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Hispanic link weekly report, February 12, 1990

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Hispanic link weekly report, February 12, 1990
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News Week
The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations honors U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch, U.S. Rep. Bill Richardson, Calif. Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard and Washington, D.C., Office of Latino Affairs executive director Arlene Gillespie with its 1990 Health Leadership Awards...U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar goes on trial in San Francisco in the nation’s first prosecution of a federal judgae on racketeering charges...Cathi V&squez Villalpando, U.S. treasurer, resigns as national chairwoman of the Republican National Hispanic Asssembiy. Jos6 Manuel Casanova, executive director of the Inter-American Development Bank during the Reagan administration, assumes the RNHA position...Florida Gov. Bob Martinez names Jaime Rodriguez, Matilda Aguirre and Jestis Mesa to
replace three of five Sweetwater City Council members the governor suspended Jan. 26for being indicted or named in an indictment...The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education and the Christa McAuliffe institute for Educational Pioneering honor at a Washington, D.C., ceremony Theresa Roybal of Arizona, and four other teachers, as their 1990 Christa McAuliffe Educators for their use of technology in teaching...A Los Angeles federal grand jury indicts Manuel Ibarra Hererra, former director of the Mexican Federal Judicial Police, Miguel Aldafia Ibarra, former director of Interpol in Mexico, and 17 other people in connection with the 1985 kidnap-torture-death of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena. Flor Morales “Ramito” Ramos, one of Puerto Rico’s most popular folkloric singers, commits suicide in Salinas, Puerto Rico. He was 74...

Court Jolts English Movement
Rights Restoration Bill Targets Court Rulings
Reacting to what it said were a series of 1989 U.S. Supreme Court decisions that created gaps in federal laws banning job discrimination, a bipartisan group of U.S. senators and representatives introduced Feb.
7 a bill titled the Civil Rights Act of 1990.
‘The...decisions of 1989 have stood our civil rights laws on their heads,” said Rep. Matthew Martinez (D-Calif.), a sponsor of the bill.
One decision pro- MARTINEZ hibited a 124-year-old co-sponsors cmi rights mii law from being invoked in lawsuits against state and local governments. The law allowed plaintiffs to receive punitive damages as well as back pay. Another ruling allowed white workers to challenge a court-approved affirmative action settlement. The third decision held it was insufficient for workers to show discrimination. They had to prove that employers created the imbalance and had no legitimate business reasons to do so.
By Roberto Rodriguez
Latino leaders across the country felt vindication as a result of U.S. District Judge Paul Rosenblatt’s Feb. 6 ruling that struck down Arizona’s voter-approved English Language Amendment. They contend it not only sets precedent but it should reverse the momentum of the official English movement.
In handing down his decision, Rosenblatt, in Phoenix, said the law was a violation of the First Amendment right to free speech and was overly broad.
“This verifies what we were telling the voters ail along -- that it was unconstitutional,” said Manny Mejfa, a member of the Arizona steering committee that opposed the “English only” law. “And now that the federal court has agreed, it will send a clear signal to the English only forces.”
State Rep. Armando Ruiz, a southeast Phoenix Democrat, said, “It sends the message to other states that the whole notion that these measures are merely symbolic is false. They do take away the freedom of speech.”
Gov. Rose Mofford - the lawsuit’s sole defendant - said she will not appeal the decision, citing that the amendment was “flawed from the beginning.”
Although 16 other states have declared English as their official language, “only Arizona’s law had legal teeth,” said Mejfa.
Asked about the implications of the ruling for other states, Richard Castro, executive director of the City and County of Denver Human Rights and Community Relations office, said, “I don’t know that it will change the English only law in Colorado, but it does send a message around the country that it’s not good public policy.”
The 1988 initiative, sponsored by Arizonans for Official English, was narrowly approved, ruling sends message
580,830-569,993. The amendment to the Arizona Constitution required the state and county governments conduct business in English, with the exceptions of public health and safety, education and “to protect the rights of criminal defendants or victims of crime.” It also provided residents, who felt the amendment was not being adequately enforced, the right to bring suit.
The ruling was the result of a lawsuit filed by Marfa Yfiiguez, of Tempe, a state Department of Administration employee, two days after the passage of the initiative. Yfiiguez, who evaluates and arbitrates medical malpractice claims, charged that the law inhibited her
continued on page 2
Joblessness Rate Drops
The Hispanic unemployment rate plunged from 8.5% in December to 7.1% last month, the Department of Labor reported Feb. 2.
The drop in Latino joblessness took the rate to Its lowest level since March 1989, when it was 6.7%. The number of Hispanic unemployed decreased from804,000 in December to 671,000 last month. The black unemployment was 11.3% and the white one was 4.5%.
Md. Panel Rejects Official-English Bid
By Roberto Rodriguez
A bill designating English as the official language of the state of Maryland was soundly defeated, 18-2, by the Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee of the state’s House of Delegates.
“We did our homework,” said Jos6 Rufz, executive director of the Governor’s Commission on Hispanic Affairs. “To defeat the bill, we not only garnered the support of Latinos but we also went beyond the Hispanic community,” said Rufz. The bill was killed Jan. 26.
The measure was introduced by delegates Peter Callas and Charles Kolodziejski,
both Democrats. It was opposed by a coalition of groups ranging from the Center for Applied Linguistics, the American Jewish Committee, People for the American Way, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Maryland State Teachers Association.
Callas, of Greek descent, told Weekly Report the bill was “just an insurance policy,” adding, “Seventeen other states can’t be wrong.”
Kolodziejski said, “I’m Polish. I just wanted people to learn English. But I can read the writing on the wall. Everybody does wantto learn English. That’s what I heard (in testimony)."


INS Eases Rule on Deportation for Spouses, Children
By Roberto Rodriguez Effective Feb. 14, undocumented spouses or children of immigrants legalized under the 1986 immigration act may remain in the United States while they wait to qualify for permanent residence.
"The INS had been stonewalling for two years. Thus, the new policy represents a significant step forward,” said Cecilia Munoz, senior immigration policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza.
The policy is a reversal of one that had been decried by immigrants’ rights activists for causing the separation of spouses
and the placing of young children in deportation proceedings.
Under the old policy, Mufloz said, tens of thousands of immediate family members of individuals who qualified for legalization were ineligible for the program, primarily because they arrived after the 1982 cutoff date. It made minor children eligible for such relief only if both parents had qualified for legalization.
The new policy announced Feb. 2 by Gene McNary, commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, provides a renewable, one-year protection against
deportation to children under 18 and spouses who can prove that they have resided within this country since Nov. 6,1986, and have not been convicted of a felony or three misdemeanors in the United States.
Although most Latino leaders have hailed the change as positive, Antonio Rodriguez, Los Angeles immigrants’ rights attorney, was critical of the policy. "It excludes people who came after Nov. 6,1986 - which is the bulk. It excludes those in the household over 18. It subjects the applicants to a needless year-by-year review. And lastly, it says nothing of confidentiality.”
Montoya Guilty; Calderbn Says He’ll Run
Ed. Dept. Ups Funds For Bilingual Method
Signaling a change in its approach to bilingual education, the U.S. Department of Education will spend $3 million in developmental bilingual education programs this year, Rita Esquivel, the department’s bilingual programs director announced Jan. 23.
If successful developmental programs result, said Esquivel, director of the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, the department hopes to increase funding for them even further.
Under President Reagan the department spent $250,000 each year since 1985 on two developmental programs.
Developmental bilingual education programs teach like numbers of English-speaking and non-English-speaking students both languages. The method pushes for both groups to each learn a new language, all the while building on the students’ native language. Conversely, transitional bilingual education programs, the most prevalent method, rely primarily on English. They attempt to mainstream the student at a faster pace.
By Jonathan Higuera
The Feb. 2 conviction of California State Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) on racketeering, extortion and money laundering charges has opened the door for Assemblyman Charles Calderbn (D-Montebello) to run for his seat.
Calderbn announced his candidacy shortly after Montoya was convicted of seven of the 10 charges filed against him by the U.S. attorney’s office.
The convictions culminated an eight-week trial in which jurors were shown a videotape of Montoya receiving a $3,000 bribe from an undercover FBI agent in exchange for backing legislation that would benefit a dummy company.
He will be sentenced April 26 and faces up
right to free speech and prevented her from carrying out her job.
In his 21-page opinion, Rosenblatt wrote, "A state may not require that its officers and employees relinquish rights guaranteed them by the First Amendment as a condition of public employment.”
Catherine Ely, communications coordinator of U.S. English, a Washington D.C.-based umbrella group for the official English movement, told Weekly Reportthat it is considering petitioning the court for the right to intervene,
to 20 years in prison for each count and $2 million in fines.
Richard Martfnez, executive director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, said the loss of Montoya hurts because of the dearth of elected Latino officials in the California legislature.
But, he said, "The argument that it doesn’t make a difference whether the replacement is a Latino as long as he or she is good doesn’t hold water. That’s the number one argument used against us when we begin to flex our political muscle.
"We should not feel guilty about one of our own doing the wrong thing but do the responsible thing and replace him with another Latino or Latina,” he added.
a procedure that would allow it it to file an appeal.
"We disagree with the finding of the judge. He made his decision on the premise that the woman (Yniguez) was prohibited from speaking Spanish and that the state can not restrict the activities of its employees. That’s not the case. The court has allowed the government to prohibit government workers from participating in campaigns. The judge is simply mistaken. And I think we’ll win.”
Ely acknowledged that it is difficultto obtain intervening status.
Elated with the decision, Marta Jimenez, an attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, called it "a decision the time for which has come.”
"Our country is based on fundamental civil rights and we have shown that we will no longer allow bigotry to be couched in patriotism,” she said.
"I feel terrific right now,” said Linda Miller, one of the principal organizers against the amendment. "We are not opposed to the English language. We are opposed to the spirit of U.S. English. They made it seem that we were anti-American. What we alwaysfelt is that we should have respect for other languages. And today, we feel vindicated.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Suarez Weighs Race Against Martinez
By Roberto Rodriguez Miami Mayor Xavier Sudrez, who has supported Democrats and Republicans alike since his election to his non-partisan post four years ago, confirmed Jan. 30 that he is considering challenging Gov. Bob Martfnez in the Sept. 4 Republican primary.
The mayor, who was overwhelmingly reelected in November, told reporters he is reluctant to give up his post but is concerned about the state’s "general lack of leadership.”
"Competition is always good for the Hispanic community,” said Manuel Toro, editor of La Prensa newspaper in Orlando. Toro, immediate past president of the National Association of Hispanic Publications, added that if Su&rez runs, he would have a good chance of winning.
"The governor has not performed to our expectation. Mayor Su&rez, on the other hand, has a fairly good record. His doors are always open to the Hispanic community.”
Feb. 12.1990
ESQUIVEL
hopeful tor more funding
Judge Rules Law Violates Constitution
continued from page 1
2


Jim Sagel
Corrupt to its Core
Edward James Olmos may not have gotten the Oscar he so richly deserved for his role in the film Stand and Deliver. But when he stood up at the close of the recent Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Commerce annual banquet, he delivered a speech so raw and real it set many a tuxedoed listener squirming in his $60 seat.
I imagine it was a bit more than the chamber bargained for.
“I’m your worst nightmare!” Olmos exclaimed and, no doubt, he was to many in the well-heeled crowd.
Certainly, Olmos didn’t act “nice,” loudly pronouncing that he couldn’t be bought by Anheuser-Busch, the beer company that footed the bill for the weekend’s activities, including, no doubt, Olmos’own appearance. And he refused to act like all we need was a good infusion of “ganas” in order to solve the difficult problems facing Hispanics and society as a whole.
Olmos told the audience one of the last things they expected to hear - namely, that the version of the “American dream” so many are so busily chasing is corrupt at its core.
The dollar that had been glorified all evening from upbeat promotional films to Secretary Manuel Lujan’s description of the U.S.
Department of Interior as a “business” making millions through the sale of natural resources -- that very dollar, Olmos said, is the root of the problem.
A SPEECH AKIN TO CHE
“iMe la rayo, carnal/” he said as an entrepreneur reacted audibly. It was perhaps too much truth, for Olmos was asserting that the same money that fueled the drug economy also filled the wallets of everyone sitting in the Convention Center.
“The most important day of my life was when I turned my back on the dollar,” Olmos declared, and he wentfurther than that. Unless we all turn our back on the dollar, he said, we will lose not only the war on drugs, but also the battle against illiteracy, teen-age pregnancy and AIDS.
It must have been revolutionary talk for folks accustomed to thinking of money as a cure rather than a curse. And it certainly had to be a shock to those who expected to hear a Jaime Escalante pep-talk and got, instead, something more akin to Ch6.
For what Olmos was demanding that evening in Albuquerque was a revolution in our way of thinking and in our values.
It couldn’t come at a more critical time. While countries in Eastern Europe embrace our democratic ideals, we relinquish more of our own civil liberties as we wage a desperate, last-ditch defense against the cancer of crime and drug warfare on our dangerous streets. And even as ourfreedom at home inexorably erodes, we applaud a president who invades a sovereign nation in the name of “democracy.”
THESE ARE HUMAN ISSUES
These, of course, are not solely Hispanic issues, and Olmos did not address them as such. They are human issues, cutting across ethnic barriers.
Olmos pointed to the “familia” as our only hope for the future -- the family and Its values of hard work, integrity and respect for others passed down over the generations. Those are quintessential values now largely abandoned by the “mainstream."
The crucial leadership role Hispanics can now play does not consist of playing the stock market as ruthlessly as the Anglo and, in the process, losing stock of himself, but rather, in embracing the values of his heritage and helping to lead the United States back to her true self.
This country, as Olmos said, was built on the backs of Hispanics. Yet, each succeeding generation held onto its dignity, refusing to collapse under the weight of economic, social and political oppression.
Hispanic elders provide an unwearying “ejemplo, ” the example of a life built on self-respect and concern for one’s neighbor. It’s an “e/em-p/o” all can emulate, regardless of color or creed.
(Jim Sagel is an author based in Espahola, N.M.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pelos en la lengua
OFF AND RUNNING: Entering the mighty ’90s, which Hispanics are out of the gate fastest?
IN THE EAST: No. 1 has to be New York City Schools’ 53-year-old Chancellor Joseph Fern&ndez. The no-nonsense administrative approach to education reform that he brought north from Miami has the New York Daily News and New York Times, publications that don’t agree on a lot, fawning in unison.
Responding to Fernandez’s call for a 1991 school budget increase of nearly half a billion dollars, a Jan. 25 Daily News editorial begins: “The revolution has started.” It praises his actions to eliminate the leeches and politicians in the city’s educational bureaucracy and his efforts to put the power into the hands of progressive principals, teachers and parents.
“This is war,” it trumpets. “The Fernandez budget is a revolutionary document, like the Declaration of Independence...Sabotaging (it) would cripple a generation of New Yorkers.”
Earlier, in an editorial headed, “No Chancellor Can Do It Alone,” the Times offered a calmer kudo: “The school system finally has a strong Chancellor in Mr. Fernandez.”
IN THE WEST: In Los Angeles, it’s Leticia Quezada, the lone Hispanic on Los Angeles’ school board, who’s receiving favorable press for her strength and logic. Reporter Michael Quintanilla wrote an excellent profile on the 36-year-old immigrant from Judrez, Mexico, in the Los Angeles Times Jan. 28.
It addition to leading the fight for bilingual education, Quezada joined Rita Walters, the board’s lone black, on the short end of a 5-2 vote that relaxed the district’s rules on students’ participation in extracurricular activities. Moving counter to a national “no-pass, no-play” trend, the district will now permit a jock with an “F” to participate in sports, provided he has a “C” average.
Reacted Quezada: “I feel that this is a case of liberal mentality whose good intentions are misplaced, the idea that our students can’t be expected to do as well.”
After years of Anglo-led school systems encouraging educational inferiority of Hispanics and blacks, representatives from these groups are finally getting a shot at setting the standards -and making the most of it.
OFF AND STUMBLING: To prove that not all Latinos are superhuman, there’s Jorge Ch&vez, a Peruvian jockey who rides at New York’s Aqueduct Park. Jorge’s English isn’t up to snuff yet and when stewards and starters reminded the jockeys on Jan. 21 that the $50,000,21/4-mile sixth race required three laps around the inner track, their messages whizzed right by Jorge.
Rounding into the stretch the second time, Ch&vez urged his 6-1 shot, High Policy, into the lead and eased up after he thought he’d won. As the whole field swept past him, he recognized his error and cranked his mount up again, miraculously passing all the horses but the 3-5 favorite, who was still four lengths ahead.
Race fans, even less forgiving than football and basketball fans, doused Jorge with enough boos to make him break into sobs in front of the grandstand, the New York Post reported.
The gelding’s owner was more forgiving. Acknowledging that his horse definitely would have won had Jorge understood the instructions, he told reporters, “Everyone makes mistakes,” and promised to let Jorge ride for him again. Presumably with an interpreter in the rumbleseat. - KayBctrbaro
Quoting...
CARMEN CRUZ, whose 17-year-old daughter drowned when an Alton, Texas, school bus plunged into a water-filled quarry, reacting in the Jan. 18 New York Times to the rush of lawyers seeking to represent families of the 21 drowned children:
'7he first lawyer who can bring my daughter back, i’H hire."
Feb. 12,1990
3


COLLECTING
JOB RIGHTS UNDER IRCA: The Immigration and Naturalization Service has published two 12-page booklets, in English and Spanish, that cover the rights of employees who feel they have been discriminated against because of their immigration status. To receive a free copy, contact the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices, P.O. Box 65490, Washington, D.C. 20035-54901-800-255-7688. In Washington, D.C., call (202) 653-8121.
CONSUMER BANKING INFORMATION: Consumer Action has published Spanish-, Chinese- and English-language editions of a booklet, 23 pages, that describes how to shop for, open and maintain a checking or savings account. To receive a copy, send $1 to Consumer Action, Banking Booklet, 116 New Montgomery St., Suite 223, San Francisco, Calif. 94105 (415) 777-9648.
ORANGE COUNTY LATINOS: The Tomas Rivera Center has released a study summary that focuses on the issues the Latino community in Orange County, Calif., considers most urgent. A free six-page copy of "At the Crossroads of Poverty and Affluence” can be ordered from the Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607. The full report will be available in a few weeks.
SCIENCE/MATH EDUCATION: The Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education has released a 10-page report, "A Plan of Action,” that urges President Bush and Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos to make science and math education a high priority in our schools. The report also urges Bush and Cavazos to encourage more private-sector help for schools. The report is free from the TCSTE, 5112 Berwyn Road, College Park, Md. 20740 (301) 220-0870.
BROADCAST JOURNALISM CAREERS: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has published a booklet about the education and training necessary for a career in broadcasting. Copies of the eight-page booklet are free and available by writing to NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228.
ENCOUNTER OF TWO WORLDS: The Organization of American States publishes a quarterly quincentennial newsletter, "Discovery of America: Encounter of Two Worlds.” To submit Information or to receive a free copy of the newsletter, write to Quincentennial, Organization of American States, 1889 F St. NW, Washington D.C. 20006.
PUERTO RICAN ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Puerto Rican Coalition has published the "Directory of Puerto Rican Elected Officials in the United States,” the first such listing that specifically identifies mainland Puerto Ricans who hold public office. Copies of the 30-page directory are available for $6 from NPRC, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 500, Washington D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915.
CONNECTING
EFFORT LINKS ELDERLY, AT-RISK YOUTH
Los Angeles, Miami and Hartford, Conn., are among nine cities in a $3 million initiative headed by Philadelphia’s Temple University that will pair elderly persons with at-risk youth to help the youngsters succeed.
Called Linking Lifetimes, the project will pay mentors a small stipend to spend at least two hours per week with the partner to offer guidance as well as participate in social events together. The mentors will be trained on how to help the troubled youth gain self-respect and educational skills.
COLLEGE NETWORK RECEIVES $1.3 MILLION
Miami-Dade Community College, a school that is 51 % Hispanic, has received $1.3 million from IBM in computers and software to help it develop a computerized curriculum for a network of colleges to help underprepared higher ed students acquire basic reading, writing and math skills.
Miami-Dade will develop the curriculum for its students and those at 19 other community colleges and two four-year colleges, a network called the League for Innovation in the Community College. Students will have access to the software programs while it is being evaluated.
Some of the cities where other institutions are located are Phoenix, Ariz., Bakersfield, Calif., Dallas and Santa Fe, N.M.
CENSUS, INSTITUTE ENTER AGREEMENT
TheU.S. Census Bureau and the Southwest Voter Research Institute, in San Antonio, have signed an agreement making the institute a dissemination point for census data and reports to the Hispanic community.
The institute, an arm of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project founded by the late Willie Velasquez, becomes the first Hispanic organization to enter into such an arrangement.
Robert Brischetto, executive director of the institute, said the availability of the census data to the institute will help it in redistricting studies and analyzing the socioeconomic conditions of Hispanics.
SANTA ANA, CALIF., TARGETS CENSUS
The Santa Ana, Calif., City Council has voted unanimously to pay $50,000 for two programs that it hopes will encourage Latinos to participate in the upcoming census.
Being developed by Hispanic Management and Hispanic America Inc., the programs will attempt to increase Latino awareness of the census through a grocery store marketing campaign. Some 10,000 packets of store coupons along with a census information flyer will be distributed to homes in southeast Santa Ana. Also proposed are two three-hour grocery store fiestas with Latino personalities to attract and educate Hispanics about the census.
Calendar
THIS WEEK
RECEPTION
Washington, D.C. February 14 The National Council of Hispanic Women is holding a reception to welcome Catalina VAsquez Villal-pando, U.S. treasurer.
San Garcfa (301) 907-0127
HUMAN CAPITAL Oakland, Calif. Feb. 15-17 The Professional Management Association of Aztl6n is holding a national conference on the investment and development of the “Professional Hispanic Work Force.” A career fair and job listings will be another highlight.
4
Concepcion Trevino Wadler (415) 273-3284
POETRY, SONG Stanford, Calif. Feb. 17
Casa Zapata at Stanford University will host a poetry and song festival, celebrating the revival of the 1970s* Floricanto and Canto al Pueblo festivals instrumental in the development of Chicano literature and art.
Bel6n Aguirre (415) 325-2250
LATINA LEADERSHIP Houston Feb. 17
The Magnolia Park Chapter of the YWCA’s Hispanic Leadership Committee will host its fifth Leadership Conference for Hispanic Women.
Rita Rodriguez (713) 926-2601
COMING SOON
Feb. 12.1990
“STAND AND BE COUNTED”
American Gl Forum Chicago Feb. 22
Vilma Col6m (312) 664-5641
HISPANIC WOMEN
Mexican American Opportunity Foundation
Los Angeles March 2
Terri Hern&ndez (213) 722-7807
SPOTLIGHT
MEDIA ARTS: The National Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences will host a conference in Universal City, Calif., March 1-3, addressing the challenges and opportunities facing Latinos in the entertainment and media industry. A job fair and film and video screening program will also be featured. For more information call Helen Hern&ndez at (818) 848-4148.
Hispanic Unk Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR
The Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for the position of Associate Director of QUASAR (Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Students Achievement and Reasoning), a five-year national project aimed at improving mathematics education for middle students attending schools in economically disadvantaged communities. Candidates should have substantial knowledge and experience related to at least one of the following areas: school instructional programs in mathematics, education of ethnic minority students, development of mathematics assessment, or qualitative and quantitative methods of program evaluation. Candidates should have knowledge of and sensitivity to the issues of education in economically disadvantaged communities, excellent communication skills, and demonstrated administrative ability.
The Associate Director must be able to provide leadership while continuing to work as a member of a team. Duties include project administration, preparation of written reports, oral presentations on behalf of the project, and substantive involvement in the research/development activities of at least one project area (e.g., mathematics instruction, student assessment, program evaluation). Salary will be competitive and commensurate with academic preparation and experience.
Consideration of applicants will begin on March 15,1990, and will continue until the position is filled. Applicants should send a letter of application describing their training, professional interests, and goals, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, samples of relevant written work, and names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references to: QUASAR Search, 707 LRDC, 3939 O’Hara Street, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. 15260.
The University of Pittsburgh is an equal opportunity employer. Women and minority group members are invited and encouraged to apply.
Assistant Dean for Advising
University of Pennsylvania College of Arts and Sciences seeks an Assistant Dean for undergraduate and academic advising with special attention to needs of Hispanic students, and related administrative duties.
Qualifications: Master’s degree preferably in Liberal Arts. Three years teaching and counseling undergraduates, fluency in Spanish.
Salary range: $24,875 to $31,100. Submit letter of application, r6sum6 and list of references by March 14, 1990, to: Diane Fry
Room 100, Logan Hall University of Pennsylvania College of Arts and Sciences Philadelphia, PA 19104
Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer.
Programs
Development Director Novela Health Education
F/T position experienced, bilingual Spanish/English fundraiser/grant-writer. Non-profit organization producing health education material targeting Hispanics in U.S.
Send r6sum6 and salary requirements to: Esther Ricardo, Novela Health Foundation, 252416th Avenue So., Seattle WA. 98144.
| ntf rtg: |
MANAGER OF FINANCE &
ACCOUNTING
KABC-TV is currently seeking a Manager of Finance & Accounting.
This position will assist in performance of variance analysis on monthly operating results, preparations of quarterly forecasts and annual operating plan. Additional responsibilities include accounting for fixed assets, and supervision of accounting for intercompany transactions and payroll, union contracts, and personnel.
The ideal candidate will have a college degree and at least 2 years auditing experience with a Big 8 CPA firm or comparable private industry experience. Strong accounting skills, working knowledge of LOTUS and PCs, and excellent interpersonal, analytical, organizational and supervisory skills are essential.
You will find an excellent salary and benefits package, and an exciting and dynamic work environment Please send your r6sum6 to Capital Cities/ABC, Inc., Personnel Department (HL), 4151 Prospect Ave., Hollywood, Calif., 90027.
Equal Opportunity Employer
DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy received (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (ET) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES:
90 cents per word (city, state & ZIPcode Ordered by_______________________
count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 Organization________________________
word). Multiple use rates on request. street
DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: ----—--------------------------
(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 Crty*state & Z,P----------------
per column inch. Area Code & Phone____________________
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Feb. 12, 1990
5


m o > r- *u h m 7s x > 2
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
TRAFFIC ENGINEER II, $32,240-$45,822 -- Performs prof, traffic eng. work involving the planning, design & constr. of transpo. projects. Req. 1 yr. exp. in traffic eng. & a BS in Eng. incl. traffic and/or transpo. related courses. To request application, call (602) 262-6277 or write City of Phoenix, Personnel Department, 135 N. 2nd Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. 85003.
AA/EEO/H Employer
GIRL SCOUTS
PERSONNEL
CONSULTANT
Girl Scouts of U.S.A. is offering a challenging and stimulating opportunity for a strong personnel generalist to join the staff of the national organization located in midtown Manhattan.
You will use your 5 plus years solid HR experience to provide technical assistance to outbased locations in: AA planning/implem-entation, employee relations, recruitment, performance management, legislation & policy interpretation, and other related areas.
Candidates must be able to travel approximately 50% nationally, design and conduct training sessions, problem solve and have excellent communication skills. Salary mid $30’s with excellent benefits.
For immediate consideration, send r6sum6 to: Janice Jacobs, Girl Scouts of the U.S.A., 830Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022.
EOE M/F/H/V
Linguist Specialist-Spanish Speaking
Los Angeles Superior Court, 111 North Hill Street, Rm. 230, Los Angeles, Calif. 90012. Phone (213) 974-5403. Salary: $225 per day.
Deadline: File before February 23,1990. Minimum Qualifications Graduate Degree in Spanish Language or equivalent area of study and five years of demonstrated experience.
FROM KORN/FERRY INTERNATIONAL
F.I.T.
FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Dean of Graduate Programs
Nominations and expressions of interest are invited for the position of Dean of Graduate Programs of the Fashion Institute of Technology.
The dean of Graduate Programs reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and is a member of the President’s Administrative Council. The Dean serves as the principal administrator of at least four graduate programs with responsibility for maintaining and enhancing academic standards, developing close working relationships within the professional museum and fashion communities, overseeing personnel and budget, and coordinating and supervising activities of faculty and program coordinators.
As the Dean of Graduate Programs of the Fashion Institute of Technology, the Dean works in close consultation with the graduate faculty (full-time and adjunct) to provide overall leadership and direction for the Programs. Those reporting to the Dean include 21 full-time and adjunct faculty. The Dean is expected to foster and build upon the existing strengths of the faculty and to provide the personal and professional leadership to chart and guide the future course of the F.l.T. Graduate Programs. The Dean is expected to provide leadership in developing private funds to support both programs and student scholarships.
The Fashion Institute of Technology is seeking an individual with a distinguished record of accomplishment. Leading candidates for the Dean of Graduate Programs will be seasoned and successful educators with demonstrated evidence of mature and decisive leadership skills, strong commitment of the values of both the liberal arts and graduate education, and a successful record of fundraising. Leading candidates will have a strong scholarly background and will possess the PhD, or appropriate terminal degree. Leading candidates will possess 1) senior-level administrative experience in higher education, preferably graduate education; or 2) senior-level administrative experience in a museum, gallery, or artworld Institution, or in fashion management.
The Graduate Programs currently include Masters of Arts degree programs in Gallery and Retail Art Administration; Museum Studies: Applied Arts; Museum Studies: Costume and Textiles; and, projected for 1991, a Masters degree program in Fashion Management.
The newest program in Fashion Management promises to provide high-level leadership to the apparel industry. Business and industry leaders have assisted in the design and development of this program.
Nominations and expressions of interest will continue to be received until the position is filled. Since screening of candidates will begin on April 15,1990, submissions are specially encouraged prior to that date.
Nominations and expressions of interest should be submitted to:
Elizabeth Rocklin, Senior Associate Education Practice Korn/Ferry International 900 - 19th Street N.W.
Washington D.C. 20006
All inquiries, nominations, and applications will be held in strictest confidence.
The Fashion Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, and actively seeks nominations of, and expressions of interest from, minority and female candidates.
6
Feb. 12, 1990
Hispanic Link Weekly Repor


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
Radio Sales Trainee
KABC-AM Talk Radio is currently looking for an energetic, career oriented individual with excellent writing and communication skills to join our new Radio Sales Trainee Program.
This one year program will involve comprehensive training in all aspects of radio sales. You will receive a modest base salary plus commissions on any accounts personally handled and sold. Should a regular position become available during the program and if you have met the challenges as a trainee, you will be strongly considered for a position on our Radio Sales Staff.
We prefer a college degree or equivalent experience with some sales background, preferably broadcasting related.
If you are interested in this excellent career opportunity, please send a resume in confidence to Capital Cities/ABC, Inc., Personnel Department, 4151 Prospect Ave., Hollywood, CA 90027.
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H/V.
ospect Ave.,
REPORTER
•Jy^H1NGRT)N, j
ington, D.Q.y lor bright journalist with limited experience,
$18-$21K.
Y;;
, Cecilio Morales | ' j
Editor;
Employ merit and iTrjSiirif ing' Bepprter <• 1211 Connecticut Ave, NW .
, ' Suite 402 Washington, D.C, 200$6
NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR
The Council, a Washington D.C., based organization, accredits 550 colleges and universities. Constituent members include twenty-four national education associations, representing teachers, state and local policy makers, teacher education institutions, and professional specialty areas.
Salary In $80fs or higher
Screening will begin on or about March 15. Submit r6sum6 with letter of application and a list of five references to:
Michael D. Usdan
Secretary, NCATE Search Committee The Institute for Educational Leadership 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Suite 310 Washington, D.C. 20036
An equal opportunity, affirmative action employer
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics In Philanthropy
DUTIES: Organize educational and organizational programs, develop and facilitate grant-seeker training programs, identify and obtain necessary funding, oversee publication of periodic reports and HIP’S quarterly newsletter.
QUALIFICATIONS: Administrative and fundraising experience in nonprofit corporation. Strong interpersonal and communications skills. Extensive working knowledge of Latino community issues in the U.S. Excellent report and proposal writing skills. Demonstrated ability to work cooperatively in a professional capacity with boards of directors, funding sources, and other, diverse individuals and organizations.
EMPLOYMENT: Compensation includes a starting salary commensurate with experience, standard fringe benefits. The starting salary may be adjusted following a six-month performance review, and following annual reviews thereafter. The appointment is full-time at HIP’s office in San Francisco. Extensive travel is required.
APPLICATION: Letters of application should be sent with r6sum6 to: Hispanic in Philanthropy Search Committee c/oSHALAN FOUNDATION 82 2nd St. 3rd Floor San Francisco, Calif. 94105
Please submit names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least three professional references, and a brief salary history.
Applications will be closed on February 23,1990.
CARTOONISTS: We pay $25 for humorous or political cartoons. Submit to: F6lix P6rez, editor, Hispanic Link Weekly Report, 1420N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone: (202) 234-0280.
MANAGING EDITOR, for non-profit Youth News Service.
Salary: mid-to-upper teens.
Contact Craig Trygstad, Youth Communication, 2025 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006.
â– 
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Feb. 12, 1990
7
mOrtMniXJi >5


Arts & Entertainment
OSCAR POSSIBILITIES: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces nominations for its 62nd annual awards Feb. 14, and two Latinos could be among the nominated.
Recent studio advertisements in entertainment trade publications have called the attention of Academy members to the performances of Raul Juliei in Romero and Edward James Olmos in Triumph of the Spirit
Juli&, who has never been nominated for an Oscar before, qualifies this year in the “best actor” category. Olmos, who was nominated last year in the “best actor” category for Stand and Deliver, qualifies this time for “best supporting actor.”
In a related item, Edward James Olmos may recreate the role of “el Pachuco” in a planned revival of Luis Valdez’s musical play Zoof Suit The revival is reportedly planned by San Francisco producer Charles Duggan, Valdez’s El Teatro Campesino company and the play’s original producing organization, Los Angeles’ Center Theatre Group. Duggan reportedly has a letter of intent from Olmos to appear as “el
Pachuco, " a role he created in the original Los Angeles production and for which he won a Tony nomination on Broadway.
New plans would have ZootSuit open this fall in San Francisco, then move to Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.
Another revival is currently underway at El Teatro Campesino's home base in San Juan Bautista, Calif. The theater is currently staging Luis Valdez’s comedy / Don't Have To Show You No Stinkin' Badges, through March 4.
In more California theater news: The Granny, an English-language version of Roberto Cossa’s fare eta Nona, continues at San Diego’s Old Globe through Feb. 18...And Eduardo Machado’s new play Stevie Wants to Play the Blues has its world premiere at the Los Angeles Theatre Center Feb. 17. It runs through April 8.
ONE LINER: The Book in the Americas, an exhibit of rare books from the colonial period, commemorates the 450th anniversary of printing in the New World, in Mexico (1539), and the 350th anniversary of the beginning of printing in British America, in Cambridge (1639); it is on view at the Americas Society, in New York, through March 31...
-Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
NAHJ PICKS McMURRAY: The Nations Association of Hispanic Journalists an nounced Feb. 1 that Jos6 McMurray, asenio producer with National Public Radio, will b< its new executive director. McM urray, who will take over the posi-tion Feb. 26, sue-ceeds Frank Newton, |l§f executive director of IMIff the Washington, D.C.-based organization since its founding in 1984. Born in Uruguay, the 40-year-old Me- flU *5\ Wm Murray has been with McMURRAY NPR for 10 years, most recently producing the program Latin File. Before his NPR job, he was station manager of KBBF radio in Sante Rosa, Calif., for five years. LATIN FILE TO BE PHASED OUT: Citing 1 r 3 ) 3 1 J
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT

A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service Inc. 1420 'N1 Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher and Editor: F6lix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Roberto Rodrfguez, Jonathan Higuera. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108; Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
low interest among its member stations, Adam Powell, National Public Radio vice president of news and information, confirmed to Weekly Report Feb. 7 that NPR will phase out its 15-minute, daily Latin File program.
No cancellation date was given for the program, which began in August 1988 on the heels of another Hispanic-oriented program cut by NPR, Enfoque Nacional. Powell said that six of the seven employees will remain at NPR and the material normally produced for Latin File would be incorporated into the shows Morning Edition and All Things Considered.
Seen by some as an attempt to soften criticism over the cutting of Latin File, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a prime NPR funder, has accepted an NPR proposal to fund three Latino specials.
“The problem,” said Jos6 McMurray, former producer of Latin File, “is that Latinos will no longer be able to produce their own shows. Latinos will now be absorbed into the mainstream. Some Latinos believe in that. I don’t.”
TRIBUTE TO RUBEN SALAZAR: The California Chicano News Media Association
will hold a conference Sept. 7-9 in Los Angeles to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the death of Journalist Rub6n Salazar and to assess the status of Latinos in journalism.
Salazar, who was news director for Span-ish-language KMEX-Channel 34 and a columnist for the Los Angeles Times, was killed Aug. 29,1970, in East Los Angeles while covering the Chicano Moratorium protest against the Vietnam War. He was hit in the head by a tear-gas canister fired by a deputy sheriff. Contact CCNMA at (213) 743-7158.
TV MARTI SELECTS DIRECTOR: Armando Navarro, a Key Biscayne, Fla, businessman, has been named acting director of 7V Martf, the U.S. government-sponsored station that plans to broadcast to metropolitan Havana. President Bush must confirm his selection.
TV Martf is set to broadcast, under strong objections from the Cuban government, in March. Congress approved $7.5 million Jan. 30 for its testing. If the broadcast proves to be technically feasible, Congress has approved $16 million annually for 1990 and 1991.
- Roberto Rodrfguez


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week replace three of five Sweetwater City Council members the governor suspended Jan. 26for being indicted or named in an indictment. .. The National Foundation for the Improvement of Education and the Christa McAuliffe Institute for Educational Pioneering honor at a Washington, D.C., ceremony Theresa Roybal of Arizona, and four other teachers, as their 1990 Christa McAuliffe Educators for their use of technology in teaching ... A Los Angeles federal grand jury indicts Manuel Ibarra Hererra, former director of the Mexican Fed eral Judicial Police, Miguel Aldana Ibarra, former director of Interpol in Mexico, and 17 other people in connection with the 1985 kidnap torture-death of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enri que Camarena ... Fior Morales "Ramito" Ramos, one of Puerto Rico's most popular folkloric singers, commits suicide in Salinas, Puerto Rico. He was 7 4 ... The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Services Organizations honors U.S. Sen. Orrin Hatch, U.S. Rep. Bill Richardson, Calif. Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard and Washington, D.C., Office of Latino Affairs executive director Arlene Gillespie with its 1990 Health LeadershipAwards ... U.S. District Judge Robert Aguilar goes on trial in San Francisco in the nation's first prosecution of a Jederal judgae on racketeering charges ... Cathi Vasquez Villalpando, U.S. treasurer, resigns as national chairwoman of the Republican National Hispanic Asssembly. Jose Manuel Casanova, executive director of the Inter-American Development Bank during the Reagan administration, assumes the RNHA position ... Fiorida Gov. Bob Martinez names Jaime Rodriguez, Matilda Aguirre and Jesus Mesa to Voi. 8 No.7 Feb. 12, 1990 Court Jolts English Movement Reacting to what it said were a series of 1989 U.S. Supreme Court decisions that created gaps in federal laws banning job dis crimination, a bipartisan group of U.S. sena tors and representatives introduced Feb. 7 a bill titled the Civil Rights Act of 1990. ''The ... decisions of 1989 have stood our : civil rights laws on :! their heads," said ,: Rep. Matthew Martfnez (D-Calif.), a sponsor of the bill. One decision proMARTINEZ a 124-year -Qic:J co-sponsors eM/ rigiD bill law from being invoked in lawsuits against state and local governments. The law allowed plaintiffs to receive punitive damages as well as back pay. Another ruling allowed white workers to challenge a court -approved affirmative action settlement. The third deci sion held it was insufficient for workers to i show They had to prove that employers created the imbalance and had no legitimate business reasons to do so. By Roberto Rodriguez Latino leaders across the country felt vindi cation as a result of U.S. District Judge Paul Rosenblatt's Feb. 6 ruling that struck down Arizona's voter-approved English Language Amendment. They contend it not only sets precedent but it should reverse the momen tum of the official English movement. In handing down his decision, Rosenblatt, in Phoenix, said the law was a violation of the First Amendment right to free speech and was overly broad. "This verifies what we were telling the voters all along --that it was unconstitutional," said Manny Mejfa, a member of the Arizona steering committee that opposed the "Eng lish only" law. "And now thatthe federal court has agreed, it will send a clear signal to the English only forces." State Rep. Armando Rufz, a southeast Phoenix Democrat, said, "It sends the message to other states that the whole notion that these measures are merely symbolic is false. They do take away the freedom of speech." Gov. Rose Mefford-the lawsuit's sole de fendant --said she will not appeal the deci sion, citing that the amendment was "flawed from the beginning." Md. Panel Rejects Official-English Bid By Roberto Rodriguez A bill designating English as the official language cl the state of Maryland was s001d defeated, 18-2, by the Constitutional and Administrative Law Committee of the state's of Delegates. "We did our homework," said Jose Rufz, executive director of the Governor's Com mission on Hispanic Affairs. "To defeat the bill, we not only . garnered the support of Latinos but we also went beyond the His panic community," said Rufz. The bill was killed Jan. 26. The measure was introduced by dele gates Peter Csllcm and Charles Kolodziejski, bah Democrats. It WC!S opposed bJ a of groups ranging from the Center for Applied Linguistics, the American Jewish Commit tee, People for the American Way, the American Civil Liberties Union and the Maryland State Teachers Association. Callas, of Greek descent, told Weekly Report the bill was "just an insurance pol icy," adding, "Seventeen other states can't be wrong." Kolodziejski said, "I'm Polish. I just wanted people to learn English. But I can read the writing on the wall. Everybody does want to learn English. That's what I heard (in testi mony)." Although 16 other states have declared English as their official language, "only Ari zona's law had legal teeth," said Mejfa. Asked about the implications of the ruling for other states, Richard Castro, executive director of the City and County of Denver Human Rights and Community Relations of fice, said, "I don't know that it will change the English only law in Colorado, but it does send a message around the country that it's not good public policy." The 1988 initiative, sponsored by Arizo nans for Official English, was narCASTRO rawly approved, ruling sends message 580,830-569,993. The amendment to the Arizona required the state am county governments conduct business in English, with the exceptions of public health and safety, education and "to protect the rights of crimi nal defendants or victims of crime." It also provided residents, who felt the amendment was not being adequately enforced, the right to bring suit. The ruling was the result of a lawsuit filed by Marfa Yniguez, of Tempe, a state Department of Administration employee, two days after the passage of the initiative. Yniguez, who evaluates and arbitrates medical malpractice claims, charged that the law inhibited her contlooed on page 2 Joblessness Rate Drops The Hispanic unemployment rate plunged from 8.5% in December to 7.1% last month, the Department of Labor reported Feb. 2. The drop in Latino joblessness took the rate to its lowest level since March 1989, when it was 6.7%. The number of Hispanic unem ployed decreased from 804,000 in December to 671,000 last month. The black unemploy ment was 11.3% and the white onewas4.5%.

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INS Eases Rule on Deportation for Spouses, Children By Roberto Rodriguez Effective Feb. 14, undocumented spouses or children of immigrants legalized under the 1986 immigration act may remain in the United States while they wait to qualify for permanent residence. "The INS had been stonewalling for two years. Thus, the new policy represents a significant step forward," said Cecilia Munoz, senior immigration policy analyst at the National Council of La Raza. The policy is a reversal of one that had been decried by immigrants' rights activ ists for causing the separation of spouses Ed. Dept. Ups Funds For Bilingual Method Signaling a change in its approach to bilin gual education, the U.S. Department of Edu cation will spend $3 million in developmental bilingual education programs this year, Rita Esquivel, the department's bilingual programs director announced Jan. 23. If successful de velopmental pro grams result, said Esquivel, director of the Office of Bilin gual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, the depart ment hopes to in crease funding for them even further. Under President ESQUIVEL Reagan the departhopeful tor more tundlng ment spent $250,000 each year since 1985 on two developmental programs. Developmental bilingual education programs teach like numbers of English-speaking and non-English-speaking students both lan guages. The method pushes for both groups to each learn a new language, all the while building on the students' native language. Conversely, transitional bilingual education programs, the most prevalent method, rely primarily on English. They attempt to main stream the student at a faster pace. and the placing of young children in depor tation proceedings. Under the old policy, Munoz said, tens of thousands of immediate family members of individuals who qualified for legalization were ineligible for the program, primarily because they arrived after the 1982 cutoff date. It made minor children eligible for such relief only if both parents had qualified for legalization. The new policy announced Feb. 2 by Gene McNary, commissioner of the Immi gration and Naturalization Service, pr01ides a renewable, one-year protection against deportation to children under 18 and spouses who can prove that they have resided within this country since Nov. 6, 1986, and have not been convicted of a felony or three misdemeanors in the United States. Although most Latino leaders have hailed the change as positive, Antonio Rodriguez, Los Angeles immigrants' rights attorney, was of the policy. "It excludes people who came after Nov. 6, 1986 --which is the bulk. It excludes those in the household over 18. It subjects the applicants to a needlessyear-by-year review. And lastly, it says nothing of confidentiality." Montoya Guilty; CalderOn Says He'll Run By Jonathan Higuera The Feb. 2 conviction of California State Sen. Joseph Montoya (D-Whittier) on racketeering, extortion and money laundering charges has opened the door for Assemblyman Charles Calder6n (D-Montebello) to run for his seat. Calder6n announced his candidacy shortly after Montoya was convicted of seven of the 10 charges filed against him by the U.S. attorney's office. The convictions culminated an eight-week trial in which jurors were shown a videotape of Montoya receiving a $3,000 bribe from an undercover FBI agent in exchange for back ing legislation that would benefit a dummy company. He will be sentenced April 26 and faces up to 20 years in prison for each count and $2 million in fines. Richard Martfnez, executive director of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, said the loss of Montoya hurts be cctuse of the dearth of elected Latino officials in the California legislature. But, he said, "The argument that it doesn't make a difference whether the replacement is a Latino as long as he or she is good doesn't hold water. That's the number one argument used against us when we begin to flex our political muscle. "We should not feel guilty about one of our own doing the wrong thing but do the responsible thing and replace him with another Latino or Latina," he added. Judge Rules Law Violates Constitution conlirXJed from page 1 right to free speech and prevented her from carrying out her job. In his 21-page opinion, Rosenblatt wrote, "A state may not require that its officers and employees relinquish rights guaranteed them by the First Amendment as a condition of public employment." Catherine Ely, communications coordina tor of U.S. English, a Washington D.C.-based umbrella group for the official English movement, told Weekly Report that it is considering petitioning the court for the right to intervene, a procedure that would allow it it to file an appeal. "We disagree with the finding of the judge. He made his decision on the premise that the woman (Yniguez) wcs prohibited from speaking Spanish and that the state can not restrict the activities of its employees. That's not the case. The court has allowed the government to prohibit government workers from partici pating in campaigns. The judge is simply mistaken. And I think we'll win." Ely acknowledged that it is difficult to obtain intervening status. Suarez Weighs Race Against Martinez Elated with the decision, Marta Jimltnez, an attorney with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, called it "a decision the time for which has come." 2 By Roberto Rodriguez Miami Mayor Xavier who has supported Democrats and Republicans alike since his election to his non-partisan post four years ago, confirmed Jan. 30 that he is considering challenging Gov. Bob Martfnez in the Sept. 4 Republican primary. The mayor, who was overwhelmingly re elected in November, told reporters he is reluctant to give up his post but is con cerned about the state's "general lack of leadership." "Competition is always good for the His panic community," said Manuel Toro, edi tor of La Prensa newspaper in Orlando. Toro , immediate past president of the Na tional Association of Hispanic Publications, added that if runs, he would have a good chance of winning. ••The governor has not performed to our expectation. Mayor on the other hand, has a fairly good record. His doors are always open to the Hispanic commu-n . ity " Feb. 12. 1990 "Our country is based on fundamental civil rights and we have shown that we will no longer allow bigotry to be couched in pa-triotism," she said. "I feel terrific right now," said Linda Miller, one of the principal organizers against the amendment. "We are not opposed to the English language. We are opposed to the spirit of U.S. English. They made it seem that we were anti-American. What we always felt is that we should have respect for other lan guages. And today, we feel vindicated." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Jim Sagel Corrupt to its Core Edward James Olmos may not have gotten the Oscar he so richly deserved for his role in the film Stand and Deliver. But when he stood up at the close of the recent Albuquerque Hispano Chamber of Com merce annual banquet, he delivered a speech so raw and real it set many a tuxedoed listener squirming in his $60 seat. I imagine it was a bit more than the chamber bargained for. "I'm your worst nightmare!" Olmos exclaimed and, no doubt, he was to many in the well-heeled crowd. Certainly, Olmos didn't act "nice," loudly pronouncing that he couldn't be bought by Anheuser -Busch, the beer company that footed the bill for the weekend's activities, including, no doubt, Olmos' own appearance. And he refused to act like all we need was a :. ,. good infusion of "ganas" in order to solve the f '' r:twmmr;ni difficult problems facing Hispanics and soci ety as a whole. Olmos told the audience one of the last.: things they expected to hear--namely, that • the version of the "American dream" so many , are so busily chasing is corrupt at its core. The dollar that had been glorified all eve: ning from upbeat promotional films to Secretary Manuel Lujan's description of the U.S. Department of Interior as a "business" mak ing millions through the sale of natural resources --that very dollar, Olmos said, is the root of the problem. A SPEECH AKIN TO CHE IIi Me Ia rayo, carnal!" he said as an entrepreneur reacted audibly. It was perhaps too much truth, for Olmos was asserting that the same money that fueled the drug economy also filled the wallets of everyone sitting in the Convention Center. "The most important day of my life was when I turned my back on the dollar," Olmos declared, and he went further than that. Unless we all turn our back on the dollar, he said, we will lose not only the war on drugs, but also the battle against illiteracy, teen-age pregnancy and AIDS. It must have been revolutionary talk for folks accustomed to thinking of money as a cure rather than a curse. And it certainly had to be a shock to those who expected to hear a Jaime Escalante pep-talk and got, instead, something more akin to Che. For what Olmos was demanding that evening in Albuquerque was a revolution in our way of thinking and in our values. It couldn't come at a more critical time. While countries in Eastern Europe embrace our democratic ideals, we relinquish more of our own civil liberties as we wage a desperate, last-ditch defense against the cancer of crime and drug warfare on our dangerous streets. And even as our freedom at home inexorably erodes, we applaud a pres . ident who invades a sovereign nation in the name of "democracy." THESE ARE HUMAN ISSUES These, of course, are not solely Hispanic issues, and Olmos did not address them as such. They are human issues, cutting across ethnic barriers. Olmos pointed to the "familia" as our only hope for the future-the family and its values of hard work, integrity and respect for others passed down over the generations. Those are quintessential values now largely abandoned by the "mainstream." The crucial leadership role Hispanics can now play does not consist of playing the stock market as ruthlessly as the Anglo and, in the process, losing stock of himself, but rather, in embracing the values of his heritage and helping to lead the United States back to her true self. This country, as Olmos said, was built on the backs of Hispanics. Yet, each succeeding generation held onto its dignity, refusing to collapse under the weight of economic, social and political oppression. Hispanic elders provide an unwearying "ejemplo," the example of a life built on self-respect and concern for one's neighbor. It's an "ejemplo" all can emulate, regardless of color or creed. Sin pelos en Ia lengua OFF AND RUNNING: Entering the mighty '90s, which Hispanics are out of the gate fastest? IN THE EAST: No. 1 has to be New York City Schools' 53-year old Chancellor Joseph Fernandez. The no-nonsense administra tive approach to education reform that he brought north from Miami has the New York Daily News and New York Times, publi cations that don't agree on a lot, fawning in unison. Responding to Fernandez's call for a 1991 school budget in crease of nearly half a billion dollars, a Jan. 25 Daily News editorial begins: "The revolution has started." It praises his actions to eliminate the leeches and politicians in the city's educational bureaucracy and his efforts to put the power into the hands of progressive principals, teachers and parents. "This is war," it trumpets. "The Fernandez budget is a revolution ary document, like the Declaration of lndependence ... Sabotaging (it) would cripple a generation of New Yorkers." Earlier, in an editorial headed, "No Chancellor Can Do It Alone," the Times offered a calmer kudo: "The school system finally has a strong Chancellor in Mr. Fernandez." IN THE WEST: In Los Angeles, it's Leticia Quezada, the lone Hispanic on Los Angeles' school board, who's receiving favorable press for her strength and logic. Reporter Michael Quintanilla wrote an excellent profile on the 36-year -old immigrant from Juarez, Mexico, in the Los Angeles Times Jan. 28. It addition toleading the fight for bilingual education, Quezada joined Rita Walters, the board's lone black, on the short end of a 5-2 vote that relaxed the district's rules on students' participation in extracurricular activities. Moving counter to a national"no-pass, no-play" trend, the district will now permit a jock with an "F" to participate in sports, provided he has a "C" average. Reacted Quezada: "I feel that this is a case of liberal mentality whose good intentions are misplaced, the idea that our students can't be expected to do as well." After years of Anglo-led school systems encouraging educa tional inferiority of Hispanics and blacks, representatives from these groups are finally getting a shot at setting the standards and making the most of it. OFF AND STUMBLING: To prove that not all Latinos are super human, there's Jorge Chavez, a Peruvian jockey who rides at New York's Aqueduct Park. Jorge's English isn't up to snuff yet and when stewards and starters reminded the jockeys on Jan. 21 that the $50,000, 2 1/4-mile sixth race required three laps around the inner track, their messages whizzed right by Jorge. Rounding into the stretch the second time, Chavez urged his 61 shot, High Policy, into the lead and eased up after he thought he'd won. As the whole field swept past him, he recognized his error and cranked his mount up again, miraculously passing all the horses but the 3-5 favorite, who was still four lengths ahead. Race fans, even less forgiving than football and basketball fans, doused Jorge with enough boos to make him break into sobs in front of the grandstand, the New York Post reported. The gelding's owner was more forgiving. Acknowledging that his horse definitely would have won had Jorge understood the in structions, he told reporters, "Everyone makes mistakes," and promised to let Jorge ride for him again. Presumably with an interpreter in the rumbleseat. -Kay Barbaro Quoting ... CARMEN CRUZ, whose 17-year-old daughter drowned when an Alton, Texas, school bus plunged into a water-filled quarry, reacting in the Jan. 18 New York Times to the rush of lawyers seeking to represent families of the 21 drowned children: "The first lawyer who can bring my daughter back, I'll hire." (Jim Sage/ is an author based in Espanola, N.M.) Hispanic Link Weekly Report Feb. 12, 1990 3

PAGE 4

COLLECTING JOB RIGHTS UNDER IRCA: The Immigration and Naturalization Service has published two 12-page booklets, in English and Spanish, that cover the rights of employees who feel they have been discrimi nated against because of their immigration status. To receive a free copy, contact the Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices, P.O. Box 65490, Washington, D.C. 20035-5490 1-800-255-7688 . In Washington, D.C., call (202) 653-8121. CONSUMER BANKING INFORMATION: Consumer Action has published Spanish-, Chineseand English-language editions of a booklet, 23 pages, that describes how to shop for, open and maintain a checking or savings account. To receive a copy, send $1 to Con sumer Action, Banking Booklet, 116 New Montgomery St., Suite 223, San Francisco, Calif. 94105 (415) 777-9648. ORANGE COUNTY LATINOS: The Tomas Rivera Center has re leased a study summary that focuses on the issues the Latino commu. nity in Orange County, Calif., considers most urgent. A free six-page copy of "At the Crossroads of Poverty and Affluence" can be ordered from the Tomas Rivera Center, 710 N. College Ave., Claremont, Calif. 91711 (714) 625-6607. The full report will be available in a few weeks. SCIENCE/MATH EDUCATION: The Triangle Coalition for Science and Technology Education has released a 10-page report, "A Plan of Action," that urges President Bush and Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos to make science and math education a high priority in our schools. The report also urges Bush and Cavazos to encourage more private-sector help for schools. The report is free from the TCSTE, 5112 Berwyn Road, College Park, Md. 207 40 (301) 220-0870. BROADCAST JOURNALISM CAREERS: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists has published a booklet about the education and training necessary for a career in broadcasting. Copies of the eight page booklet are free and available by writing to NAHJ, National Press Building, Suite 634, Washington, D.C. 20045 (202) 783-6228. ENCOUNTER OF TWO WORLDS: The Organization of American States publishes a quarterly quincentennial newsletter, "Discovery of America: Encounter of Two Worlds." To submit information or to receive a free copy of the newsletter, write to Quincentennial, Organi zation of American States, 1889 F St. NW, Washington D.C. 20006. PUERTO RICAN ELECTED OFFICIALS: The National Puerto Rican Coalition has published the "Directory of Puerto Rican Elected Officials in the United States," the first such listing that specifically identifies mainland Puerto Ricans who hold public office. Copies of the 30-page directory are available for $6 from NPRC, 1700 K St. NW, Suite 500, Washington D.C. 20006 (202) 223-3915. CONNECTING EFFORT LINKS ELDERLY, AT-RISK YOUTH Los Angeles, Miami and Hartford, Conn., are among nine cities in a $3 million initiative headed by Philadelphia's Temple University that will pair elderly persons with at-risk youth to help the youngsters succeed. Called Linking Lifetimes, the project will pay mentors a small stipend to spend at least two hours per week with the partner to offer guidance as well as participate in social events together. The mentors will be trained on how to help the troubled youth gain self-respect and educational skills. COLLEGE NETWORK RECEIVES $1.3 MILLION Miami-Dade Community College, a school that is 51% Hispanic, has received $1.3 million from IBM in computers and software to help it develop a computerized curriculum for a network of colleges to help underprepared higher ed students acquire basic reading, writing and math skills . Miami-Dade will develop the curriculum for its students and those at 19 other community colleges and two four -year colleges, a network called the League for Innovation in the Community College. Students will have access to the software programs while it is being evaluated. Some of the cities where other institutions are located are Phoenix, Ariz., Bakersfield, Calif., Dallas and Santa Fe, N.M. CENSUS, INSTITUTE ENTER AGREEMENT The U.S. Census BureauandtheSouthwestVoterResearch Institute, in San Antonio, have signed an agreement making the institute a dissemination point for census data and reports to the Hispanic community. The institute, an arm of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project founded by the late Willie Velasquez, becomes the first His panic organization to enter into such an arrangement. Robert Brischetto, executive director of the institute, said the availa bility of the census data to the institute will help it in redistricting studies and analyzing the socioeconomic conditions of Hispanics. SANTA ANA, CALIF., TARGETS CENSUS The Santa Ana, Calif., City Council has voted unanimously to pay $50,000 for two programs that it hopes will encourage Latinos to participate in the upcoming census. Being developed by Hispanic Management and Hispanic America Inc., the programs will attempt to increase Latino awareness of the census through a grocery store marketing campaign. Some 10,000 packets of store coupons along with a census information flyer will be distributed to homes in southeast Santa Ana. Also proposed are two three-hour grocery store fiestas with Latino personalities to attract and educate Hispanics about the census. Calendar Concepci6n Trevino Wadler (415) 273-3284 POETRY, SONG "STAND AND BE COUNTED" American Gl Forum Chicago Feb. 22 THIS WEEK RECEPTION Washington, D.C. February 14 The National Council of Hispanic Women is hold ing a reception to welcome Catalina Vasquez Villal pando, U.S. treasurer. San Garcia (301) 907-0127 HUMAN CAPITAL Oakland, Calif. Feb. 15-17 The Professional Management Association of Aztlan is holding a national conference on the investment and development of the "Professional Hispanic Work Force." A career fair and job list ings will be another highlight. 4 Stanford, Calif. Feb. 17 Casa Zapata at Stanford University will host a po etry and song festival, celebrating the revival of the 1970s' Floricanto and Canto a/ Pueblo festivals instrumental in the development of Chicano litera ture and art. Bellm Aguirre (415) 325-2250 LATINA LEADERSHIP Houston Feb. 17 The Magnolia Park Chapter of the YWCA's His panic Leadership Committee will host its fifth Lead ership Conference for Hispanic Women. Rita Rodriguez (713) 926-2601 COMING SOON Feb. 12, 1990 Vilma Col6m (312) 664-5641 HISPANIC WOMEN Mexican American Opportunity Foundation Los Angeles March 2 Terri Hernandez (213) 722-7807 SPOTLIGHT MEDIA ARTS: The National Hispanic Academy of Media Arts and Sciences will host a conference in Universal City, Calif., March 1-3, addressing the challenges and opportunities facing Latinos in the entertainment and media industry. A job fair and film and video screening program will also be fea tured. For more information call Helen Hernandez at (818) 848-4148. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE Fl EDS ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR The Learning Research and Development Center at the University of Pittsburgh invites applications for the position of Associate Director of QUASAR (Quantitative Understanding: Amplifying Students Achievement and Reasoning), a five-year national project aimed at improving mathematics education for middle students attending schools in economically disadvantaged communities. Candidates should have substantial knowledge and experience related to at least one of the following areas: school instructional programs in mathematics, education of ethnic minority students, development of mathematics assessment, or qualitative and quantitative methods of program evaluation. Candidates should have knONiedge a and sensitivity to the issues a education in dscOiantaged communities, excellent communication skills, and demonstrated administrative ability. The Associate Director must be able to provide leadership while continuing to work as a member of a team. Duties include project administration, preparation of written reports, oral presentations on behalf of the project, and substantive involvement in the research/development activities of at least one project area (e. g., mathematics instruction, student assessment, program evaluation). Salary will be competitive and commensurate with academic preparation and experience. Consideration of applicants will begin on March 15, 1990, and will continue until the position is filled. Applicants should send a letter of application describing their training, professional interests, and goals, accompanied by a curriculum vitae, samples of relevant written work, and names, addresses, and telephone numbers of at least three references to: QUASAR Search, 707 LRDC, 3939 O'Hara Street, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. 15260. The University of Pittsburgh is an equal opportunity employer. Women and minority group members are invited and encouraged to apply. Assistant Dean for Advising University of Pennsylvania College of Arts and Sciences seeks an Assistant Dean for undergraduate and academic advising with special attention to needs of Hispanic students, and related administrative duties. Qualifications: Master's degree preferably in Liberal Arts. Three years teaching and counseling under graduates, fluency in Spanish. Salary range: $24,875 to $31,100. Programs Development Director Novela Health Education F {f position experienced, bilingual Spanish/English fundraiser/grant-writer. Non-profit organization producing health education material targeting Hispanics in u.s. Send resume and salary requirements to: Esther Ricardo, Nevala Health Foundation, 2524 16th Avenue So., Seattle WA. 98144. MANAGER OF FINANCE & ACCOUNTING ... KABC-TV is currently seeking a Manager of Finance & Accounting. This position will in performance of variance analysis on monthly operating results, preparations of forecac;1s aoo annual operating plan. Additional responsibilities include accounting for fixed assets, and supervision of accounting for intercompany transactions and payroll, union contracts, and personnel. The ideal candidate will have a college degree and at least 2 years auditing experience with a Big 8 CPA firm or comparable private industry experience. Strong accounting skills, working knowledge of LOTUS and PCs, and excellent interpersonal, analytical, organizational and supervisory skills are essential. You will find an excellent salary and benefits package, and an exciting and otnamic work environment Please send your to Capital Cities/ABC, Inc., Personnel Department (HL), 4151 Prospect Ave., Hollywood, Calif., 90027. Equal Opportunity Employer abc I Submit letter of application, and list of references by March 14, 1990, to: Diane Fry DEAR PERSONNEL DIRECTOR: No other publication or system lets you target a national pool of Latino professionals with the effectiveness and speed of Hispanic Link Weekly Report. To place an ad in Marketplace, please call in or send your copy to: Room 100, Logan Hall University of Pennsylvania College of Arts and Sciences Philadelphia, PA 191 04 Equal Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer. ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280. Ad copy re ceived (mail or phone) by 5 p.m. (El) Tuesday will be in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. CLASSIFIED AD RATES: 90 cents per word (city, state & ZIPcode Ordered by ________ _ count as 2 words; telephone number, 1 Organization _________ _ word). Multiple use rates on request. Street DISPLAY CLASSIFIED RATES: . ---. -------(ads with borders, varied type sizes) $45 City, State & Z1p _______ _ per column inch. Area Code & Phone ______ _ Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Feb. 12, 1990 : . . . : . :. :. : : . 1 . ; . . : . l i =:::::::::::;:::::::;:;::1 :. : . l . . . : . :. .. : . : . l : : . :: : . : .. . .. :: : i . : .. : . . : : l : :. : : : 1 : : : . : . . : : .. i . : . : . i : : . : . . . . ; . : : :. : : . : l . . : . : . . . .. . . : . . . . . : l 5

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: . . : ... : .. : :: .:::: : :::: : : : :: : :;: ::;:;:::: : : : ..... :> =: ..... :.=:>= : .. ; . : . . :::.. : = ==.: 6 I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS TRAFFIC ENGINEER II, $32,240$45,822 --Performs prof. traffic eng. work involving the planning, design & constr. of transpo. projects. Req. 1 yr. exp. in traffic eng. & a BS in Eng. incl. traffic and/ortranspo. related courses. To request application, call (602) 2626277 or write City of Phoenix, Person nel Department, 135 N. 2nd Ave., Phoenix, Ariz. 85003. AA/EEO/H Employer GIRLSCOU1S PERSONNEL CONSULTANT Girl Scouts of U.S.A. is offering a challenging and stimulating op portunity for a strong personnel generalist to join the staff of the national organization located in midtown Manhattan. You will use your 5 plus years solid HR experience to provide technical assistance to outbased locations in: AA planning/implem entation, employee relations, recruitment, performance manage ment, legislation & policy interpre tation, and other related areas. Candidates must be able to travel approximately 50% nationally, design and conduct training ses sions, problem solve and have excellent communication skills. Salary mid $30's with excellent benefits. For immediate consideration, send resume to: Janice Jacobs, GiriScoutsofthe U.S.A., 830Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022. EOE M/F/HN Linguist Specialist Spanish Speaking Los Angeles Superior Court, 111 North Hill Street, Rm. 230, Los An geles, Calif. 90012. Phone (213) 974-5403. Salary: $225 per day. Deadline: File before February 23, 1990. Minimum Qualifications Graduate Degree in Spanish Lan guage or equivalent area of study and five years of demonstrated experience. FROM KORN/FERRY INTERNATIONAL • • • FASHION INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Dean of Graduate Programs Nominations and expressions of interest are invited for the position of Dean of Graduate Programs of the Fashion Institute of Technology. The dean of Graduate Programs reports to the Vice President for Academic Affairs and is a member of the President's Administrative Council. The Dean serves as the principal administrator of at least four graduate programs with responsibility for maintaining and enhancing academic standards, developing close working relation ships within the professional museum and fashion communities, overseeing person nel and budget, and coordinating and supervising activities of faculty and program coordinators. As the Dean of Graduate Programs of the Fashion Institute of Technology, the Dean works in close consultation with the graduate faculty (full-time and adjunct) to provide overall leadership and direction for the Programs. Those reporting to the Dean include 21 full-time and adjunct faculty. The Dean is expected to foster and build upon the existing strengths of the faculty and to provide the personal and professional leadership to chart and guide the future course of the F.I.T. Graduate Programs. The Dean is expected to provide leadership in developing private funds to support both programs and student scholarships. The Fashion Institute of Technology is seeking an individual with a distinguished record of accomplishment. Leading candidates for the Dean of Graduate Programs will be seasoned and successful educators with demonstrated evidence of mature and decisive leadership skills, strong commitment of the values of both the liberal arts and graduate education, and a successful record offundraising. Leading candidates will have a strong scholarly background and will possess the PhD, or appropriate terminal degree. Leading candidates will possess 1) senior-level administrative experience in higher education, preferably graduate education; or 2) senior -level administrative experience in a museum, gallery, or artworld institution, or in fashion management. The Graduate Programs currently include Masters of Arts degree programs in Gallery and Retail Art Administration; Museum Studies: Applied Arts; Museum Studies: Costume and Textiles; and, projected for 1991, a Masters degree program in Fashion Management. The newest program in Fashion Management promises to provide high-level leadership to the apparel industry. Business and industry leaders have assisted in the design and development of this program. Nominations and expressions of interest will continue to be received until the position is filled. Since screening of candidates will begin on April 15, 1990, submis sions are specially encouraged prior to that date. Nominations and expressions of interest should be submitted to: Elizabeth Rocklin, Senior Associate Education Practice Korn/F erry International 90019th Street N.W. Washington D.C. 20006 All inquiries, nominations, and applications will be held in strictest confidence. The Fashion Institute of Technology is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer, and actively seeks nominations of, and expressions of interest from, minority and female candidates. Feb. 12. 1990 Hispanic Unk Weekly Repor I

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I Radio Sales Trainee KABC-AM Talk Radio is currently looking for an energetic, career oriented individual with excellent writing and communica tion skills to join our new Radio Sales Trainee Program. This one year program will involve comprehensive training in all aspects of radio sales. You will receive a modest base salary plus commissions on any accounts personally handled and sold. Should a regular position become available during the program and if you have met the challenges as a trainee, you will be strongly considered for a position on our Radio Sales Staff. We prefer a college degree or equivalent experience with some sales background, preferably broadcasting related. If you are interested in this ex cellent career opportunity, please send a resume in confidence to Capital Cities/ ABC, Inc., Personnel Department, 4151 Prospect Ave., Hollywood, CA 90027. We are an Equal Opportunity Em ployer M/F /H/V. Hispanic Unk Weekly Report abc NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR ACCREDITATION OF TEACHER EDUCATION EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The Council, a Washington D.C., based organization, accredits 550 colleges and universities. Constituent members include twenty-four national education associations, representing teachers, state and local policy makers, teacher education institutions, and professional specialty areas. Salary In $80's or higher Screening will begin on or about March 15. Submit resun 'e with letter of application and a list of five references to: Michael D. Usdan Secretary, NCATE Search Committee The Institute for Educational Leadership 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Suite 310 Washington, D.C. 20036 An equal opportunity, affirmative action employer EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Hispanics In Philanthropy DUTIES: Organize educational and organizational programs, develop and facilitate grant-seeker training programs, identify and obtain necessary funding, oversee publication of periodic reports and HIP's quarterly newsletter. QUALIFICATIONS: Administrative and fundraising experience in non profit corporation. Strong interpersonal and communications skills. Extensive working knowledge of Latino community issues in the U.S. Excellent report and proposal writing skills. Demonstrated ability to work coopera tively in a professional capacity with boards of directors, funding sources, and other, diverse individuals and organizations. EMPLOYMENT: Compensation includes a starting salary commensurate with experience, standard fringe benefits. The starting salary may be adjusted following a six-month performance review, and following annual reviews thereafter. The appointment is full-time at HIP's office in San Francisco. Extensive travel is required. APPLICATION: Letters of application should be sent with resume to: Hispanic In Philanthropy Search Committee c/o SHALAN FOUNDATION 82 2nd St. 3rd Floor San Francisco, Calif. 94105 Please submit names, addresses and telephone numbers of at least three professional references, and a brief salary history. Applications will be closed on February 23, 1990. CARTOONISTS: We pay $25 for humorous or political cartoons. Submit to: Felix Perez, editor, His panic Link Weekly Report, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005. Phone: (202) 234-0280. Feb. 12, 1990 MANAGING EDITOR, for non-profit Youth News Service. Salary: mid-to-upper teens. Contact Craig Trygstad, Youth Com munication, 2025 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006. . . : .. : ; . : : . . . 7

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Arts & Entertainment Pachuco," a role he created in the original Los Angeles production and for which he won a Tony nomination on Broadway. OSCAR POSSIBILITIES: The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announces nominations for its 62nd annual awards Feb. 14, and two Latinos could be among the nominated. New plans would have Zoot Suit open this fall in San Fran cisco, then move to Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. Recent studio advertisements in entertainment trade publications have called the attention of Academy members to the performances of Raul Julia in Romero and Edward James Olmos in Triumph of the Spirit. Another revival is currently underway at El Teatro Campesino's home base in San Juan Bautista, Calif. The theater is currently staging Luis Valdez's comedy I Don't Have To Show You No Stinkin' Badges, through March 4. In more California theater news: The Granny, an English-language version of Roberto Cossa's farce La Nona, continues at San Diego's Old Globe through Feb. 18 ... And Eduardo Machado's new play Stevie Wants to Play the Blues has its world premiere at the Los Angeles Theatre Center Feb. 17. It runs through April 8. Julia, who has never been nominated for an Oscar before, qualifies this year in the "best actor" category. Olmos, who was nominated last year in the "best actor" category for Stand and Deliver, qualifies this time for "best supporting actor." In a related item, Edward James Olmos may recreate the role of "el Pachuco" in a planned revival of Luis Valdez's musical play Zoot Suit. The revival is reportedly planned by San Francisco producer Charles Duggan, Valdez's El Teatro Campesino company and the play's original producing organization, Los Angeles' Center Theatre Group. Duggan reportedly has a letter of intent from Olmos to appear as "el ONE LINER: The Book in the Americas, an exhibit of rare books from the colonial period, commemorates the 450th anniversary of printing in the New World, in Mexico (1539), and the 350th anniversary of the beginning of printing in British America, in Cambridge (1639); it is on view at the Americas Society, in New York, through March 31 ... Media Report NAHJ PICKS McMURRAY: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists announced Feb. 1 that Jose McMurray, a senior producer with National Public Radio, will be its new executive director. McMurray, who will ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, take over the posi,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, tion Feb. 26, succeeds Frank Newton, executive director of D.C.-. based organization since its founding in 1984. Born in Uruguay, the 40-year -old Mc-Murray has been with McMURRAY NPR for 10 years, most recently producing the program Latin File. Before his NPR job, he was station manager of KBBF radio in Santa Rosa, Calif., for five years. LATIN FILE TO BE PHASED OUT: Citing HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 •N• Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher and Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Roberto Ro driguez, Jonathan Higuera. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Unk Weekly Repoff may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 l•ues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108; Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. low interest among its member stations. Adam Powell, National Public Radio vice president of news and information, confirmed to Weekly Report Feb. 7 that NPR will phase out its 15-minute, daily Latin File program. No cancellation date was given for the program, which began in August 1988 on the heels of another Hispanic-oriented program cut by NPR, Enfoque Nacional. Powell said that six of the seven employees will remain at NPR and the material normally produced for Latin Rle would be incorporated into the shoNs Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Seen by some as an attempt to soften criticism over the cutting of Latin File, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, a prime NPR funder, has accepted an NPR pro posal to fund three Latino specials. "The problem," said Jose McMurray, former producer of Latin File, "is that Latinos will no longer be able to produce their o.vn shows. Latinos will now be absorbed into the mainstream. Some Latinos believe in that. I don't." TRIBUTE TO RUBEN SALAZAR: The Cali fornia Chicano News Media Association -Antonio Mejias-Rentas will hold a conference Sept. 7-9 in Los Ange les to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the death of journalist Ruben Salazar and to assess the status of Latinos in journalism. Salazar, who was news director for Span ish-language KMEX-Channel 34 and a col umnist for the Los Angeles Times, was killed Aug. 29, 1970, in East Los Angeles while covering the Chicano Moratorium protest against the Vietnam War. He was hit in the head by a tear -gas canister fired by a deputy sheriff. Contact CCNMA at (213) 743-7158. 7V MARTI SELECTS DIRECTOR: Armando Navarro, a Key Biscayne, Fla., businessman, has been named acting director of TV Mart(, the U.S. government-sponsored station that plans to broadcast to metropolitan Havana. President Bush must confirm his selection. TV Marti is set to broadcast, under strong objections from the Cuban government, in March. Congress approved $7.5 million Jan. 30 for its testing. If the broadcast proves to be technically feasible, Congress has approved $16 million annually for 1990 and 1991. Roberto Rodriguez