Citation
Hispanic link weekly report, January 22, 1990

Material Information

Title:
Hispanic link weekly report, January 22, 1990
Series Title:
Hispanic link weekly report
Creator:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Place of Publication:
Washington, D.C.
Publisher:
Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
Making The News This
The editorial board of the Progressive Farmer magazine names U.S. Rep. E. “Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas), chairman of the House Committee on Agriculture, its 1990 Man of the Year in Service to Agriculture...Dan Vigil, associate dean at the University of Colorado at Denver, takes office as the president of the Colorado Hispanic Bar Association...The Rose Institute of State and Local Government of Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, Calif., elects Richard Amador to its board of governors. Amador, president and CEO of CHARO Inc., also serves as president of the Latin Business Foundation...The Phoenix, Ariz.-based National Hispanic Corporate Council elects Albert Moreno, an executive with Levi Strauss Inc. in
San Francisco, as its president... Robert G6mez, 21, wins his first start on the Professional Golfers’ Association Tour with a four-shot victory in the $900,000 Northern Telecom Tucson "Open. G£mez, who attended the University of Arizona in Tucson, is the first player to win in his debut on the PGA Tour since 1973...Callers harass and threaten Manuel Evarieto Noriega, a retired resident of Miami Beach, Fla., in the mistaken belief that he is related to former Panamanian leader Manuel Antonio Noriega. Evaristo, a transplanted New Yorker, is 83 years old and of Mexican and Spanish ancestry...According to New York City police, three men attempting to rob a store flee after one shoots worker Angel Santana, 51, with a .357-caliber Magnum pistol and the bullet lodges in Santana’s trouser zipper. Santana was treated for trauma..
Evidence Mounts on Job Bias Tied to IRCA
By Danilo Alfaro
Evidence that the 1986 immigration act’s employer sanctions have caused widespread discrimination continues to mount with the
Only one Cabinet-level department had a higher percentage of Hispanic employees in 1988 than the Latino representation in the U.S. labor force, according to statistics released Jan. 17 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials.
The Justice Department exceeded the 7.3% national average by two percentage points, while Commerce fared the worst of the 13 departments, 2.7%.
Although not a Cabinet department, the White House had the lowest Hispanic representation, 1.1%.
.."Hispanics are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, but you would not see this reflected in federal employment trends,” said U.S. Rep. and NALEO President Edward Roybal (D-Calif.).
Overall, there are 109,566 Hispanics in the federal workforce, or 5.2%.
The percentage of low-income Hispanic high school graduates 18 to 24years old who were enrolled in college dropped 15 percentage points, to 35%, between 1976 and 1988, according to a report released Jan. 15 by the American Council on Education.
Middle-income 18- to 24-year-old Hispanics also experienced a decline over the 12-year period. Their college enrollment rate went from 53% to 46%.
“Given the low high school completion rate of low-income African American and Hispanic youth,...one realizes that as a nation we have not come close to addressing the postsecondary educational needs of low-income minority youth,” stated the report.
Overall, there were 450,000 18- to 24-year-old Hispanics enrolled In college in 1988.
Latinos earned 2.7% of the 991,000 bache-
release Jan. 11 of a report by a California government panel in San Francisco.
Echoing charges leveled by Hispanic and other rights advocates, the seven-member
The departments headed by Hispanics ranked 10th and 12th in Latino representation. The Interior Department, led by Manuel Lujdn, had 3.5%, while the Education Department, headed by Lauro Cavazos, had 3.2%.
The report also revealed that the salary gap between Anglo and Hispanic white-collar federal workers increased by $705 since 1982. In 1988, Anglos averaged $28,517 a year, compared with $24,599 for Hispanics.
Latino Employee Representation
1988
Justice 9.3% Health 4.5% Trans. 3.5%
Treasury 6.3 Energy 4.5 Education 3.2
HUD 5.6 Agric. 4.4 Commerce 2.7
Defense 5.5 State 3.6 White Hse. 1.1
Labor 4.6 Interior 3.5 Labor Force 7.3
Source: U.S. Office of Personnel Management, compiled by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials
lor’s degrees awarded in 1987, a slight increase from 2% in 1976. The percentage of Hispanics with master’s degrees also grew in that period, going from 1.7% to 2.4%.
Latino High School Completion And College Participation 18- to 24-year-old high school graduates (numbers in thousands)
High School College
Grads Rate Enrolled Rate
76 862 55.6% 309 35.8%
78 935 55.9 254 27.2
’80 1,054 53.7 315 29.9
’82 1,153 57.7 337 29.2
’84 1,212 60.0 362 29.9
’86 1,506 59.9 443 29.4
’88 1,458 55.2 450 30.9
Source: American Council on Education
California Fair Employment and Housing Commission found that employers are unclear about the sanctions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which prohibit hiring undocumented workers under threat of imprisonment and fines up to $10,000.
Many employers fear hiring people who "are or appear to be foreign-born,” the commission reported.
More than half of the 3 million undocumented immigrants granted legal residency under the 1986 act live in California.
According to Justice Department spokesperson Deborah Burstion-Wade, 785 IRCA-related discrimination cases had been filed as of Jan. 16. Of those, 269were in California.
Cruz Sdndoval, the commission’s sole Latino, told Weekly Report, "The law is causing a lot of problems. Employers aren’t taking any chances. If your eyes aren’t blue, you’re not too fair andyou haven’tyet mastered English, you may be subject to discrimination.”
The commission’s findings are "highly significant,” said Francisco Garcfa, director of
continued on page 2
Kansan Lands RNC Job
Julian Martfnez, a Kansas native, became the highest ranking Hispanic in the Republican National Committee when he began his job Jan. 8 as aspecial assistant to RNC Chairman Lee Atwater.
Most recently an investment broker in Dallas, Martfnez will report directly to Atwater.
"My goal is to increase the participation of the Hispanic community in the political process and to show them that their i-deals are more in mesh with the Republican Party than they are with the Democrats,” Martfnez told Weekly Report.
Martfnez, 42, has worked in the campaign to re-elect U.S. Rep. Steve Bartlett (R-Texas) and was a staff member in 1978 in Secretary of State Jim Baker’s unsuccessful campaign for Texas attorney general. Martfnez will work in the RNC Voter Outreach Office.
Cabinet-Level Hiring Trails U.S. Average
College Enrollment Decreases, 1976-88


Questions Remain Over Health Foundation’s Mission
By Danilo Alfaro
With its first national fund-raising effort scheduled for March, a Milwaukee-based health foundation targeting Latino children continues to raise concerns by ignoring established Hispanic health organizations.
Formed last July by Milwaukee residents James Parks, an attorney, and Darryl Hanson, a fund-raising management executive, the Hispanic Children’s Foundation of America has announced as its two-year goal raising $10 million.
The group plans a March 10 radio-thon that will air in the top 30 Hispanic markets over the Spanish Information Service Net-
work. Reported in Weekly Report Aug. 28, the plan has provoked skepticism among Hispanic health organization leaders. They say the foundation is not in touch with the existing network.
“We have never been contacted or approached by them,” said Helen Muftoz, a vice president for the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations in Washington, D.C.
Citing the group’s relative youth, Parks told Weekly Report, “Concerns that we aren’t getting involved are premature. If further down the road we still haven’t gotten involved, then those concerns might be legiti-
mate.”
Latino health leaders also worry the group may exhaust a limited funding pool. Chris Lange, the foundation’s development director, countered, “We would try to expand that pool by targeting a new market that may be sympathetic to Hispanics.”
While the foundation has placed six Latinos, including three health professionals, on its nine-member advisory board, the sole Hispanic on the foundation’s five-member board of directors, Ricardo Dfaz, commissioner of the Department of City Development in Milwaukee, was forced to resign because of conflict of interest.
Court Stays New Texas Judge Elections
By F6lix Perez
In the latest twist of a lawsuit charging that the system used by Texas’ nine largest counties to elect judges dilutes the vote of Latinos, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Austin, Texas, stayed Jan. 11a lower federal court order calling for special elections this May.
The League of United Latin American Citizens, a plaintiff, called the stay a momentary delay in an inevitable revamping of the way judicial elections in those counties are held.
"We’ve struggled with this judicial system since 1850, and afew more days being given to the governor and the legislature certainly
will not be an eternity,” said Cruz Chavira, LULAC’s national chief of staff.
The appellate court said that the legislature should have more time to come up with its own proposal to restructure the countywide method of electing judges.
The legislature will begin a special session Feb. 27 and has until the end of that session to devise a plan. If it cannot do so, the stay will be lifted and the lower court’s order will go into effect. The order stipulates that the elections be based on state legislative districts in the larger counties and on county commissioner districts in the smaller ones.
Calif. Panel Confirms Previous Findings
continued from page 1
immigration prog rams for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. “It’s independent confirmation from a government agency of what MALDEF and other civil rights groups have been saying ~ that there has been widespread discrimination, confusion and misleading information as a result of the employer sanctions.”
The commission estimated that after the immigration law took effect, 53,000 California employers began asking only job applicants who appeared to be foreign-born or who spoke with an accent for work authorization documents. Another 73,000 employers began hiring only U.S. citizens, it stated.
INS spokesperson Verne Jervis noted that the information in the report was “anecdotal.” He told Weekly Report, “We do take such reports seriously. But who’s to say how much discrimination was present before IRCA? How much was actually caused by IRCA? Those things are difficult to measure.”
In addition to penalizing employers for knowingly hiring undocumented workers, IRCA contains previsions for assessing fines against employers who are found to discriminate against workers because of their ethnic background. They can be ordered to hire and give back pay to the bias victims.
The U.S. General Accounting Office, charged 2
with evaluating the act, is scheduled in February or March to release its third and final report to Congress on IRCA. If GAO concludes employer sanctions have caused discrimination, Congress must vote on whether to repeal the sanctions. On the other hand, if the GAO finds no such bias, IRCA’s anti-discrimination provisions could be scrapped.
Neither of the GAO’s first two reports concluded that job discrimination could be attributed to the sanctions.
In November MALDEF issued a report linking discrimination to the employer sanctions and criticized the GAO for failing to acknowledge the bias.
Last July the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights also reported a pattern of discrimination against authorized workers. It concluded the GAO understated the extent of the bias.
Al Stapleton, assistant director of the GAO’s general government division, said the contrast between the findings was due in part to difficulty in defining a “widespread pattern.” But, he added, the upcoming third report uses new criteria and measurements. “All bets are off in terms of previous reports. It’s a whole new ball game,” he said.
The new report also urged a moratorium on sanctions against employers who hire newly legalized immigrants still awaiting work authorization documents.
Jan. 22,1990
INS Agrees to Rethink Fee for Naturalization
After receiving letters from two Latino congressmen and a national advocacy group, the Immigration and Naturalization Service told Weekly Report Jan. 17 it will reconsider its 5-week-old fees for legal residents seeking to become naturalized citizens.
“Our intention is to go back and issue another final rule...,” said INS spokesperson Duke Austin, quickly adding that this did not mean the agency would repeal the policy.
INS Commissioner Gene McNary received letters from U.S. Reps. Edward Roybal (D-Calif.), Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials arguing the fee increase placed atremendous burden on the working-poor Latino. INS established a $60 fee for adults and $50 for minors. These were in addition to the current $50 court filing fee.
The average annual income of Mexican immigrants, the second largest group to apply for U.S. citizenship, is $18,000, said NALEO.
“The next thing they will do is charge us to vote,’’ said Mike Zamba, director of the NALEO Washington office.
Crime Hits Latinos Hard
An average of 40 out of every 1,000 Latinos 12 and older were the victims of violent crime each yearfrom 1979 to 1986, compared with 35 per 1,000 for non-His-panics, found a survey released Jan. 14 by the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics.
The number of household crimes ~ burglary, larceny and auto theft - for every 1,000 Hispanics dipped from 299 in 1979 to237 in 1986. The rate for non-Hispanics decreased also. It fell from 242 to 172.
The survey reported that an average of 11 out of every 1,000 Hispanics 12 and older were robbed from 1979 to 1986. This compares with six for non-Hispan-ics. The aggravated assault rate was 12 for Latinos during the eight-year period. It was 10 for non-Latinos.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


John Trasvina
Peace and Census Dividends
Whether it was a beer company or a national news magazine that labeled the 1990s as “The Decade of the Hispanic” is now irrelevant. The real question facing our community today is whether the 1990s will be the decade when our hopes of justice and equality will be finally realized.
The breadth of opportunities for Hispanics in the 1990s will be determined largely by two entirely different events - one that is occurring thousands of miles away from the Americas and another that will occur shortly in every barrio. The fate of Hispanics for the rest of this century will be shaped by the permanency of the changes in Eastern Europe and resulting “peace dividend” of rechanneled military expenditures in a post-Cold War era and by the success of the 1990 census.
Simply stated, with the threat to Europe drastically diminished, the President and Congress gain new options for tackling the budget def icit and reinvesting in the people of the United States. The needs of Hispanics must be heard in this decade.
According to a comprehensive analysis of the coming “peace dividend” produced by BusinessWeek, a5% cut in defense spending could lower the federal budget deficit and achieve dramatic growth in the gross national product.
PEACE DIVIDEND PROMISES BENEFITS
Although some detractors fearthatthe peace dividend will be diverted to pay for the growing savings and loan bailout, economists now forecast that the reduction in interest rates will foster investments in housing, the general infrastructure, and education, areas where Hispanics have critical needs.
Hispanics have the lowest home-ownership level of any group and are three times more likely than whites to live in inadequate or overcrowded housing. A peace dividend could mean 500,000 extra new housing starts in the next decade.
Public investments in roads, bridges, and core infrastructure have been neglected and delayed since the 1970s. Added expenditures in this area, perhaps as little as $15 billion, would spur Hispanic employment in certain trades and create opportunities for Hispanic contractors and entrepreneurs.
Investment in education is also a must for Hispanic progress. At the end of the 1980s, bilingual education was available to a smaller percentage of students in need than at the beginning of the Reagan era. After a decade of underfunding, spending here and for higher education is long overdue.
1990s HOLD GREAT PROMISE
A prerequisite for full consideration of Hispanic needs in the budget process is full participation by Hispanics when the federal census Is taken Sunday, April 1. The census count determines the apportionment of the U.S. House of Representatives and the allocation of many federal spending programs. Three of the states with substantial Hispanic populations - California, Texas and Florida ~ are expected to gain up to 16 seats in the House and control more than 110 electoral votes for the 1992 election.
For the census to recognize population increases among Hispanics and for new congressional districts to be drawn to represent Hispanic areas takes Hispanics to stand up and be counted on Census Sunday and for institutions interested in Hispanics to encourage that participation.
The 1990s hold great promise for being the real Decade of the Hispanic. While Hispanics are hardly able to direct the liberation of Eastern Europe that can reshape U.S. budget priorities, they are in a position to capitalize on those developments by gaining the political clout and recognition that a full census count would bring.
(John Trasvina, the only Hispanic counsel in the U.S. Senate, is president-elect of the Washington, D.C., Hispanic Bar Association.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report Jan.
Sin pelos en la lengua
TASTEBUDS AND CONVENTION CONVERSATION: My tas-tebuds are wilting. After a lifetime eating mangoes, I can still tell a good one from a bad one. But the more subtle differences in flavor tend to evade me now.
It’s that way, too, with Hispanic conventions. I’ve learned the tricks: which banquet tables get served first, where to sit so I can sneak out when 20 plaques are about to be bestowed (and 20 acceptance speeches delivered), which receptions will run out of the good finger-food early. All that important stuff.
But I’m so busy developing my own agenda that I’m losing my ability to capture the flavor of the whole affair.
So it was at the National Association of Hispanic Publications convention in Orlando this month. I liked the food, the people, the program, the talented musicians and dancers, even the some-times-intense politicking.
(Florida seems to bring out that intensity in us. At the December meeting of Dade County’s 160-member Republican Executive Committee, Latino GOP leaders exchanged enough fisticuffs and obscenities to cause party activist Marfa Tuma to declare to The Miami Herald: "We’re going to have to start giving everybody two Valiums before the meetings.”)
Newspaper publishers are better behaved, of course. And it wasn’t until flying home that I realized what made the NAHP event unique. A mango with a special sabor.
Never have I seen a convention where the language shifted so smoothly between English and Spanish. Cocktail conversations, major speakers, workshop debates, pitches by exhibitors -- it didn’t seem to matter what tongue was used. Philip Morris VP George Knox and Lauro Cavazos' stand-in from the Department of Education, John Sanders (Where does Lauro go when Hispanics meet?), did their oraciones in English; Antonio Leano Alvarez del Castillo, president of the Universidad Autdnoma de Guadalajara, did his in Spanish.
Everybody understood. No double introductions needed.
It’s even getting tough now to guess national origins.
I date back to those activist days in California where Spanglish was the official conference idiom, mariachis played for an hour and then you took up a collection if you wanted them to stay, and fistfights were so common they could have been advertised in the program as part of the after-dinner entertainment.
The change that impresses me most is the use of language. For a large body of U.S. Hispanics, the transition from being semiliterate to melodious in two languages has been occurring for quite a while. Interestingly, those who do it best are immigrants.
It’s a heritage that could be passed along so easily if our schools would make a decent investment in bilingual education.
I wonder if Cavazos’ stand-in, John Sanders, got the message.
-- Kay Birbaro
Quoting...
MANUEL EVARISTO NORIEGA, an 83-year-old resident of Miami Beach, Fla., who has received threatening phone calls from people thinking he is related to former Panamanian leader Manuel Antonio Noriega, explaining in the Jan. 11 New York Times he is not related to the deposed Noriega:
*7 have no pineapple face by any means. I don’t use pimple cream. And I don’t wear red unden/vear. ”
HECTOR “MACHO MAN" CAMACHO, the boxer, in USA Today on his affinity for Elvis Presley after visiting Graceland:
1 was impressed, and I’m not easy to impress - Elvis'home, the way he lived, the way he dressed. It’s a lot like myself.”
22,1990
TRASVINA
3


Calendar
MAJOR 1990 EVENTS
Following is a fistin^<3^^s*^aj0*^^Ornin§ conferences, convention$,seminarsandbanquet$ of interest to Hispanics.
CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION : m â– : â–  I x
Conference' gj r:f, “
San Francisco Jan. 23-27 *• , . V.- , .
Hal McCurte (213) 946-1424 f
cuban American National council
Conference * & ' 3!• :• ^ ••
Miami Jan. 24-26
AlinaB©(|^f^305) 6^2-34^^ 7 ^
LATIN BUILDERS-iSlIIII
Banquet;•..; /a
Miami Jail.- 26 * y,\ :iSSk;- -R
Jorge Abril (305) 44S§9^,^.
NATIONAL ASSOQIAHON^O!^ LATINO ELECTEP Oif-Fp^ |
Legalization Workshop '
Houston Jan. 30,31 _/'4R Eliza May (512) 2274^}^
LATIN BUSliNi^A^^^^ll^^’
Banquet
Los Angeles Feb. 2 Ana Barbosa (81 8) 965-4227
SOCIETY OF H@MicI1WfSsSI0NAL
ENGINEERS
Conference , v '
Long 'Beach, dai|. Feb, 9,10_ • •
Ludwig Cam’pqs%1i#725-3970
PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION OF AZTLAN Conference
Oakland, Calif. Feb. i 5-171"
Concepcion T revihoWadier(415) 581-2808
NMBQ8AL on AG-
ING
Conference
McAllen, Texas Feb./1;0,V'.:-•; • [i Luis Acevedo (202) ^5-1288
NATIONAL iHiSFA^jclA OF
MEDIA ARTS AND SCIENCES
Conference
Universal City, iMf^rch:T-3
Helen Hem*r««|j^Srt4t4B
MEXICAN' I AMERICA^ oRRORTUNITY
FpUNDATI0|i^;
Women’s Conf^ingt^
Los Angeles March 2 r, / ’
Dionicio: Morales (213) 72^7^t;-
TEACHERS OF^Ii&ISH Will. OF OTHER LANGUAGES Convention ^ : ^ ‘ '
San Francisco March 6-10 I ||||| §f§ W
Susan Bayley (703) 836-0774 *, ' '' .
NATIONAL COALITION OF HISPANiC HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ORGANIZATIONS
Conference
San Francisco March 15-18
Paula Marie Read (202) 371-2100
NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN FORUM
Conference
New York March 19,20
Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311
NATIONAL HEAD START MIGRANT DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION Conference
San Antonio March 22-24 Romeo Sifuentes (512) 722-5174 CENTER FOR MIGRATION STUDIES Conference
Washington, D.C. March 29,30 LydioTomasi (718) 351-8800
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION Conference Boston March 29-31 Cassie Schultz (312) 329-2511 SER-JOBS FOR PROGRESS Conference Dallas April 10-14 Obie Gonz&lez (214) 631-3999
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC
JOURNALISTS
Conference
San Francisco April 11-14
Executive Director (202) 783-6228
SPANISH PROFESSIONALS IN AMERICA
General Assembly
San Juan, Puerto Rico April 17-22
Gloria Castresana Waid (209) 226-6415
NATIONAL SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIATION
Pluralism Convention New Orleans April 21-24 Phil Smith (703) 838-6722
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL
EDUCATION
Conference
TucSon, Ariz. April 21-25 Kathy Escamilla (602) 621-1286
NEBRASKA MEXICAN AMERICAN COMMISSION Conference
Omaha, Neb. May 10-12 Patricia Davila (308) 534-2630 NATIONAL IMAGE Conference
Oakland, Calif. May 14-19 Albert Rocha (707) 644-4470
NATIONAL ACTION COUNCIL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING Forum
Chicago May 29-31
Ronnie Dennes (212) 279-2626
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF HISPANIC WOMEN
Conference
Washington, D.C. May 31-June 1 Jan. 22,1990
V:: dl|:- LATINO
Conference
Miami Juilfe^:'-, -fi- •
Li#;; Baquedano (202) 546-2536
Mexican American women’s national
t , , >
Kansas City, Mo,j.t Patricia Padilla (202) 54745482Vii >
LEAGUE OF UNITED: ^
CITIZENS
Convention
Albuquerque* N.M, June 20-24 Max Martinez (505) 846-616/
national
Conference
WashlnQFtQh^ .
RajSlYzaguirre (202) 289-1380 AMERICAN Gl FORUM -Convention • '
Chicago July 30-Aug. 5 .
Vilma Cotom
HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS GALA Fashion Show ^d Benefit; |
Washington* D.C. Sept 19 ..
Grace Land in (202) 452-00^2 ;
CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC CAUCUS IN-
.
Dinner : ^ v
Washington, D.C. Sept. 25 (tentative)
EVaDe Luna (202) 543-1771
U.$C HISP^NIC CHAMBER OF COMMERCE •
Convention•; JRP-VR-;„ * -
Albuquerque, N.M. Sept. 26-30 ^
MaxineWober (816)531-6363
MEXICAN AMERICAN LEGAL DEFENSE
AND EQUfl^ â– 
Leadership Symposium"
San Ahtdhio Sept. 28i, 29 (tentative)
Adela Flores (512) 224-5476
PUERf^i RICAN LEGAL DEFENSE AND
EDUCATION FUND t
Banquet
New York Oct. (date not set)
Eli^^h pklh^bn (212) 219-3360 MIDWEST/^ VOTER REGISTRA-
TION EDUC^lGN PR Leadership d^nferohce.^
Chicago Oct. 1&14,
Joanna Martinez (312) 427-8683
NAIldiM OPMETfr COUNCIL Conference' \
Houston Oct; 24-26 Anne Ashton (212) 944-2430 :
N^ONA^PUERTO RjCAN COALITION
Conference
New York Nov. 15-17 \
Rambn Daubbn (202) 223^915
4
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
Explore Employment Opportunities with Arlington County Government Seminar
Arlington County Government Department of Personnel is sponsoring two FREE evening seminars to provide jobseekers with helpful information in the search for employment opportunities with Arlington County.
Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover the following topics:
â–  Identifying the appropriate job match
â–  Determining relevant skills and abilities for specific position
â–  Learning to compete effectively
â–  Information on current and future vacancies
The Personnel Department will offer individual assistance in English and Spanish after the seminar.
COME TO THE FREE SEMINARS WHEN: Thursday, January 25,1990
Thursday, March 22,1990
Both sessions will be held from 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse Plaza
2100 Clarendon Boulevard County Board Room - 3rd Floor - Room 307 Arlington, Virginia 22201
(Across from the Courthouse Metro Stop on the Orange Line)
If any questions please call (703) 358-3501
***No job interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop*** Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
obd
if you’ve got
_______ the ability,
broadcast it. Marketing Director
Capital Cities/ABC is currently seeking a Marketing Director with experience in sales and programming promotions. This is a key position responsible for creating and executing promotions and advertising campaigns for a top-rated Southern California radio station and its programs.
The ideal candidate will have at least 5 years experience in a principal role in mayor market radio, television or advertising, along with knowledge of broadcast production and radio studio operations.
ABC will provide you wfth a competitive salary and benefits package, plus the opportunity to work in an exciting and dynamic environment. For consideration, please send your r6sum6 and salary history to Personnel Department, Capital Cities/ABC Inc., 4151 Prospect Ave., Hollywood, Calif. 90027.
Equal Opportunity Employer MJFIH/V.
CARTOONISTS: We pay $25 for humorous or political cartoons. Submit to: Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone: (202) 234-0280.
DEARPERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No otheir publication ft? system jets ybu targetnational popi;:^ professional with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link ;Wedkfy Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy id: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by : 5 p.rii, (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CUVSSiFlIiilb RATES:
90 cents
ZiPcode count as2words; telephone number, : ! word). Multiple use raids on request.
Dispi-AV ci!^ puyf es|
(ads with border^ varied type sizes) $45 per column inch.
The Last Supper of Chicano Heroes By Muralist Jose Antonio Burciaga
For full-color poster (17 1/2" by 23"), send $15 to Diseflos, P.O. Box 3729, Stanford, CA 94039. (Information sheet on mural heroes included.)
The Last Supper of Chicano Heroes is a detail of the 14' by 9' Burciaga mural "Mythology and History of Maiz," dedicated in June 1989 at Stanford University's Casa Zapata.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jan. 22, 1990
5
ftto>


M
A
R
K
El
T
P
L
A
C
E
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
VICE PROVOST FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS
Arizona State University West Campus, the first university campus established by the state of Arizona in this century, is seeking applicants and nominees for the position of Vice Provost for University Relations.
The Vice Provost for University Relations is charged with developing and implementing plans to promote West Campus to internal and external constituencies and assist the Provost in coordination with the President and the Vice President of University Relations in presenting issues related to campus advancement and external relations to the media, the community, and the Arizona Boards of Regents, the legislature and the Governor.
The Vice Provost for University Relations reports directly tothe Provost for ASU West, the chief executive officer of the campus. The functions of External Relations, Marketing, Community Relations, Publications, Information Services and Alumni Relations report to this position.
The successful candidate should have broad knowledge of and experience in marketing research, marketing, alumni relations and development, public relations, publications, student recruitment, and government relations in a university setting. Considerable knowledge of management principles and practices in higher education is needed. Advanced degree is preferred; minimum requirements include a bachelor’s degree and at least eight years of relevant management experience preferably in institutions of higher education. Other equivalent combinations of training and experience will be considered.
Letters of application should be accompanied by a complete vita and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least three references. Mail all applications and nominations to;
Dr. Jacquelyn A. Matterfeld, Chair Vice Provost for University Relations Search Committee c/o Personnel Arizona State University ASB 326
Tempe, Ariz. 85287
CLOSING DATE: January 31,1990, or the first of each month thereafter until position is filled.
I PERSONNEL
| CONSULTANT
| 1 Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. is offer-
- m 1 ing a challenging and stimulating
§ | opportunity for a strong person-
1 | nel generalist to join the staff of
l the national organization located
p | in midtown Manhattan.
V § You will use your 5-plus years ; solid HR experience to provide
technical assistance to outbased locations in: AA planning/implem-entation, employee relations, recruitment, performance manage-
| merit, legislation & policy inter-| pretation, and other related areas.
Candidates must be able to travel
1 approximately 50% nationally, de-| sign and conduct training ses-
| sions, problem solve and have
' excellent communication skills.
! | Salary mid $30’s with excellent
Â¥ benefits.
For immediate consideration, send r6sum6 to:
m Janice Jacobs
Girl Scouts of the U.S.A.
f: 830 Third Avenue
? New York, N.Y. 10022.
EOEM/F/H/V
GIRL SCOUTS
liil The Social Science Research Cbi^ with the Cen-
ter for the Study of Urban Poverty, UCL^i: isf offerihg a 1 $90 SUmrrier bi^eriatioh Workshop Program for 1&12 minority graduate students interested in research on the urban underclass,
be held &UCIA will assist students in devetopihg a dissehgffibh proposal dqring two ses-sions: June 18-29 and August 20-24; The §SRC win cover all expense| for participants, and studbhtsWIH receive a stipend of $750 for successful .com: pletion bjf the progrartfe|
Application poatmaHc deadline March 1990. Fbr further iriforrha-tion on applying, ptease contact: Social Science Research Council Research on the Urban Underclass, 605 Third Avenue; islew York, N.Y.:10158 (212) 661-0280.
DEAN, COLLEGE OF THE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER
The Dean is the executive officer of the college and is responsible to the Vice Chancellor and Chancellor for its administration. In consultation with the Dean’s staff, the department chairpersons and college committees, the Dean will provide leadership and support the development, evaluation and administration of the academic programs of the college including curriculum, instruction, scholarship and service.
Major qualifications include a strong commitment to shared governance and affirmative action, flexible and innovative executive skills with a proven administrative record; successful experience in communication and in arts advocacy to all segments of the university community and the general public; a knowledge of the diverse disciplines within the college; an appropriate academic degree with a successful record of teaching and professional achievement sufficient for a potential tenured appointment at a senior faculty rank in an arts discipline.
Send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and three original letters of reference to Dr. Glenn C. Hayes, Chairperson, Search and Screen Committee, College of the Arts, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wis. 53190. Review of applications will begin on March 1,1990. The position will be available July 1,1990.
UW-WHITEWATER IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER WITH AN AFFIRMATIVE ACTION PLAN. WOMEN, MEMBERS OF MINORITY GROUPS, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES, AND VIETNAM-ERA VETERANS ARE ENCOURAGE TO APPLY.
6
Jan 22, 1989
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS
Sociology: Teach Research Methods courses; contribute to other areas of curriculum. All areas of substantive specialization considered. Prefer Ph.D., undergraduate teaching experience. Search committee SOC.
Performing Arts (Director of Theatre): 12-month position. Teach acting, directing, speech; manage theatre facilities/staff; develop funding. Requires terminal degree or equivalent in Theatre; strong teaching experience; professional experience in multicultural theatre. Prefer professional experience in integration of theatre, music, dance. Available: Summer 1990. Search committee DTMT.
Analytical Chemistry: Ph.D. required. Prefer strong commitmentto undergraduate teaching & research. Search committee AC.
Comparative Humanities (Language/Linguistics): Teach Intro, to Language, Structure of English, Politics of Language from cross-cultural perspective. Ph.D. required. Search committee CHL.
Teacher Education: 3 positions.
Reading/Language Arts: Teach reading found., content area reading, language arts; participate in curriculum development. Prefer doctorate in reading/related area, precollege & college teaching/teacher training experience. Search committee TE-RLA.
Director of Field Experience: Administer elementary/secondary school field placements; coordinate field activities; teach 1 course/sem. Required: Master’s degree, elementary or middle-school teaching & student teacher supervising experience. Prefer administrative & college teaching experience, knowledge of Long Island (NY) school districts. Search committee TE-DFE.
Foundations/Coordinator, Secondary Education: Teach educ. foundations courses; coordinate secondary education concentration. Prefer doctorate in foundations of secondary education & secondary or middle school teaching experience. Search committee TE-FCSE.
American Studies (Journalism): Teach magazine, print journalism courses, including; Editing/Production, African-American Press, Feature Writing. Prefer graduate degree; practical experience in journalism/freelance writing; journalism teaching experience. Search committee ASJ.
Politics, Economics & Society (Economics): Teach basic economics courses with competence in political economy/ statistics. Requires: Ph.D., teaching experience. Prefer public policy or international studies specialty. Search committee PES-E.
The College also anticipates the following faculty openings:
Business & Management Department:
Operations Mgmt. & MIS. Search committee BM-OMM.
Marketing (2 pos.). Search committee BM-M.
Finance. Search committee BM-F.
Quant. Methods. Search committee BM-QM.
Community Health (Biol. Sciences Dept.) Search committee CH.
Mathematics (Mathematics Dept.) Search committee MATH.
Experience in multicultural higher education institutions desirable. All positions tenure-track. Ranks, salaries commensurate with experience. Except as noted, positions begin Fall 1990. R6sum6s reviewed upon receipt.
Director, Administrative Computing Svcs.:
Responsibilities: Supervise overall activities of Admin. Computing Center; analyze/evaluate admin, requirements of college community; maintain/upgrade hardware; oversee implementation of campus & statewide networking. Requires Master’s relevant field; 5yrs. experience data processing systems design, programming or operations; 3yrs. mgmt. of Unisys large system A-series. Prefer experience networking fiber optic cables, Ethernet, DEC, Student Info. & Campus Admin, database system. Antic, available Oct. 1990. Screen committee DACS.
Associate Dean of instruction
Responsibilities: Supervise all instruc. support areas, including Center for Academic Advisement & Testing, learning centers, acad. computing center; leading retention/graduation activities. Reports to Dean of Instruction & participates in planning for Academic Affairs. Requires: Ph.D.; extensive college-level teaching experience; background in multicultural setting. Screen committee ADI.
Director, Center for Academic Advisement & Testing
Responsibilities: Supervise admin./evaluation of placement exams; coordinate advisement activities; participate in design of assessment outcome activities. Requires: Master’s, appropriate experience. Immed. Screen committee DCAAT.
For all positions, send r6sum6 & names of 3 references by March 1 to:
Office of Personnel & Affirmative Action Screening Committee (specify)
State University of New York/College at Old Westbury Old Westbury, NY 11568-0210
Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer
M
A
R
K
El
T
|P|
I'Ll
A
C
E
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Jan. 22,1990
7


Arts & Entertainment
LATINOS ‘ACED’ IT: Two Hispanic entries were big winners at this year’s cable TV ACE awards.
The music special Gloria Estefan & Miami Sound Machine picked up three ACEs. The program, aired on the Showtime cable network, was named “best music special” and earned additional kudos for “best directing” and “best editing, comedy special, series or musical special.”
The first award went to the show’s producers, among whom Emilio Estefan, Gloria’s husband, was one of three executive producers.
Named “best actor in a film or miniseries” was Rub6n Blades, who was featured last year in the HBO film Dead Man Out A visibly surprised Blades picked up the award at the ceremony, held in Los Angeles Jan. 14.
The ACE awards are given by the National Academy of Cable Programming - and are not to be confused with the ACEs given by New York’s Asoclacidn de Cronlstas cfe Espectaculos.
The latter organization - a grouping of Latino entertainment journalists ~ recently announced nominees for its awards ceremony, to be
held in March. Dozens of nominees in several categories include, coincidentally, singer Gloria Estefan.
In other award news, four Latin American films and a Spanish entry have been submitted this year for consideration by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for a “foreign language” Oscar. Argentina’s Laamiga, Brazil’s A Belter Future, Cuba’s Papeies secun-darios, Puerto Rico’s 6Qu6 le pas6 a Santiago? and Spain’s Montoyas y Tarantos compete with 32 other foreign films for five spots among 1989 Oscar nominees. The academy will announce its nominations next month.
FOCUS ON THE ISLAND: New York’s En Foco community visual arts agency has begun an educational exchange program with Puerto Rico’s Universidad del Sagrado Corazdn.
Titled intercambio, the program will include three photography seminars over three consecutive Saturdays at the University's San Juan campus.
The program began Jan. 20 with Puerto Rico-based photographer Jack Delano. It continues Jan. 27 with Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer and concludes Feb. 3 with New York's Jill Freedman.
- Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
PUBLISHERS ELECT DURAN: At an annual conference that broke records and new ground for Latino print media, the National Association of Hispanic Publications elected Texan Tino Dur4n its new president Jan. 13.
The three-day event in Orlando, Fla., set attendance and exhibit records. Some 302 persons registered, double the number last year when the publishers met in Las Vegas, Nev. Sales of exhibit booths jumped from 10 last year to 49, with groups such as airlines, software companies and news-wire services participating for the first time.
Durdn, publisher of two Texas weeklies, El Informador Hispano in Fort Worth and La Prensa in San Antonio, edged incumbent Manuel Toro, publisher of La Prensa ’n Orlando, by a single delegate vote, 21-20.
Duran, 55, told Weekly Report he hoped to gain recognition and credibility for the association from corporate advertisers. “I want to
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc.
1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: F6lix Perez
Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Danilo Alfaro. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108; Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
show that we’re here to do a job for a special, rapidly growing segment of the population and that advertisers can’t afford to ignore these consumers.” He also mentioned the possibility of hiring an executive director and other staff, as well as establishing an office in Washington, D.C.
All of the other three officers were re-elected: Vice President Vfctor Field, Mundo Artistico, Los Angeles; Secretary Hilbert Morales, El Observador, San Jose, Calif.; and Treasurer A. B. Collado, El Hispano, Albuquerque, N.M.
Regional caucuses atthe sixth annual event elected the following chairpersons: Region I, co-chairs Rhonda Ehrlich, El Dlarlo, New York City, and Eduardo Sampertedui, El Espeo tacular, Philadelphia; Region II, Oscar Reyes, El Pregonero, Washington, D.C.; Region III, Luis Rossi, La Raza, Chicago; Region IV, Rogelio Noriega, El Mexlca, Houston; Region VI, Juan Pifarr6, Horizontes, San Fran-cisco/San Jose, Calif.; and RegionVII, Carlos Dur4n, Ola magazine, Long Beach, Calif. The Region V election, initially a tie, was not re-
solved.
Other conference highlights included the announcement by Kraft General Foods of a $500,000commitment for corporate advertising in Hispanic print media this year.
Founded in 1982, NAHP has 77 member publications spread throughout 15 states and the District of Columbia.
NOTABLE: The Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences has appointed Ray Blanco, president of Cutting Edge Entertainment Inc., to the post of national chairperson of the group’s U.S. Hispanic Media Conference March 1-3 in Universal City, Calif...Carlos Alberto Montafler, former editorial director of the Miami Herald’s Spanish-language supplement El Nuevo Heraldhas joined the Herald Features Syndicate. His column, "Point of Vlew/Punto de Vista," will be syndicated in English and Spanish...Former Hispanic Link News Service reporter Rhonda Smith has joined The Daily Journal in Vine-land, N.J., as a reporter...
~ Danilo Alfaro
Bachelor’s, Master’s, Ph.D. Degrees Awarded to Latinos
2&991
25,874 llllllp Bachelor's
21,832 1 ^ |||||^ MB Master's UlIHlllll Doctorate
w ' dJ ..

1981 1985 1987
Source: American Council on Education


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week The editorial board of the Progressive Farmer magazine names U.S. Rep. E. "Kika" de Ia Garza (D-Texas), chairman of the House Com mittee on Agriculture, its 1990 Man of the Year in Service to Agriculture ... Dan VIgil, associate dean at the University of Colorado at Denver, takes office as the president of the Colorado Hispanic Bar Association ... The Rose Institute of State and Local Government of Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, Calif., elects Richard Amador to its board of governors. Amador, president and CEO of CHARO Inc., also serves as president of the Latin Business Foundation ... The Phoenix, Ariz.-based National Hispanic Corporate Council elects Albert Moreno, an executive with Levi Strauss Inc. in San Francisco, as its president. .. Robert Gamez, 21, wins his first start on the Professional Golfers' Association Tour with a four-shot victory in the $900,000 Northern Telecom Tucson Open. Gamez, who at tended the University of Arizona in Tucson, is the first player to win in his debut on the PGA Tour since 1973 ... Callers harass and threaten Manuel Evarlsto Noriega, a retired resident of Miami Beach, Fla., in the mistaken belief that he is related to former Panamanian leader Manuel Antonio Noriega. Evaristo, a transplanted New Yorker, is 83 years old and of Mexican and Spanish ancestry ... According to New York City police, three men attempting to rob a store flee after one shoots worker Angel Santana, 51 , with a .357 -caliber Magnum pistol and the bullet lodges in Santana's trouser zipper. Santana was treated for trauma ... L By Danilo _ _ _! _ _ Evidence that the 1986 immigration act's employer sanctions have caused widespread discrimination continues to mount with the release Jan. 11 of a report by a California government panel in San Fran cisco. Echoing charges leveled by Hispanic and other rights advocates, the seven-member Cabinet-Level Hiring Trails U.S. Average Only one Cabinet-level department had a higher percentage of Hispanic employees in 1988 than the Latino representation in the U.S. labor force, according to statistics released Jan. 17 by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. The Justice Department exceeded the 7.3% national average by two percentage points, while Commerce fared the worst ofthe 13 de partments, 2. 7%. Although not a Cabinet department, the White House had the lowest Hispanic repre sentation, 1. 1 %. 'tHispanics are the fastest growing seg ment of the U.S. population, but you would not see this reflected in federal employment trends," said U.S. Rep. and NALEO Presi dent Edward Roybal (D-Calif.). Overall, there are 109,566 Hispanics in the federal Y'orkforce, \ or 5.20k. The departments headed by Hispanics ranked 1Oth and 12th in Latino representa tion. The Interior Department, led by Manuel Lujan, had 3.5%, while the Education Depart ment, headed by Lauro Cavazos, had 3.2%. The report also revealed that the salary gap between Anglo and Hispanic white-collar federal workers incree93d by $705 since 1982. hi 1988, Anglos averaged $28,517 a year, compared with $24,599 for Hispanics. Latino Employee Representation 1988 Justice 9.3% Health 4.5% Treasury 6.3 Energy 4.5 HUD 5.6 Agric. 4.4 Defense 5.5 State 3.6 Labor 4.6 Interior 3.5 Trans. 3.5% Education 3.2 Commerce 2. 7 White Hse. 1.1 Labor Force 7.3 Source: U.S. Office of Personnel Management, com piled by the National Association of Latino Elected and Appoirted Officials College Enrollment Decreases, 1976-88 The percentage of low-income Hispanic high school graduates 18 to 24 years old who were enrolled in college dropped 15 percent age points, to 35%, between 1976 and 1988, according to a report released Jan. 15 by the American Council on Education. Middle-income 18-to 24-year-old Hispan ics also experienced a decline over the 12-year period. Their college enrollment rate went from 53% to 46%. "Given the low high school completion rate of low-income African American and Hispanic youth, ... one realizes that as a nation we have not come close to addressing . the postsecondary educational needs of low income minority youth," stated the report. Overall, there were 450,000 18-to 24-year . old Hispanics enrolled in college in 1988. Latinos earned 2. 7% of the 991 ,000 bachelor's degrees awarded in 1987, a slight in crease from 2% in 1976. The percentage of Hispanics with master's degrees also grew in that period, going from 1.7% to 2.4%. J_atino High School Completion And College Participation 18-to 24-year -old high school graduates (numbers In thousands) High School College Grads Rate Enrolled Rate '76 862 55.6% 309 35.8% '78 935 55.9 254 27.2 '80 1,054 53.7 315 29.9 '82 1,153 57.7 337 29.2 '84 1,212 60.0 362 29.9 '86 1,506 59.9 443 29.4 '88 1 ,458 55.2 450 30.9 Source: American Council on Education Jan.22,1990 California Fair Employment andHousing Commission found that employers are un clear about the sanctions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act, which prohibit hiring . undocumented workers under threat of im prisonment and fines up to $10,000. Many employers fear hiring people who "are or appear to be foreign-born," the com mission reported. More than half of the 3 million undocu mented immigrants granted legal residency under the 1986 act live in California. According to Justice Department spokes person Deborah Burstion-Wade, 785 !RCA related discrimination cases had been filed as of Jan. 16. Of those, 269 were in California. Cruz SSooCMll, the commissioo's sole Latino, told Weekly Report, "The law is causing a lot of problems. Employers aren't taking any chances. If your eyes aren't blue, you're not too fair and you haven'tyet mastered English, you may be subject to discrimination." The commission's findings are "highly sig nificant," said Francisco Garcra, director of oonl/IXJed on page 2 Kansan Lands RNC Job Julian Martrnez, a Kansas native, be came the highest ranking Hispanic in the Republican National Committee when he began his job Jan. 8 as a special assistant to RNC Chairman Lee Atwater. Most recently an investment broker in Dallas, Martrnez will report directly to Atwater. "My goal is to increase the participation of the Hispanic community in the political process and to show them that their ideals are more in mesh with the Republi can Party than they are with the Democrats," Martrnez told Weekly Report. Martrnez, 42, has worked in the cam paign to re-elect U.S. Rep. Steve Bartlett (A-Texas) andwasastaffmemberin 1978 in Secretary of State Jim Baker's unsuc cessful campaign for Texas attorney general. Martrnez will work in the RNC Voter Outreach Office.

PAGE 2

Questions Remain Over Health Foundation's Mission By Danilo Alfaro With its first national fund-raising effort scheduled for March, a Milwaukee-based health foundation targeting Latino children continues to raise concerns by ignoring established Hispanic health organizations. Formed last July by Milwaukee residents James Parks, an attorney, and Darryl Han son, a fund-raising management execu tive, the Hispanic Children's Foundation of America has announced as its two-year goal raising $1 0 million. The group plans a March 10 radio-thon that will air in the top 30 Hispanic markets over the Spanish Information Service Network. Reported in Weekly Report Aug. 28, the plan has provoked skepticism among Hispanic health organization leaders. They say the foundation is not in touch with the existing network. "We have never been contacted or ap proached by them," said Helen Munoz, a vice president for the National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Or ganizations in Washington, D.C. Citing the group's relative youth, Parks told Weekly Report, "Concerns that we aren't getting involved are premature. If further down the road we still haven't gotten in volved, then those concerns might be legiti-Court Stays New Texas Judge Elections By Felix Perez In the latest twist of a lawsuit charging that the system used by Texas' nine largest coun ties to elect judges dilutes the vote of Latinos, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Austin, Texas, stayed Jan. 11 a lower federal court order calling for special elections this May. The League of United Latin American Citi zens, a plaintiff, called the stay a momentary delay in an inevitable revamping of the way judicial elections in those counties are held. "We've struggled with this judicial system since 1850, and a few more days being given to the governor and the legislature certainly will not be an eternity," said Cruz Chavira, LULAC's national chief of staff. The appellate court said that the legislature should have more time to come up with its own proposal to restructure the countywide method of electing judges. The legislature will begin a special session Feb. 27 and has until the end of that session to devise a plan. If it cannot do so, the stay will be lifted and the lower court's order will go into effect. The order stipulates that the elec tions be based on state legislative districts in the larger counties and on county commis sioner districts in the smaller ones. Calif. Panel Confirms Previous Findings continued from page 1 immigration programs for the Mexican Ameri can Legal Defense and Educational Fund. "It's independent confirmation from a gov ernment agency of what MALDEF and other civil rights groups have been saying --that there has been widespread discrimination, confusion and misleading information as a result of the employer sanctions." The commission estimated that after the immigration law took effect, 53,000 California employers began asking only job applicants who appeared to be foreign-born or who spoke with an accent for work authorization documents. Another 73,000 employers be gan hiring only U.S. citizens, it stated. INS spokesperson Verne Jervis noted that the information in the report was "anecdo tal." He told Weekly Report, "We do take such reports seriously. But who's to say how much discrimination was present before IRCA? How much was actually caused by I RCA? Those things are difficult to measure." In addttion to penalizing empiOJers for knONingly hiring undocumented workers, IRCA contains for assessing fines against employers who are found to discriminate against workers because of their ethnic back ground. They can be ordered to hire and give back pay to the bias victims. The U.S. General Acoounting Offtee, charged 2 with evaluating the act, is scheduled in Febru ary or March to release its third and final report to Congress on I RCA. If GAO concludes em ployer sanctions have caused discrimina tion, Congress must vote on whether to re peal the sanctions. On the other hand, if the GAO finds no such bias, I RCA's anti-discrimi nation provisions could be scrapped. Neither of the GAO's first two reports con cluded that job discrimination could be attrib uted to the sanctions. In November MALDEF issued a report link ing discrimination to the employer sanctions and criticized the GAO for failing to acknowl edge the bias. Last July the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights also reported a pattern of discrimina tion against authorized workers. It concluded the GAO understated the extent of the bias. AI Stapleton, assistant director ofthe GAO's general government division, said the con trast between the findings was due in part to difficulty in defining a "widespread pattern." But, he added, the upcoming third report uses new criteria and measurements. "All bets are off in terms of previous reports. It's a whole new ball game," he said. The new report also urged a moratorium on sanctions against employers who hire newly legalized immigrants still awaiting work au thorization documents. Jan.22, 1990 mate." Latino health leaders also worry the group may exhaust a limited funding pool. Chris Lange, the foundation's development di rector, countered, "We would try to expand that pool by targeting a new market that may be sympathetic to Hispanics." While the foundation has placed six Lati nos, including three health professionals, on its nine-member advisory board, the sole Hispanic on the foundation's five member board of directors, Ricardo Dfaz, commissioner of the Department of City Development in Milwaukee, was forced to resign because of conflict of interest. INS Agrees to Rethink Fee for Naturalization After receiving letters from two Latino con gressmen and a national advocacy grou p , the Immigration and Naturalization Service told Weekly Report Jan. 17 it will reconsider its 5-week-old fees for legal residents seek ing to become naturalized citizens. "Our intention is to go back and issue another final rule ... ," said INS spokesperson Duke Austin, quickly adding that this did not mean the agency would repeal the policy. INS Commissioner Gene McNary received letters from U.S. Reps. Edward Roybal (0Calif.), Esteban Torres (D-Calif.) and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials arguing the fee increase placed a tremendous burden on the working poor Latino. INS established a $60 fee for adults and $50 for minors. These were in addition to the current $50 court filing fee. The average annual income of Mexican immigrarts, the second largest group to apply for U.S. citizenship, is $18,000, said NALEO. "The next thing they will do is charge us to vote," said Mike Zamba, director c:l the NALEO Washington office. Crime Hits Latinos Hard An average of 40 out of every 1 ,000 Latinos 12 and older were the victims of violent crime each year from 1979to 1986, compared with 35 per 1 ,000 for non-His panics, found a survey released Jan. 14 by the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics. The number of household crimes -burglary, larceny and auto theft --for every 1 ,000 Hispanics dipped from 299 in 1979 to 237 in 1986. The rate for non-Hispanics decreased also. It fell from 242 to 172. The survey reported that an average of 11 out of every 1,000 Hispanics 12 and older were robbed from 1979 to 1986 . This compares with six for non-Hispan ics. The aggravated assault rate was 12 for Latinos during the eight-year period. It was 1 0 for nonLatinos. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

PAGE 3

John Trasviria Peace and Census Dividends Whether it was a beer company or a national news magazine that labeled the 1990s as "The Decade of the Hispanic" is now irrelevant. The real question facing our community today is whether the 1990s will be the decade when our hopes of justice and equality will be finally realized. The breadth of opportunities for Hispanics in the 1990s will be determined largely by two entirely different events-one that is occur ring thousands of miles away from the Americas and another that will occur shortly in every barrio. The fate of Hispanics for the rest of this century will be shaped by the permanency of the changes in Eastern Europe and resulting "peace dividend" of rechanneled military expen ditures in a post-Cold War era and by the success of the 1990 census. Simply stated, with the threat to Europe drastically diminished, the President and Congress gain new options for tackling the budget deficit and reinvesting in the people of the Unite _ d States. The needs of HispaQics must be heard in this decade. According to a comprehensive analysis of the coming "peace dividenc;f' produced by Business Week, a 5% cut in defense spending could lower the federal budget deficit and TRASVINA achieve dramatic growth in the gross national product. PEACE DIVIDEND PROMISES BENEFITS Although some detractors fear that the peace dividend will be diverted to pay for the growing savings and loan bailout, economists now forecast that the reduction in interest rates will foster investments in housing, the general infrastructure, and education, areas where His panics have critical needs. Hispanics have the lowest home-ownership level of any group and are three times more likely than whites to live in inadequate or over crowded housing. A peace dividend could mean 500,000 extra new housing starts in the next decade. Public investments in roads, bridges, and core infrastructure have been neglected and delayed since the 1970s. Added expenditures in this area, perhaps as little as $15 billion, would spur Hispanic employ ment in certain trades and create opportunities for Hispanic contractors and entrepreneurs. Investment in education is also a must for Hispanic progress. At the end of the 1980s, bilingual education was available to a smaller percentage of students in need than at the beginning of the Reagan era. After a decade of underfunding, spending here and for higher education is long overdue. 1990s HOLD GREAT PROMISE A prerequisite for full consideration of Hispanic needs in the budget process is full participation by Hispanics when the federal census is taken Sunday, April1. The census count determines the apportionment of the U.S. House of Representatives and the allocation of many federal spending programs. Three of the states with substantial Hispanic populations-California, Texas and Florida-are expected to gain up to 16 seats in the House and control more than 11 0 electoral votes for the 1992 election. For the census to recognize population increases among Hispanics and for new congressional districts to be drawn to represent Hispanic areas takes Hispanics to stand up and be counted on Census Sunday and for institutions interested in Hispanics to encourage that participa tion. The 1990s hold great promise for being the real Decade of the Hispanic. While Hispanics are hardly able to direct the liberation of Eastern Europe that can reshape U.S. budget priorities, they are in a Sin pelos en Ia lengua TASTEBUDS AND CONVENTION CONVERSATION: My tas tebuds are wilting. After a lifetime eating mangoes, I can still tell a good one from a bad one. But the more subtle differences in flavor tend to evade me now. It's that way, too, with Hispanic conventions. I've learned the tricks: which banquet tables get served first, where to sit so I can sneak out when 20 plaques are about to be bestowed (and 20 acceptance speeches delivered), which receptions will run out of the good finger -food early. All that important stuff. But I'm so busy developing my own agenda that I'm losing my ability to capture the flavor of the whole affair. So it was at the National Association of Hispanic Publications convention in Orlando this month. I liked the food, the people, the program, the talented musicians and dancers, even the some . times-intense politicking. (Florida seems to bring out that intensity in us. At the December meeting of Dade County's 160-member Republican Executive Committee, Latino GOP leaders enough fisticuffs and obscenities to cause party activist Marra Tuma to declare to The Miami Herald: "We're going to have to start giving everybody two Valiums before the meetings.") Newspaper publishers are better behaved, of course. And it wasn't until flying home that I realized what made the NAHP event unique. A mango with a special sabor. Never have I seen a convention where the language shifted so smoothly English and Spanish. Cocktail conversations, major speakers, workshop debates, pitches by exhibitors -it didn't seem to matter what tongue was used. Philip Morris VP George Knox and Lauro Cavazos' stand-in from the Department of Education, John Sanders (Where does Lauro go when Hispan ics meet?), didtheiroraciones in English; Antonio LeanoAivarez del Castillo, president of the Universidad Aut6noma de Guadalajara, did his in Spanish. Everybody understood. No double introductions needed. It's even getting tough now to guess national origins. I date back to those activist days in California where Spanglish was the official conference idiom, mariachis played for an hour and then you took up a collection if you wanted them to stay, and fistfights were so common they could have been advertised in the program as part of the after -dinner entertainment. The change that impresses me most is the use of language. For a large body of U.S. Hispanics, the transition from being semiliter ate to melodious in two languages has been occurring for quite a while. Interestingly, those who do it best are immigrants. It's a heritage that could be passed along so easily if our schools would make a decent investment in bilingual education. I wonder if Cavazos' stand-in, John Sanders, got the message. Kay Barbaro Quoting ... MANUEL EVARISTO NORIEGA, an 83-year -old resident of Miami Beach, Fla., who has received threatening phone calls from people thinking he is related to former Panamanian leader Manuel Antonio Noriega, explaining in the Jan. 11 New York Times he is not related to the deposed Noriega: "/ have no pineapple face by any means. I don't use pimple cream. And I don't wear red underwear." position to capitalize on those developments by gaining the political HECTOR "MACHO MAN" CAMACHO, the boxer, in USA Today clout and recognition that a full census count would bring. on his affinity for Elvis Presley after visiting Graceland: (John Trasvifla, the only Hispanic counsel in the U.S. Senate, is "/was impressed, and I'm not easy to impress-Elvis' home the president-elect of the Washington, D.C., Hispanic Bar Association.) way he lived, the way he dressed. It's a lot like myself." ' Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Jan. 22, 1990 3

PAGE 4

Calendar 4 Conference San Francisco March 15-18 Paula Marie Read (202) 371-21 00 NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN FORUM Conference New York March 19,20 Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 NATIONAL HEAD START MIGRANT DIREC TORS ASSOCIATION Conference San Antonio March 22-24 Romeo Sifuentes (512) 722-5174 CENTER FOR MIGRATION STUDIES Conference Washington, D.C. March 29, 30 Lydio Tomasi (718) 351-8800 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR AFFIRMA TIVE ACTION Conference , Boston March 29-31 Cassie Schultz (312) 329-2511 Conference Dallas Af>ril 1 0-14 Obie Gonzalez (214) 631-3999 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS Conference San Francisco April11-14 Executive Director (202) 783-6228 SPANISH PROFESSIONALS IN AMERICA General Assembly San Juan, Puerto Rico April 17-22 Gloria Castresana Waid (209) 226-6415 NATIONAL SCHOOL BOARDS ASSOCIA TION Pluralism Convention New Orleans April 21-24 Phil Smith (703) 838-6722 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION Conference Tucson, Ariz. April 21-25 Kathy Escamilla (602) 621-1286 NEBRASKA MEXICAN AMERICAN COM MISSION Conference Omaha, Neb. May 1 0-12 Patricia Davila (308) 534-2630 NATIONAL IMAGE Conference Oakland, Calif. May 14-19 Albert Rocha (707) 644-4470 NATIONAL ACTION COUNCL FOR MINORI TIES IN ENGINEERING Forum Chicago May 29-31 Ronnie Dennes (212) 279-2626 NATIONAL COUNCIL OF HSPANIC WOMEN Conference Washington, D.C. May 31-June 1 Jan.22, 1990

PAGE 5

I CORPORATE Explore Employment Opportunities with Arlington County Government Seminar Arlington County Government Department of Personnel' is sponsoring two FREE evening seminars to provide jobseekers with helpful information in the search for employment opportunities with Arlington County. Workshop presenter Marvin A. Cortez, Outreach Specialist with the Personnel Department, will cover the follow ing topics: • Identifying the appropriate job match • Determining relevant skills and abilities for specific position • Learning to compete effectively • Information on current and future vacancies The Personnel Department will offer individual assistance in English and Spanish after _ the seminar. _ .. COME TO THE FREE SEMINARS WHEN: Thursday, January 25, 1990 Thursday, March 22, 1990 Both sessions will be held from 7:00 pm 9:00 pm WHERE: Arlington County Courthouse Plaza 2100 Clarendon Boulevard County Board Room 3rd Floor Room 307 Arlington , Virginia 22201 (Across from the Courthouse Metro Stop on the Orange Line) If any questions please call (703) 358-3501 ***No job interviews or job offers will be made at this workshop*** Arlington County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. abc if you've got the ability, broadcast it. Marketing Director capital c•iesiABC is seeking a Marketing Director with experience in sales and programming promotions. This is a key position responsible for creating and executing promotions and advertising campaigns for a top-rated Southern California radio station and its programs. The ideal candidate will have at least 5 years experience in a principal role in major market radio, television or advertising, along with knowledge of broadcast production and radio studio operations. ABC will provide you wlh a competitive salary and benefits package, plus the opportunity to work in an exciting and dynamic environment. For consideraion, pleacse send your and salary history to Personnel Department, Capital Cities/ABC Inc., 4151 Prospect Ave., Hollywood, Calif. 90027. Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/HN. CARTOONISTS: We pay $25 for humorous or political cartoons. Submit to: Editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone: (202) 234-0280. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report The Last Supper of Chicano Heroes By Muralist Antonio Burciaga For full-color poster (17 1/2" by 23"), send $15 to Diserios, P.O. Box 3729, Stanford, CA 94039. (Information sheet on mural heroes included.) The Last Supper of Chicano Heroes is a detail of the 14' by 9' Burciaga mural "Mythology and History of Maiz," dedicated in June 1989 at Stanford University's Casa Zapata. Jan. 22, 1990 I . . l . : . . : . . . . : : . . . : : : . . . . : : : . . : . ' ' •l : : : ; : . : . : : . . : : : . . : : . 1 : . ::: . : : : :: .. . : . 1.=; . . . . : : : : : : ':: 5

PAGE 6

I 6 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS VICE PROVOST FOR UNIVERSITY RELATIONS Arizona State University West Campus, the first university campus established by the state of Arizona in this century, is seeking applicants and nominees for the position of Vice Provost for University Relations. The Vice Provost for University Relations is charged with developing and implementing plans to promote West Campus to internal and external constitu encies and assist the Provost in coordination with the President and the Vice President of University Relations in presenting issues related to campus ad vancement and external relations to the media, the community, and the Arizona Boards of Regents, the legislature and the Governor. The Vice Provost for University Relations reports directly to the Provost for ASU West, the chief executive officer of the campus. The functions of External Relations, Marketing, Community Relations, Publications, Information Services and Alumni Relations report to this position. The successful candidate should have broad knowledge of and experience in marketing research, marketing, alumni relations and development, public rela tions, publications, student recruitment, and government relations in a university setting. Considerable knowledge of management principles and practices in higher education is needed. Advanced degree is preferred; minimum require ments include a bachelor's degree and at least eight years of relevant manage ment experience preferably in institutions of higher education. Other equivalent combinations of training and experience will be considered. Letters of application should be accompanied by a complete vita and the names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least three references . Mail all applications and nominations to: Dr. Jacquelyn A. Matterfeld, Chair Vice Provost for University Relations Search Committee c/o Personnel Arizona State University ASB 326 Tempe, Ariz. 85287 CLOSING DATE: January 31,1990, or the first of each month thereafter until position is filled. PERSONNEL CONSULTANT Girl Scouts ofthe U.S.A. is offer ing a challenging and stimulating opportunity for a strong person nel generalist to join the staff of the national organization located in midtown Manhattan. You will use your 5-plus years solid HR experience to provide technical assistance to outbased locations in: AA planning/implem entation, employee relations, recruitment, performance manage ment, legislation & policy inter pretation, and other related areas. Candidates must be able to travel approximately SOOA> nationally, de sign and conduct training ses sions, problem solve and have excellent communication skills . Salary mid $30's with excellent benefits. For immediate consideration, send rltsumlt to: Janice Jacobs Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. 830 Third Avenue New York, N.Y. 10022. EOEM/FIHN GIRL SCOUTS DEAN, COLLEGE OF THE ARTS UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-WHITEWATER I The Dean is the executive officer of the college and is responsible to the Vice Chancellor and Chancellor for its administration. In consultation with the Dean's staff, the department chairpersons and college committees, the Dean will provide leadership and support the development, evaluation and administration of the academic programs of the college including curriculum, instruction, scholarship and service. Major qualifications include a strong commitment to shared governance and affirmative action, flexible and innovative executive skills with a proven administrative record; successful experience in communication and in arts advocacy to all segments of the university community and the general public; a knowledge of the diverse disciplines within the college; an appropriate academic degree with a successful record of teaching and professional achievement sufficient for a potential tenured appointment at a senior faculty rank in an arts discipline. Send letter of application, curriculum vitae, and three original letters of reference to Dr. Glenn C. Hayes, Chairperson, Search and Screen Committee, College of the Arts, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, Whitewater, Wis. 53190. Review of applications will begin on March 1, 1990. The position will be available July 1, 1990. UW-WHITEWATER IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER WITH AN AFFIRMA TIVE ACTION PLAN. WOMEN, MEMBERS OF MINORITY GROUPS, PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES AND VIETNAM-ERA VETERANS ARE ENCOURAGE TO APPLY. , . Jan 22, 1989 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

PAGE 7

I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I FACULTY & ADMINISTRATIVE POSITIONS Sociology: Teach Research Methods courses; contribute to other areas of curriculum. All areas of substantive specialization considered . Prefer Ph.D., undergraduate teaching experience. Search committee SOC. Performing Arts (Director of Theatre): 12-month position. Teach acting, directing, speech; manage theatre facilities/staff; develop funding. Requires terminal degree or equivalent in Theatre; strong teaching experience; professional experience in multicultural theatre. Prefer professional experience in integration of theatre, music, dance. Available: Summer 1990. Search committee DTMT. Analytical Chemistry: Ph.D. required. Prefer strong commitmentto undergraduate teaching & research. Search committeeAC . Comparative Humanities (Language/Linguistics): Teach lntro. to Language, Structure of English, Politics of Language from cross-cultural perspective. Ph.D. required. Search committee CHL. Teacher Education: 3 positions. Reading/Language Arts: Teach reading found., content area reading, language arts; participate in curriculum develop ment. Prefer doctorate in reading/related area, precollege & college teaching/teacher training experience. Search committee TERLA. Director of Fiel _ d Experience: _ ,;dmioister elementary /secondary school field placements; coordinate activities; teach 1 course/sam. Required: Master's degree, elementary or middle-schoolteaching & student teacher supervising experience. Prefer administrative & college teaching experience, knowledge of Long Island (NY) school districts. Search committee TE-DFE. Foundations/Coordinator, Secondary Education: Teach educ. foundations courses; coordinate secondary educa tion concentration. Prefer doctorate in foundations of secondary education & secondary or middle school teaching experience. Search committee TE-FCSE. American Studies (Journalism): Teach magazine, print journalism courses, including; Editing/Production, African-American Press, Feature Writing. Prefer graduate degree; practical experience in journalism/freelance writing; journalism teaching experience. Search committee ASJ. Politics, Economics & Society (Economics): Teach basic economics courses with competence in political economy/ statistics. Requires: Ph.D., teaching experience. Prefer public policy or international studies specialty. Search committee PES E. The College also anticipates the following faculty openings: Business & Management Department: Operations Mgmt. & MIS. Search committee BM-OMM. Marketing (2 pos.). Search committee BM-M. Finance. Search committee BM-F. Quant. Methods. Search committee BM-QM. Community Health (Bioi. Sciences Dept.) Search committee CH. Mathematics (Mathematics Dept.) Search committee MATH. Experience in multicultural higher education institutions desirable. All positions tenure-track. Ranks, salaries commensurate with experience. Except as noted, positions begin Fall 1990. Resumes reviewed upon receipt. Director, Administrative Computing Svcs.: Responsibilities: Supervise overall activities of Admin. Computing Center; analyze/evaluate admin. requirements of college community; maintain/upgrade hardware; oversee implementation of campus & statewide networking. Requires Master's relevant field; 5 yrs. experience data processing systems design, programming or operations; 3 yrs. mgmt. of Unisys large system A-series. Prefer experience networking fiber optic cables, Ethernet, DEC, Student Info. & Campus Admin. database system. Antic. available Oct. 1990. Screen committee DACS. Associate Dean of Instruction Responsibilities: Supervise all instruc. support areas, including Center for Academic Advisement & Testing, learning centers, acad. computing center; leading retention/graduation activities. Reports to Dean of Instruction & participates in planning for Academic Affairs. Requires: Ph.D.; extensive college-level teaching experience; background in multicultural setting. Screen committee ADI. Director, Center for Academic Advisement & Testing Responsibilities: Supervise admin./evaluation of placement exams; coordinate advisement activities; participate in design of assessment outcome activities. Requires: Master's, appropriate experience. lmmed. Screen committee DCAAT. For all positions, send resume & names of 3 references by March 1 to: Office of Personnel & Affirmative Action Screening Committee (specify) State University of New York/College at Old Westbury Old Westbury, NY 11568-0210 Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Jan.22,1990 7

PAGE 8

Arts & Entertainment held in March. Dozens of nominees in several categories include, coincidentally, singer Gloria Estefan. LA TIN OS 'ACED' IT: Two Hispanic entries were big winners at this year's cable TV ACE awards. In other award news, four Latin American films and a Spanish entry have been submitted this year for consideration by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for a "foreign language" Oscar. Argentina's La amiga, Brazil's A Better Future, Cuba's Pape/es secun darios, Puerto Rico's lQue le pas6 a Santiago? and Spain's Mon toyas y Tarantos compete with 32 other foreign films for five spots among 1989 Oscar nominees. The academy will announce its nomi nations next month. The music special Gloria Estefan & Miami Sound Machine picked up three ACEs. The program, aired on the Showtlme cable network, was named "best music special" and earned additional kudos for "best directing" and ''best editing, comedy special, series or musical special." The first award went to the show's producers, among whom Emilio Estefan, Gloria's husband, was one of three executive producers. Named "best actor in a film or miniseries" was Blades, who was featured last year in the HBO film Dead Man Out. A visibly surprised Blades picked up the award at the ceremony, held in Los Angeles Jan. 14. FOCUS ON THE ISLAND: New York's En Foco community visual arts agency has begun an educational exchange program with Puerto Rico's Universidad del Sagrado Coraz6n. The ACE awards are given by the National Academy of Cable Programming --and are not to be confused with the ACEs given by New York's Asoclacl6n de Cronlstas de Espectaculos. Titled lntercambio, the program will include three photography seminars over three consecutive Saturdays at the University's San Juan campus. The program began Jan. 20 with Puerto Rico-based photographer Jack Delano. It continues Jan. 27 with Mexican photographer Pedro Meyer and concludes Feb. 3 with New York's Jill Freedman. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas The latter organization -a grouping of Latino entertainment journal ists -recently announced nominees for its awards ceremony, to be Media Report PUBLISHERS ELECT DURAN: At an an nual conference that broke records and new ground for Latino print media, the National Association of Hispanic Publications elected Texan Tina Duran its new president Jan. 13. The three-day event in Orlando, Fla., set attendance and exhibit records. Some 302 persons registered, double the number last year when the publishers met in Las Vegas, Nev. Sales of exhibit booths jumped from 10 last year to 49, with groups such as airlines, software companies and news-wire services participating for the first time. Duran, publisher of two Texas weeklies, El tnformador Hispano in Fort Worth and La Prensa in San Antonio, edged incumbent Manuel Taro, publisher ct La Prensa i1 Orlcrldo, by a single delegate vote, 21-20. Duran, 55, told Weekly Report he hoped to gain recognition and credibility for the asso ciation from corporate advertisers. "I want to HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or (202) 234-o737 Publisher: Hector Ericksen-Mendoza Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Oanilo Alfaro. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 Issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108; Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIED$: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. show that we're here to do a job for a special, rapidly growing segment of the population and that advertisers can't afford to ignore these consumers." He also mentioned the possibility of hiring an executive director and other staff, as well as establishing an office in Washington, D.C. All of the other three officers were re-elected: Vice President Vfctor Field, Mundo Artist/co, Los Angeles; Secretary Hilbert Morales, El Obsetvador, San Jose, Calif.; and Treasurer A. B. Collado, El Hlspano, Albuquerque, N.M. Regional caucuses atthe sixth annual event elected the following chairpersons: Region I, co-chairs Rhonda Ehrlich, El Dlarlo, New York Oty, and Eduardo Sampertedui, B Espec tacular, Philadelphia; Region II, Oscar Reyes, El Pregonero, Washington, D.C.; Region Ill, Luis Rossi, La Raza, Chicago; Region IV, Rogelio Noriega, El Mexlca, Houston; Re gion VI, Juan Pifarre, Horlzontes, San Fran cisco/San Jose, Calif.; and Region VII, Carlos Duran, Ola magazine, Long Beach, Calif. The Region V election, initially a tie, was not resolved. Other conference highlights included the announcement by Kraft General Foods of a $500,000 commitment for corporate advertis ing in Hispanic print media this year. Founded in 1982, NAHP has n member publications spread throughout 15 states and the District of Columbia. NOTABLE: The Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences has appointed Ray Blanco, president of Cutting Edge En tertainment Inc., to the post of national chair person of the group's U.S. Hispanic Media Conference March 1-3 in Universal City, Calif ... Carlos Alberto Montarier, former edito rial director of the Miami Herald's Spanish language supplement El Nuevo Herald, has joined the Herald Features Syndicate. His column, "Point of View/Punto de Vista," will be syndicated in English and Spanish ... Former Hispanic Unk NaNs Service reporter Rhonda Smith has joined The Daily Journal in Vine land, N.J., as a reporter ... Danilo Alfaro Bachelor's, Master's, Ph.D. Degrees Awarded to Latinos 1981 1985 Source: American Council on Education IW4A Bachelor's Master•• -Doctorate 1987