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Hispanic link weekly report, October 22, 1990

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Hispanic link weekly report, October 22, 1990
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Making The News
The heads of Puerto Rico’s three political parties, Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n of the Popular Democratic Party, Carlos Romero Barceld of the New Progressive Party and Rub6n Berrios Martinez of the Puerto Rican Independence Party, write a letter to U.S. Sen. Bennett Johnston requesting he allow the full Senate to vote on a bill setting up a 1991 plebisicite on the island’s status. Johnston has indicated there is not enough time to reconcile differences between the House and Senate...Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox announces he will appeal a state district judge’s ruling that declared the state’s new education funding system - which was created to bring greater funding parity between property-poor and property-rich districts - unconstitutional...The University of California at Los Angeles’
School of Law announces former California Supreme Court justice Cruz Reynoso will become a tenured member of the school beginning in January...California Gov. George Deukmejian presents to writer/producer/director Luis Valdez the California Arts Council’s Individual Artist Lifetime Achievement Award in the literary arts... Mercy Rodriguez, a graduate student at Florida International University, meets First Lady Barbara Bush at the White House and later receives the Florida Victory Award. Rodrfguez, who is a paraplegic with limited use of her arms, won the award for her perseverance in the face of adversity...A federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicts Amparo Bouchey, former director of the U.S. Transportation Department’s Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization, along with a former consultant to the office, on conspiracy to commit bribery and defraud the government...

Funders, Groups Agree Education Tops List
By Frank Cota-Robles Newton Corporate representatives and leaders of Latino organizations agree on the single magic word to attract funders: education.
The dropout rate, illiteracy, the need for bilingual education and related issues in the Hispanic community are the primary concern of virtually all major corporate contributors.
“No question about it,” says Ed Rodrfguez, assistant manager for corporate urban programs at Ford Motor Co. “Education is the priority.”
Carlos Soto, national programs manager for Coors Brewing Co., says of his company’s interests: “Virtually any proposal now has to have some sort of literacy angle to it.” Similarly, other prominent funders to the Hispanic community, such as PepsiCo Inc., Miller Brewing Co., McDonald’s, Anheuser-Busch Cos. and AT&T, have concentrated
By Roberto Rodrfguez
Attorneys for both sides of a federal voting rights lawsuitthat charges the Oxnard, Calif., City Council’s at-large election system discriminates against Mexican Americans expect to reach an out of court settlement.
The attorney for the plaintiffs, Gerhard Orthuber, and City Attorney Gary Gillig told Weekly Report Oct. 15 they expect the city will do so to avoid costly and protracted litigation.
The suit, filed Sept. 28 by six Mexican American Oxnard residents, said there have been only three persons of Mexican American heritage elected to the Oxnard City Council since its founding in 1903.
Currently, there is one Mexican American, Manuel Flores, on the five-member council, which includes the mayor.
According to Orthuber, Mexicans made up 44% of Oxnard’s population in 1980 and currently are 50% of the city’s 137,500 residents.
The suit asks the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to declare the current system illegal
much of their support on learning programs.
Intertwined with this support is Corporate America’s increasing concern about tomorrow’s labor force. Ever since the “Workforce 2000” report, which projected that by the end of this decade more than 75% of people entering the labor force will be women and minorities, corporations have expressed great
The House and Senate approved a compromise civil rights bill Oct. 16 and 17, respectively, but fell short of the two-thirds majority necessary to override a threatened veto by President Bush.
The House voted 273-154 while the Senate voted 62-34. The House needs 290 votes for an override; the Senate needs 67.
The bill would reverse six recent Supreme
under the Voting Rights Act and the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution. It seeks new elections in single-member districts.
Flores said that because the Mexican American population is dispersed and growing, if the city switched to single-member districts, he can see that Mexican Americans would be the majority in at least half of them.
concern over the future supply of educated, competent employees. Many admit that failure to support Hispanic educational efforts will hurt their ability to remain competitive in an increasingly global economy.
This enlightened self-interest is creating new opportunities for Hispanic organizations. The
Court decisions that have narrowed the scope and remedies of federal laws against job discrimination.
Suzanne Ramos, with the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, countered that the bill has language prohibiting quotas. She added that while compromise language added to appease Bush makes it easier for employers to defend themselves against charges of discrimination, “we still feel the bill is strong and necessary.”
Leading supporters of the measure, including the Leadership Congress on Civil Rights, Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Rep. Don Edwards (D-Calif.), are still hopeful of an override. They cite the reluctance of members of Congress to vote against civil rights prior to the Nov. 6 election.
If Bush’s expected veto holds, he would be the third president, after Ronald Reagan and Andrew Johnson, to veto a civil rights bill.
Cavazos Picks ‘Latino ' Chief
U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Cavazos appointed Oct. 16 Gilbert Rom4n as executive director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans.
Romdn, 63, a native of South Texas, will report directly to Cavazos and will be the principal liaison between the department and the Hispanic, business and education communities.
Rom&n is the former deputy assistant secretary for operations at the Office of Civil
Rights for the department.
Cavazos said the next priority in carrying out the executive order is to have the initiative’s 25-member advisory commission appointed by President Bush.
“We’ve already taken the most important step,” Cavazos said, explaining he has directed the offices within the Education Department to come up with recommendations on the order’s seven areas of emphasis within four weeks.
Bush signed the order Sept. 24.
Lawyers Predict Election Suit Settlement
continued on page 2
Civil Rights Bill Passes, But Veto Awaits


Activists Set to Protest Border Anti-Immigrant Activity
By Roberto Rodriguez
Immigrant rights activists have called for a demonstration Nov. 2 on the U.S.-Mex-ico border in the San Diego area to protest what they call "the racist attitudes of immigration officials, anti-immigrant vigilante groups and the continued killings of immigrants by the Border Patrol."
Roberto Martinez, director of the American Friends Service Committee U.S.-Mex-ico Border Program in San Diego, told Weekly Report the demonstration will also protest the Light Up the Border movement and a new splinter group, Wake Up Washington, both of which seek to curtail the flow of undocumented immigrants into the United States through the use of military
troops, physical barriers along the border, and stricter laws.
Unlike Light Up the Border, which protests by shining vehicle headlights near the Otay Mesa crossing, Wake Up Washington holds more vociferous marches and rallies with signs, speeches and calls for political activism. Its last march, held Sept. 27 in South San Diego, drew 50 demonstrators.
Ted Hilton, a real estate agent from La Jolla, Calif., and one of the chief organizers, said "the protests need to be more vocal" for Congress to listen. The group plans to rally the last Saturday of every month.
Martinez characterized both groups as attracting the "lunatic fringe," adding that immigrant rights groups are as concerned
about the Border Patrol as they are about restrictionists and vigilantes. Victor Man-dujano, a 17-year-old undocumented Immigrant, was killed last month by a Border Patrol agent while attempting to cross into the United States near San Diego. Patrol officials said the youth was shot while trying to wrestle a gun from an agent. Martinez and Mandujano’s friends said he had been trying to run back into Mexico when he was caught and shot.
In a separate incident, two Border Patrol agents were placed on administrative leave Oct. 5 for crossing into Mexico to apprehend an undocumented immigrant. The agents stopped when they realized they were being photographed.
Corporate Funders Key in on Education
continued from page 1
current buzzword for this is “partnerships."
Not only are partnerships a trend for the future, but so are joint sponsorships for events and programs, points out Janice Petrovich, president of the Aspira Association.
While companies have traditionally preferred to be sole sponsors, Petrovich says this is rarely possible now as corporate contributions shrink and program expenses grow.
One solution is "selling discrete pieces of whole projects" to different companies. For example, with some Aspira projects that operate in several cities, Petrovich explains, she has found a different sponsor for each city. That way, each corporation feels it has some measure of sponsorship exclusivity without having to fund the entire project.
Concerning future trends in fund-raising, corporate representatives are unanimous in advising Hispanic organizations to define clearly their funding requests and enhance the professionalism of their fund-raising efforts. Frank G6mez, director of public relations for Philip Morris Companies Inc., emphasizes that "proposals must be well reasoned , sound, realistic and well presented."
Patricia Asip, special segment marketing managerfor J.C. Penney Co., notes the most successful Hispanic groups are those "whose approach is more professional than before." She adds that in the past some organizations focused only on their agendas and corporate involvement was tacked on as an afterthought.
"But now," says Asip, the more successful groups are "carefully planning and defining the role companies can play in their events."
Christina Cuevas, program officer for the Ford Foundation, agrees the quality of pro-2
posals submitted has not been good. Things have improved because of fund-raising seminars, she notes, but Hispanic groups still do not attend as carefully as they should to such key questions as "How does this project fit into a larger, more coherent picture of a problem area?” or "Why is our approach effective and worth funding?"
Cuevas emphasizes, however, that foundations need to do much more to assist Hispanic organizations with the funding process.
Others dismiss the argument that Latino proposals lack professionalism. F6Kx Gutierrez, a vice president at the Gannett Foundation, says Hispanic proposals are more apt to be rejected because Latinos are not part of the "country club network" most foundation and corporate representatives belong to.
Jerry Apodaca, president of the Hispanic Association for Corporate Responsibility, says, "Some people have said there’s a conspiracy against Hispanics, but there’s no conspiracy because we’re not an entity. They don’t even think about us!" adding, "Nothing will improve unless we make it improve."
Oct 22, 1990
6,600 Locales Dispute Census Bureau Count
The U.S. Census Bureau expects to complete by the end of this month challenges from 6,600 communities that charge the 1990 census missed hundreds of thousands of households.
While the number of challenges is higher than in 1980, John Connolly, assistant to Census Director Barbara Bryant, told Weekly Report, "We invited these challenges, and we’ll be able to handle most of them."
Connolly pointed out that only 25% of the more than 39,000 towns, cities and counties responded to the preliminary census figures, and a quarter of those had no objections.
Arturo Vargas, the census project director forthe Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said uncounted households affect Latinos more because they typically live in ones with more members.
Several cities that challenged the figures have joined a lawsuit that would mandate the use of what they say is a more accurate statistical method..
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
PETROVICH
uses joint sponsorships
Jury Indicts Bonilla
Former League of United Latin American Citizens president Tony Bonilla, of Corpus Christi, Texas, was indicted on a sexual assault charge Oct. 9 by a Bexar County, Texas, grand jury.
Bonilla, 54, would not comment on the case, saying only, “I’m innocent of the charges, and I intend to defend vigorously my honor and integrity."
Bonilla, a lawyer, was released on a $10,000 personal recognizance bond.
on Sexual Assault
He is accused of sexually assaulting a 22-year-old friend of his daughter at a San Antonio motel May 5. The woman charged she was lured to a room by Bonilla under the pretext of helping with his and his wife’s belongings so they could check out. The assault allegedly occurred then.
The woman, who went to a hospital the next day, filed a complaint May 15.
Bonilla’s lawyer, Anthony Nicholas, called the grand jury’s refusal to allow Bonilla to testify "highly unusual and irregular," particularly in light of Bonilla’s stature in the community and the length of time it took the matter to go before the grand jury.
Bonilla served as LULAC president from 1981 to 1983.


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
PROVOST AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI OXFORD, OHIO
The Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs is the chief academic officer of the University and reports directly to the President. She/He is responsible for supervising and administering the academic programs of the University, including planning and development. Reporting to the Provost are the Deans of the College of Arts and Science, School of Business Administration, School of Education and Allied Professions, School of Fine Arts, School of Applied Science, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, the Graduate School and Research, the Executive Directors of the Hamilton and Middle-town regional campuses, the Executive Director of the Dolibois European Center in Luxembourg, as well as the Dean and University Librarian. The Provost also has direct responsibility for the Office of Conferences and Continuing Education, the Office of International Programs, and the University Honors Program.
Miami University is one of the nation’s most selective public universities. It has a tradition of dedication to teaching excellence and undergraduate liberal arts educatfbn with an increasingly strong record of scholarly achievement. Miami currently enrolls approximately 20,000 students on its four campuses. Miami seeks a strong academic leader who shares its commitment to outstanding liberal arts and professional education and scholarship who will work closely with faculty, staff, and students to enhance Miami’s record of quality higher education.
The successful candidate must possess an earned doctorate or its equivalent and have a strong record of teaching and scholarship at the University level.
The Search Committee will be considering such further characteristics as:
o A record of leadership in academic administration, o A firm commitment to and appreciation of the mission of Miami University.
o The ability to build a consensus and work with all groups in the University to enhance academic excellence and to implement Miami’s newly adopted plan for liberal education reform.
o A demonstrated ability to establish positive relationships with faculty, staff, students, and other members of the University community.
o A demonstrated knowledge of budgetary procedures, long range planning, and program evaluation.
o A demonstrated commitment to equal opportunity and affirmative action in higher education for women and minorities.
The screening of applications will began on or about January 14,1991. The search will remain open until the position is filled. The successful candidate will be expected to assume his or her duties on July 1, 1991. Questions about this position can be directed to Dr. William G. Slover, Secretary of the Search Committee, (513) 529-3610. Applicants should send a r6sum6 and statement of interest to the Secretary of the University at the address below. Supporting information, including references, will be requested by the Search Committee at the appropriate time. Dr. William G. Slover, Secretary of the University, 101 Roudebush Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056.
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
MALDEF
CrVIL RIGHTS ATTORNEYS
The Mexi<^h Ar^^rican Legal Defense and Educational Fund (MAL-DEF) is accepting applications for three Program Director poshior# 1$ Los Angeles. Program Directors are responsible for supervising ail of MALDEF’s national litigation and advocacy activities in the appropriate program areas,
Political Access (Voting Rights) Programs Director: applicants should have six years of experience in civil rights law, preferably in voting rights litigation.
â– . Immigrants Rights Programs Director: applicants should have six years of experience in civil rights law, preferably in immigration (iflgarl
Language Rights Program Director: applicants should have three years of experience in civil rights law.
Spanish/English bilingual proficiency is required, Send r6$um£ and writing sample to: E. Richard Larson, MALDEF, 634 S. Spring St., Los Angeles Calif. 90014.
The Michigan Department of State seeks
Highly Qualified Candidates for the position of Director, Bureau of History
The Bureau of History is the lead historical agency in the State of Michigan, comprising the State’s Archaeology office, the State Archives, the State Historic Preservation Office, the State Museum System, and a publication section including the Michigan History magazine. The Director reports to the Secretary of State, and serves as State Historic Preservation Officer.
The successful candidate will be highly experienced administrator, preferably with a graduate degree in afield related to one or more of the Bureau’s programs. The candidate will also have significant experience in a broadly based historical agency. Those who have multi-disciplinary experience will be preferred. The candidate must have excellent communication and decision making skills, both oral and written. The candidate will be expected to provide direction and leadership to the State’s historical program. The director must work effectively with diverse political, cultural and ethnic groups. Training and experience in public sector program planning and budgeting is highly desireable. Leadership in strategic planning for the Bureau is critical. The Bureau Director will supervise a growing staff which presently approximates 70 full time employees, primarily in professional positions. Broad knowledge of professional fields and the ability to work with and to direct professional staff is critical. The Bureau budget is presently $3.8 million. The state has recently constructed a $40+ million facility to house the Bureau and the State Library.
The position is located in Lansing, Michigan. The salary is competitive and includes an excellent benefits package. This is a Civil Service position and successful completion of an examination is required for employment.
The State of Michigan is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women and minority candidates are especially encouraged to apply.
Interested applicants should send a r6sum6 and four letters of reference to:
James Rynbrandt, Personnel Office, Michigan Department of State, P.O. Box 40765, Lansing, Ml 48901-7965
Applications must be postmarked by November 30,1990
Oct 22,1990
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Arts & Entertajnment
GETS GRANT: One of the nation’s leading Latino TV producers has won a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to produce a film based on a novel by the late scholar Tom4s Rivera.
Paul Espinoza, executive producer for public affairs at KPBS-TV in San Diego, was awarded $850,000 toward the production of Rivera’s Yno se lo trago la tierra (The Earth Did Not Swallow Him). The grant is the biggest in the station’s history.
Rivera’s semi-autobiographical tale about the experiences of growing up the son of Mexican American migrant workers in Texas is to be adapted and directed by Severo P6rez. Espinoza - who will serve as producer and executive producer - expectsto raise additional financing for the film, which he plans to produce for theatrical release and for airing on the PBS series American Playhouse.
Espinoza is the Emmy-awarti winning producer of such TV documentaries as Ballad of an Unsung Hero and The New Tijuana.
ADDS SHOWS: The Telemundo Spanish-language network has
upped to 54% its rate of domestic programming, with a slate of 26 new programs added to its fall schedule.
New domestic programs - which include Hablando, an "infotainment” daily program for women, and El magnate, an independently produced novela shot in Miami - reportedly represent a30% increase in the network’s programming budget, estimated at $30 million.
DROPS TOUR: A much publicized comeback by Camilo Sesto came to an abrupt stop when the Spanish singer "disappeared” last month in Miami.
The tour had a shaky start in San Juan, Puerto Rico, when he explained to a full house at the Centro de Bellas Artes that he had not been able to fully rehearse and could not perform. He completed the rest of a three-night engagement to devastating reviews.
Dates in the continental United States began with a performance at Miami’s Fountainbleau Hotel. The following day, he reportedly argued with his manager and, according to published reports, disappeared. The singer has resurfaced in Madrid.
Sesto was a major pop star in the late 70s and early ’80s. He quit four years ago to raise his son. - Antonio Mejfas-Rentas
Media Report
Latinos who cross over from Spanish- to English-language media and vice versa do so, for the most part, with relative ease. Because they are bilingual, they say language has not been a major factor.
Teresa Rodriguez, who rejoined NBC affiliate WTVJ in Miami as a reporter/anchor this year, found the news gathering process for both languages essentially the same. She said Spanish-language news operations often beat their English-language counterparts to major stories. It was SIN (Univision's predecessor) that broke the story on the Oliver North connection to the Iran-Contra scandal, she mentioned.
Rodriguez, a Cuban American who began as a reporter with WTVJ in 1980, was with Univision and SIN as a reporter/anchor since 1982.
Richard Ramirez, appointed last month general manager for KMEX-TV in Los Angeles, said because Spanish-language media target Latinos, they provide superior cover-
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
A national publication of Hispanic Link News Service inc.
1420 'N* Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 or (202) 234-0737 Publisher and Editor: F6lix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejfas-Rentas, Roberto Rodriguez.
Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza.
No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $108; Trial (13 issues) $30
CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week.
age on them and Latin America.
Before moving to Los Angeles, Ramfrez, who is Puerto Rican and Cuban, was a general partner and general manager at English-language WHCT-TV in Hartford, Conn. He commented the professional integrity of Spanish-language journalism is equal to or better than its English-language counterpart. "We’re not into sensationalism.”
The transition Luis Nogales made was not on the air but at the highest levels of the profession, going from UPI president in 1986 to president of Univision in 1987.
Nogales, who is Mexican American, said Spanish-language media are not yet on a par in terms of general coverage but that they are quickly catching up. "More resources means higher salaries,” which he said allows for the recruitment and retention of high-quality personnel.
Nogales now is co-owner of a media acquisition company, Nogales Castro Partners, in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Guillermo Martinez, vice president/news director for Univision, crossed over from the English-language Miami Herald, where he
worked from 1976-1987 and served on the editorial board, to Spanish-language television.
Martfnez, who is Cuban, said the transition for him was natural because he’s bilingual and had worked at UPI, where "there’s a deadline every minute -- same as television.”
Not all transitions are smooth. Bob Navarro, a Mexican American and long-time news writer/ reporter/producerfor English-language television, went to Spanish-language KVEA-TV in Los Angeles as its news director in 1988 and left the following year amid controversy. "It had nothing to do with language,” he said.
Navarro, a reporter with Los Angeles’s English-language KCAL-TV, said what he encountered as he crossed overfrom English to Spanish was the bias of Latinos against Mexicans and specifically against Mexican Americans.
"I don’t know if thaf s still true but it was when I was there,” he said. "The darker the skin, the bigger the problem. They’re all trying to out-Europeanize each other.”
1 m? Roberto Rodriguez
DICH0
"NO FIRMES CARTA NO
LEAS, Nl BEBAS
NO VEAS"
"DO NOT SIGN 0 LETTER THHT YOU HRUE NOT HERO, NOR DRINK IURTER YOU HRUE NOT SEEN8
LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP


Full Text

PAGE 1

Making The News This Week School of Law announces former California Supreme Court justice Cruz Reynoso will become a tenured member of the school begin ning in January ... California Gov. George Deukmejian presents to writer/producer/director Luis Valdez the California Arts Council's Individual Artist Lifetime Achievement Award in the literary arts ... Mercy Rodriguez, a graduate student at Florida International University, meets First Lady Barbara Bush at the White House and later receives the Florida Victory Award. Rodrfguez, who is a paraplegic with limited use of her arms, won the award for her perseverance in the face of adversity ... A federal grand jury in Washington, D.C., indicts Amparo Bouchey, former director of the U.S. Transportation Department's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization, along with a former consultant to the office, on conspiracy to commit bribery and defraud the government. .. The heads of Puerto Rico's three political parties, Gov. Rafael Hernandez Col6n of the Popular Democratic Party, Carlos Romero Barcel6 of the New Progressive Party and Ruben Berrios Martinez of the Puerto Rican Independence Party, write a letter to U.S. Sen. Bennett Johnston requesting he allow the full Senate to vote on a bill setting up a 1991 plebisicite on the island's status. Johnston has indicated there is not enough time to reconcile differences between the House and .Senate ... Texas Attorney General Jim Mattox an nounces he will appeal a state district judge's ruling that declared the state's new education funding system-which was created to bring greater funding parity between property-poor and property-rich dis tricts-unconstitutionai...The University of California at Los Angeles' Funders, Groups Agree Education Tops List By Frank Cota-Robles Newton much of their support on learning programs. concern over the future supply of educated, Corporate representatives and leaders of Intertwined with this support is Corporate competent employees. Many admit that failLatina organizations agree on the single magic America's increasing concern about tomorure to support Hispanic educational efforts word to attract funders: education. row's labor force. Ever since the "Workforce will hurt their ability to remain competitive in The dropout rate, illiteracy, the need for 2000" report, which projected that by the end an increasingly global economy. bilingual education and related issues in the of this decade more than 75% of people enThis enlightened self-interest is creating new Hispanic community are the primary concern taring the labor force will be women and miopportunities for Hispanic organizations. The of virtually all major corporate contributors. norities, corporations have expressed great continued on page 2 "No question about it," says Ed Rodriguez, assistant manager for corporate urban pro grams at Ford Motor Co. "Education is the priority." Carlos Soto, national programs manager for Coors Brewing Co., says of his com pany's interests: "Virtually any proposal now has to have some sort of literacy angle to it." Similarly, other prominent funders to the Hispanic community, such as Pepsico Inc., Miller Brewing Co., McDonald's, Anheuser Busch Cos. and AT&T, have concentrated Civil Rights Bill Passes, But Veto Awaits The House and Senate approved a com promise civil rights bill Oct. 16 and 17, re spectively, but fell short of the two-thirds majority necessary to override a threatened veto by President Bush. The House voted 273-154 while the Senate voted 62-34. The House needs 290 votes for an override; the Senate needs 67. The bill would reverse six recent Supreme Court decisions that have narrowed the scope and remedies of federal laws against job discrimination. Lawyers Predict Election Suit Settlement Suzanne Ramos, with the Mexican Ameri can Legal Defense and Fund, countered that the bill has language prohibit ing quotas. She added that while compro mise language added to appease Bush makes it easier for employers to defend themselves against charges of discrimination, "we still feel the bill is strong and necessary." Leading supporters of the measure, includ ing the Leadership Congress on Civil Rights, Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Rep. Don Edwards (D-Calif.), are still hopeful of an override. They cite the reluctance of mem bers of Congress to vote against civil rights prior to the Nov. 6 election. By Roberto Rodriguez Attorneys for both sides of a federal voting rights lawsuitthat charges the Oxnard, Calif., City Council's at-large election system dis criminates against Mexican Americans ex pect to reach an out of court settlement. The attorney for the plaintiffs, GerharQ Orthuber, and City Attorney Gary Gillig told Weekly Report Oct. 15 they expect the city will do so to avoid costly and protracted litiga tion. The suit, filed Sept. 28 by six Mexican American Oxnard residents, said there have been only three persons of Mexican American heritage elected to the Oxnard City O:>undl since its founding in 1903. Currently, there is one Mexican American, . . Manuel Flores, on the five-member council, which includes the mayor. According to Orthuber, Mexicans made up 44% of Oxnard's population in 1980 and currently are 50% of the city's 137,500 resi dents. The suit asks the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to declare the current system illegal under the Voting Rights Act and the 14th and 15th amendments to the Constitution. It seeks new elections in single-member districts. Flores said that because the Mexican American population is dispersed and grow ing, if the city switched to single-member districts, he can see that Mexican Americans would be the majority in at least half of them. If Bush's expected veto holds, he would be the third president, after Ronald Reagan and Andrew Johnson, to veto a civil rights bill. Cavazos Picks 'Latino Initiative' Chief U.S. Secretary of Education Lauro Ca vazos appointed Oct. 16 Gilbert Roman as executive director of the White House Initia tive on Educational Excellence for His panic Americans. Roman, 63, a native of South Texas, will report directly to Cavazos and will be the principal liaison between the department and the Hispanic, business and education communities. Roman is the former deputy assistant secretary for operations at the Office of Civil Rights for the department. Cavazos said the next priority in carrying out the executive order is to have the initia tive's 25-member advisory commission appointed by President Bush . "We've already taken the most important step," Cavazos said, explaining he has di rected the offices within the Education De partment to come up with recommenda tions on the order's seven areas of empha sis within four weeks. Bush signed the order Sept. 24.

PAGE 2

Activists Set to Protest Border Anti-Immigrant Activity By Roberto Rodriguez Immigrant rights activists have called for a demonstration Nov. 2 on the U.S.-Mex ico border in the San Diego area to protest what they call"the racist attitudes of immi gration officials, anti-immigrant vigilante groups and the continued killings of immi grants by the Border Patrol." Roberto Martinez, director of the American Friends Service Committee U.S.-Mex ico Border Program in San Diego, told Weekly Report the demonstration will also protest the Light Up the Border movement and a new splinter group, Wake Up Wash ington, both of which seek to curtail the flow of undocumented immigrants into the United States through the use of military troops, physical barriers along the border, and stricter laws. Unlike Light Up the Border, which pro tests by shining vehicle headlights near the Otay Mesa crossing, Wake Up Washington holds more vociferous marches and rallies with signs, speeches and calls for political activism. Its last march, held Sept. 27 in South San Diego, drew 50 demonstrators. Ted Hilton, a real estate agent from La Jolla, Calif., and one oft he chief organizers, said ••the protests need to be more vocal'' for Congress to listen. The group plans to rally the last Saturday of every month. Martrnez characterized both groups as attracting the "lunatic fringe," adding that immigrant rights groups are as concerned about the Border Patrol as they are about restrictionists and vigilantes. Vfctor Mandujano, a 17 -year -old undocumented immigrant, was killed last month by a Border Patrol agent while attempting to cross into the United States near San Diego. Patrol of ficials said the youth was shot while trying to wrestle a gun from an agent. Martine z and Mandujano's friends said he had been trying to run back into Mexico when he was caught and shot. In a separate incident, two Border Patrol agents were placed on administrative leave Oct. 5 for crossing into Mexico to appre hend an undocumented immigrant. The agents stopped when they realized they were being photographed. Corporate Funders Key in on Education 6,600 Locales Disput e Census Bureau Coun t continued from page 1 current buzzword for this is "partnerships." Not only are partnerships a trend for the future, but so are joint sponsorships for events and programs, points out Janice Petrovich, president of the Aspira Association. While companies have traditionally preferred to be sole sponsors, Petrovich says this is rarely possible now a s corporate con tributions shrink and program expenses grow. One solution is "selling discrete pieces of whole projects" to different companies. For example, with some Aspira projects that operate in several cities, Petrovich explains, she has found a different sponsor for each city. That way, each PETROVICH corporation feels it uses joint sponsorships has some measure of sponsorship exclusivity without having to fund the entire project. Concerning future trends in fund-raising, corporate representatives are unanimous in advising Hispanic organizations to define clearly their funding requests and enhance the professionalism of their fund-raising efforts. Frank G6mez, director of public tions for Philip Morris Companies Inc., em phasizes that "proposals must be well reasoned , sound, realistic and well presented." Patricia Asip, special segment marketing managerforJ.C. Penney Co., notes the most successful Hispanic groups are those .. whose approach is more professional than before." She adds that in the past some organizations focused only on their agendas and corporate involvement was tacked on as an afterthought. "But now," says Asip, the more successful groups are "carefully planning and defining the role companies can play in their events." Christina Cuevas, program officer for the Ford Foundation, agrees the quality of pro-2 posals submitted has not been good. Things have improved because of fund-raising seminars, she notes, but Hispanic groups still do not attend as carefully as they should to such key questions as "How does this project fit into a larger, more coherent picture of a prob lem area?" or "Why is our approach effective and worth funding?" Cuevas emphasizes, however, . that founda tions need to do much more to assist His panic organizations with the funding process. Others dismiss the argument that Latino proposals leek professional sm. Felix Gutierrez, a vice president at the Gannett Foundation, says His panic proposals are more apt to be rejected because Latinos are not part of the "country club network" most foundation and corporate representatives belong to. Jerry Apodaca, president of the Hispanic Association for Corporate Responsibility, says, "Some people have said there's a conspiracy against Hispanics, but there's no conspiracy because we're not an entity. They don't even think about us!" adding, "Nothing will im prove unless we make it improve." The U.S. Census Bureau expects to com plete by the end of this month challenges from 6,600 communities that charge the 1990 census missed hundreds of thousands of households. While the number of challenges is higher than in 1980, John Connolly, assistant to Census Director Barbara Bryant, told Weekly Report, "We invited these challenges, and we'll be able to handle most of them." Connolly pointed out that only 25% of the more than 39,000 towns, cities and counties responded to the preliminary census figures, and a quarter of those had no objections. Arturo Vargas, the census project director for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said uncounted house holds affect Latinos more because they typi cally live in ones with more members. Several cities that challenged the figures have joined a lawsuit that would mandate the use of what they say is a more accurate sta tistical method .. Jury Indicts Bonilla on Sexual Assault Former League of United Latin American Citizens president Tony Bonilla, of Corpus Christi, Texas, was indicted on a sexual assault charge Oct. 9 by a Bexar County, Texas, grand jury. Bonilla, 54, would not com ment on the case, saying only, "I'm innocent of the charges, and I intend to defend vigorously my honor and integrity." BONILLA Bonilla, a lavvyer, was released on a $10,000 personal recognizance bond. Oct 22, 1990 He is accused of sexually assaulting a 22-year -old friend of his daughter at a San Antonio motel May 5. The woman charged she was lured to a room by Bonilla under the pretext of helping with his and his wife's belongings so they could check out. The assault allegedly occurred then. The woman, who went to a hospital the next day, filed a complaint May 15. Bonilla's lawyer, Anthony Nicholas , called the grand jury's refusal to allow Bonilla to testify "highly unusual and irregular," par ticularly in light of Bonilla's stature in the community and the length of time it took the matter to go before the grand jury. Bonilla served as LULAC president from 1981 to 1983. Hispanic Link Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS I PROVOST AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI Hispanic Link Weekly Report The Michigan Department of State seeks Highly Qualified Candidates for the position of Director, Bureau of History The Bureau of History is the lead historical agency in the State of Michigan, comprising the State's Archaeology office, the State Archives, the State Historic Preservation Office, the State Museum System, and a publication section including the Michigan History magazine. The Director reports to the Sec retary of State, and serves as State Historic Preservation Officer. The successful candidate will be highly experienced administrator, preferably with a graduate degree in a field related to one or more of the Bureau's programs. The candidate will also have significant experience in a broadly based historical agency. Those who have multi-disciplinary experience will be preferred. The candidate must have excellent communication and decision making skills, both oral and written. The candidate will be expected to provide direction and leadership to the State's historical program. The director must work effectively with diverse political, cultural and ethnic groups. Training and experience in public sector program planning and budgeting is highly . desireable. Leadership in strategic planning for the Bureau is critical. The Bureau Director will supervise a growing staff which presently approximates 70 full time employees, primarily in professional positions. Broad knowledge of pro fessional fields and the ability to work with and to direct profes sional staff is critical. The Bureau budget is presently $3.8 million. The state has recently constructed a $40 + million facility to house the Bureau and the State Library. The position is located in Lansing, Michigan. The salary is competitive and includes an excellent benefits package. This is a Civil Service position and successful completion of an examination is required for employment. The State of Michigan is an Affirmative Action/Equal Oppor tunity Employer. Women and minority candidates are espe cially encouraged to apply. Interested applicants should send a resume and four letters of reference to: James Rynbrandt, Personnel Office, Michigan Department of State, P.O. Box 40765, Lansing, Ml48901-7965 Applications must be postmarked by November 30, 1990 Oct22, 1990 7

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Arts & Entertainment upped to 54% its rate ofttomestic programming, with a slate Of26 new programs added to its fall schedule. New domestic programs--which include Hablando, an "infotain ment" daily program for women, and El magnate, an independently produced nove/a shot in Miami--reportedly represent a30% increase in the network's programming budget, estimated at $30 million. GETS GRANT: One of the nation's leading Latino TV producers has won a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to produce a film based on a novel by the late scholar Tomas Rivera. Paul Espinoza, executive producer for public affairs at KPBSTV in San Diego, was awarded $850,000 toward the production of Rivera's Y nose /o trago Ia tierra (fhe Earth Did Not Swallow Him). The grant is the biggest in the station's history. DROPS TOUR: A much publicized comeback by Camilo Sesto came to an abrupt stop when the Spanish singer "disappeared" last month in Miami. The tour had a shaky start in San Juan, Puerto Rico, when he ex plained to a full house at the Centro de Bellas Artes that he had not been able to fully rehearse and could not perform. He completed the rest of a three-night engagement to devastating reviews. Rivera's semi-autobiographical tale about the experiences of grow ing up the son of Mexican American migrant workers in Texas is to be adapted and directed by Severo Perez. Espinoza --who will serve as producer and executive producer--expects to raise additional financ ing for the film, which he plans to produce for theatrical release and for airing on the PBS series American Playhouse. Dates in the continental United States began with a performance at Miami's Fountainbleau Hotel. The following day, he reportedly argued with his manager and, according to published reports, disappeared. The singer has resurfaced in Madrid. Espinoza is the Emmy-award winning producer of such TV docu mentaries as Ballad of an Unsung Hero and The New Tijuana. Sesto was a major pop star in the late '70s and early '80s. He quit four ADDS SHOWS: The Telemundo Spanish-language network has years ago to raise his son. --Antonio Mejias-Rentas Media Report Latinos who cross over from Spanish-to English-language media and vice versa do so, for the most part, with relative ease. Be cause they are bilingual, they say language has not been a major factor. Teresa Rodrfguez, who rejoined NBC affili ate WTVJ in Miami as a reporter/anchor this year, found the news gathering process for both languages essentially the same. She said Spanish-language news operations of ten beat their English-language counterparts to major stories. It was SIN (Univision's prede cessor) that broke the story on the Oliver North connection to the Iran-Contra scandal, she mentioned. Rodriguez, a Cuban American who began as a reporter with WTVJ in 1980, was with Univision and SIN as a reporter/anchor since 1982. Richard Ramirez, appointed last month general manager for KMEX-TV in Los Ange les, said because Spanish-language media target Latinos, they provide superior coverHISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service Inc. 1420 'N' Street NW Wa shington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or (202) 234-o737 Publisher and Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Roberto Ro driguez. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $1 08; Trial (13 issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word. Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. age on them and Latin America. Before moving to Los Angeles, Ramfrez, who is Puerto Rican and Cuban, was a general partner and general manager at Eng lish-language WHCTTV in Hartford, Conn. He commented the professional integrity of Spanish-language journalism is equal to or better than its English-language counterpart. not into sensationalism." The transition Luis Nogales made was not on the air but at the highest levels of the profession, going from UPI president in 1986 to president of Unlvlslon in 1987. Nogales, who is Mexican American, said Spanish-language media are not yet on a par in terms of general coverage but that they are quickly catching up. "More resources means higher salaries," which he said allows for the recruitment and retention of high-quality per sonnel. Nogales now is co-owner of a media ac quisition company, Nogales Castro Part in Beverly Hills, Calif. Guillermo Martinez, vice president/news director for Univision, crossed over from the English-language Miami Herald, where he worked from 1976-1987 and served on the editorial board, to Spanish-language televi Martfnez, who is Cuban, said the trans ition for him was natural because he's bi lingual and had worked at UPI, where a deadline every minute -same as televi sion." Not all transitions are smooth. Bob Navarro, a Mexican American and long-time news writer/ reporter/producerfor English-language tele vision, went to Spanish-language KVEATV in Los Angeles as its news director in 1988 left the following year amid controversy. 11lt had nothing to do with language," he said. Navarro, a reporter with Los Angeles's English-language KCAL-TV, said what he encountered as he crossed over from English to Spanish was the bias of Latinos against Mexicans and specifically against Mexican Americans. "I don't know if thafs still true but it was when I was there," he said. "The darker the skin, the bigger the problem. They're all trying to out-Europeanize each other." -Roberto Rodriguez oo NOT SI6N R LETTER THRT 'IOU HRUE NOT RERD, NOR DRINK UIRTER 'IOU HRU NOT SEEN• LOOK BEFORE YOU LEAP