government and Politics, but desirable areas of expertise might include political parties, voting behavior, Congress, minority group politics, public policy, state and local government, and scope and methods.
Ph.D. preferred with teaching and/or politically related experience advantageous rank and salary related to qualifications. UYJ-River Falls is an EO/AA employer. Applications from minority candidates are encouraged. This position will fill a vacancy in a four-person department which serves both undergraduate majors and the general student population.
UW-River Falls is one of 13 universities in the University of Wisconsin system which attracts about one-third of its nearly 5,000 undergraduate students from the nearby Twin Cities metropolitan area. As the department hopes to make a final appointment to this position by January of 1990, immediate application is encouraged. Some interviews will be conducted at the 1989 APSA meeting. All application materials should be in hand as soon as possible. Screening by the department will begin as soon as possible, and a limited number of on-campus interviews will be conducted in early December.
Applications available from Prof. Richard J. Brynildsen, Chair, Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, River Falls, Wis. 54022.
FIRST LISTING
PROGRAM
DEVELOPMENT
SPECIALIST
National organization working to build minority participation in engineering seeks top-notch program developer with proven grant-writing skills. Excellent opportunity for educator or technical professional to initiate elementary through college programs. Travel required.
MA/MS in education/technical field plus 3-5 years successful program development experience required.
Excellent compensation. Vitae, cover letter, proposal writing sample by December 1. Program Department, NACME, 3 West 35th Street, New York, N.Y. 10001-2281.
MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP CITY OF PHOENIX
Three positions beginning July 1,1990, for a minimum twelve-month period. Present salary $21,632 plus comprehensive employee benefits. Management interns will work in the Management and Budget Department, and serve in rotational assignments in the City Manager's Office and a line department.
This will be the 41st year of our intern program which has proven to be an excellent training ground for higher level administrative and managerial positions.
Applicants must have completed courses required for a Master’s degree in Public Administration or related field by July 1, 1990.
To obtain application, write or call: Charles E. Hill, Management and Budget Director, 251 West Washington, Phoenix, Ariz. 85003. (602) 262-4800.
Deadline for all applications is February 2,1990.
AA/EEO/H Employer
DIETARY
INTERVIEWERS
Dietary interviewers needed for a telephone survey. Training in nutrition or dietetics and computer terminal experience desired. Fluency in Spanish required. Flexible hours. 15-40 hours/ week. $8.50-$10.00/hour.
For information call (301) 738-8318.
WESTAT INC.
1650 Research Blvd.
Rockville, Md. 20850 EOE M/F/H/V
DIRECTOR OFFICE OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
SALARY: $68,700-$80,700 Must have experience in an accounting or financial management operation and excellent supervisory/managerial skills.
Must submit an SF-171, Application for Federal Employment, under vacancy announcement number 00-ER-90-0002.
To obtain the announcement and application form, contact:
U.S.Department of HUD, 451 7th St. SW, Room 2282, Washington, D.C. 20410-3100 or call (202) 755-0381.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
PROJECT COORDINATOR for internship program for national nonprofit organization. Excellent communication and organizational skills required. Call (213) 487-1922
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & ZIPcode Ordered by---------------------
count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 Organization______________________
word). Multiple use rates on request. street DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES:
(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 State & Z'P----
per column inch Area Code & Phone_
Oct 30, 1989


Arts & Entertainment
LA. CELEBRATES THE DEAD: An unprecedented number of art exhibits and cultural events are planned this year in Los Angeles to commemorate the Nov. 2 observance of D/a de los muertos.
Most activities planned for this week include the creation of Calaveras (skulls) and altars, emulating the traditional activities that take place during this holiday in Mexico. Some “Day of the Dead” activities were planned to coincide with Halloween - among them, D/a de los muertos activities at the Los Angeles Children’s Museum, Oct. 28 and 29, where children created clay ofrendas and tasted pan de los muertos.
Other activities in the Greater Los Angeles area include:
• D/a de los muertos celebration at Olvera Street, with guelaguetza dancers, mariachis, artisan workshops and an art exhibit, through Nov. 2.
• The sixth annual Day of the Dead altar exhibition at The Folk Tree gallery in Pasadena, open through Nov* 2, with works by Alfredo de Batuc, Teddy S&ndoval, Alfredo Calderdn, Rose Portillo, Vfctor Du-
razo and others.
• The sixth annual D/a de los muertos celebration, a Nov. 2 procession of school children wearing masks through the Ventura County community of Moorpark, culminating with the debut of Happy Muerto To You, a play by El Teatro Inlakech.
• All Souls Festival at Highways Performance Space in Santa Monica, scheduled for Nov. 2-4, featuring works by performance artists, poets, musicians and dancers.
• Dfas de los muertos art exhibit at Los Angeles’ La Marimba restaurant, with works by Joseph Malagdn, Peter Peace and Marilyn Welch, through Nov. 5.
• Day of the Dead multimedia exhibition atthe Long Beach Museum of Art, through Nov. 5.
• Invitation to the Death, an exhibit of contemporary Day of the Dead artwork, on display at LA’s Self Help Graphics gallery, Nov. 2-25.
The Day of the Dead is a pre-Hispanic celebration that coincides with the Catholic Feast of All Souls (Nov. 2) in which families reunite with dead relatives at burial sites. Increasingly, this holiday is being adopted by southwestern artists and artisans. - Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
treat you like a foreigner, tell them that your ancestors arrived here first. Tell them that many parts of the United States were settled by Spanish explorers more than 100 years before the Pilgrims stepped ashore on Plymouth Rock in 1620.
“If they argue against bilingual education, tell them Spanish was taught in North America long before a word of English was uttered in the NewWorld...
“If they talk to you about ‘American history,’ tell them this country was settled from South to North, not East to West, and that the first permanent settlement in the continental United States, St. Augustine, Fla., was established by the Spaniards...
“But tell them that unlike North American history, Latin American history doesn’t cover up the slaughter of the Indians. Tell them that even when we celebrate the discovery of the NewWorld, we are also mournful that it marks the beginning of a holocaust for the real native Americans and the opening of the gates to African slavery.’’
-- Danilo Alfaro
Media Report
QUOTING HISPANIC COLUMNISTS: Here’s a look at what some are talking about: JOSE ANTONIO BURCIAGA, San Jose Mercury News: “There is no question the generic term ‘Hispanic’ seems to have united a whole country of diverse Latinos from Afro-Hispanicsto Anglo-Hispanics. As a handle it has been handy for the government, the media and the corporate world.
“However, mere labels don’t make a difference in education, median incomes and political representation...Cuban Americans and Mexican Americans continue a rivalry. Cuban Americans lead in the Hispanic economy but Mexican Americans have the numbers and get along better with Puerto Ricans...’’ SERGIO LOPEZ-MIRO, The Miami Herald: “I saw a bumper sticker in Little Havana the other day.JDon’t call me Hispanic,’ it read in angry red letters. ‘I am Cuban.’ Yet everywhere one turns -- the media, government, ad
agencies, social service outfits - the term ‘Hispanic’ lunges out with the full force of its arbitrary nature...
“Don’t get me wrong - I’m very proud of my Spanish heritage. I am even prouder of my Cuban roots, though. And while the two terms are not mutually exclusive, the broader one -Hispanic - has a tendency to cancel out the other...’’
FRANK DEL OLMO, Los Angeles Times: “Every time lleana Ros-Lehtinen does something that sets her apart from her Latino colleagues in Congress, all of them moderate-to-liberal Democrats, it should remind us just how diverse the Latino population in this country is. Particular attention should be paid by those Latinos who propagate the myth that there is an interest group in this nation that can properly be called ‘Hispanic.’
“In fact, it is rare for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus to vote as a bloc on anything, unlike the Congressional Black Caucus and several state delegations...”
MIGUEL PEREZ, New York Daily News: “My message to Latinos is: If non-Latinos
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 'N1 Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Rabago.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencie8$118; Personal $108 Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
Family and Per Capita Income: 1988
HISPANIC BLACK WHITE
Source: U.S. Census Bureau Created by Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Full Text

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Making The News This Week Physicist Franklin Chang-Dfaz, 39, and four other astronauts touch down Oct. 24 at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of California after a six-day flight of the space shuttle Atlantis. It was Chang-Dfaz's second shuttle mission ... U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos names Thomas Topuzes, CEO of the First Interna tional Bank of Chula Vista, Calif., to the National Assessment Govern ing Board, the body that oversees the National Assessment of Educational Progress. He is the first Hispanic to serve on the board .. Adolph Coors Co. Chairman William Coors announces that former U nMsion and United Press International Presidert Luis Nogales, 45, has been elected to the company's board of directors. He is the first Latino to sit on the nine-member board ... Jimmy Gurule, 38, a law professor at Notre Dame Law School, takes over as president of the Hispanic National Bar Association at the group's national convention in Washington, D.C. The group honored Sacramento, Calif., attorney Mario Obledo, past president ofthe League of United Latin American Citizens, with its Lifetime Achievement Award ... Miami police buy 700 gas masks and make plans to deploy two armored trucks, if neces sary, in preparation for the verdict in the trial of police officer William Lozano. Lozano is accused of fatally shooting a 23-year -old black man, Clement Uoyd. The killing touched off race ndS in January ... Justice Helen Freedman of the State Supreme Court in Manhattan, New York, rules that the City Hospital Center at Elmhurst can remove the one-month-old son of Luis and Carlotta Alvarado from life-support equipment. Doctors have declared the infant brain-dead. His parents plan to appeal. .. By Rhonda Smith . While parental choice is being touted as the centerpiece of the Bush administration's educational reform initiative, many Latino officials say de facto segregation and a two tier school system will be its end result. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos made the second stop in Minnesota Oct. 23-24 of a scheduled five-city, cross-country junket to rally support for the choice program. At his first stop, in New York, he ran head-on into parents irate over educational funding in the East Harlem school district. Educational choice gives parents the op tion to choose where their children will attend school. If a particular school is not meeting studert needs, theoretically parents may move the child to another school. Choice is based on the premise that "market demands" will force the ailing school to improve or close. Opponents say choice favors the fittest. Jack Klenk, director of the Secretary's Choice Initiative, says, "Choice gives everyone ac cess to better schools. With choice, we're not cortirxJed on page 2 Poverty Rate Drops Slightly from '87-'88 By Danilo Alfaro . . . The number of Hispanic families living in 1.16 m1lllon 1n 1988, concluded a report re-poverty dropped from 1.19 million in 1987 to leased .Oct.. 1.8 by the U.S . Census Census off1c1als called the change statiStiCensus Hits New Hurdle By Danilo Alfaro The results of a planned census survey, to develop a formula to measure an un dercount of minorities in 1990 and man dated by a July court settlement, may not be ready in time for redrawing state and federal election districts, a congressional researcher said Oct. 17. Census officials admit that the 1980 tally missed up to 6% of Hispanics. Some His panic organizations say there may have been an undercount as high as 1 0%. As a result of a 1988 lawsuit, the bureau agreed to conduct a separate survey of 150,000 homes following the full census in April 1990. The results of the more intensive second survey, in August 1990, would then be reviewed by U.S. Com merce Secretary Robert Mosbacher to determine whether to adjust the final count. But Daniel Melnick, a researcher with the Congressional Research Service, told a House subcommittee that by Apri11991, when initial figures are released to states for reapportionment, the bureau may not have completed the surveys that would estimate the percentage of undercount cally insignificant. Twenty-four percent of Hispanic families lived below the government poverty level in 1988, down two percentage poirts from 1987, stated the report, "Money Income and Pov erty Status in the United States: 1988." About 5.4 million, or 27% of all Latinos, were poor in 1988, representing no change from 1987. "We need to awaken the government and the private and corporate sectors as to the gravity of the poverty problem," said Louis Nunez, president of the National Puerto Rican Coalition in Washington, D.C. Annual per capita income for Hispanics in 1988 was $7,960, down $10 from 1987. Per capita income among whites rose $21 0 to $13,900 and among blacks it rose $310 to $8,270. "One quarrel we have with the Census Bureau is that they lump all Hispanics to gether," said Nunez. "The poverty rate for Puerto Ricans is about 39%. But these figures are lost among the Hispanic figures." Reflecting the relative youth of the U.S. His panic population, the report found that 4goA> of poor Latinos in 1988 were 18 or younger. The report noted that 90% of poor Latinos lived in metropolitan areas, compared with 78% of poor blacks and 70% of poor whites. Jury Convicts Garcia and Wife of Extortion By Felix Perez Robert Garcia, who successfully took on New York City's Democratic machine in 1978 to wrest control of the 18th Con gressional District seat, saw his political career and personal freedom put in seri ous jeopardy Oct. 20 when a federal jury in Manhattan convicted him on two counts of extortion and one of conspiracy. Found guilty on the same charges was his wife, Jane. The convictions arose from deal ings with defunct military contractor Wedtech. A U.S. District Court in Manhat tan set sentencing for Rep. GarGARCIA cfa, 56, and his Faces up to 45 years wife, 48, for Jan. 5. They each face up to 45 years in prjson and fines of $750,000. The Garcfas plan to appeal. They were convicted of extorting some $170,000 in payoffs from Wedtech in re turn for help securing federal contracts. U.S. Rep. Kika de Ia Garza (D-Texas), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said, "I'm saddened by the con viction not only of Garcfa, but his wife ... Any illegal activity is not within the character of the Bobby Garcfa we know." Angelo F alc6n, president of the Institute for Puerto Rican Policy in New York, praisoo Garcia's work on census matters and immigration and his leadership ci the Con gressional Hispanic Caucus from 1978 to 1982. But, Falc6n added, " ... there have always been questions" about Garcfa's effectiveness as a congressman. Garcfa had not decided whether to resign at press time. New York state Assembly man Jose Serrano is currently favored for . the post, if vacated.

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Dropout Report Concludes Needs Differ by Subgroup By Danilo Alfaro Programs aimed at staunching the Latino high school dropout rate may be ineffective or counterproductive if they treat Hispanic subgroups as a homogeneous class, ac cording to a study released Oct. 23. Age, grades, absenteeism and the num ber of parents at home also affect the drop out rate, the report found. The study resulted from su.Veys in Sep tember 1986 of 706 Hispanic ninth-graders in Chicago, Miami, Milwaukee, Newark, N.J., and San Antonio by the Washington, D.C.based Aspira Institute for Policy Research. .. The responses of Mexican American, Puerto Rican, Cuban American and Central American students show their perspectives differ," said study Ricardo Fernandez, assistant vice chancellor at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. He added that characteristics such as parents' educational attainment and expec tations for a child's education are linked to the tendency to drop out, and that these characteristics differ among the subgroups. Follow -up interviews in September 1987 found 8% of the students had dropped out. Another 15% could not be located. Among the study's findings, Puerto Rican and Cuban American students dis cuss their future plans with parents once or twice a week, while Mexican American and Central American students do so less than once a month. More than SOOA> of respondents had no clear educational role model at home, because their parents did not graduate from high school or the students did not know whether their parents graduated. Congress OKs Census Tally of Undocumented Critics Say 'Choice' Offers Little Choice By Adrienne Rabago A U.S. House and Senate conference committee agreed Oct. 19 to use undocumented immigrants counted in the 1990 census for congressional redistricting. Eight days prior the House rejected an at tempt to exclude undocumented immigrants. The Senate voted Sept. 29 to bar the Census from counting undocumented immigrants. ''I am extremely pleased with the decision that made," said Arturo Vargas, census outreach coordinator for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund ... Now we can go about the work of making sure everyone is counted." The move to bar undocumented immigrants was initiated by Northern states that stand to lose congressional seats. The U.S. Immigra tion and Naturalization Service estimates there are 4.5 million undocumented immigrants in the United States. contlfXJed from page 1 segregating people any longer by income or political influence." Counters Arturo Madrid, president of the Tomas Rivera Center in California, .. The prin cipal manifestation of choice at this point is magnet schools. And I think the evidence today concludes that magnet schools rein force inequities and stratification. The most ctfluert and aggressive get into magnet schools, and the rest are left out." Critics worry that the choice initiative is too loosely defined ... Educational choice sounds reasonable," explains Jim Lyons, executive director of the National Association for Bilin gual Education, .. but it's such an elastic term. The admi1istration has not great content or defined it." Lyons also says choice will be effective only if the federal government pro vides funds to sponsor educational programs. Klenk replies: .. For better or worse, the reality is that the federal government's in volvement in funding education is very, very small. The realistic role for the federal govern-Florida Latinos, 23%, Report Prejudice 2 By Adrienne Rabago Nearly one-fourth of Florida Hispanics feelthere is .. a lot of prejudice" against Lati nos in their communities, concludes a Florida International University survey re leased Oct. 19. .. There is a tremendous amount offriction because the Anglos feel that we are taking over," said Osvaldo Dfaz, chairman of the Miami-based Spanish American League Against Discrimination. ..We want a share of the political, social and economic pow ers., More than half the Hispanics surveyed said their standard of living was closer to that of whites than it was 1 0 years ago. Dfaz pointed out that 1 0 years ago there were approximately 150,000 newly arrived Mariel refugees. ..Of course, people are better off than they were ten years ago ... The refugees did not have a penny." Hispanics, blacks and Anglos from South Florida were in basic agreement with their counterparts in the rest of the state in most responses. However, more Anglos from South Florida, 67%, reported that Hispan ics' standard of living was closer to theirs than did Anglos from outside the area, 45%. Is the Hispanic standard of living closer to that of whites than 10 years ago? Florida Hispanics 53% South Florida Hispanics Blacks 45 Blacks Anglos 45 Anglos Is there "a lot of prejudice" against Hispanics In your community? Florida Hispanics 23% South Florida Hispanics Blacks 22 Blacks Anglos 20 Anglos Oct 30, 1989 58% 51 67 220.4 19 19 ment is never going to be as a major funder for this kind of innovation." State and local funding now pays 94% of the nation's public education bill. Opponents of choice see access as an other major problem. ..For us, access is more than just how to get there. It includes knowing the schools are there and being able to learn about them. And all of that is complicated bf lcr1guage," explains Josue Gonzalez, vice chancellor for planning, development and research of the City Colleges of Chicago. He predicts, .. Choice is going to take hold in different degrees in different places." Cur rently, Minnesota, Arkansas, Iowa and Ne braska are the four states calling for open enrollment options. Administration officials are using the Minnesota plan as a model. But Madrid says: .. Although Minnesota has implemented open enrollment, the econ omy, demography and political climate there are unique. It's not going to be easily repli cated anywhere else. ..An example I use is that all the children in Lake Wobegon are above average. One would assume that all the schools in that imaginary community are also above aver age. What meaning does choice have if all the schools in your community are medi ocre? Or, if above-average schools are not readily accessible to you geographically?" Gonzalez says, ''Understandably, a lot of people want to send their kids to schools . close to We still have Hispanics going to Hispanic schools. If we could have excel lent schools of choice close to Hispanic communities, that might help. But they tend not to be located there." Another choice component is that market forces or competition will force mediocre schoolsto improve. But, says Lyons, .. While good educational programs have to exist, competition isn't necessarily going to create them any more than it made housing afford able, cars safe, or fuel efficient." Madrid concludes: .. The real issues for us are making sure that we have small student/ teacher ratios, safe physical plants, substan tive curricula, and teachers who have very high expectations for their Latino students." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

PAGE 3

Jose Vargas How to Reduce Street Workers 1 n Southern California we have a phenomenon called "the day worker." Hundreds of Latino males stand on street corners offering to do hard work for minimum wages. Merchants and citizens complain about their presence and actions, accusing them of urinating on the street, whistling at females and scaring the daylights out of motorists who stop nearby. The police in some cities try to get rid of the workers by enforcing every law or ordinance written by man. True, the workers' stomachs are not always law abiding. When hunger calls, they obey the survival instinct that has protected mankind for ages. I found a probable solution to their di lemma when my wife told me that my big panza, my beautiful gut, was not sexy any more. That morning I drove to the drugstore. Im mediately after I pulled into the parking lot, four young men jumped into my truck. A patrol officer arrived and shouted at them to get out. They dismounted quietly. Then the officer told me that if I hired undocumented workers, I could be subject to VARGAS fines and other horrendous penalties. (How he determined they were undocumented was probably an ability a Border Patrolman would envy.) REVOLUTIONS COULD BE PREVENTED 1 walked into the drugstore and found the latest diet remedy. Gordo-8-Gone or something similar, with an ingredient guaranteed to ap pease my hunger for tacos for 24 hours. I left, thinking sexy. All of sudden it hit me! One daily Gordo-B-Gone capsule for the workers and they would forget about standing on the corners. The reason for their hunger pangs would be removed. If the capsules worked locally, why not send truckloads to poor countries? With the feeling of having a full belly, impoverished peasants would not think about heading for the USA. Revolutions could be prevented. People would say penas con pan son menos." 11iTengo Ia soluci6n!" I yelled. To me, it made sense. "That is the most stupid, harebrained idea I've heard in a long time," my mate said. Maybe she was right. If you give the workers a hard time, will they go away? Has any leader who recommended such a solution been hungry enough, or has he heard the cries of his own starving children, to realize that a point comes when the laws of men don't count? "Their numbers scare the customers," complain local leaders. "They whistle at the women. II "The local citizens resent their cocky attitude. II "Crime goes up whenever they gather." A CRY FOR TORTILLAS 2,000 MILES AWAY Don't these sound like the same complaints brought about by any group of young men standing for hours in open spaces with no sanitary facilities and plenty of energy? The same calls could be received about servicemen on leave or college students on Easter vacation. For God's sake, if Los Angeles was able to provide toilets and other services for one million visitors during the last Olympic Games, why can't a community do the same thing for people who are willing to trade their sweat and abilities for minimum wages, an admirable trait? How ironic that two blocks away, small-time dope dealers were in business, knowing the police were busy with the workers, probably against their will, obeying orders that originated above department. Some people really believe that law enforcement at the local level can stop the cry for tortillas 2,000 miles away. By the way, 1 took all my diet pills and gained two pounds; at last count there were many more workers on the street. (Jode Vargas is a police officer in Southern California.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua FALLING: Bobby Garcia's Oct. 20 conviction in the Wedtech scandal serves as a reminder that the line between good guys and bad guys in this political citadel is not only a fine one, but one that shifts like the Caribbean sands. After the guilty verdict was announced, some supposed friends of the 56-year-old Bronx congressman were quick to distance themselves from him by reminding the inquisitive press of any frailties and flaws in his character that popped into their minds. My memory of Congress' only voting Puerto throughout the '80s is of a man who fought for all He devoted endless hours to issues of Mexican Amencans 1n the Southwest, immigration and census most prominent among them. 1 heard the comment more than once that his heart was more Chicano than the corazones of some of his Mexican American congressional colleagues. On Hispanic issues, Garcfa always spoke sin pelos Ia Whether talking among friends in the South Bronx, 1nsp1nng a group of visiting Latino students in the Capitol, or firing .up a rally in the Midwest or Southwest, he preached unity with pulpit passion. He understood what makes political weight. In so many ways Bobby Garcia was a good guy, it will be hard to see him in any other light. FALLEN: Last month the nation's newspapers carried the obitu ary of Pepe San Roman. His suicide in Miami at age 58 wrote the epitaph to the Kennedy Administration's hour of greatest frustra tion and shame, the Bay of Pigs. It was San Roman who at age 29 led the 1 ,500-member 2506 Brigade on the CIA-ordered invasion of Cuba in 1961. When !he U.S. Air Force failed to provide promised support, the land1ng turned into a debacle. San Roman spent 20 months in a Castro prison before being ran somed, with other brigade prisoners, by the White House for $50 million. In this country he served in the military, entered some business ventures, but never attained the promise he demon strated in his youth -as an artist, an athlete, scholar and leader. The Washington Post carried an extensive profile on San Roman Oct. 17, noting that among his effects when his body was found was a job resume listing his experience as Commander of the 2506 Assault Brigade. In the column "Reason for Leaving, II he had written, "Obvious. II -Kay Barbaro Quoting ... HENRY B. GONZALEZ, Texas congressman, in the October issue of Hispanic magazine, describing to writer Carlos Conde the bad old days in his home state: were so tough at one time that if a dog bit a Mexican, they'd kill the Mexican, send his head to Austin for analysis, and give the dog rabies shots." RICHARD ALA TORRE, in the Oct. 22 Los Angeles Times Magazine, explaining why he left the California legislature to seek (and win) a seat on the Los Angeles City Council: 11To tell you the truth, I got tired of telling people that as an assembly man 1 didn't work for GM. No one knows what an assemblyman does." EDUARDO PENA, Washington attorney, describing Pablo Sedillo, executive director of the Hispanic Secretariat, U.S. Catholic Confer ence, at the American G. I. Forum's annual roast in Washington, D.C., Oct. 19: so slow, it takes him an hour and a half to watch 'Sixty Minutes."' Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Oct. 30, 1989 3

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COLLECTING INCOME AND POVERTY: .. Money Income and Poverty Status in the United States: 1988" is a 181-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that takes a detailed look at poverty status according to race and ethnicity. For a copy. (specify Series P-60, No. 166) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) VOTING AND REGISTRATION: .. Voting and Regis.tration in the Election of November 1988" is an 89-page report by the U.S. Census Bureau that offers a breakdown of voting and registration patterns by race, gender and ethnicity, including data on Hispanic subgroups. For a copy (specify Series P-20, No. 435) contact the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. GovernmerJt Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402 (202) 782-3238. (Price was not available at press time.) HISPANICS JN PITTSBURGH: .. Pittsburgh Hispanic" is a free bi monthly newsletter by the Hispanic Association for Community Inter ests on happenings and personalities in the Pittsburgh area. To recieve it write HACI, P.O. Box 81853, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15217. COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES: The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities recently released a triennial report that finds that while higher education institutions with 25% or more Hispanic enrollment represent 3.5% of U.S. colleges and universities, they enroll 45% of Hispanic college students. In addition, the report contains a section on the history of HACU and profiles of its member institutions. To receive one of a limited number of copies, contact HACU, 411 S.W. 24th St., San Antonio, Texas 78207 (512) 433-1501. ENGLISH PLUS INFORMATION: The National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials compiled two packets on English Plus -II English Plus: Legislative Packet for School Board Members," 28 pages, and 11English Plus: Legislative Packet for Municipal/County Officials," 31 pages --that offer information on the movement's origin and evolution, as well as background material on the language restric tionist movement. Each packet costs $5. They can be ordered from NALEO, 708 G St. SE, Washington, D.C. 20003 (202) 546-2536. HISPANIC DROPOUTS: "Five Cities Dropout Study: Characteris tics of Hispanic High School Students" tracks 706 Latino ninth-graders over one year. The 170-page report is available for $20 from the Asp ira Institute for Policy Research, 111216th St. NW, Suite 340, Washington, D.C. 20036 (202) 835-3600. AIDS VIDEO: 11At Risk!" is 30-minute video based on a play written by Carlos Morton on AIDS prevention for Hispanic youth. The VHS video is available at no cost to non-profit organizations by writing El Paso Community College, Center for Instructional Telecommunica tions, P.O. Box 20500, El Paso, Texas 79998. CONNECTING $574,000 GIVEN FOR CHILDREN The Family Place, a non-profit family resource center in Washington, D.C., that serves a 95% Hispanic clientele, has been awarded a $574,125 grant by the W.K Kellogg Foundation to promote positive development of low-income children through health, social, parental and educational services. Among the new programs to be implemented are two eight-session courses, Caring for Children and Baby Sitter/Child Care-Giver Training, aimed at improving the well-being of mothers and children at risk because of poverty. In addition, the agency will expand its prenatal, counseling, job skills and nutritional services. Last year 536 families received services from the eight-year -old Family Place, all at no charge. LIVENING MATH, AIDING FARM WORKERS The Ford Foundation has announced a five-year, $10 million under taking to help middle schools devise more creative ways to teach math to students from economically and educationally disadvantaged com munities. The initiative, Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Student Achieve ment and Reasoning, will select five schools to participate during the 1989-90 school year. The project will be used in classrooms in the 199091 school year, expanding to 10 more schools in 1991-92. A committee composed of labor leaders, business executives, educators, community advocacy leaders and others will advise the project coordinator, the Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh. Serving on the board are lsaura Santiago Santiago, president of Hostos Community College in New York, and Raul Yzaguirre, president of the National Council of La Raza ... The Pesticide Education Center of San Francisco will receive a $101,343 grant over two years from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foun dation to establish an education and training program for farm workers about pesticides, it was announced. The center will develop educational materials and establish a national network to disseminate information to farm worker communities ... OTHER FACES, OTHER PLACES Susan Engeleiter, the administrator for the U.S. Small Business Ad ministration, announces that Frank Ramos has been appointed the agency's associate deputy administrator for management and admini stration. Ramos, a Californian, will oversee the agency's budget, accourting, personnel and equal employment opportunity program ... The board of directors of the San Antonio-based Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities elects Ra(ll Cardenas, president of South Mountain Community College in Phoenix, Ariz., as its chairman ... The Hispanic Association for Higher Education of New Jersey honors Elsa G6mez, president of Kean College in Union, N.J ... Calendar Participants will also attempt to identify effective policy areas and devise an action plan to imple ment those policies. ship skills and self-esteem of high school girls. Lisa Penaloza (714) 647-7581 RECEPTION TO OUR READERS: To ensure information about your organization's upcoming event will be in cluded in Hispanic Link's Calendar, it must be received at least two Fridays before the publica tion date of the issue in which you would like it to appear. There is no charge. Please include date, location, contact name and phone number. Ad dress items to Calendar Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. THIS WEEK POVERTY Boston Nov. 2, 3 The National Puerto Rican Coalition is holding its annual conference, which will gather community leaders, policy-makers and researchers to exam ine the circumstances of Puerto Rican poverty. 4 Jose Cruz (202) 223-3915 LAWYERS' CONVENTION San Francisco Nov. 3-5 The California La Raza Lawyers Association is host ing its annual convention. It will include an alumni reunion, dance, panel presentations, judges' breakfast and seminar on leadership develop ment. Edith Adame (415) 552-3152 YOUTH LEADERSHIP Santa Ana, Calif. Nov. 4 The Orange County chapter of the Mexican Ameri can Women's National Association is sponsoring the youth leadership conference "Mujer Latina: A History of Creativity and Contribution." It is de signed to build the communications and leader-Oct 30, 1989 Bethesda, Md. Nov. 5 The Committee in Suppo rt of the Office of the League of United Latin American Citizens' National Vice President, Northeast Region, is holding are ception to honor Jess Quintero, who holds that office. Entertainment will be provided by El Trio Los Amigos. San Garza (301) 907-0128 DIVERSITY IN EDUCATION San Francisco Nov. 5-7 The American Council on Education will hold its second conference on increasing minority partici pation in all aspects of higher education. An infor mation exchange will enable participants to share materials on campus programs designed to inte grate campuses. Martha Morse Rawlings (202) 939-9393 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Christmas Gifts With That Special 'Sabor , Latino' Artist John August Swanson, born in Los Angeles, is an American artist in the tradition of the primitive or native style. His narratives, often multi-framed stories such as THE TREE PLANTING, reflect the strong heritage of storytelling received from his Swedish father and his Mexican mother. His works are exhibited in galleries throughout the United States and Europe (England-France-Germany-and the Vati can museums.) Poster: THE TREE PLANTING is simple and straightforward. The theme of work and harvest makes it an especially appropriate piece with which to celebrate AN PPM's 15 years of efforts to bring about the day when all persons may enjoy the just fruits of their lifelong labor. THE TREE PLANTING is printed on first-quality stock, size 2711 by 2111, $25.00 for an unsigned reproduction, $30 for a signed reproduction. Tax-deductible. Christmas Cards: THE TRIPTYCH. Three-fold card with three vertical images: The Epiphany, The Shepherds, The Nativity, reproducing original serigraphs by artist John August Swanson. In color on heavy white stock. 411 x 11 1 /8" folded. No message. Cards with envelopes in packages of 10 for $15.00. California residents please add 6.5% tax. PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE: Asociaci6n Nacional Pro Personas Mayores National Association for Hispanic Elderly 2727 West Sixth St., Suite 270 Los Angeles, Calif. 90057 (213) 487-1922 HISPANIC RESOURCES DIRECTORY Hispanic Resources Directory. By A. Schorr. Foreword by Archbishop Ma hony .... 347 pp. Refugee & Immigrant Resource Directory 1990-91. By A. Schorr. Foreword by Congressman Solarz. Essay by Refu gee Policy Group. 352 pp. Each book is $37.50 plus $2.50 ship ping. Write for brochure. COMIDA SABROSA Home-Style Southwestern Cooking I rene Barraza Sanchez and Gloria Sanchez Yund This cookbook includes instructions and drawings on how to string a ristra of red chiles--and howlo roast green ones. Paper $10.95 IMPORTED MEXICAN GIFTS Mexican Flag T -Shirt (Puff) 1 00% Heavy Cotton U.S.A. Black only $14.99 PPD S,M,L,XL. Children's Wood Chair-Straw Seat, Hand Painted 911. High Seat, with a 19 .. Back. Colors-Blue, Red, Orange, Pink $16.99 PPD. Religious Wood Plaques-1 011X12 .. Guadalupe with flag, SH Jesus, Last Supper; Footprints-Las Huelas $14.99 PPD. Guatemala Worry Dolls-Box of 6 $2.00, Earrings Pierced $3.00, Pin $3.50, Beret 4.99, PPD. Check or money order to: A.D. Velasco E-14 Olvera Street Los Angeles Calif. 90012 Large variety of Mexican Party Decor. Sombreros, Serapes, Baskets, Spanish Fans, Flowers, Toys, Woven Placemats, Etc. For information call Mike Mariscal (213) 972-9541. THE MEXICAN MURALIST IN THE UNITED STATES Laurance P. Hurlburt Foreword by David W. Scott This book analyzes the murals pro duced by "Los Tres Grandes" Orozco, Rivera and Siqueirros, that were originally acclaimed but are now largely ignored. Cloth $45.00 . . . • I • I 0 I THE DENALI PRESS Box 021535 Juneau, Alaska 99802 (907) 586-6014 Available from your local bookseller, or call (505) 2n-7564. You may also write to us--Attn: Dept. HLN9. _ • _ UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO PRESS Albuquerque, N.M. 87131 •••• -0 I I I • DRESS IN STYLE AND HELP A GOOD CAUSE Make a minimum $25.00 contribution to the National Association of Hispanic Journlaists/Hispanic Link 1990 Journalism Intern Fund, and receive free a "Kay Barbaro Is My His panic Link" T -Shirt. T -Shirts are available in Powder Blue, Sunshine Yellow, Chile Red in sizes S,M,L,XL. Your contribution is tax deductible. Send to: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Oct 30, 1989 . . To celebrate LULAC's 60th Anniversary, Coca-Cola has pro duced a 1 Ooz commemorative Coca-Cola Bottle. Own a little LULAC history while your $10.00 tax deductible contribution goes to the LULAC National Scholarship Fund. 1m::mmm1 Send your requests to: LULAC IHmm::Hm National Educational Service Center, 400 First St. NW, Suite 716, Washington, D. C. 20001 (202) 347-1652. . . . : . : : : . l . . . : : : : . . . : : : . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

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6 I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I SPACE AVAILABLE AND IT HAS YOUR NAME ON IT! There is always space available for bright, motivated people at Ross Roy. Were Michigan's largest inde pendent advertising agency and were looking for people to fill a variety of positions in our Bloomfield Hills headquarters office. If you're enthusiastic about the advertising business, send your resume and a brief description of the kind of space you a like to fill, to our Vice PresidentDirector of Human Resources. ROSS ROY Ross Roy Group • Bloomfield Hills Parkway Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48013 MEDIA RELATIONS Arlington, Va. MEDIA RELATIONS SPECIALIST: Management consutting firm seeks a media relations specialist with strong writing skills to conduct public aware ness program directed at small disad vantaged businesses throughout the u.s. Will require developing a media strat egy, news releases, editing newsletter, and developing public service an nouncements. Will also be respon sible for research and preparation of effective coverage for seminars, con ferences, new programs & contrac tors. Four to five years prior experience required. $25,000-$30,000/yr., dependent on experience. Please send resum e and salary history to: M. McGunnigle META Inc. 2000 N. 15th St., Suite 407 Arlington, Va. 22201 Oct 30, 1989 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE COUNCIL ON LEGAL EDUCATION OPPORTUNITY The Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO) administers pre-law academic summer institutes and scholarship programs which are designed to assist educationally and economi cally disadvantaged students in entering and succeeding in law school. CLEO is jointly sponsored by the American Bar Association, Law School Admission Council and the National Bar Association. The Executive Director should be either an expe rienced legal educator or a lawyer with administra tive experience. A law degree is required and bar membership expected. Upon appointment, resi dence in the Washington, D.C., area will be required. Salary: $40,000-$60,000 based upon qualifica tions. Application deadline: November 30, 1989 or until position filled. Submit letter and resume to: Council on Legal Education Opportunity 1800 M St. NW, Suite 290 North Lobby Washington, D.C. 20036 Attn: Search Committee Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CI .. I UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-RIVER FALLS TENURE TRACK POSITION Applications are invited for a tenure track position beginning in September 1990 at the Instructor or Assistant Professor level for a specialist in American Government. All department members teach the introductory course in American Government and Politics, but desirable areas of expertise might include political parties, voting behavior, Congress, minority group politics, public policy, state and local government, and scope and methods. Ph.D. preferred with teaching and/or politically related experience advantageous rank and salary related to qualifications. UW-River Falls is an EO/AA employer. Applications from minority candidates are encouraged. This position will fill a vacancy in a four-person department which serves both undergraduate majors and the general student population. UW-River Falls is one of 13 universities in the University ofW!sconsin system which attracts about one-third of its nearly 5,000 undergraduate students from the nearby Twin Cities metropolitan area. As the department hopes to make a final appointment to this position by January of 1990, immediate application is encouraged. Some interviews will be conducted at the 1989 APSA meeting. All application materials should be in hand as soon as possible. Screening by the department will begin as soon as possible, and a limited number of on-campus interviews will be conducted in early December. Applications available from Prof. Richard J. Brynildsen, Chair, Department of Political Science, University of Wisconsin-River Falls, River Falls, Wis. 54022. FIRST LISTING PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST National organization working to build minority participation in engineering seeks top-nach program developer with proven grant-writing skills. Excellent opportunity for educator or technical professional to initiate elementary through college programs. Travel required. MNMS in education/technical field plus 3-5 years successful program development experience required. DIETARY INTERVIEWERS Dietary interviewers needed for a telephone survey. Training in nutrition or dietetics and computer terminal experience desired. Fluency in Spanish required. Flexible hours. 15-40 hours/ week. $8.50-$1 0.00/hour. For information call (301) 738-8318. WESTAT INC. 1650 Research Blvd. Rockville, Md. 20850 EOE M/F/H/V MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP CITY OF PHOENIX Three positions beginning July 1, 1990, for a mi1imum twewe-month period. Present salary $21,632 plus comprehensive employee benefits. Management interns will work in the Management and Budget Department, and serve in rotational assignments in the City Manager's Office and a line department. This will be the 41st year of our intern program whch pr01en to be an excellent training groond for higher level administrative and managerial positions. Applicants must have completed courses required for a Master's degree in Public Administration or related field by July 1, 1990. To obtain application, or call: Charles E. Hill, Management and Budget Director, 251 West Phoenix, Ariz. 85003. (602) 262-4800. Deadline for all applications is February 2, 1990. AAIEEO/H Employer DIRECTOR OFFICE OF FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING SALARY: $68,700-$80,700 Must have experiEilCe in an accountirg or financial management operation and excellent supervisory /managerial skills. Must submit an SF-171, Application for Federal under vacancy announcement number 00-ER-90-0002. To obtain the announcement and application form, contact: U.S:Department of HUD, 451 7th St. SW, Room 2282, Washington, D.C. 20410-3100 or call (202) 755-0381. AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER Excellent compensatbn. Vrtae, letter, proposal writing sample by December 1. Program Department, NACME, 3 West 35th Street, New York, N.Y. 10001-2281. DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy re ceived (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: PROJECT COORDINATOR for internship program for national nonprofit organization. Excellent communication and organizational skills required. Call (213) 487-1922 90 cents per word (city, state & ZIPcode Ordered by _________ _ count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 Organization ________ _ word). Multiple use rates on request. Street DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: . ---. -------(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 City, State & Z1p _______ _ per column inch Area Code & Phone ______ _ Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Oct 30, 1989 7

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Arts & Entertainment Media Report HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 •N• Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234.0280 or (202) 234.0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro, Rhonda Smith, Adrienne Rabago. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/ agencles$118; Personal $108 Trial (131ssues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. -Danilo Alfaro Family and Per Capita Income: 1988 $21,770 -Family I///] Per Capita HISPANIC Source: U.S. Census Bureau $33,920 $19,330 BLACK WHITE Created by Hispanic Unk Weekly Report