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Hispanic link weekly report, January 1, 1991

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Hispanic link weekly report, January 1, 1991
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Hispanic link weekly report
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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Washington, D.C.
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Hispanic Link News Service, Inc.
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English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Making The News This
Antonio Mireles, a 46-year-old from Annandale, Va., and six other hostages released by Iraq meet with President Bush for a briefing...New Mexico Gov.-elect Bruce King names Roswell district highway engineer Louis Medrano director of the state Highway and Transportation Department. King also taps Joe Anaya of Stanley as a state Highway Commissioner...U.S. Small Business Administration chief Susan Engeieiter bestows on Andy Vargas, owner of Andy’s of California, a retail clothing operation, the first Award in Excellence for Volunteerism. Engeieiter praised Vargas for his work in Los Angeles' Adopt-A-School Program...The Dade County Community Foundation elects Juan Loumiet as its chairman. Loumiet, an attorney with the Miami firm of Greenberg, Traurig, Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen &
Quentel, is the first Hispanic to head the 24-year-old civic group...The Mile High United Way Concilio elects Gilbert Barela, executive director of the American Gl Forum Veterans Outreach Program of Denver Inc., as its chairman. The Concilio's members are executive directors of Hispanic agencies that receive funding from Mile High United Way...San Diego police arrest Dwight Ray Pannel, 23, and charge him with murder in the shooting of 12-year-old Emilio Jimenez Bejines, a Mexican national. Pannel was reported to have said “Let's shoot some aliens" before firing at Jimenez Bejines from an apartment balcony as the youth walked along the border with his family last May. Bail was set at $1 million...Los Angeles police arrest Daniel Ramos, 18, charging him with 48 counts of vandalism and trespassing. Police believe Ramos has defaced some 10,000 places with the moniker “Chaka,” resulting in $500,000 property damage...
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Groups Prepare Nationally for Redistricting
Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organizations are gearing up for nationwide redistricting battles early this year that they see as leading up to the most important political act of the decade.
At stake, they say, are not just congressional seats but political empowerment for the entire Latino community ~ from the local to the national level.
Due to their explosive population growth overthe past decade, Latinos are expected to
MAPA Votes to Back Molina for LA. Race
The Mexican American Political Association, California’s largest and oldest Latino political group, voted Dec. 16 to endorse Los Angeles City Councilwoman Gloria Molina in the Jan. 22 special election for the newly created Los Angeles County supervisorial district.
The endorsement came on the second ballot, with 51% of the 75 MAPA delegates voting for Molina and 49% for state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles).
Six candidates attended the countywide MAPA convention, including state Sea Charles Calderbn (D-Whittier) and Republican Sarah Flores, a former aide to Supervisor Pete Schab-arum. Calderdn did not receive avote on the first ballot, whereas Flores won 7% of the MAPA votes.
The newly redrawn 1st District is 71% Latino. If, as expected, a Latino is elected to the five-member county Board of Supervisors, it would be the first time in 115 years.
gain significantly more representation through the redistricting process, which is slated to begin in April when the Census Bureau releases its 1990 demographic data. Presently, mainland Latinos comprise 8.1 % of the population while holding only 1% of the nation’s elective offices.
But because of lawsuits filed by a number of cities and civil rights organizations, the process will not begin in earnest until after July 15, following a Department of Commerce determination whether to adjust the data for undercounts.
Afterthe population figures are determined, as required by the Constitution, each state will be apportioned representatives. Subsequently, the job of drawing new district lines will be left up to the state legislatures.
“If Hispanic representation were proportionate to its population," Rob Paral, a researcher at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, points out, “there would be 40 Hispanics in Congress today."
Currently, there are 10 Hispanic voting members in the House of Representatives and none in the Senate.
Paral sees the upcoming redistricting as critical because it will make possible the election of Hispanics to Congress in areas such
The U.S. Education Department, following a firestorm of criticism from education and civil rights groups as well as members of the Bush administration, retreated Dec. 18 from its six-day-old ruling to bar federal funding to colleges and universities that award scholarships based on race or ethnicity.
At a meeting called Dec. 17 by White House Chief of Staff John Sununu and attended by administration lawyers and the author of the short-lived policy, Assistant Secretary of Education Michael Williams, Sununu ordered the ruling revamped.
In a six-point policy statement issued the following day, the Education Department said
as northern Illinois, where more than 700,000 Latinos reside.
Afterthe 1981 redistricting, Hispanics immediately doubled their seats in Congress from four to eight. This time around, leaders are hopeful that Hispanic representation will again double. They are encouraged because of the nine states in which 90% of U.S. Hispanics live, four- Arizona, California, Florida and Texas - will most likely pick up 15 House seats.
Illinois, New Jersey and New York will lose a total of six seats, but because their Hispanic population growth outpaced that of non-His-panics, the Latino population becomes a more important factor, they say.
Colorado and New Mexico, where Hispanic population percentages have decreased slightly, will neither gain nor lose seats. At present, New Mexico has a single Hispanic - Democrat Bill Richardson - in Congress; Colorado has none.
With their new technological capabilities, Hispanic organizations expect to be on an equal footing with state legislative map-makers. “It makes us players," says demographer Leo Estrada, a professor at the University of California at Los Angeles.
Estrada adds that Latino redistricting com-
continued on page 2
that “no scholarships that have already been awarded, whether in the current year or in a multi-year cycle, will be affected in any way."
The two-page statement also stipulated that universities can award scholarships for minorities if they are funded by private donors. It added that race-based scholarships funded by state and local governments cannot be addressed “administratively" but are constitutional questions that must be addressed by the courts.
Education institutions were given a four-year “transition period” within which to review their scholarship programs.
Department Revamps Scholarship Rule


Study Urges Congress to Amend 1986 Immigration Act
Congress should amend the 1986 immigration lav to allow the legalization of 540,000 “documertable” individuals who for a variety of reasons have been deemed ineligible, urged the National Council of La Raza in a report it released Dec. 14.
In its report, "Unfinished Business: The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986," NCLR also renewed its call for the repeal of the employer sanctions provision of the law.
"Four years after IRCA was enacted, it is clear that the law has not accomplished what it intended. The chailengesthe nation faced which led to the enactment of IRCA
remain," said NCLR President Ratil Yzaguirre.
Cecilia Murtaz, senior immigration policy analyst for NCLR and author of the report, said that while 1.7 million individuals have been legalized, the law has failed in its objective to legalize the majority of the eligible undocumented population in the country and that employer sanctions have failed in their objective to curb undocumented immigration.
In fact, charged Yzaguirre, "IRCA has created massive discrimination and exploitation against Hispanics and Asians."
Also being inadequately addressed are
“severe" implementation problems with the second stage of legalization, stated the report. It cited congressional cutbacks in funding for required English and civics classes and complicated application deadlines.
Because there continues to be a sizable undocumented population in the United States, Yzaguirre said it is also time to open the debate on the possibility of a second amnesty.
The report estimated there are currently between 3.9 million to 4.8 million undocumented immigrants living in the country, as opposed to 3.4 million to 4 million in 1980.
Redistricting Process to Kick Off in April
continued from page 1
mittees will be able to use the same data to prepare lawsuits if they are not satisfied with the results.
The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and the Southwest Voter Research Institute have formed a triad that will conduct a series of state and regional meetings in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. Their efforts in research, litigation and public education will be coordinated, says SVREP President Andy Hernandez.
Robert Brischetto, executive director of SVRI, says another goal of the triad is to train between 150-200 local committees throughout the Southwest and in Cook County, III.
He says the costs to SVRI will exceed $500,000. Beyond 1992, he projects, MAL-DEF will incur many additional expenses as it pursues litigation.
The Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project’s research director, Orestes Aguilldn, says it is active in ail of the states of the Midwest and the Northeast.
Hiring Hall to Change
Costa Mesa, Calif., which has come under fire for what many perceive as its anti-immigrant policies, will likely open its hiring hall this winter to all day-la-borers regardless of their citizenship status, a councilwoman from that city told Weekly Report Dec. 18.
"If a fairly good proportion (of workers) who want a job can’t use the center, it defeats its purpose," council member Sandy Genis said. Currently, only workers who are citizens can use the hall.
Two factors are precipitating the council’s move: because of elections, the council now has a majority who favor the expanded scope of the hiring hall; a Superior Court commissioner struck down part of the city's day-laborer law.
In Chicago, MNVREP, along with MALDEF, is already involved in a battle to delay the Feb. 26 aldermanic elections. They say that because elections won’t occur again until 1995, failure to conduct the elections until after the redistricting process could cost Hispanics four additional seats.
Out of 50 City Council seats, Hispanics now hold only four.
Spearheading redistricting on behalf of Puerto
Ricans in the Northeast is the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund. It will concentrate work in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Massachusetts and Connecticut.
pri hff Prpsirtant Ri ih6n Franco says his group is very active in the process for New York City. The City Council has just been expanded from 35 members to 51. Franco says that with 25% of the population, Latinos should be entitled to 13 of the seats. more opportunities for Latinos Currently, there are three Latino city council members.
Peter Chacbn (D-San Diego), who chairs the California Assembly redistricting committee, says the priority of the state Democratic Party will be to increase the number of women and minorities who are elected. Although he does not speculate on how many seats will be picked up by Latinos, he comments, "I do think there will be more opportunities for Hispanics to be elected."
Currently, California has three Hispanic state senators and four Hispanics in the Assembly.
Although both parties have indicated they will provide support to Hispanic redistricting efforts, most Latinos believe that up to this point, it's been "promises."
Latino leaders say they welcome support from all quarters but insist, as Hemdndez
indicated, on "conducting an independent campaign."
Quincentenary Group Head Quits Amid Probe
John Goudie, the Cuban American chairman of the presidential Christopher Columbus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission, tendered his resignation Dec. 17 to President Bush amid continuing congressional investigations into his chairmanship.
The commission, created by Congress in 1983, owes $600,000 to Spain for replicas of Columbus’ ships that are to recreate the adventurer’s journey. Texaco Inc., which had pledged $5 million over five years for the ships and the voyage, has stopped payment over contractual problems.
Goudie said his resignation from the non-salaried post was not prompted by allegations of wrongdoing but rather publicity over the Texaco flap and the attendant risk of losing a possible multimillion pledge from the Chrysler Corp.
A House Post Office and Civil Service subcommittee has been investigating whether the commission acted properly in awarding contracts. In question are contracts given to Goudie associates and friends. The panel will hold hearings after an audit of the commission is completed.
Congress appropriates about $200,000 a year for the commission.
Amnesty Deadline Nears
Immigrants legalized under the 1986 immigration act will receive amnesty from prosecution for using fraudulent Social Security cards if they stop using the cards by Jan. 3.
The deadline is the end of a 60-day amnesty period provided for in Congress’ 1990 budget legislation. The Social Security Administration estimatesthat2.5 million of the 3.1 million people who were legalized under the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and subsequent immigration legislation could be affected by the provision.
Individuals can report work they performed using their old cards and receive credits to qualify for greater benefits when they become eligible.
2
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Antonio Monroig
’91 Remap...a Republican’s View
As the newyear approaches, redistricting will become the paramount political issue for Hispanics around the nation, defining the political landscape for the next decade.
Every 10 years, after the national census, state legislators redraw congressional and state legislative boundaries, and governors sign or veto their plans. The Democrats, who control chambers of the state legislatures in 30 states, often draw those lines to favor their candidates - a practice called gerrymandering.
Through gerrymandering, Democrats have locked themselves into control. This determines in advance the outcome of congressional, legislative and local elections, locking out voters and locking in incumbents by diluting the voting power of minorities. The practice protects incumbent Anglo Democrats by preventing the drawing of majority Hispanic or black districts.
Two developments of the 1980s will make the 1990 redistricting much different, giving Hispanics and other minorities unprecedented opportunities to get maximum representation in the decades to come. MONROIG
ANY PERSON OR GROUP CAN PARTICIPATE First, technology. Any person or group can participate in the process using a personal computer. The Republican National Committee is aiding voting rights groups and other organizations obtain the proper redistricting software so they can submit plans. The second development resulted from an amendment to the Voting Rights Act, which established that the maximum number of districts represented by minorities must be created, or the plan is likely to be struck down in court.
The Republican Party and the Hispanic community are both minorities on this issue, and together we will make a stronger alliance for fair redistricting.
In an interview in the National Journal, Democratic National Committee Chairperson Ron Brown stated that “when there are points of inconsistency, we are for maximizing Democratic strength.” I was very disappointed to hear this, because for a fair redistricting there shouldn’t be points of inconsistency. It is one way or the other: you are for full enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, or you’re not - period.
!t is time for us, as Hispanic Americans, to develop a new plan of action. Time to demand that our votes are not taken for granted. Time to understand that the competition of both parties for our votes will benefit our community. Now more than ever we must get involved and take advantage of this country’s two-party system.
NO PARTY HAS CONTROL OVER OUR COMMUNITY Our challenge lies in understanding and fully participating in the political system. It lies in working to make our voices heard and our concerns as a community addressed. We must encourage our people to compare and decide for themselves which party and which candidates best reflect their goals and values and deliver for our community.
At the expense of the Democrats, this new plan of action has taken its roots. The 1990 elections saw a large increase in the percentage of Hispanic voters who decided to vote Republican.
The H ispanic vote was crucial to the election of GOP governors in two key states. In California, 47% of the Hispanic vote went to Pete Wilson and in Illinois, 40% went to Jim Edgar. Overall, the percentage of Hispanic votes for Republican candidates increased nearly 10 points since the 1988 elections.
This clearly shows that no party has control over our community. Both parties will have to compete for our votes and work hard to earn our loyalty. And the best way to begin this decade is by supporting a fair redistricting that will ensure full enforcement of the Voting Rights Act and stronger Hispanic participation in the process and the policies that affect our community.
(Antonio Monroig, a Washington, D.C. lawyer, is national co-chairman of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly.)
Uicnanir I inlr \A/mMv Bonort Ion 1
Henry Cisneros
’91 Remap...a Democrat’s View
Hispanics are not sitting idly by as state governments prepare to redraw legislative district lines next spring.
Recently more than 600 Latinos and Latinas gathered in San Antonio forthe Texas Hispanic Redistricting Conference. The event was hosted by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, which has signed an agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau to be a site for dissemination of 1990 census data
At the conference, SVREP’s research arm, the Southwest Voter Research Insttute, produced analyses of votin of election districts and participation of various racial and ethnic groups. SVRI is being joined by the Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund and other groups in monitoring the redistricting process. At last, Hispanics have access to computers andtechnology equal tothat used by others,
Andrew Hernandez, president of SVREP, states with confidence.
“Those in power don’t always do the right thing just because it’s the right thing to do," he says. So, he adds, Latinos in the Southwest, Midwest and throughout the country “must learn the computer programs as well as those sitting on the other side of the table."
HISPANICS MUST REMAIN WARY
When state officials draw the nation’s political map next spring, it may be the most vital political event of the decade for Hispanics, who still account for only about 1% of our elected officials while representing 8.1% of the nation’s population.
The stakes and potential are equally high for the Democratic and Republican parties. With both vying for the allegiance of the second-largest and fastest-growing minority, Hispanics must remain wary.
The politically astute Hernandez insists on independence: "Minorities’ first priority should be to get more control over more districts."
Redistricting is a process where lines can be drawn to increase or decrease the representation of special interest groups. In the past, politically conservative groups have drawn those lines to dilute minority voting strength; traditionally, it is the Democratic ticket that has placed minorities in elective positions.
The redrawing of state legislative boundaries and of the 435 districts in the U.S. House of Representatives affects everything from health care access to who bears the brunt of taxes; from funding of public schools and access to higher education, to maintenance of highways.
HISPANICS LIKELY TO GAIN SEVERAL U.S. REPS
New district boundaries provide opportunities for minority candidates to influence their communities’ destinies. Presently, there are no Hispanics in the U.S. Senate, and only 10 (nine of them Democrats) in the House of Representatives. That’s less than a fifth of what would be expected if Hispanics were represented in Congress in the same percentage as they are in the population.
Even thoughHispanic growth will be diluted by a census undercount, Hispanics are still likely to gain several representatives in Congress.
The objective for fair redistricting is simple: true representative government. Throughout the ’80s, the Reagan and Bush administrations and the Republican National Committee failed to make any real inroads with Hispanics and other minorities.
As one who has worked diligently withthe Democratic Parly's highest levels of leadership, I am convinced the Hispanic community can count on support from the one party that has consistently championed equality of opportunity for all U.S. residents -- in education, the work force and the ballot box. Hopefully, the GOP wil follow suit.
But the biggest difference in 1991 redistricting is that when map-makers sit down in state capitals across the country to begin their arduous task, Hispanic leaders will be right there beside them.
(Henry Cisneros is former mayor of San Antonio and chairman of Cisneros Asset Management Company.)
1QQ1 n


Full Text

PAGE 1

, . ... Making The News This Week Quentel, is the first Hispanic to head the 24-year -old civic group ... The Mile High United Way Concilio elects Gilbert Barela, executive direc tor of the American Gl Forum Veterans Outreach Program of Denver Inc., as its chairman. The Concilio's members are directors of Hispanic agencies that receive funding from Mile High United Way ... San Diego police arrest Dwight Ray Pannel, 23, and charge him with murder in the shooting of 12-year-old Emilio Jimenez Bejines, a Mexican national. Pannel was reported to have sajd "Let's shoot some aliens" before firing at Jimenez Bejines from an apart ment balcony as the youth walked along the border with his family last May. Bail was set at $1 million ... Los Angeles police arrest Daniel Ramos, 18, charging him with 48 counts of vandalism and trespass ing. Police believe Ramos has defaced some 10,000 places with the moniker "Chaka," resulting in $500,000 property damage ... Antonio Mireles, a 46-year-old from Annandale, Va., and six other hootages relea;ed by Iraq meet with President Bush tor a briefing ... New Mexico Gov.-elect Bruce King names Roswell district highway engi neer Louis Medrano director of the state Highway and Transporta tion Department. King also taps Joe Anaya of Stanley as a state Highway C o mmissioner ... U.S. Small Business Administration chief Susan Engelelter bestows on Andy Vargas, owner of Andy's of California, a retail clothing operation, the first Award in Excellence for Volunteerism. Engeleiter praised Vargas for his work in Los Angeles' Adopt-A-School Program ... The Dade County Community Founda tion elects Juan Loumlet as its chairman. Loumiet, an attorney with the Miami firm of Greenberg, Traurig, Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen & Hispanic civil rights and advocacy organi zations are gearing up for nationwide redis tricting battles early this year that they see as leading up to the most important political act of the decade. At stake, they say, are not just congres sional seats but political empowerment for the entire Latino community --from the local to the national level. Due to their explosive population growth over the past decade, Latinos are expected to MAPA Votes to Back Molina for L.A. Race The Mexican American Political Asso ciation, California's largest and oldest Latino political group, voted Dec. 16 to endorse Los Angeles City Councilwoman Gloria Molina in the Jan. 22 special elec tion for the newly created Los Angeles County supervisorial district. The endorsement came on the second ballot, with 51% of the 75 MAPA delegates vot ing for Molina and 49% for , gain significantly more representation through the redistricting process, which is slated to begin in April when the Census Bureau re leases its 1990 demographic data. Presently, mainland Latinos comprise 8.1% of the popu lation while holding only 1% of the nation's elective offices. But because of lawsuits filed by a number of cities and civil rights organizations, the proc ess will not begin in earnest until after July 15, following a Department of Commerce deter mination whether to adjust the data for under counts. After the population figures are determined, as required by the Constitution , each state will be apportioned representatives. Subse quently, the job of drawing new district lines will be left up to the state legislatures. "If Hispanic representation were propor tionate to its population," Rob Paral, a re searcher at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials, points out, "there would be 40 Hispanics in Congress today." Currently, there are 10 Hispanic voting members in the House of Representatives and none in the Senate. Paral sees the upcoming redistricting as critical because it will make possible the elec tion of Hispanics to Congress in areas such as northern Illinois, where more than 700,000 Latinos reside. After the 1981 redistricting, Hispanics im mediately doubled their seats in Congress from four to eight. This time around, leaders are hopeful that Hispanic representation will again double. They are encouraged because of the nine states in which 90% of U.S. His panics live, four-Arizona , California , Florida and Texas-will most likely pick up 15 House seats. Illinois, New Jersey and New York will lose a total of six seats, but because their Hispanic population growth outpaced that of non-His panics , the Latino population becomes a more important factor, they say. Colorado and New Mexico, where Hispanic population percentages have decreased slightly, will neither gain nor lose seats. At present, New Mexico has a single Hispanic --Democrat Bill Richardson --in Congress; Colorado has none. With their new technological capabilities, Hispanic organizations expect to be on an equal footing with state legislative map-makers. "It makes us players," says demogra pher Leo Estrada, a professor at the Univer sity of California at Los Angeles. Estrada adds that Latino redistricting comcortJf'IJfld on page 2 state Sen. Art Torres (D-Los Angeles). Six candidates attended Department Revamps Scholarship Rule the countywide MOLINA MAPA conven-ekes out endorsement tion, including state Sen. Char1es Calder6n (D-Whittier) and RepubHcan Sarah Flores, a former aide to Supervisor Pete Schab arum. Calder6n did not receive a vote on the first ballot, whereas Flores won 7% of the MAPA votes. The newly redrawn 1st District is 71% Latino. If, as expected, a Latino is elected to the five-member county Board of Supervisors, it would be the first time in 115 years. The U.S. Education Department, following a firestorm of criticism from education and civil rights groups as well as members of the Bush administration, retreated Dec. 18 from its six day-old ruling to bar federal funding to colleges and universities that award scholar ships based on race or ethnicity. At a meeting called Dec. 17 by White House Chief of Staff John Sununu and attended by administration lawyers and the author of the short-lived policy, Assistant Secretary of Education Michael Williams, Sununu ordered the ruling revamped. In a six -point policy statement issued the following day, the Education Department said that "no scholarships that have already been awarded, whether in the current year or in a multi-year cycle, will be affected in any way." The two-page statement also stipulated that universities can award scholarships for mi norities if they are funded by private donors. added that race-based scholarships funded by state and local governments cannot be addressed "administratively" but are consti tutional questions that must be addressed by the courts. Education institutions were given a four year "transition period" within which to re view their scholarship programs.

PAGE 2

• • Study Urges Congress to Amend 19861mmigration Act Congress should amend the 1986 immigatioolaN il SION 1he legalizatioo ct 540,000 "documertable" individuals who tor a variEty of reasons have been deemed ineligible, urged the National Council of La Raza in a report it released Dec. 14. In its report, .. Unfinished Business: The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986," NCLR also renewed its call for the repeal of the employer sanctions provision of the law. "Four years after IRCAwas enacted, it is clear that the law has not accomplished what it intended. The challenges the nation faced which led to the enactment of I RCA remain,.. said NCLR President Raul Yzaguirre. Cecilia Munoz, senior immigration policy analyst for NCLR and author of the report, said that while 1. 7 million individuals have been legalized, the law has failed in its objective to legalize the majority of the eligible undocumented population in the country and that employer sanctions have failed in their objective to curb undocu mented immigration. In fact, charged Yzaguirre, .. IRCA has created massive discrimination and ex ploitation against Hispanics and Asians." Also being inadequately addressed are "severe" implementation problems with the second stage of legalization, stated the report. It cited congressional cutbacks in funding for required English and civics dasses and compUcated application dead lines. Because there continues to be a sizable undocumented population in the United States, Yzaguirre said it is also time to open the debate on the possibility of a second amnesty. The report estimated there are currently between 3.9 million to 4.8 million undocu mented immigrants living in the country, as opposed to 3.4 million to 4 million in 1980. Redistricting Process to Kick Off in April Quincentenary Group cortirued from page 1 mittees will be able to use the same data to prepare lawsuits if they are not satisfied with the results. The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund, the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project and the SoLih west Voter Research Institute have formed a triad that will conduct a series of state and regional meetings in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. Their efforts in research, litigation and public edu cation will be coordinated, says SVREP PresJ dent Andy Hernandez. Robert Brschetto, exerutive directcr of SVRI, says another goal of the triad is to train be tween 150-200 local committees throughout the Southwest and in Cook County, Ill. He says the costs to SVRI will exceed $500,000. Beyond 1992, he projects, MALO EF will incur many additional expenses as it pursues litigation. The Midwest/Northeast Voter Registration Education Project's research director, Orestes Aguill6n, says it is active in all of the states of the Midwest and the Northeast. 2 Hiring Hall to Change Costa Mesa, Calif., which has come under fire for what many perceive as its anti-immigrant policies, will likely open its hiring hall this winter to all day-la borers regardless of their citizenship status, a councilwoman from that city told Weekly Report Dec. 18. "If a fairly good proportion (of workers) who want a job can't use the center, it defeats its purpose," council member Sandy Genis said. Currently, only work ers who are citizens can use the hall. Two factors are precipitating the council's move: because of elections, the council now has a majority who favor the expanded scope of the hiring hall; a Superior Court commissioner struck down part of the city's day-laborer law. In Chicago, MNVREP, along with MALDEF, is already involved in a battle to delay the Feb. 26 aldermanic elections. They say that be cause elections won't occur again until1995, failure to conduct the elections until after the redistricting process could cost Hispanics four additional seats. Out of 50 City Council seats, Hispanics now hold only four. Spearhecrjing redistricting 01 behaf d Puerto Ricans in the Northeast is the Puerto Rican Legal Defense and Education Fund. It will concentrate work in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Massachusetts and Connecticut. PRLDEF President Ruben Franco says his group is very active in the process for New York City. The aty Coli1Cil has jl.S been expanded from 35 members to 51. F ranee says that with 25% of the population, Latinos should be entitled N to 13 of the seats. more opportunities tor Latinos Currently, there are three Latino city council members. Peter Chac6n (D-San Diego), who chairs the California Assembly redistricting commit tee, says the priority of the state Democratic Party will be to increase the number a women and minorities who are elected. Although he does not speculate on how many seats will be picked up by Latinos, he comments, .. I do think there will be more opportunities for His panics to be elected." CLrrentty, caJlornia three Hispanic state senators and four Hispanics in the Assembly. Although both parties have indicated they will provide support to Hispanic redistricting efforts, most Latinos believe that up to this point, it's been .. promises ... Latino leaders say they welcome support from all quarters but insist, as Hernandez Indicated, on .. conducting an independent campaign ... JAn . 1 1QQ1 Head Quits Amid Probe John Goudie, the Cuban American chair man of the presidential Christopher Colum bus Quincentenary Jubilee Commission, tendered his resignation Dec. 17to President Bush amid continuing congressional investi gations into his chairmanship. The commission, created by Congress in 1983, owes $600,000 to Spain for replicas of Columbus' ships that are to recreate the ad venturer's journey. Texaco Inc., which had pledged $5 million over five years for the ships and the voyage, has stopped payment over contractual problems. Goudie said his resignation from the non salaried post was not prompted by allega tions of wrongdoing but rather publicity over the Texaco flap and the attendant risk of losing a possible multimillion pledge from the Chrysler Corp. A House Post Office and Civil Service subcommittee has been investigating whether the commission acted properly in awarding contracts. In question are contracts given to Goudie associates and friends. The panel will hold hearings after an audit of the commis sion is completed. Congress appropriates about $200,000 a year for the commission. Amnesty Deadline Nears Immigrants legalized under the 1986 immi gration act will receive amnesty from prose cution for using fraudulent Social Security cards if they stop using the cards by Jan. 3. The deadline is the end of a 60-day amnesty period provided for in Congress' 1990 budget legislation. The Social Security Administra tion estimates that 2.5 million of the 3.1 million people who were legalized under the Immi gration Reform and Control Act of 1986 and subsequent immigration legislation could be affected by the provision. Individuals can report work they performed using their old cards and receive credits to qualify for greater benefits when they be come eligible.

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• • Antonio Monroig '91 Remap ... a Republican's View As the new year approaches, redistricting will become the paramount political issue for Hispanics around the nation, defining the political landscape for the next decade. Every 1 0 years, after the national census, state legislators redraw congressional and state legislative boundaries, and governors sign or veto their plans. The Democrats, who control chambers of the state leg islatures in 30 states, often draw those lines to favor their candidates --a practice called gerrymandering. Through gerrymandering, Democrats have locked themselves into control. This determines in advance the out come of congressional, legislative and local elections, locking out voters and locking in incumbents by diluting the voting power of minorities. The practice protects incumbent Anglo Democrats by preventing the drawing of majority . Hispanic or black districts. Two developments of the 1980s will make the 1990 redistricting much different, giving Hispanics and other minorities unprecedented opportunities to get maximum representation in the decades to come. MONROIG ANY PERSON OR GROUP CAN PARTICIPATE First, technology. Any person or group can participate in the process using a personal computer. The Republican National Committee is aiding voting rights groups and other organizations obtain the proper redistricting software so they can submit plans. The second develop ment resulted from an amendment to the Voting Rights Act, which es tablished that the maximum number of districts represented by minorj ties must be created, or the plan is likely to be struck down in court. The Republican Party and the Hispanic community are both minori ties on this issue, and together we will make a stronger alliance for fair redistricting. In an interview in the National Journal, Democratic National Commit tee Chairperson Ron Brown stated that "when there are points of inconsistency, we are for maximizing Democratic strength." I was very disappointed to hear this, because for a fair redistricting there shouldn't be points of inconsistency. It is one way or the other: you are for full enforcement of the Voting Rights Act, or you're not --period. !tis time for us, as Hispanic Americans, to develop a new plan of action. Time to demand that our votes are not taken for granted. Time to understand that the competition of both parties for our votes will b2nefit our community. Now more than ever we must get involved and take advantage of this country's two-party system. NO PARTY HAS CONTROL OVER OUR COMMUNITY Our challenge lies in understanding and fully participating in the political system. It lies in working to make our voices heard and our con cerns as a community addressed. We must encourage our people to compare and decide for themselves which party and which candidates best reflect their goals and values and deliver for our community. At the expense of the Democrats, this new plan of action has taken its roots. The 1990 elections saw a large increase in the percentage of Hispanic voters who decided to vote Republican. The Hispanic vote was crucial to the election of GOP governors in two key states. In California, 47% of the Hispanic vote went to Pete Wilson and in Illinois, 40% went to Jim Edgar. Overall, the percentage of Hispanic votes for Republican candidates increased nearly 10 points since the 1988 elections. This clearly shows that no party has control over our community. Both parties will have to compete tor our votes and work hard to earn our loyalty. And the best way to begin this decade is by supporting a fair redistricting that will ensure full enforcement of the Voting Rights Act and stronger Hispanic participation in the process and the policies that affect our community. (Antonio Monroig, a Washington, D. C. lawyer, is national co-chair-man of the Republican National Hispanic Assembly.) Henry Cisneros '91 Remap ... a Democrat's View Hispanics are not sitting idly by as state governments prepare to redraw legislative district lines next spring. Recently more than 600 Latinos and Latinas gathered in San Antonio forthe Texas Hispanic Redistricting Conference. The event was hosted by the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project, which has signed an agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau to be a site for dissemination of 1990 census data At the conference, SVREP's research arm, the Southwest Voter Research lnstllJe, produced analyses of voting patterns, ethnic of election districts and participation of vari: = ous racial and ethnic groups. SVRI is being , joined by the Mexican American Legal De fense and Educatialal Fund ard other groups in monitoring the redistricting process. At last, Hispanics have access to computers and technology equal to that used by others, Andrew Hernandez, president of SVREP, states with confidence. "Those in power don't always do the right thing just because it's the right thing to do," he says. So, he adds, Latinos in the South-CISNEROS west, Midwest and throughout the country "must learn the computer programs as weU as those sitting on the other side of the table." HISPANICS MUST REMAIN WARY When state officials draw the nation's political map next spring, it may be the most vital political event of the decade for Hispanics, who still account for only about 1% of our elected officials while representing 8.1% of the nation's population. The stakes and potential are equally high for the Democratic and Republican parties. With both vying for the allegiance of the second largest and fastest-growing minority, Hispanics must remain wary. The politically astute Hernandez insists on independence: "M inori ties' first priority should be to get more control over more districts." Redistricting is a process where lines can be drawn to increase or decrease the representation of special interest groups. In the past, politically conservative groups have drawn those lines to dilute minority voting strength; traditionally, it is the Democratic ticket that has placed minorities in elective positions. The redrawing of state legislative boundaries and of the 435 districts in the U.S. House of Representatives affects everything from health care access to who bears the brunt of taxes; from funding of public schools and access to higher education, to maintenance of highways. HISPANICS UKELY TO GAIN SEVERAL U.S. REPS New district boundaries provide opportunities for minority candi dates to influence their communities destinies. Presently, there are no Hispanics in the U.S. Senate, and only 10 (nine of them Democrats) in the House of Representatives. That's less than a fifth of what would be expected if Hispanics were represented in Congress in the same percentage as they are in the population. Even thoughHispanic growth will be diluted by a census undercount, Hispanics are still likely to gain several representatives in Congress. The objective for fair redistricting is simple: true representative government. Throughout the '80s, the Reagan and Bush administra tions and the Republican National Committee failed to make any real inroads with Hispanics and other minorities. As one who has worked diligently with the Democratic Party's highest levels of leadership, I am convinced the Hispanic community can count on support from the one party that has consistently championed equality of opportunity for all U.S. residents in education, the work force and the ballot box. Hopefully, the GOP wil follow suit. But the biggest difference in 1991 redistricting is that when map makers sit down in state capitals across the country to begin their arduous task, Hispanic leaders will be right there beside them. (Henry Cisneros is former mayor of San Antonio and chairman of Cisneros Asset Management Company.) lan 1 1001