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Hispanic link weekly report, December 17, 1990

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Hispanic link weekly report, December 17, 1990
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News
The House Democratic Caucus re-elects U.S. Rep. Henry B.Gonz4lez (D-Texas) as chairman of the House Banking Committee and Rep. E “Kika” de la Garza (D-Texas) as chairman of the House Agriculture Committee...The National Organization for Women selects Assemblywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard as its California Legislator of the Year...A U.S. district court judge dismisses one of eight counts of extortion and racketeering charges against suspended Hialeah, Fla., Mayor Raul Martinez, saying the count had not been filed within the statute of limitations. Martinez is scheduled to stand trial Jan. 22 on charges of extorting nearly $1 million in cash and real estate from developers between 1981 and 1987 in exchange for favorable treatment on zoning matters...Chicago Mayor Richard Daley submits to
the City Council for approval the name of Mary Montes for appointment to the Illinois International Port District Board. Montes is director of Illinois Fiesta Educativa...The Caring Institute honors Ralph Torres, a 17-year-old from Hillsdale, N.J., as one of the 10 most caring young people in the United States. Recognized at a ceremony in a U.S. Senate office building, Torres was instrumental in the development of a drug abuse prevention program called LEAD. He has worked with mentally challenged children for the past four years and is peer counselor at his high schooL.The Golf Writers Association of America names Lee Trevino, who won seven tournaments this year, its player of the year for the men’s senior tour...Reinaldo Arenas, a novelist who was jailed in Cuba for two years as a political prisoner, is found dead Dec. 8 in his New York home, the victim of an apparent drug overdose. Arenas, 47, had been diagnosed with AIDS...

Scholarship Rule Evokes Shock
By F6lix P6rez
Educators surveyed by Weekly Report expressed shock and sometimes anger at a Dec. 12 U.S. Education Department decision to bar federal funds from higher education institutions that dole out scholarships based on race or ethnicity. They described the directive as yet another obstacle in the battle to enroll more Hispanics and other underrepresented groups.
"From all indications, the decision is plain ridiculous," fumed C£sar Trimble, vice president of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities.
Modesto Maidique, president of Florida International University in Miami, said, "I am deeply disappointed by this announcement. It is extremely unfortunate and flies in the face
of what many of us have been trying to achieve in higher education for years."
The sole Latino on President Bush’s National Education Policy Advisory Committee, Maidique said he would dispatch a letter to the Education Department and Bush’s domestic policy adviser asking that the policy be overturned.
The department argued that race-based scholarships discriminate against non-minorities. It further contended the impact will be negligible because financial aid targeted at educationally and economically disadvantaged students will still be available.
That rationale does not square with enrollment statistics nationally, said Diana Natal-icio, president of the University of Texas at El
continued on page 2
Dallas Remap Suit to Go to Court Again
By F6lixP6rez
The rejection by Dallas voters of a redistricting plan that was designed to increase Latino and African American representation on the City Council will put the rancorous issue back in federal court and result in a more equitable remap plan, two Hispanic leaders told Weekly Report Dec. 10.
The referendum, voted on Dec. 8, lest 45,624 to 45,252, or 50.2% to 49.8%. It would have created 14 single-district seats, with the mayor being elected at large. The current system has eight seats elected by district and an-otherthree, including the mayor, elected citywide.
Dallas is 30% black and 18% Hispanic. It has two blacks and no Latinos on its City Council.
"We have historically gotten our relief from the courts," said Elizabeth Vetesquez-Flores, executive director of the Greater Dallas Community Relations Commission.
Al Gonzalez, a councilman in 1987-88, was disappointed with the vote. “This means we have to start the process all over again," he said. Gonzalez, who was tapped by Mayor Annette Strauss three months ago to round
up support for the defeated plan, said eventual redress will come from the courts but he lamented that the issue will continue to divide the city through a protracted appeals proc-
An attorney fa the two black plaintiffs whose lawsuit resulted in the referendum said if negotiations did not work he would ask U.S. District Judge Jerry Buchmeyerto implement the 14-1 plan. Buchmeyer ordered the system redrawn in 1988 as part of a settlement.
While the Council can now approve a plan passed by voters in August 1989that calls for 10 members to be elected by individual district and four others and the mayor to be elected at large, Veldsquez-Flores and Gonzalez said Buchmeyer will likely strike it. That plan was not implemented last year because the judge suggested it would be unconstitutional.
Cavazos Quits Assessed Critically
By F6lix P6rez
Educational leaders were taken by surprise by the Dec. 12 resignation announcement of U.S. Education Secretary Lauro Cavazos. Despite their agreement on how crucial it is to have a Hispanic in the nation’s highest education post, they were on balance critical of the secretary’s performance.
At one end of the spectrum was Jim Lyons, executive director of the National Association for Bilingual Education. Cavazos deserves an "‘A’ on putting together a class team," said Lyons, pointing to Rita Esquivel, director of the department’s bilingual education programs, and Ted Sanders, the department’s second in command.
Lyons gave the secretary a ‘C-,’ however, for his "pub- FLORES Be Utterances." Cavazos has done nothing Among those: children who do not speak English are not ready to learn; and Hispanic parents deserve much of the blame for the high Latino dropout rate.
Sara Flores, a bilingual education
continued on page 2
DEAR READERS...
This Issue of Weekly Report isthefittaf one for 1990. We will resume publication Jan. 1,
As we prepareto gather with families and friends this holiday season, we send you, your family and loved ones our warmest wishes far a Feliz Navidadyun Prospero Aho Nuevo.
’ liS1
VELASQUEZ-FLORES expects court relief


Avoid Bitterness Over Council Seat
Houston Seeks to
By Roberto Rodriguez The Houston City Council will vote Dec.
19 on nominations to fill a vacant at-large Council seat with a caretaker, thereby hoping to avoid an increasingly bitter debate over who should be named. The council will select a candidate on the condition the appointee agrees not to run for the position next November when the term expires.
The vacancy was created when Judson Robinson, the first black elected to council this century, died Nov. 15.
The caretaker position was agreed to after concern was raised that an appointee,
with the status of incumbent, would have an unfair advantage in next year’s election. Blacks asked that the post remain a “black seat,” while many Hispanics have said that because of their underrepresentation on the council, it should go to a Hispanic.
Until Robinson’s death, blacks held five seats on the 15-member council, whites nine and Hispanics one. Whites and blacks each make up roughly a third of Houston’s 1.9 million residents; Hispanics are 28%.
If Hispanics do not get a seat through an appointment a through the November 1991 elections, Houston attorney Frumencio
Reyes has indicated he will file a lawsuit to restructure the council into between 17 and 22 single-member districts.
The council currently has five at-large and nine single-member districts. The mayor is also a voting member.
Dolores Guerrero, the national secretary of the League of United Latin American Citizens, echoes most everyone’s distaste for a caretaker position but is hopeful a Latina eventually will be elected to the post.
Councilman Reyes insists that contrary to media reports, relations between blacks and Hispanics have not been frayed.
Cavazos, 1st Latino
continued from page 1
teacher in Killeen, Texas, offered this critique: “I have seen nothing to make me feel he has done anything” for bilingual education.
A member of the National Education Association’s board of directors, Flores said she has seen "no commitment to give all people an equal chance at a quality education.”
Los Angeles school board member Leticia Quezada, while finding fault with Cavazos’ heimsmanship, lashed out at what she perceived as alack of support from the Bush administration. “I disagreed with him (Cavazos) on many occasions, but I have said publicly that I would defend him if people called for his resignation,” said Quezada.
It was reported that Cavazos was fired by White House Chief of Staff John Sununu.
Quezada suggested Cavazos may have been a sacrificial lamb. “What’s behind it is more worrisome than the resignation itself. ” Cavazos, the first Hispanic to sit on a Cabinet, tendered his resignation to Bush in a three-paragraph letter. The statement spoke of his pride in “raising awareness of the grow-
on Cabinet, Resigns
ing diversity of America’s student population.” It gave no reason for his departure.
A native of Texas, Cavazos, 63, was a carryover from the Reagan administration.
Ad Pushes Gulf Dialogue
The California chapter of the American Gl Forum placed a fuil-page ad in that state’s edition ofThe New York Times Dec. 11 urging more congressional dialogue to avoid war in the Persian Gulf.
Joined in its effort by the League of United Latin American Citizens, the Mexican American Political Association and the Latino Issues Forum, the Gl Forum questioned the morality of sending troops to defend the "discriminatory monarchy” of Kuwait.
“We’re prepared tofightfor democracy, but we need to have some tough questions answered,” said Carlos Mel6ndrez, a Gi Forum representative. He said lawmakers have been slow to air the subject fully because few have family members in the armed forces.
The ad was sent to ail Congress members.
Supreme Court Rules L.A. Race Will Proceed
The U.S. Supreme Court denied Dec. 10 a petition from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to stay an election in a newly redrawn, predominantly Latino district.
Because of the decision, the county must proceed with its Jan. 22 election for one of five seats on the board. In its 115-year history, the board has not had a Hispanic representative.
The court held off ruling on a petition to review the case. But Richard Fajardo, lead attorney in the lawsuit for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said it was unlikely the review will be granted after the election.
Said MALDEF President Antonia Hemdndez, “We believe that denying the county’s motion to stay the election indicates there are not enough votes on the Supreme Court to hear the case. The Latino community effectively has won this historic lawsuit.”
A decision on the motion to review is expected in mid-January.
Educators Say Scholarship Rule Presents New Barrier
continued from page 1
Paso. “Why isthere an underrepresentation if those scholarship programs already address their needs?”
The UTEP president said she was “puzzled at the timing and content” of the decision because it “seems to go against everything developed recently to increase minority participation.” Of particular concern to Natalicio are programs that seek to improve the enrollment of Hispanics and others in science and engineering programs.
At Stanford University, Cecilia Burciaga, assistant dean for graduate studies, sees the pronouncement emanating from a “national sentiment that minorities are walking away
with all the money.” This is not the case, she said, and the department’s action may well put the notion to rest.
Natalicio and Burciaga do not foresee a precipitous drop-off in Hispanic and black students. They said that financial aid at their institutions is based on need, not race.
Few universities and colleges offer race-based scholarships, said Bob Huff, financial aid director at Stanford, which does not accept gifts contingent on race. Nonetheless, he added, he fears minority students will say, “Gee whiz, this is further evidence that it will be increasingly difficult to go to college.”
INS Lethal-Force Rule Must Go: Attorney
Painting a backdrop of increasing instances where U.S. Border Patrol agents use deadly force against immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, a Los Angeles immigrant rights attorney told Weekly Report Dec. 11 that Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Gene McNary should revamp, rather than review, the agency’s use of lethal force.
“The protection of life is the only thing that justifies the use of lethal force,” said Antonio Rodriguez. McNary “should not order a review but give the leadership that’s needed on
Dec. 17,1990
this issue,” he added.
McNary ordered the review Dec. 5. Among the options under consideration are rubber bullets, stun guns and other non-lethal weapons, and the use of helmets and safety glasses.
Seven Mexicans have been shot this year by Border Patrol agents, four fatally.
McNary attributed the overall increase in injuries and deaths to rising violence along the border by bandits, smugglers and gangs. Rodriguez cited the “climate of violence and racism along the border.”
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


Clyde James Arag6n
Aragon’s Lexicon
The last few years have seen the emergence of an odd English-only movement in the United States, much to the chagrin of Spanishspeaking Americans. There’s been a lot of rhetoric and heated debate. Some members of Congress are even pondering whether to hold up the plebiscite on Puerto Rican statehood unless the island is willing to adopt English as its official language.
That is the height of absurdity.
If Puerto Rico becomes a state, there are very few English words its residents will really need.
I will summarize them for you:
Taxes. (Translation: Impuestos.)
Pay them or we’l break your legs. Oranslation:
Muchas gracias y ten un buen dfa.)
A common language is absolutely essential to hold a country together. Look at what happened in Quebec this year:
This past baseball season, singing the national anthems of the United States and Canada took longer at Montreal Expos games than the games. Then there were the introductions, in English and French, of the players ARAGON and their agents. Next came announcements, in English and French, about drivers who left their car lights on, and bilingual introductions of distinguished guests like Spuds MacKenzie and Vice President Quayle.
ENGLISH DICTIONARIES WOULD SUFFER Eliminating Spanish in the United States could create even greater problems. The most serious effect would be on English dictionaries. There are too many words that have Spanish mixed into them.
Take a word like barcolounger. It contains a Spanish component (barco) and an English component (lounger). Under English-only, it would become a boat sofa. And who would go on an ocean cruise to lie on a boat sofa?
Ocean voyages aside, think of the effect it would have on our judicial system. A defense lawyer will no longer be able to argue that his client stuck a bread knife into someone’s back because he was in a discourage (a mindless anger at a scratched record). Gone will be the D.A.’s response that that is a locomotion (crazy action).
Such madness. Here we are, trying to excise perfectly good words from our daily language because some of our English-speaking neighbors want to know everything we Spanish-speakers gossip about.
VANNA WHITE WILL BE OUT OF A JOB Look at afew of the hundreds of words containing Spanish that we will have to toss out of Merriam-Webster’s favorite book: correlate - to run behind schedule colleague - cabbage league deliver ~ of liver mallard - bad lard margin -- sailors’ favorite beverage mesquite - quite a month mHlions - a thousand lions mistress - my anxiety moralist ~ blackberry list montevideo ~ mountain movie parapet-forthe pet piebald - not having hairy feet surname - a name used in the South topography - mole designs trespass - a pass for three people veracity - to see a city
If we allow English-only laws to rule us, the semantic damage alone could leave us, well, speechless. Unspeakable hardship will follow. Vanna White will be out of a job.
Let us stand against this monolingual (monkey language) threat. We must, lest we have the words taken right out of our mouths.
(Clyde James Aragdn, of Albuquerque, N.M., is a free-lance writer.)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Sin pe/os en la lengua
A NEW MEXICAN THING: It’s been a year or so since Marfa Alvarez quit her job as editor of Hispanic magazine to return to New Mexico and become an editor with the Albuquerque Journal. Another D.C. media star, video producer Vfctor Romero, goes back occasionally for a cultural fix. So, I suspect, does Jerry Apodaca, the former governor, but he doesn’t make a big thing out of it.
Having visited the state afewtimes myself, I often wondered why people who leave New Mexico go back. There’s nothing wrong with the state. It’s just -- what do you do there after you’re done looking at the scenery?
Clyde Aragdn, an Albuquerque writer who is this week’s guest columnist, may have the answer: You invent games.
Clyde finds Spanish words inside English words and comes up with daffy definitions. Encouraged by the apparent ease with which he does it, I’ve been trying. But the best I could do were:
Salmonella - a female Alaskan fish
Taconite - Saturday evening in Espafiola
Reddish - a strainer
Palaver - a shovel with eyes (but it has two Spanish words and may be disqualified)
Ricochet - a rich chet
Or is that French? I’m afraid I don’t quite have it down yet. When I called Vfctor and asked if I were on the right track, all he’d tell me was, "It's a New Mexican thing - you wouldn’t understand."
LAURO, GO HOME: Meanwhile, in neighboring Texas, they’re planning a homecoming for Lauro Cavazos, a nice man but not nimble enough to elude John Sununu’s machete.
After Lauro couldn’t sell Texas Latinos a GOP limdn named Claytie Williams as gubernatorial material in last month’s election, the secretary of education finally became excess baggage in the Bush administration.
Los Angeles attorney Herman Sillas documented Cavazos’ problems with Latino educators for Hispanic Link News Service several months ago. More recently, D.C.-based writer Zita Arocha won a $1,000 Media Institute award for her not-too-flattering Vista magazine assessment of the secretary's performance.
A couple of weeks ago, The Wall Street Journal was asking when Cavazos would get the loud "message" that he was no longer wanted.
The day before Cavazos was dishonorably discharged by the White House, Richard MArquez, who serves (at least he does as I write this) as acting director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, met with a group of nearly 100 Latino educators in San Antonio. The session was called by the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities at the behest of the U.S. Department of Education.
In true Cavazosfashion, Mdrquez alienated his audience. He did so by interrupting and scolding leaders who challenged the administration’s concern about Latino children.
The former Dallas high school principal warned the group, "If we lose Lauro Cavazos, it will be another story in Hispanic America that says, 'You see, we told you Mexicans couldn’t do that job.'"
Among the heavyweights Mdrquez chose to lecture were Jos6 CArdenas, executive director of the Intercultural Development Research Association, and Edgewood School District Superintendent James VAsquez.
At one point, V&squez drew applause by responding to M&rquez's boast that Bush had legitimized the existence of Hispanics and their concerns, "I think it’s wonderful that we now have an emancipation declaration for Mexicans."
The group’s bottom line: If Latino students are to survive a system that has been stacked against them for decades, more resources and less rhetoric are needed pronto.
- Kay B&rbaro
Dec. 17,1990
3


Calendar
MAJOR EVENTS F$R 1991
Following is Weekly Report's annua) fisting of
tlonal Latino groups or groups that deaf with issues of interest to Hispanics.Nextweekasim^^^^ fisting for state and tocaf gtoups wfff be presented,
SOCIETY FOR AQWNC^
NOS AND NATIVE AMERICA^!®
PliliM
Conference
Costa Mesa, Calif, Jan, 4-7 Judith ;
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR BILINGUAL EDUCATION
Washington, D.C, Jan, 9*12 '
Jim Lyons (202) 8984829 *
NATWnS^^
PUBLICATIONS
Conference
Las Vegas, Nev, Jan, 24*28 Tino Durin (512) 270-4690
national association of Hispanic
PROFESSORS JN BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS
Symposium i i
South Padre Island, Texas Feb. 7*9:
Gilbert C6rdenas ($12) 381*3354 ;
SOCIETY OF HI&^NIC#^^
ENGINEERS -
CareerConference !,â–  , 1
Universal City* CaiS, Feb. 7-9 Jestis M&e* (213) 725*3970 •' .
nationALhead STARf Migrant direc* TORS ASSOCIATION:.
Conference " -y ; ' â– 
Albuquerque, N.M. - February (date notset):!;:-::v^ Louie JR^^;icSljS)i:; / ;v:
H!SP^|C:iLECTED Conference
Washington, D*C, March $L12 , ,
Julio Barreto (202) 626-3030
NATIONAL HISPANIC COUNCIL ON AG*
IB
Health Promotion Workshop New Orleans March 18 • ! | •! !j'‘, •
Tomasa Gonzales Rosales (202) 285*1288 CENTER FOR MIGRATION STUDIES Conference j|||j|(|;
Washington, 0.6. March 21,22 Carol Durante (718) 351*8800
TEACHERS OF ENGLISH TO SPEAKERS
OF OTHER LANGUAGES
Convention
New York March 24-28
Ellison Loth (703) 836*0774 • ;
nation^Iassociation OF HISPANIC JOURNALISTS
4
Conference
New York March 27-30
Patricia Rodriguez (202) 783-6228
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
Conference
Los Angeles April 3-7
Dorothy Frooman (312) 329-2512
SER-JOBS FOR PROGRESS
Literacy/Leadership Conference
Dallas April 9-12
Sally Torres (512) 631-3999
HISPANIC ACADEMY OF MEDIA ARTS AND SCIENCES Los Angeles April 18-20 Oralia Michel (213) 451-9161 NATIONAL PUERTO RICAN FORUM Conference New York April 23-25 Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 NATIONAL COALITION OF HISPANIC HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ORGANIZATIONS Benefit
Washington, D.C. May 9 Adolph FalcOn (202) 371-2100 NATIONAL IMAGE
Employment Symposium
St. Louis May 13-18
Charles Athie (314) 832-0790
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF CUBAN
AMERICAN WOMEN
Awards Reception Washington, D.C. May 20 Ana Maria Perera (202) 732-1545
NATIONAL ACTION COUNCL FOR MINORITIES IN ENGINEERING Conference
Anaheim, Calif. May 29-June 1
Ronnie Dennes (212) 279-2626
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF HISPANIC WOMEN
Conference
Washington, D.C. June 12,13 Elia Mendoza (202) 523-6698
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LATINO ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS Conference
Anaheim, Calif. June 27-29 Kelly Wagner (202) 289-1380 HISPANIC PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSOCIATION
Scholarship Banquet
Los Angeles June (date not set)
Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690
LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN
CITIZENS
Conference
Chicago July 1-7
George Cantu (702) 737-1240
NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA
Conference
Dec. 17,1990
Houston July 14*16
SOCIETY OF HISPANIC PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS ; • .
Awards, Installation Banquet Ban Francisco July (date not set)! ‘
Martha Ventura jRI jR 725-3970 ;
AMERICAN Gl FORUM
Convention Houston Aug. 11 *18 Antonio Morales 14500-638-2443 CONGRESSIONAL HISPANIC
Dinner
Washington* D.C. Sept 17
Miguel Gonz&ez (202) 848*1771
U.S. HISPANIC CHAMBER OF Co|l^lERCE
Conference
Chicago Sept. 18-22 ■ • § SI18B
Maxine Weber (202) $92717 HISPANIC FASHION DESIGNERS GALA Fashion Show and Benefit
j": / f-t..
MEXICAN AMERICAN WOMEN'S NATIONAL
ASSOCIATION
Hispanic Heritage Luncheon
W^hln^
Judy Canales (202) 898*2036 MIDWEST/NORTHEAST VOTER REGISTRATION EDUCATION PROJECT Conference ||S|f?.V:.
Chicago Oct 11*13 Joanne Martinez (312) 427-8683 COM IS I ON MBXJCANA NACIONAL
Semana de la Mujer California
Maggle Cervantes (81 H'
PUERTO RICAN LEGAL DEFENSE AND
|ducation fund
Banquet
New York October (date not set) •
Elizabeth Dickinson (21^) 219*3360
NATIONAL SOCIETY OF HISPANIC MBAs
Convention
Miami Nov, 7*10
NSHMBA (512) 226*2101
.Conference
Nd^'l^' 15 "
doe* Cruz(^$3*39i$
hIspanic'
AND UNIVERSITIES Financial Assistance Conference El Paso, Texas Dec. 6,7 r
MEXICAN AMERICAN LEGAL DEFENSE ANP |EDU<^ FUND -vlllllllll Awards Dinner
. (date not set)
Hispanic Link Weekly Report


CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS
ANTICIPATED FACULTY VACANCY
I Northern I Michigan ! University
Northern Michigan University ASSISTANT PROFESSOR DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Northern Michigan University, located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, anticipates and invites applications for an opening in the Department of Education. The successful candidate for this tenure-earning position must possess a PhD. or EdD. degree, certification or endorsement in special education related to the areas of mental impairment and/or learning disabilities and three years of teaching experience. Experience with handicapped students at the preprimary and/or elementary levels (K-8) related to mental impairment and/or learning disabilities preferred along with college/university experience in teaching and supervising students in elementary (K-8) preprofessional teacher education curricula. Additional experience and preparation would be desired related to a) demonstrating assistive technologies for the handicapped students; b) assisting regular educators with instructing handicapped students. This position will be responsible for teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in special education, supervision of student teachers, sponsorship of the special education students association, and other assigned responsibilities. The appointment will begin on August 21,1991.
Northern Michigan University encourages applications from minorities and women.
Send a letter of application, a current vita and placement credentials, and the names and addresses of three academic/performance references no later than March 4,1991 to:
Dr. James D. Hendricks, Associate Dean School of Behavioral Sciences, Human Services, and Education Northern Michigan University Marquette, Ml 49855-5347
^________________________________Phone: (906) 227-2728_______________________________^
CLAREMONT GRADUATE SCHOOL
Tenure Track Position - Education (rank open): Individual with exceptional strength in educating Latinos in a pluralistic society.
Experience in some/all of the following: Curriculum development, tefiching/learn-ing, second language learning, child development, multicultural education.
Qualifications: Doctorate, demonstrated ability to teach/supervise doctoral students, research competence, scholarly publications, interest in establishing links between scholarship/practice at all levels of education.
Write/call for information:
Dr. Philip Dreyer The Claremont Graduate School Claremont, Calif. 91711 Ph. 714-621^8317
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY BAKERSFIELD
EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY: Assistant through Full Professor (tenure track), $33*192 3. '1991* Responsibilities
include teaching courses in educational technology: advising graduate sh> dents; establishing professional devetopment programs and courses in.edu-c^ipnill|ffi partnerships withK-1 2 schools, business, and
QSOB; consulting WlfH fapu^ technology Into the School of
Education curriculum; writing proposals for funding of curriculum, program! development andin professional! organizations and scholarly activities. Earned doctorate required In educational technology, computer education, or a related field, Applications received by January 31,1991 with a completed file will givenfull consideration; openunti! filled. Send letter of application, vita, placementfiie (if available) withthree letters of recommendation and transcripts of graduate courses to:
Dr. Betty Greathouse, Dean, School of Education, California State Universl^, Bakersfield, 09001 Stockdale Hwy,, Bakersfield, Calif. 93311-1099; CSUB is an AA/EOE* ,
PROF GOVT CAREER IN VIRGINIA
Supvry Computer Spec., Director, Information Resources Management Division GM-0334-15. Salary $61,643.00 +.
CALL (703)756-3351 for VACANCY ANN#91-10 NOW! Closes 01-14-91.
Food & Nutrition Service, USDA Personnel Division Rm. 620 3101 Park Center Drive Alexandria, VA 22302
EEO Employer-US Citizenship Required.
UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO
University of New Mexico seeks broadcast journalism teacher for email, professionally oriented department; starting next August See ad this publication December 10, 1990 or write:
Chair, Journalism Search, Department of Journalism, UNM, Albuquerque, NM 87131
PUBLIC COUNSEL DIRECTING ATTORNEY
Public Counsel/UCLA Public Interest Law Program
Unique joint effort between Public Counsel and UCLA School of Law. The Public Interest Law Program will coordinate litigation and transactional public interest law projects. It will provide students with opportunities for hands-on case work and client contract within the framework of clinical courses at UCLA. The Directing Attorney will be an employee of Public Counsel and a non-tenure UCLA faculty lecturer and will work directly with Public Counsel staff attorneys, UCLA Law School clinical professors, social service groups and client community groups, as well as law students. Applicants will be a member of CA Bar and have a min. of 5 years experience. Salary $50,000-$59,500, generous benefits. Apply by r6sum6 only to:
Steven A. Nissen, Executive Director, PUBLIC COUNSEL, 3535 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cailf. 90020
Applications from minority group members and women particularly welcomed.
M
A
R
K
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Hispanic Link Weekly Report
Dec. 17, 1990
5


Arts & Entertainment
NEW ON THE AIR: The nation's first Latino-owned cable television network is scheduled to be launched in early February.
One cable system each in Puerto Rico and California are the first to agree formally to carry Viva Television Network’s planned mix of English- and Spanish-language and bilingual programing. According to company executives, Viva has "agreements in principle" with other cable systems to bring the potential reach to 500,000 homes. The network’s goal is to launch with a half million subscribers.
The Viva signal, which will be beamed nationwide via satellite, will carry documentaries, a jazz program, news, talk shows, comedy series, sports, children’s shows, music videos, novelas and other varied fare.
The network recently signed a five-year exclusive contract with Mexico’s Imevlsldn network to air 12 hours of its daily programing. Other programs will be obtained from Puerto Rico and South America.
NEW ON THE JOB: The Los Angeles-based Getty Conservation Institute has appointed Miguel Angel Corzo as its new director.
The Mexico-born Corzo is president of the Friends of Mexico Foundation. The foundation organized the landmark exhibition of Mexican art now on view at New York’s Metropolitan Museum. (The exhibition, Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries, is the most extensive ever outside of Mexico. It travels to Los Angeles next October.)
Corzo begins at his new post in January, overseeing an organization that promotes the preservation of art worldwide.
ONE UNERS: Salsa Caliente de Japdn, an album by the Tokyo-based, all-Japanese Orquesta de la Luz band reached the No. 1 spot last week on the sa/saAropical charts compiled by Billboard magazine...Meat My Beat, a performance piece by Albert Antonio Ariza, plays Sunday evenings at Los Angeles' Celebration Theater through the end of the year...A mid-career retrospective of the works of Mexican filmmakers Arturo Ripstein and Jaime Umberto Hermo-sillo, screens at New York's Museum of Modern Art through Dec. 31 ..Adelante C/S, a show by artist Frank Romero, Ann Chamberlin and C6sar Martinez, continues at the Galerfa Sin Fronteras in Austin, Texas, through Jan. 9...And the Spanish Pictures Exhibitors Association will hold its 1991 convention Jan. 15,16 at the Mirage Hotel in Las Vegas. - Antonio Mejias-Rentas
Media Report * •
1994 JOINT CONVENTION: The four national minority journalists organizations took another step Dec. 7 toward coordination of a 1994 joint convention by creating the nonprofit Atlanta ’94 Unity Convention and naming Lloyd LaCuesta as its first president.
LaCuesta, 43, South Bay bureau chief for KTVU in Oakland, Calif., is the immediate past president of the Asian American Journalists Association.
The associations also named:
• Don Flores as vice president. Flores is president of the National Association of Hispanic Journalists.
• Thomas Morgan as treasurer. Morgan is president of the National Association of Black Journalists.
• Mark Trahant as secretary. Trahant is president of the Native American Journalists Association.
The overriding goal of the first-ever joint convention, the officers said, is to increase
HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT
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Publisher and Editor: F6lix P6rez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Roberto Rodriguez.
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No portion of Hispanic Link Weekly Report may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission.
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diversity in the newsroom.
The four associations also agreed to explore the possibility of holding joint forums in various cities and to review media coverage and hiring practices of the industry. Denver is slated to hold the first forum in 1991.
The purpose of the forums, the four presidents said, is to ensure that the industry not use the recession as an excuse to slow efforts to diversify newsrooms.
CAPITAL INTERNSHIP: The National Association of Hispanic Journalists is offering a one-year internship to train as a reporter in the nation’s capital. It will begin in February and provide a $16,000 stipend.
Competition is open to anyone of Hispanic heritage who wants to pursue print journalism as a career. The chosen intern will work with Hispanic Link News Service.
Applicants will be judged on their writing skills (emphasis on English language), potential and commitment to pursue print journalism as a career. There are no age limits or education requirements.
Deadline is Jan. 15.
interested individuals may contact Hispanic Link, 1420 N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 for application forms and more details.
AWARD COMPETITIONS: The John Hancock Awards for Excellence program provides $5,000 to writers judged to have contributed significantly to consumer understanding of business and finance. Material for consideration must have been published in 1990. Deadline is January 15.
For an application and information, contact Awards for Excellence T-54, John Hancock Financial Services, P.O. Box 111, Boston, Mass. 02117 (617) 572-6000...
‘The annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards, honoring the best journalistic efforts of broadcast and print professionals, is now accepting submissions for its 1990 awards. Deadline is Jan. 10. Work must have been broadcast or published in 1990.
For an application, contact the Society of Professional Journalists, P.O. Box 77,16S. Jackson St., Greencastle, Ind. 46135-0077 (317) 653-3333. — Roberto Rodriguez
(See Guest Column, page three)


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' . );. .c! • t-,. ; . 1 : M!Jfing ,JheNeWs This Week _., 4 '! ' • ' • f' I , The House oemocratic Caucus re-elects u.s . . Rep . . Henry B. Gonzalez chairman of the House Banking Committee and Rep. E. .''Kika" de Ia Garza (D-Texas) as chairman of the House Agriculture Committee ... The National Organization for Women selects Assem blywoman Lucille Roybal-Allard as its California Legislator of the Year ... A U.S. district court judge dismisses one of eight counts of extortion and racketeering charges against suspended Hialeah, Fla., Mayor Raul Martrnez, saying the count had not been filed within the statute of limitations. Martfnez is scheduled to stand trial Jan. 22 on charges of extorting nearly $1 million in cash and real estate from developers between 1981_ and 1987 in exchange for favorable treat ment on zoning matters ... Chicago Mayor Richard Daley submits to the City Council for approval the name of Mary Montes for appoint ment-to the Illinois International Port District Board. Montes is director of Illinois Fiesta Educativa ... The Caring Institute honors Ralph Tor res, a 17-year-old from Hillsdale, N.J., as one of the 10 most caring young people in the United States. Recognized _ at a ceremony in a U.S. Senate office building, Torres was instrumental in the develop ment of a drug abuse prevention program called LEAD. He has worked with mentally challenged children for the past four years and is peer counselor at his high school. .. The Golf Writers Association of America names Lee Trevhio, who won seven tournaments this year, its player of the year for the men's senior tour ... Relnaldo Arenas, a novelist who was jailed in Cuba for two years as a political prisoner, is found dead Dec. 8 in his New York home, the victim of an apparent drug overdose. Arenas, 47, had been diagnosed with AIDS ... HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT Scholarship Rule Evokes Shock By Felix Perez Educators surveyed by Weekly Report expressed shock and sometimes anger at a Dec. 12 U.S. Education Department decision to bar federal funds from higher education in stitutions that dole out scholarships based on race or ethnicity. They described the directive as yet another obstacle in the battle to enroll more Hispanics and other underrepresented groups. .. From all inqications, the decision is plain ridiculous," fumed Cesar Trimble, vice presi dent of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities. Modesto Maidique, president of Florida International University in Miami, said, .. 1 am deeply disappointed by this announGement. It is extremely unfortunate and flies in the face ct what many of us have been trying to a:hieve in higher education for years." The sole Latino on President Bush's Na tional Education Policy Advisory Committee, Maidique said he would dispatch a letter to the Education Department and Bush's do mestic policy adviser asking that the policy be overturned. The department argued that race-based scholarships discriminate against non-minori ties. It further contended the impact will be negligible financial aid targeted at educationally and economically disadvan taged students will still be available. That rationale does not square with enroll ment statistics nationally, said Diana Natal icio, president of the University of Texas at El continued on page 2 Dallas Remap Suit to Go to Court Again By Felix Perez The rejection by Dallas voters of a redistrict ing plan that was designed to increase Latino and African American representation on the City Council will put the rancorous issue back up support for the defeated plan, said even tual redress will come from the courts but he lamented that the issue will continue to divide the city through a protracted appeals proc ess. in federal court and result in a more equitable AA attorney fa the remap plan, two Hispanic leaders told two black plaintiffs Report Dec. 1 0. whose lawsuit re-The referendum voted on Dec. 8, loot 45,624 suited in the referto 45,252, or 50.2<>Jb to 49.8%. It would have endum said if necreated 14 single-distrid seats, with the mayor gotiations did not being elected at large. The current system work he would ask has eight seats elected by district and anU.S. District Judge other three, including the mayor, elected cityJerry Buchmeyer to wide. implement the 14-1 Dallas is 30% black and 18% Hispanic. It VELASQUEZ-FLORES plan. Buchmeyer has two blacks and no Latinos on its City expects court relief ordered the system Council. redrawn in 1988 as part of a settlement. "We have historically gotten our relief from While the Council can now approve a plan the courts," said Elizabeth Velasquez-Flares, passed by voters in August 1989 that calls for executive director of the Greater Dallas 1 0 members to be elected by individual disCommunity Relations Commission. trict and four others and the mayor to be AI Gonzalez, a councilman in 1987-88, was elected at large, Velasquez-Floras and disappointed with the vote. "This means we Gonzalez said Buchmeyer will likely strike it. have to start the process all over again, II he That plan was not implemented last year said. Gonzalez, who was tapped by Mayor because the judge suggested it would be un Annette Strauss three months ago to round constitutional. Cavazos Quits Job, Assessed Critically By Felix Perez Educational leaders were taken by surprise by the Dec. 12 resignation an nouncement of U.S. Education Secre tary Lauro Cavazos. Despite their agree ment on how crucial it is to have a His panic in the nation's highest education post, they were on balance critical of the secretary's performance . At one end of the spectrum was Jim Lyons, executive director of the National Association for Bilingual Education. Cavazos deserves an "'A' on putting to gether a class team, II said Lyons, point ing to Rita Esquivel, director of the de partment's bi lingual educa tion programs, and Ted Sand ers, the department's second in command. Lyons gave the secretary a 'C-,' however, for his "pubFLORES lie utterances." Cavazos has done nothing Among those: children who do not speak English are not ready to learn; and His panic parents deserve much of the blame for the high Latino dropout rate. Sara Flores, a bilingual education OOI'tlrued on page 2

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Houston Seeks to Avoid Bitterness Over Council Seat By Roberto Rodriguez The Houston City Council will vote Dec. 19 on nominations to fill a vacant at -large Council seat with a caretaker, thereby hq:>ing to avoid an increasingly bitter debate over who shornd be . named. The council will select a candidate on the condition the ap pointee agrees not to run for the position next November when the term expires. The vacancy was created when Judson Robinson, the first black elected to council this century, died Nov. 15. The caretaker position was agreed to after concern was raised that an appointee, with the status of incumbent, would have an unfair advantage in next year's election. Blacks asked that the post remain a .. black seat,'' while many His panics have said that because of their underrepresentation on the council, it should go to a Hispanic. Until Robinson's death, blacks held five seats on the 15-member council, whites nine and Hispanics one. Whites and blacks each make up roughly a third of Houston's 1.9 million residents; Hispanics are 28%. If Hispanics do not get a seat through an appointment or through the N01ember 1991 elections, Houston attorney Frumencio Reyes has indicated he will file a lawsuit to restructure the council into 'between 17 and 22 single-member districts. The council currrently has five at-large and nine silgle-member districts. The mayor is also a voting member. Dolores Guerrero, the national secretary of the League of United Latin American Citizens, echoes most everyone's distaste for a caretaker position but is hopeful a Latina eventually will be elected to the post . Councilman Reyes insists that contrary to media reports, relations between blacks and Hispanics have not been frayed. Cavazos, 1st Latino on Cabinet, Resigns Supreme Court Rules coriltXJed from page 1 teacher in Killeen, Texas, offered this critique: "I have seen nothing to make me feel he has done anything" for bilingual education. A member of the National Education Asso ciation's board of directors, Flores said she has seen "no commitment to give all people an equal chance at a quality education." Los Angeles school board member Leticia Quezada, while finding fault with Cavazos' helmsmanship, lashed out at what she per ceived as a lack of support from the Bush ad ministration. "I disagreed with him (Cavazos) on many occasions, but I have said publicly that I would defend him if people called for his resignation," said Quezada. It was reported that Cavazos was fired by White House Chief of Staff John Sununu. Quezada suggested Cavazos may have been a sacrificial lamb. "What's behind it is more worrisome than the resignation itself. " Cavazos, the first Hispanic to sit on a Cabinet, tendered his resignation to Bush in a three-paragraph letter. The statement spoke of his pride in "raising awareness ofthe growing diversity of America's student popula tion." It gave no reason for his departure. A native of Texas, Cavazos, 63, was a carry over from the Reagan administration. Ad Pushes Gulf Dialogue The California chapter of the American Gl Forum placed a full-page ad in that state's edition of The New York Times Dec. 11 urging more congressional dialogue to avoid war in the Persian Gulf. Joined in its effort by the League of United Latin American Citizens, ' the Mexican Ameri can Political Association and the Latino Is sues Forum, the Gl F arum questioned the morality of sending troops to defend the "discriminatory monarchy" of Kuwait. "We're prepared to fight for democracy, but we need to have some tough questions answered," said Carlos Melendrez, a Gl Fo rum representative. He said lawmakers have been slow to air the subject fully because few have family members in the armed forces. The ad was sent to all Congress members. L.A. Race Will Proceed The U.S. Supreme Court denied Dec. 10 a petition from the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to stay an election in a newly redrawn, predominantly Latino district. Because of the decisiofl, the county must proceed with its Jan. 22 election for one offive seats on the board. In its 115-year history, the board has not had a Hispanic representative. The court held off ruling on a petition to review the case. But Richard Fajardo, lead attorney in the lawsuit for the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, said it was unlikely the review will be granted after the election. Said MALDEF Presidert Antonia Hernandez, "We believe that denying the county's motion to stay the election indicates there are not enough votes on the Supreme Court to hear the case. The Latino community effectively has won this historic lawsuit." A decision on the motion to review is ex pected in mid-January. Educators Say Scholarship Rule Presents New Barrier cortitXJed from page 1 Paso. ''Why is there an underrepresentation if those scholarship programs already address their needs?" The UTEP presi dent said she was ' ' ' ' i "puzzled at the ,,,,,,,,,,:,?r timirg and content" of the decision , ;;: ,,,;: because it "seems ' t :m:::: to go against eve rything developed recently to minority participaNATALICIO tion." Of particular disputes department rationale concern to Natalicio are programs that seek to improve the enrollment of Hispanics and others in science and engineering programs. At Stanford University, Cecilia Burciaga, assistant dean for graduate studies, sees the pronouncement emanating from a "national sentiment that minorities are walking away 2 with all the money." This is not the case, she said, and the department's action may well put the notion to rest. Natalicio and Burciaga do not foresee a precipitous drop-off in Hispanic and black students. They said that financial aid at their institutions is based on need, not race. Few universities and colleges offer race based scholarships, said Bob Huff, financial . aid director at Stanford, which not ac cept gifts contingent on race. Nonetheless, he added, he fears minority students will say, "Gee whiz, this is further evidence that it will be increasingly difficult to go to college." INS Lethal-Force Rule Must Go: Attorney Painting a backdrop of increasing instances where U.S. Border Patrol agents use deadly force against immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico border, a Los Angeles immigrant rights attarnay told Weekly Report Dec. 11 that lmmigra. tion and Naturalization Service Commissioner Gene McNary should revamp, rather than review, the agency's use of lethal force. "The protection of life is the only thing that justifies the use of lethal force," said Antonio Rodrfguez. McNary "should not order a review but give the leadership that's needed on Dec. 17, 1990 this issue," he added. McNary ordered the review Dec. 5. Among the options under consideration are rubber bullets, stun guns and other non-lethal weapons, and the use of helmets and safety glasses. Seven Mexicans have been shot this year by Border Patrol agents, four fatally. McNary attributed the overall increase in injuries and deaths to rising violence along the border by bandits, smugglers and gangs. Rodrfguez cited the "climate of violence and racism along the border." Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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Clyde James Arag6n AragOn' s Lexicon The last few years have seen the emergence of an odd English-only movement in the United States, much to the chagrin of Spanish speaking Americans. There's been a lot of rhetoric and heated debate. Some members of Congress are even pondering whether to hold up the plebiscite on Puerto Rican statehood unless the island is willing to adopt English as its official language. That is the height of absurdity. If Puerto Rico becomes a state, there are very few E residents will really need. ..... ,,.,,,,., .. \""'''''"'''' I will summarize them for you: Taxes. (Translation: lmpuestos.) Pay them cr we'll:x"eak your legs. (Translation: Muchas gracias y ten un buen dfa.) A common language is absolutely essential to hold a country together. Look at what happened in Quebec this year: This past baseball season, singing the national anthems of the United States and Canada ..• took longer at Montreal Expos games than the games. Then there were the introduc-tions, in English and French, of the players ARAGON and their agents. Next came announcements, in English and French, about drivers who left their car lights on, and bilingual introductions of distinguished guests like Spuds MacKenzie and Vice President Quayle. ENGLISH DICTIONARIES WOULD SUFFER Eliminating Spanish in the United States could create even greater problems. The most serious effect would be on English dictionaries. There are too many words that have Spanish m ixed into them. Take a word like barcolounger. It contains a Spanish component (barco) and an English component (lounger). Under English-only, it would become a boat sofa. And who would go on an ocean cruise to lie on a boat sofa? Ocean voyages aside, think of the effect it would have on our judicial system. A defense lawyer will no longer be able to argue that his client stuck a bread knife into someone's back because he was in a discourage (a mindless anger at a scratched record). Gone will be the D.A.'s response that that is a locomotion (crazy action). Such madness. Here we are, trying to excise perfectly good words from our daily language because some of English-speaking neighbors want to know everything we Spanish-speakers gossip about. VANNA WHITE WILL BE OUT OF A JOB Look at a few oft he hundreds of words contair:ting Spanish that we will have to toss out of Merriam-Webster's favorite book: correlate --to run behind schedule colleague --cabbage league deliver --of liver mallard --bad lard ......__ margin --sailors' favorite beverage mesquite --quite a month millions--a thousand lions mistress--my anxiety moralist --blackberry list montevideo --mountain movie parapet --for the pet piebald --not having hairy feet surname --a name used in the South topography --mole designs trespass --a pass . for three people veracity --to see a city If we allow English-only laws to rule us, the semantic damage alone could leave us, well, speechless. Unspeakable hardship will follow. Vanna White will be out of a job. Let us stand against this monolingual (monkey language) threat. We must, lest we have the words taken right .out of our mouths. (Clyde James Arag6n, of Albuquerque, N.M., is a free-lance writer.) Sin pelos en Ia lengua A NEW MEXICAN THING: lfs been a year or so since Marra Alvarez quit her job as editor of Hispanic magazine to return to New Mexico and become an editor with the Albuquerque Journal. Another D.C. media star, video producer V(ctor Romero, goes back occasionally for a cultural fix. So, I suspect, does Jerry Apodaca, the former governor, but he doesn't make a big thing out of it. Having visited the state a few times myself, I often wondered why people who leave New Mexico go back. There's nothing wrong with the state. It's just--what do you do there after you're done looking at the scenery? Clyde Arag6n, an Albuquerque writer who is this week's guest columnist, may have the answer: You invent games. Clyde finds Spanish words inside English words and comes up with daffy definitions. Encouraged by the apparent ease with which he does it, I've been trying. But the best I could do were: Salmonella --a female Alaskan fish Taconite -Saturday evening in Espanola Reddish --a strainer Piiiaver --a shovel with eyes (but it has two Spanish words and may be disqualified) Ricochet --a rich chat Or is that French? I'm afraid I don't quite have it down yet. When I called Vfctor and asked if I were on the right track, all he'd tell me was, "It's a New Mexican thing --you wouldn't understand." LAURO, GO HOME: Meanwhile, in neighboring Texas, they're planning a homecoming for Lauro Cavazos, a nice man but not nimble enough to elude John Sununu's machete. After Lauro couldn't sell Texas Latinos a GOP lim6n named Claytle Williams as gubernatorial material in last month's election, the secretary of education finally became excess baggage in the Bush administration. Los Angeles attorney Herman Slllas documented Cavazos' proble .ms with Latino educators for Hispanic Link News Service several months ago. More recently, D.C.-basedwriterZitaArocha won a $1,000 Media Institute award for her not-too-flattering Vista magazine assessment of the secretary's performance. A couple of weeks ago, The Wall Street Journal was asking when Cavazos would get the loud "message" that he was no longer wanted. The day before Cavazos was dishonorably discharged by the White House, Richard Marquez, who serves (at least he does as I write this) as acting director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, met with a group of nearly 1 00 Latino educators in San Antonio. The session was called by the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities at the behest of the U.S. Department of Education. In true Cavazos fashion, his audience. He did so by interrupting and scolding leaders who challenged the administration's concern about Latino children. The former Dallas high school principal warned the group, "If we lose Lauro Cavazos, it will be another story in Hispanic America that says, 'You see, we told you Mexicans couldn't do that job.'" Among the heavyweights chose to lecture were Jose Cardenas, executive director of the Intercultural Development Research Association, and School Dis1ric1 SuperintendEilt James Vasquez. At one poirt, drew applause by responding to M&-quez's boast that Bush had legitimized the existence of His panics and their concerns, "I think it's wonderful that we now have an emancipation declaration for Mexicans." The group's bottom line: If Latino students are to survive a system that has been stacked against them for decades, more resources and less rhetoric are needed pronto. -Kay Barbaro Hispanic Unk Weekly Report Dec. 17, 1990 3

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Calendar Conference New York March 27-30 Patricia Rodriguez (202) 783-6228 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR AFFIRMA TIVE ACTION Conference Los Angeles April 3-7 Dorothy Frooman (312) 329-2512 SER-JOBS FOR PROGRESS Literacy /Leadership Conference Dallas April 9-12 Sally Torres (512) 631-3999 HISPANIC ACADEMY OF MEDIA ARlS AND SCIENCES Los Angeles April 18-20 Oralia Michel (213) 451-9161 NATIONAL PUER T O RICAN FORUM Conference New York April 23-25 Marta Garcia (212) 685-2311 NATIONAL COALITION OF HISPANIC HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ORGANI ZATIONS Benefit Washington, D.C. May 9 Adolph Falc6n (202) 371-2100 NATIONAL IMAGE Employment Symposium St. Louis May 13-18 Charles Athie (314) 832-0790 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AMERICAN WOMEN Awards Reception Washington, D.C. May 20 Ana Maria Perera (202) 732-1545 OF CUBAN NATIONAL ACTION COUNCL FOR MINoRI TIES IN ENGINEERING Conference Anaheim, Calif. May 29-June 1 Ronnie Dennes (2112) 279-2626 NATIONAL COUNCIL OF HSPANIC WONIEN Conference Washington, D.C. June 12, 13 Elia Mendoza (202) 523-6698 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LATINO ELECTED AND APPOINTED OFFICIALS Conference Anaheim, Calif. June 27-29 Kelly Wagner (202) 289-1380 HISPANIC PUBLIC RELATIONS ASSOCIA TION Scholarship Banquet Los Angeles June (date not set) Esther Renteria (213) 726-7690 LEAGUE OF UNITED LATIN AMERICAN CITIZENS Conference Chicago July 1-7 George Cantu (702) 737-1240 NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LA RAZA :u>:: ::::::::::::::::::U::l1mU::m:: Conference Dec. 17, 1990 Hispanic Unk Weekly Report

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I CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS ANTICIPATED FACUL TV VACANCY Northern Michigan -..University Northern Michigan University ASSISTANT PROFESSOR DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Northern Michigan University, located in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, anticipates and invites applications for an opening in the Department of Education. The successful candi date for this tenure-earning position must possess a PhD. or EdD. degree, certification or endorsement in spec i al education related to the areas of mental impairment and/or learning disabilities and three years of teaching experience. Experience with handicapped students at the preprimary and/or elementary levels (K-8) related to mental impairment and/or learning disabilities preferred along with college/university experience in teaching and supervising students in elementary (K-8) preprofessional teacher education curricula . Additional experience and preparation would be desired related to a) demonstrating assis tive technologies for the handicapped students; b) assisting regular educators with instruct ing handicapped students. This position will be responsible for teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in special education, supervision of student teachers, sponsorship of the special education students association, and other assigned responsibilities. The ap pointment will begin on August 21, 1991. Northern Michigan University encourages applications from minorities and women. Send a letter of application, a current vita and placement credentials, and the names and addresses of three academic/performance references no later than March 4, 1991 to: Dr. James D. Hendric .ks, Associate Dean School of Behavioral Sciences, Human Services, and Education Northern Michigan University Marquette, Ml 49855-5347 Phone: (906) 227-2728 CLAREMONT GRADUATE SCHOOL Tenure Track Position Education (rank open): Individual with exceptional strength in educating Latinos in a pluralistic society. Experience in some/all of the following: Curriculum development, teaching/learn ing, second language learning, child development, multicultural education. Qualifications: Doctorate, demonstrated ability to teach/supervise doctoral stu research competence, scholarly publications, interest in establishing links be tween scholarship/practice at all levels of education. Write/call for information: Hispanic Link Weekly Report Dr. Philip Dreyer The Claremont Graduate School Claremont, Calif. 91711 Ph. 714-621-8317 Dec. 17, 1990 PROF GOV'T CAREER IN VIRGINIA Supvry Computer Spec., Director, In formation Resources Management Divi sion GM-0334-15. Salary $61 ,643.00 +. CALL (703)756-3351 for VACANCY ANN#91-1 0 NOW I Closes 01-14-91. Food & Nutrition Service, USDA Personnel Division Am. 620 3101 Park Center Drive Alexandria, VA 22302 EEO Employer-US Citizenship Re-quired. . :: '"" PUBLIC COUNSEL DIRECTING ATTORNEY Public Counsel/UCLA Public Interest Law Program Unique joint effort between Public Counsel and UCLA School of Law. The Public Interest Law Program will coordinate lttigation and transactional public interest law projects. It will provide students with opportunities for hands-on case work and client contract wtthin the framework of clini cal courses at UClJ\. The Directing Attomey will be an employee d Pubic Counsel and a non-tenure UCLA faculty lecturer and will work directly with Public Counsel staff attorneys, UCLA Law School clinical profes sors, social service groups and client community groups, as well as law students. Applicants will be a mem ber of CA Bar and have a min. of 5 years experience. Salary $50,000$59,500, generous benefits. Apply by only to: Steven A. Nissen, Executive Direc tor, PUBLIC COUNSEL, 3535 West Sixth Street, Los Angeles, Cailf. 90020 Applications from minority group members and women particularly" welcomed. I ;;;; ; .. : . . . . . . 5

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Arts & Entertainment The Mexico-born Corzo is president of the Friends of Mexico Foundation. The foundation organized the landmark exhibition of Mexican art now on view at New York's Metropolitan Museum. (The exhibition, Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries, is the most exten sive ever outside of Mexico. It travels to Los Angeles next October.) NEW ON THE AIR: The nation's first Latino-owned cable television network is scheduled to be launched in early February. One cable system each in Puerto Rico and California are the first to agree formally to carry VIva Television Network's mix of Englishand Spanish-language and bilingual programing. According to company executives, Viva has "agreements in principle" with other cable systems to bring the potential reach to 500,000 homes. The network's goal is to launch with a half million subscribers. Corzo begins at his new post in January, overseeing an organization that promotes the preservation of art worldwide. The Viva signal, which will be beamed nationwide via satellite, will carry documentaries, a jazz program, news, talk shows, comedy series, sports, children's shows, music videos, nove/as and other varied fare. ONE LINERS: Sa/sa Caliente de Jap6n, an album by the Tokyo based, all-Japanese Orquesta de Ia Luz band reached the No. 1 spot last week on the sa/sa/tropical charts compiled by Billboard magazine ... Meat My Beat, a performance piece by Albert Antonio Ariza, plays Sunday evenings at Los Angeles' Celebration Theater through the end of the year ... A mid-care . er retrospective of the works of Mexican . filmmakers Arturo Ripstein and Jaime Umberto Hermo sillo, screens at New York's Museum of Modern Art through Dec. 31 .. Adelante CIS, a show by artist Frank Romero, Ann Chamberlin and C6sar Martfnez, . continues at the Galerla Sin Fronteras in Austin, Texas, through Jan. 9 ... And the Spanish Pictures Exhibitors Associa tion will hold its 1991 convention Jan. 15, 16 at the Mirage Hotel in Las The network recently signed a five-year exclusive contract with Mexico's lmevlsl6n network to air 12 hours of its daily programing. Other programs will be obtained from Puerto Rico and South America. NEW ON THE JOB: The Los Angeles-based Getty Conservation Institute has appointed Miguel Angel Corzo as its new director. Vegas. -Antonio Mejias-Rentas ' Media Report 1994 JOINT CONVENTION: The four na tional minority journalists organizations took another step Dec. 7 toward coordination of a 1994 joint convention by creating the non profit Atlanta '94 Unity Convention and nam ing Lloyd LaCuesta as its first president. LaCuesta, 43, South Bay bureau chief for KTVU in Oakland, Calif., is the immediate past president of the Asian American Jour nalists Association. The associations also named: • Don Flores as vice president. Flores is president of the National Association. of Hispanic Journalists. • Thomas Morgan as treasurer. Morgan is president of the National Association of Black Journalists. • Mark Trahant as secretary. Trahant is president of the Native American JournalIsts Association. The overriding goal of the first-ever joint convention, the officers said, is to increase HISPANIC LINK WEEKLY REPORT A national publication of Hispanic Unk News Service l ' nc. 1420 'N' Street NW Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-o280 or (202) 234-o737 Publisher and Editor: Felix Perez Reporting: Antonio Mejias-Rentas, Roberto Ro driguez. Sales: Carlos Ericksen-Mendoza. No portion of Hispanic Unk Weekly Repolf may be reproduced or broadcast in any form without advance permission. Annual subscriptions (50 issues): Institutions/ agencies $118; Personal $1 08; Trial (13 Issues) $30 CORPORATE CLASSIFIEDS: Ad rates 90 cents per word . Display ads are $45 per column inch. If placed by Tuesday, ad will run in Weekly Reports mailed Friday of the same week. diversity in the newsroom. The four associations also agreed to ex plore the possibility of holding joint forums in various cities and to review media coverage and hiring practices of the industry. Denver is slated to hold the first forum in 1991. The purpose of the forums, the four presi dents said, is to ensure that the Industry not use the recession as an excuse to slow efforts to diversify newsrooms. CAPITAL INTERNSHIP: .The National As sociation of Hispanic Journalists is offer ing a one-year internship to train as a reporter in the nation's capital. It will begin in February and provide a $16,000 stipend. Competition is open to of Hispanic heritage who wants to pursue print journalism as a career. The chosen intern will work with Hispanic Link News Service. Applicants will be judged on their writing skills (emphasis on English language), po tential and commitment to pursue print jour nalism as a career. There are no age limits or education requirements. Deadline is Jan. 15. T H E L E A X R I A C Go 0 N N Interested individuals may contact Hispanic Link, 1420N St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-0280 for application forms and more details. AWARD COMPETITIONS: The John Han cock Awards for Excellence program pro vides $5,000 to writers judged to have con tributed significantly to consumer understand ing of business and finance. Material for consideration must have been published in . 1990. Deadline is January 15. For an application and information, contact Awards for Excellence T -54, John Hancock Financial Services, P.O. Box 111, Boston, 92117 (617) 572-6000 ... The annual Sigma Delta Chi Awards, hon oring the best journalistic efforts of broadcast and print professionals, is now accepting submissions for its 1990 awards. Deadline is Jan. 10. Work must have been broadcast or published in 1990. For an application, contact the Society of Professional Journalists, P.O. Boxn,16S. Jackson St., Greencastle, Ind. 46135-0077 (317) 653-3333. -Roberto Rodriguez (See Guest Column, page three)