Citation
A Community center for recreation

Material Information

Title:
A Community center for recreation
Creator:
Sauerhagen, Roger D.
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
University of Colorado Denver
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Source Institution:
University of Colorado Denver
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
ARCHIVES
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1190 AT 2 198U S38
A COiiUiOW CiKlTilS F®!f5
RECREATION
AN ARCHITECTURAL THESIS SPRING 1984 ROGER D. SAUERHAGEN


The Thesis of ROGER DALE SAUERHAGEN is approved.
University of Colorado at Denver
May 6, 1984


TABLE OF CONTENTS
PAGE
INTRODUCTION
Introduction........................................... 7
Statement of Problem.................................... o
Issues.................................................. g
BACKGROUND
Community Description.................................. -j-j
Existing Recreational Facilities....................... -J3
Project History........................................ -15
SITE ANALYSIS
Location.......................,.................... pg
Downtown Context.................................... 28
Building Immediate to Site.......................... 30
Vehicular Circulation.................................. 42
Parking.............................................. 43
Utilities..................................,........ 44
Topography/Vegetation.................................. 44
Soils Report............................................ cq
CLIMATE ANALYSIS
Description and Summary................................ 57
Tabulated Monthly Climatic Data for Greeley............. 59
Meteorological Data for Denver.......................... 03
Annual Wind Rose........................................ 04
Graphic Summary of Climate Data......................... gg
B.ioclimatic Chart...................................... qr
Polar Position......................................... 07
Mahoney Tables.......................................... 77
Design Guidelines Based on Climatic Analysis ........... 73
USER PROFILE
who.................................................. 83
Wh®11.................................................. 83
SITE DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA
Phasing................................................ 86
Community Theatre................................... rr
Site Image ........................................ 86
Site Relationships.................................... 87
Specific Requirements................................... 87


TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont'd)
SPACE REQUIREMENTS
Summary of Programmed Spaces........................ g-j
Space Requirements for Programmed Spaces............. g2
LEGAL CONSTRAINTS
Greeley Zoning Ordinance........................... -J48
Uniform Building Code Analysis (1979).............. -|50
Regulations and Standards Governing Swimming
Pools............................................. 156
ENERGY ANALYSIS
Energy Costs...................................... -|g-|
HVAC Concerns.................................... 162
Swimming Pool Heating.............................. -|g4
Building Load Characteristics.....................
Daylighting Potential.............................
BUDGET
Cost Estimate Analysis............................. -jyg
DESIGN SOLUTION.......................................... 177
CONCLUSION............................................... 187
REFERENCES
Bibliography...................................... -j g-j
Interviews........................................ 192


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INTRODUCTION
"In the eyes of some social critics, America's dedication to physical well-being and self-fulfillment reached new heights of narcissism during the "Me Decade" of the 1970's. The pursuit of health and happiness shows no sign of lagging in the 1980's, but a look at recently constructed recreational facilities indicates that the quest is anything but lonely, escapist, or vain. For many of us, the gym, the tennis court, the campground, and the arts and crafts studio have gained new importance as centers for community life. At the same time that people of all ages are increasingly eager to participate in sports, nature programs, and cultural,activities, the boundaries of recreation have expanded." Individuals are discovering, or rediscovering, that ones own body and mind are of primary importance in making us happy in our ever increasingly complex and stressful society. The notion of creative play for cidults, as in children, is becoming more and more importan t.
Communities and local governments are at the same time realizing that recreation is just one more thread that can be used to tie together the community, creating and improving a community spirit while at the same time improving the individual spirit. Paralleling this increasing need for recreation in the 1970's was the realization we must better utilize the energy resources available to our society. Since the energy scare of the earl}' 1970's, society has started to look at the use of energy from a different point of view. Even though the situation appears less critical today than ten years ago, conscientious citizens realize that it is our responsibility to ourselves and future generations to consider energy usage as a high priority when designing for the future.

Brenner, Douglas, "Recreational Buildings Spirit," Architectural Record, November, 1981, p
with Team 102.


At thils time, Greeley, Colorado has a unique opportunity to address these recreation needs, the idea of community unity and spirit, and the energy issue in one project, which I am also undertaking as my Masters Thesis. The city has proposed the development of a Community Center, initially consisting of a Recreational Facility and the addition of a Community Theatre in the future. These facilities are to be sited on a prominent one-block downtown site adjacent to an existing Senior Citizens Center and historic building, across the street from the City Civic Center and a two-block city park, and one block from the heart of Greeley's central business district which is now being redeveloped with new pedestrian malls. This Community Center will help to add life and activity to Greeley's downtown while at the same time consolidating and increasing the community's recreational and cultural capabilities.
STATEMENT OF PROBLEM Specifically, this thesis will deal with the design of the
Community Center for Recreation. The center is approximately 60,000 square feet which will be the center of recreation for all of Greeley. It must serve the cities youth, its old people, the singles, the mothers, school children, professionals, in short - the entire Community. The center consists of physical activity rooms, administrative offices for the Park and Recreation Department, arts and crafts, youth rooms, game rooms, a kitchen, multi-purpose rooms, and a natatorium which will serve not only the community, but also the cities high schools. The Community Center for Recreation must be sited in a manner which will allow for a Community Theatre containing 500 seats to be built on the same site in the future. The Recreation Center should work well ori its own, but once the Community Theatre is built the entire site should work as a cohesive unit.
ISSUES There are three main issues which must be dealt with and
should be emphasized in designing the Community Center for Recreation.
P


First, the facility needs to satisfy the individuals as well as the entire communities recreation needs. This requires that the space be flexible to allow for a wide range of uses and at the same time provide the environment the individual needs to improve both physically and mentally. The challenge is to allow the entire community to flow in and out of the building, yet not compromise the individuals needs.
Second, the Community Center for Recreation and the development of the entire site should have a very positive Impact on the development of Downtown Greeley. The development should strongly relate to the new Mall, the Senior's Center, the Civic Center and the Park. Since the site is such a key Downtown site, there are great opportunities and responsibilities in designing the Community Center for Recreation, and for the future expansion on the site with the Community Theatre, so that the downtown is enhanced. The center should help the downtown become a fun place to be, day and night for everyone.
Finally, the design should clearly and visibly demonstrate the concern for proper energy usage. It should be a model of how a building should be designed for those responsible citizens concerned with energy. Citizens should be proud that their community has a solar recreation center, understand how it works, and demand that more buildings have many of its energy features.




COMMUNITY DESCRIPTION
Greeley, Colorado is a community of 56,000 located to the east of the front range of the Rocky Mountains, approximately 60 miles north of Denver and 50 miles south of Cheyenne, Wyoming, along U.S. Highway 85. (See map on following page.) Greeley's population has steadily increased from 20,354 in 1950 to its present 56,000.
All indications are that its growth will continue along with the other growth along the front range. C4reeley is the county seat for Weld County, one of the most productive agricultural counties in the United States which has a population of 124,000. Historically, agriculture has been the economic base for Greeley's economy, however, this has started to change in the last few years. This is due to development of light industries in an area to the west of Greeley and south and east of Fort Collins, known as the Poudre Triangle. Within this area, Kodak is located which is the largest employer for Greeley residents with 3,100 employees. Hewlett Packard also as a computer manufacturing plant in this area, employs 485 Greeley employees. Greeley is also the home of the University of Northern Colorado, which provides diversity to the population bust.
Greeley has recently shown great interest in improving its downtown areas. This includes the development of two shopping malls as well as the renovation and improvement of several buildings in downtown Greeley.


REGIONAL MAP


EXISTING RECHEATIONAL
FACILITIES In terms of recreation facilities, most of Greeley's
present recreation programs are geared to outdoor activities. Over 37,500 people participated in City-sponsored recreation programs in 1982. The city presently does have a recreation Community Building, built in 1957, located on the site where the new Community Center for Recreation is to be located, but is considered to be inadequate. The existing Community Building is a barrel vaulted, Quonset structure and lacks even basic recreation program requirements, outside of an adequate basketball court. Locker room facilities are not even minimal, and, as shown on the existing plan on the following page, little else but meeting rooms is available. There is an adequate kitchen and much fixed seating. The seating, however, is very rarely used.


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PROJECT HISTORY
The lack of proper recreational facilities in Greeley had been known for several years, but no real effort was made to correct the problem until 1978. In April, 1978, the Greeley City Council approved the hiring of consultants to assist a citizen's committee in reviewing and consolidating past efforts, programs, and plans to access public attitude relative to proposed capital improvements, and to recommend a course of action to the community. A second phase of this procedure followed this report and was entitled "Cultural and Recreational Facilities for Greeley-Phase II." This report prepared by citizens and consulting professionals gave a detailed evaluation of site-specific alternatives of cultural and recreational facilities for Greeley. The purpose of the work was to study the implications of several alternative combinations on the city-owned land, and to identify vhat level of support existed among the general public.
Without summarizing the entire work, there were several recommendations which came from the report that reflect directly upon this thesis. First, it was recommended that a central downtown site be used for a recreational facility. Specifically, the city owned, two-block area west of the Civic Center. Second, that the historic building on this site, the old high school, be retained and used as a Cultural Arts Facility. Third, the cost of remodeling the existing recreation facility would cost as much as replacing the structure. Fourth, the development on the two-block site should be developed in phases for fiscal reasons, the idea being "pay as you go." Fifth, the phasing should be a Senior Citizen's Center, followed by a recreation facility and concluded with a Cultural Arts Facility. Finally, the report investigated five alternative development schemes of the two-block area of city owned land. The five schemes, Alternatives A through E with descriptions are shown on the following pages. The report recommends implementation of Alternative E, with Alternative A being rated second. The primary advantage of Alternative E over A is the retention of the historic school. Alternative E appears to satisfy all the needs desired by the community in a straight forward, organized site plan.
-i c


ALTERNATIVE A
SITE USES This alternative demolishes the existing school building and the existing
Community Building.
PHASE 1 Construction of a new Senior Citizens Center
PHASE 2 Construction of a new Community Recreation Center with indoor pool,
handball court(s), gymnasium and ancillary facilities.
PHASE 3 Demolition of the existing Community Building and the existing school
building. Construction of a new Cultural Arts Center with a 400 seat
community theater and ancillary cultural facilities.
SITE PLANNING A schematic conceptual site plan for Alternative A is shown on the following
page.
Provision is made for a new Senior Citizens Center at the corner of 6th Street and 11th Avenue adjacent to high density residential areas to the north and east of the site.
A new Community Recreation Center is provided with indoor pool area. The building has been placed adjacent to 10th Avenue as close as possible to the existing City park to maximize public visibility.
Both existing public buildings on the site are to be removed to provide space in the southern portion of the site for a new Cultural Arts Center with 400 seat community theater. The building is placed at the corner of 8th Street and 10th Avenue facing the existing City park for maximum public visibility.
Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the site plan.


8TH ST.<
PHASE 1
SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER
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PROPOSED
8LTLDING
PR0P03ED PARKING AREA
FROPOSED LANDSCAPED AREA
PHASE AREA BOUNDARY
PHASE/PRIORITY
UTILITY EASEMENT PRINCIPLE
VEHICULAR MOVEMENT PRINCIPLE
PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT BUILDING ENTRANCE
EXISTING CITY HALL
VEHICLE
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6TH ST.,
SPECIAL
LANDSCAPE TREATMENT
POTENTIAL FOCAL POINT
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RESIDENTIAL
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10TH AVE.
11TH AVE.
Building Coverage .32 ac.
Parking - 120 cars 1.0 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
1.8 ac.
PHASE 2
COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER
Building Coverage .8 ac.
Parking - 100 cars .8 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
2.1 ac.
PHASE 3
CULTURAL ARTS CENTER
Building Coverage .5 ac.
Parking - 165 cars 1.3 ac.
Open Space .6 ac.
2.4 ac.
ALTERNATIVE A
TASK III
SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO


ALTERNATIVE B
SITE USES This alternative retains both the Community Building and the existing school.
PHASE 1 Restore the existing school building and convert it to use a both a Senior Citizen Center and Cultural Arts Center with 250 seat community theater.
PHASE 2 Remodel and expand the existing Community Building into a complete Community Recreation Center with indoor pool, handball court(s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities.
PHASE 3 Construction of a new Public Library and new offices to house the public service functions of the City of Greeley. These facilities may be incorporated into one building if carefully designed. Provision of these facilities will free large amounts of space in the existing City Hall for expansion of police facilities, etc.
SITE PLANNING The schematic conceptual site plan for Alternative B is shown on the following
page.
Both the existing Community Building and the existing school building are renovated and/or expanded and fully utilized. Retention of the existing buildings presents limitations to utilizing the site in an efficient manner.
Because of the location of the existing buildings on the site, virtually all parking for the major uses (Senior Citizens Center, Cultural Arts and Community Recreation) must be accommodated to the north of the buildings in the central area of the site. Because insufficient land is available to provide an autonomous lot for each use in close proximity to the building entrances, this alternative provides a single, large, multi-use lot for use by both the Cultural Arts Center and the Community Recreation Center.
A Public Library and Public Service Offices are combined in a single facility on the northern portion of the site. Each use has separate parking accommodations.
A O


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7TH ST
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PROPOSED LAf'IDSCAPED AREA
PHASE AREA BOUMDARY
PHASE/PRIORITY
UTILITY EASEMENT
PRINCIPLE FYlSTlHn
VEHICULAR MOVEMENT CITY HALL
PRINCIPLE
PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT BUtDINQ ENTRANCE
VEHICLE
DROP-OFF POINT 6TH ST
VISUAL 8CREEN
SPECIAL
LANDSCAPE TREATMENT
POTENTIAL FOCAL POINT
FUTURE
RESIDENTIAL
FUTURE
RESIDENTIAL
10TII AVE.
11TH AVE.
PHASE 1
CULTURAL ARTS/
SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER
Building Coverage .33 ac.
Parking - Cultural
Arts - 120 cars 1.0 ac.
Parking - Senior
Center - 120 cars 1.0 ac.
Open Space .77 ac.
3.1 ac.
PHASE 2
COMMUNITY RECREATION 1 CENTER
Building Coverage .8 ac.
Parking - 100 cars .8 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
2.1 ac.
PHASE 3
LIBRARY/PUBL1C SERVICE
OFFICES
Building Coverage .25 ac.
Parking - Library
45 cars .36 ac.
Parking - Public
Offices - 45 cars .36 ac.
Open Space .4 ac.
1.4 ac.
ALTERNATIVE 8
TASK III
SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO


ALTERNATIVE C
SITE USES
SITE PLANNING
This alternative retains both the existing school building and the existing
Community Building.
PHASE 1 Restore the existing school building and convert it to use as a
Senior Citizens Center, Public Service Offices and Museum. Provision of these facilities will free a small amount of space in existing City Hall for expansion of police facilities.
PHASE 2 Remodel and expand the existing Community Building into a complete Community Recreation Center with indoor pool, handball court(s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities.
PHASE 3 Construction of a new Cultural Arts Center with a 400 seat community theater and ancillary cultural facilities.
A schematic conceptual site plan for Alternative C is shown on the following page.
Both the existing Community Building and the existing school building are renovated and/or expanded and fully utilized. Retention of the existing buildings presents limitations to utilizing the site in an efficient manner. Due to the location of the existing buildings on the site, insufficient land is available to provide parking for all the uses in close proximity to the building entrances. Slight parking reductions have been necessary for the Senior Citizens Center and Public Service Offices uses as a result of the limited flexibility attributed to keepiny the existing buildings. Parking for the Museum utilizes available curbside spaces.
A new Cultural Arts Center is provided on the north edge of the site adjacent to the existing City offices.
Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the plan.


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PROPOSED
BUILDING
PROPOSED PARKING AREA
PROPOSED LANDSCAPED AREA
PHASE /AREA BOUNDARY
PHASE/PRIORITY
UTILITY EASEMENT PRINCIPLE
VEHICULAR MOVEMENT PRINCIPLE
PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT BUILDING ENTRANCE
EXISTING CRY MALL
VEIflCLE
DROP-OFF POINT VI8UAL SCREEN
6TH ST(
SPECIAL
LANDSCAPE TREATMENT
POTENTIAL FOCAL POINT
FUTURE RESIDENTIAL
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FUTURE
RESIDENTIAL
PHASE 1
SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER/ MUSEUM/PUBLIC OFFICES
Building Coverage Parking - Senior .33 ac.
Center - 120 cars Parking - Museum 1.0 ac.
20 cars Parking - Public .16 ac.
Offices - 45 cars .36 ac.
Open Space .61 ac.
2.5 ac.
PHASE 2
COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER
Building Coverage .8 ac.
Parking - 100 cars .8 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
2.1 ac.
PHASE 3
CULTURAL ARTS CENTER
Building Coverage .5 ac.
Parking - 165 cars 1.3 ac.
Open Space .6 ac.
2.4 ac.
ALTERNATIVE C
TASK III
SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO


ALTERNATIVE D
SITE USES
SITE PLANNING
This alternative retains the existing Community Building and demolishes the
existing school.
PHASE 1 Construction of a new Senior Citizens Center
PHASE 2 Demolition of the existing school building. Remodel and expand the existing Community Building into a complete Community Recreation Center with indoor pool, handball court(s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities.
PHASE 3 Construction of a new Performing Arts Center with 1800 seat capacity and designed capabilities for symphony, opera, ballet and other performances.
A schematic conceptual site plan for Alternate D is shown on the following page.
Provision is made for a new Senior Citizens Center at the corner of 6th Street and 11th Avenue adjacent to residential areas to the north and east of the site.
Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the site plan.
The Community Building is to be renovated and expanded into a complete Community Recreation Center with indoor pool. The existing school is to be demolished and the available land utilized for parking for the recreation facilities.
A new 1800 seat Performing Arts Center is placed directly north of the recreation center adjacent to 10th Street and as close as possible to the existing City park for public visibility. Parking demands generated by this facility are approximately 600 cars and cannot be accommodated on the site. Parking for approximately 170 cars is provided adjacent to the facility. The remainder of the parking demand (430 cars) must be met from available curbside parking in


8TH ST.
FUTURE COMMERCIAL SERVICES

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PHASE/PRIOWTY
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10TH AVE.
11TH AVE.
PROGRAM
PHASE 1 SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER
Building Coverage .32 ac.
Parking - 120 cars 1.0 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
1.8 ac.
PHASE 2
COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER
Building Coverage .8 ac.
Parking - 100 cars .8 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
2.1 ac.
PHASE 3
PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
Building Coverage .7 ac.
Parking - 210 cars 1.7 ac.
Open Space .8 ac.
3.2 ac.
ALTERNATIVE D
TASK 131
SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO


ALTERNATIVE E
SITE USES
SITE PLANNING
This alternative retains the existing school and demolishes the existing
Community Building.
PHASE 1 Construction of a new Senior Citizens Center
PHASE 2 Construction of a new Community Recreation Center with indoor pool,
handball court(s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities.
PHASE 3 Demolish the existing Community Building. Restore the existing
school building and convert it to use as a Cultural Arts Center with a 250 seat community theater.
A schematic conceptual site plan has been developed for Alternative E and is shown on the following page.
Provision is made for a new Senior Citizens Center at the corner of 6th Street and 11th Avenue adjacent to residential areas to the north and east of the site.
A new Community Recreation Center is provided with indoor pool area. The building has been placed adjacent to 10th Avenue as close as possible to the existing City park to maximize public visibility.
The existing school is planned to be restored and converted to use as a Cultural Arts Center with a 250 seat community theater. The existing Community Building is to be demolished and the available land utilized for parking for the Cultural Arts Center. Removal of the Community Building will enhance the visibility of the Cultural Arts Center from the existing City park and the downtown area. Landscape area has been retained along 8th Street to enhance this visible connection.
Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the site plan.


FUTURE COMMERCIAL SERVICES

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10TH AVE.
11TH AVE.
PROGRAM
PHASE 1
SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER
Building Coverage .32 ac.
Parking - 120 cars 1.0 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
1.8 ac.
PHASE 2
COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER
Building Coverage .0 ac.
Parking - 100 cars .8 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
2.1 ac.
PHASE 3
CULTURAL ARTS CENTER
Building Coverage .33 ac.
Parkinq - 120 cars 1.0 ac.
Open Space .5 ac.
1.8 ac.
ALTERNATIVE E
TASK 111
SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO


Since 1978, however, the site has not developed exactly as planned in Alternative E. A Senior Center was constructed, but on the northeast corner of the site not on the northwest corner as shown in Alternative E. The existing historic high school is presently being developed as luxury office spaces by a private developer and not as the proposed Cultural Arts Facility. It is good that the school has been retained, but the need still exists for a Cultural Center upon this site.
The next step in the development process of this site is the purpose of this thesis. There are to be two steps in this thesis. One is to schematically design the site plan to accommodate the Community Center for Recreation (Phase 1 of the development) and a five-hundred seat Community Theatre, at a later date (Phase 2 of the development) . The second step is to design in detail the Community Center fo Recreation to fit into this site master plan.




LOCATION
The site for the Community Center for Recreation and the Community Theatre is an "L" shaped site between 10th Avenue and 11th Avenue, and 6th Street and 8th Street. Excluded within these two blocks is the area taken by the Senior's Center and its parking lot and the portion token by the old high school building. Seventh Avenue, which presently bisects the site, will be vacated and the entire right of way may be developed. This description also includes the land that the present recreation center and parking lot are using, but it can be assumed this facility will be demolished once the new Community Center for Recreation is completed. The site encompasses approximately 3.7 acres.
DOWNTOWN CONTEXT
The Mall The site is located at the interface between the commercial/
public area of the downtown core and the residential areas that surround it. The core of downtown is located just across two-block Lincoln Park. At present, both 9th Street and 8th Street between 9th Avenue and 8th Avenue are being redeveloped into shopping malls. This should greatly improve the image and foot traffic in the downtown area. In conjunction with this new mall, several buildings in Line downtown are being remodeled and improved.
Lincoln Park Lincoln Park is also being improved as part of the downtown
facelift. Improvements are being made to the gazebo in the center of the park, making it more attractive for large groups for oxitdoor concerts, fairs, etc. The city is also constructing a running track around the perimeter of the park which will be used by the recreation center users. Lincoln Park is a large attractive park which is the focus of down-


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Open-sided longhouse, children's playground, information kiosk, mid-hlock access, vendor areas, specialty lighting, entertainment pavilion, flower gardens, flowing fountain, specialty retail and restaurants and landscaping.

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Civic
North
South
town. To its east is the downtown core and now the malls; to the south is the historic Weld County Courthouse and a new Weld County Office complex (both of which are large, attractive buildings); to the west are smaller scale commercial buildings, a church and a portion of the site; and, finally, to the north is the City of Greeley Civic Center complex. The site, therefore, has the unique opportunity to be the final site developed around this very important open space.
Center The cities CIVIC CENTER is the eastern edge of the site
as well as the north boundary of the park. This center houses many city offices, the library, the police department, and finally a fire station which uses doors directly facing the site.
and West Immediately north of the site on 6th Street and to the
west are areas which are primarily residential in use and are expected to remain residential in accordance with the City's Comprehensive Plan.
The southern edge of the site is a mixture of quasi-public, residential and commercial service uses. This area is expected to slowly redevelop into commercial services that support the nearby governmental centers and the central business district.
A look at the following Downtown Urban Design Plans will make the above description clearer. Note that the drawing of the Senior Center is illustrative only and does not reflect what has actually been built.


THE SITE
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THE SITE
PHASE II
DOWNTOWN URBAN DLSK.N PLAN Grot'ley, ( ok u ndo
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BUILDING IMMEDIATE TO SITE
Seniors Center
Greeley High School Building
The Seniors Center was completed in 1981 and has been extremely successful since its opening. The building is approximately 18,000 square feet with gallery space, meeting areas, social halls, arts and crafts, and games all which are used by the senior citizens. The building is used by the Seniors during the day for social interaction, activities, and programs geared for the Seniors. No senior citizens live within the building. A parking lot with 79 spaces is due west of the building, thus the Seniors Center occupies the entire half of the block. The Center is low in scale, rather flat but only 16 feet high. This scale is to relate to the houses directly north of the Center.
The north and east facades are bermed with no entries. The main public entry is from the southwest and looks directly across the site. Access to the Seniors parking is from 6th Street. The architecture of the Center is not strong and is predominantly low in profile with a white roof and bland brick. Refer to the following pages for photographs of the Seniors Center.
This building, located to the south and to the west of our site, is a historic structure that at one time housed the Senior Citizen Center and a number of the city's recreation programs. The building is presently being converted to luxury office spaces by a private developer and is due for completion soon. The eastern portion of the building was built in 1895 and the entire building has been recommended for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Buildings. The building is very strong in mass, height - 54 feet tall, and color - bright red brick. Parking to this building is provided behind it and immediately adjacent to the site, with access from 11th Avenue. Refer to the following pages for photographs and drawings.


' LOOKING NORTHEAST ACROSS THE SITE TO THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE SENIOR'S CENTER
•SOUTH ELEVATION OF SENIOR'S CENTER DIRECTLY ADJACENT TO SITE





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An Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Architecture
SPRING 1984


9TH STREET ELEVATION (FRONT) OF THE GREELEY SCHOOL UNDER RENOVATION
REAR ELEVATION OF THE SCHOOL. ELEVATION FACES THE SITE.
THIS
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Existing Recreation Also on the site presently is the existing recreation
Building building, however, it is safe to assume this obsolete structure will be demolished upon completing the new Community Center for Recreation, making this portion of the site available for development. On the following pages are photographs of the site and its surrounding context, and also a base map showing their locations.


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VEHICULAR CIRCULATION
Present traffic volumes on all streets around the site except 11th Avenue are significantly below capacity and present no limitations to development. Traffic volumes on 11th Avenue, while still well below capacity, are significantly higher than other streets in the area due mainly to its designation as a north-south arterial that traverses almost the entire city. Eleventh Avenue will be a primary route to get to the site. Seventh Street is being vacated allowing more room for development on the site. This entire right of way may be developed. Eighth Street is also being closed between 10th Avenue and 9th Avenue. This is being done as part of the mall plan and allows Lincoln Park to be a full two-block park. The diagram below illustrates how the circulation in the downtown area will be with the completion of the malls.
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PARKING
The city of Greeley has determined there are nearly 650 curbside parking spaces within a 1,000 foot walk of the site. Approximately 400 of these spaces are underutilized on nights and weekends. The same can be said for the 190 spaces directly across the street serving the Civic Center. There are also two new parking areas serving the malls which at peak times could help support the Community Center. There appears to be adequate parking around the site most of which is to the east of the site.
The parking for the Seniors Center (79 spaces) is also used infrequently at night and might be a source of additional nighttime parking. The parking for the Greeley School is private and cannot be used. The illustration below shows parking in the area immediate to the malls and the following page shows available parking areas around the site.
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UTILITIES
TOPOGRAPHY/VEGETATION
Utilities in the area of the site are capable of accommodating all uses being considered for the site. Water is available in both 10th and 11th Avenues. Sanitary sewer lines are available in 11th Avenue or in the utility easement south of the Seniors Center. This easement also contains underground telephone and powe;r services. Gas service is available in the 11th Avenue right of way. There presently exists in the 7th Street right of way, gas, water, and storm sewer lines. Plans, however, have been made to remove the lines and use the other available lines allowing for full development of this right of way.
The site is essentially flat with only a 3\ foot drop over the entire site. The only significant vegetation presently on the site are four 20-foor high evergreen trees next to and north of the existing recreation building.
Refer to the following map for UTILITY and TOPOGRAPHY/ VEGETATION information.



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VIEW FROM LINCOLN FARK NORHTWEST TO THE SITE
. VIEW DOWN 7TH STREET TO SITE. NOTE THAT 7TH STREET IS ALREADY BEING VAC-ated. THIS PORTION OF THE SITE IS PROMINENT VISUALLY.


LOOKING ACROSS THE SITE AT LINCOLN PARK AND THE CBD
CHURCH ACROSS THE STREET TO THE SOUTH FROM THE SITE
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11TH AVENUE AT THE REAR OF THE SITE
LOOKING WEST FROM THE FRONT OF THE SITE
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LOOKING NORTHEAST ACROSS THE SITE TO THE SENIOR*3 CENTER AND THE CITIE'S CIVIC CENTER
SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OP CIVIC CENTER AS SEEN FROM THE SITE
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SOILS REPORT
Scope The following report presents the results of a subsurface soil investigation on a portion of Block 35, Greeley, Colorado. The property is located near 7th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues. The investigation was performed for a proposed municipal complex. The purpose of this investigation was to obtain the technical information and soils property data necessary for the design and construction of foundations for the proposed structures. The conclusions and recommendations presented in this report are based upon analysis of field and laboratory data and experience with similar soils in the general vicinity.
Field Investigation The field investigation consisted of 10 borings at selected locations on the site. The borings were advanced with a 6 inch diameter, continuous flight hollow stem, power auger. All borings were continued to penetration of weathered bedrock. Complete logs of the boring operation are shown on the attached plate and include visual classifications of each soil, location of soil changes, standard penetration test results, and water table measurement. As the boring operation advanced, an index of soil relative density and consistency was obtained by use of the standard penetration test, ASTM Standard Test D-1586. The penetration test result listed on the log is the number of blows required to drive the 2 inch split-spoon sampler one foot into the undisturbed soil by a 140 pound hammer dropped 30 inches. Undisturbed samples for use in the laboratory were taken in thin wall samplers (Shelby), pushed hydraulically into the soil. All samples were sealed in the field and preserved at natural moisture content until time of test.
Laboratory Testing The laboratory testing program was undertaken to measure critical shear and consolidation-swelling characteristics of the soils. Additional testing included tests necessary to verify visual classification and moisture content of soils from borings. All test results are summarized in Table 1.


Subsurface
Conditions
Foundation
tions
Soil Soils encountered at the site uniformly consist of 3 to
9b feet of clay, silt, sand and gravel mixtures overlying sand and gravel deposits that extend to depths of 26 to 28b feet where silty, sandy, weathered claystone is encountered. Upper-level materials overlying the gravel deposits are in part undisturbed native soils; and in part, non-homogeneous fills of expansive clays, organic debris, silt, sand and gravel, etc. The sand and gravel deposits are predominantly well-graded mixtures with maximum particle sizing of lb to 2 inches in most of the borings. The sand and gravel became finer (minus 3/4) past a depth of 14 to 15 feet. Bedrock at the site exhibits shear strength values in the range of 20,000 to 25,000 p.s.f. and is potentially expansive.
Recommenda- The selection of the foundation type for a given situation
and structure is governed by two basic considerations. First, the foundation must be designed so as to be safe against shear failure in the underlying soils; and second, differential settlement or other vertical movement of the foundation must be controlled at a reasonable level.
Two basic controls are available to us in selecting the foundation type and allowable loads. These are the standard penetration test and consolidat.ion-swell testing. The ultimate bearing capacity of the foundation soil depends upon the size and shape of the foundation element, and depth below the surface, and the physical characteristics of the supporting soil.
We recommend that structures at the site be founded on continuous spread footings designed for a maximum allowable bearing capacity (live loads plus dead load) of 8,000 p.s.f. bearing in uniform sand and gravel deposits. Our understanding is that anticipated footing elevations are approximately 12 feet below present grades, placing foot elements in competent bearing strata, and also at or near present groundwater levels. Care must be taken to protect the foundation and floor systems from moisture damage, i.e.: Sub-slab perimeter foundation drains; automatic sump pumps; and moisture barriers.


As an alternate, the proposed structure could be founded upon a drilled pier and grade beam type of foundation system, with the piers bearing in the weathered bedrock. The piers should be drilled a minimum cf 2 feet into the bedrock. The piers should be designed for a maximum end bearing value of 20,000 p.s.f., maximum side shear on that portion of the pier in weathered, silty, sandy claystone of 2,000 p.s.f., and a minimum dead load of 10,000 p.s.f. A nominal amount of reinforcing steel should be used in all piers.
Difficulty is sometimes experienced in achieving the desired minimum dead load. If this occurs, we suggest the piers be reinforced full length to take the difference between the "desired" and the "obtainable" dead load in tension. This side shear value given above may be used in uplift provided the sides of the hole are grooved.
In drilling the piers the following design and construction details should be observed:
1. Piers should be designed for the maximum end bearing pressure and skin friction specified in this report.
2. All piers should be designed for the minimum dead load pressure specified in this report.
3. All piers should penetrate a minimum of 2 feet into the hard bedrock.
4. All piers should be reinforced for their full length to resist tension. We recommend the use of at least two (2) #5 bars.
5. A minimum of 4 inch air space should be provided beneath all grade beams to insure the concentration of dead load pressure on the piers.
6. All piers should be carefully cleaned and dewatered before pouring concrete. Casing may be required.


7. Most of the bedrock at the site can be drilled with normal heavy commercial size pier drilling rig. Some of the bedrock is very hard and a problem may arise if the contractor attempts to drill the pier holes with small drill rigs.
Refusal in drilling may be encountered in the lower bedrock. In case drilling refusal is encountered, the depth of penetration into bedrock may be reduced if design criteria are adjusted accordingly.
0. All pier holes should be inspected during construction by a competent soil engineer to insure that penetration is started at the proper depth and no loose materials remain in the hole.
The following recommendation should be followed in the design
of the foundation and the footings.
1. All footings should be below frost depth.
2. Foundation walls should be reinforced with rebar to span an unsupported length of 10 feet. Rebar should run continuously around corners and be properly spliced.
3. The foundation should be protected by a perimeter drain.
4. All footings should bear on the same typo of soil,
Floor Slabs Slabs should be constructed "free floating," isolated from
all bearing members, reinforced with wire mesh, and jointed frequently. Slabs on grade should be underlain with a 4 inch layer of clean gravel or crushed rock to help distribute floor loads and provide a capillary break. Positive drainage should be provided for the gravel underlayment to prevent pooling of water beneath the slab.


Landscaping and Drainage
Every precaution should be taken to prevent wetting of the subsoils and percolation of water down along the foundation elements. Finished grades should be sloped away from the structure on all sides to give positive drainage. A minimum of 6 inches fall in the first 10 feet is recommended. Sprinkling systems should not be installed within 10 feet of the structure. Downspouts are recommended and should be arranged to carry drainage from the roof at least 5 feet beyond the foundation walls.
Backfill around the outside perimeter of the structure should be compacted at optimum moisture, or above, to at least 90 percent of Standard Proctor Density as determined by ASTM Test D-698.
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This section contains various data, analysis and summaries relating to the CLIMATE ANALYSIS in Greeley, Colorado.
This delta base will hopefully allow the designer an opportunity to learn more about the climate in Greeley and make the Community Center for Recreation more responsive to the natural climatic conditions. Specifically contained within this section are: a written Description and Summary of the climate in Greeley; Tabulated Monthly Climatic Data for Greeley; Meteorological Data for Denver, Colorado (to supplement data not available specific to Greeley but which should be similar); an Annual Wind Rose for Greeley; a Graphic Summary of Climate Data; a Bioclimatic Chart; a Solar Position Chart; a computer printout showing Solar Altitudes, Azimuths, the Vertical and Horizontal Shading Angles for various building orientations at all times of the year; a computer printout of recommendations based on the Mahoney Tables (produced by the CLJMAT program); and finally DESIGN GUIDELINES BASED ON CLIMATIC ANALYSIS.
This CLIMATE ANALYSIS section will point out the key features of Greeley's climate and serve as a good data base throughout the design of the building.


DESCRIPTION AND SUMMARY
OF THE CLIMATE OF GREELEY Greeley is located on the northern high plains of Colorado,
near their western edge. The foothills of the Rocky Mountains rise from the plains about 25 miles to the west, and the main ranges of mountains along the Continental Divide rise to altitudes between 11,000 and 12,000 feet, with peaks over 14,000 feet, at a distance of about 50 miles west of Greeley. The Cache la Poudre River flov/s along the northeastern edge of the city, and joins the South Platte River about 5 miles east. Elevations in Greeley reach over 4,800 feet at the southwestern edge, and slope gradually downward toward the northeast to about 4,630 feet along the river.
Separated from the Pacific Ocean by distance and a high mountain barrier, and located a long distance from any other major source of moisture, the climate of Greeley is characterized by low humidity, low average precipitation, and abundant sun-â–  shine. The prevailing air movement is from the west, with most
of the moisture lost in passage over the mountains. Invasions of cold air from the north in winter are also relatively dry, so that winter precipitation averages are low. Circulation patterns interrupt the westerly flow cind bring moist air from the Gulf of Mexico into the area, most frequently in the spring and summer. Spring and summar thunderstorms are occasionally severe and accompanied by heavy hail, although the frequency of severe storms is less for the Greeley area than for areas farther to the east. Tornadoes may occur in the area, but are also Less frequent and less severe than they are farther to the east. Precipitation varies widely from year to year.
Extremes in temperature come with interruptions of the prevailing westerly flow of air cold outbreaks from the north in the winter, and dry desert air reaching the area from the southwest in the summer. The highest temperature in the entire Greeley record was 107° in July 1936, and the lowest was 45° below zero in February 1899. In more than 50 years of record, the maximum temperature for the summar Lias been less than 100° in one year out of two. Winter temperature minimums have reached lower than 18° below zero in one year out of two.
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Although the average annual rainfall of less than 14 inches places the area in a semi-arid classification, heavier precipitation and winter snow accumulations in the mountains to the west provide a supply of water for an extensive irrigation system which has transformed the region into one of the highest producing agricultural areas in the country.
The dry and generally mild climate, with warm summers and open winters, together with an abundant water supply, provide unusually favorably conditions for a wide variety of agricultural activities.
SPRING is the wettest, windiest, and cloudiest season. Severe storms usually come from the north with northeasterly winds.
About 42% of the annual precipitation occurs in spring, and much of it falls as snow. Stormy periods are usually of short duration and are often followed by sunny and mild weather that removes much of the snow cover.
SUMMER precipitation amounts to about 31% of the annual total, and much of it falls from scattered thundershowers during the afternoons and evenings. Mornings are usually clear and sunny. Cloudiness increases markedly after mid-morning, and is noteworthy because of the moderating effect on the afternoon temperatures .
AUTUMN is the most pleasing season. Precipitation during this period amounts to only 18% of the annual total. Local summar thunderstorms are over and invasions of cold air from the north are infrequent. There is less cloudiness and a greater percentage of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are usually brief.
WINTER has less precipitation than any other season, with about 9% of the annual total, almost all in the form of snow. Winter storms are at times severe but are usually of short duration. There is more cloudiness than in autumn but somewhat less than in the spring months.
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SUMMARY UK MUNI HI, Y ri.ni AT IC DATA YllR GHEEI.EY IIPC
DAT I I'llilfc. - 4U ?s i.nwt; 1 TOOK
JAN KK.1I MAR
monthly MEAN MAXIMUM TEMI* (Y J AVK. 3M.4 4 7.8 S4.H
MAX. 4 7.4 6 7.2 o 3. o
YEAR 1» 76 1 8 7 U 1972
Mu. 27.1 3 7.4 4 7.4
YEAR 1R 70 1878 18K0
YEARS Oh" KYX'ORD t J. 13. 14.
MON I’HliY MEAN MINIMUM TEMP (D AVE. 12.0 18.8 2b.2
MAX . 1 /.6 2 3.0 2 9.7
YEAR 1 RDM 187 4 1 87 4
MO. 4.0 1 4 . H 2 0.2
YEAR l 9 7 4 1880 t 8b9
YEARS UY RECORD 11. 1 3. 14.
HUN THt.Y MEAN AVERAGE TEMP (Y) AVK, 7 h . 1 3 3.8 4 0.0
*» 6 X . 12.U '3 8.3 4 0.6
YEAH 1 >170 1 8 /-) t 972
mid. 15.9 27.8 34.0
V EAR 1 979 18H() 1 8tJ9
YEARS UK RECORD 13. l 3. 14.
degree i DAYS lhASK 65K) AVe. 1200. H R 7 o . 7 700.7
!' A X . lb 14 1 *182 93b
YEAR 197 9 188') 1908
MID. toll 7 1 4 bo 2
YEAR 1 'I/O 18 70 19/2
YEARS OK RECORD 1 3. 1). 14.
NO HAYS MAX TEMP GVR UR ED 9oY AVE. 0.0 0.0 0.0
MAX . 0 0 0
YEAR I>>b8 181,8 1 80 7
Ml. 0 0 0
YEAR 1 N 8 O ♦ 1880* 1 9H0 ♦
YEARS UK RECORD i 3. 13. 1 1.
HO DAYS MAX TEMP DESS OR EO 3 2F AVE. 8.2 3.1 1 .4
MAX . 2 2 1 0 4
year 18/8 1878 1 9 09
1 R . 2 0 0
YEAR 1909 1 V 7 7 + 1 9 7 8 *
YEARS OY' RECORD 1 1. 1 3. 14.
HO DAYS Mill TEMP DESS UR ED 32F AVE. 30.3 28.8 20.9
MAX. 3 1 2 8 Jo
Y Y A R 18/8 + 1 8 Dm 1 980 +
Mu. 2 8 2 4 20
YEAR 187 0 1071 1978 +
YEARS Of RECORD 1 3. 1 4. 1 4 .
no DAYS MIN TEMP LESS OR ED H F AVE. b.S . D . 3
M A X . 1 2 4 2
YEAR 1 8 / <) 18 78 1970
M 1 il , 1 0 0
YEAR l >>7 in 1978* I '»7 9 +
YEARS OF RECORD 1 3. l 3. 14.
IIKMKsr TEMPERATURE IK) 1 EMI* 71.) 72 HO
YEAR A >1(1 DAY 1 8/024 18/228 197RJO*
YEARS OK RECORD 1 3. 13. \ >.
DM 4 K.ST TEMPERA 1 ORE (Y) 1 EM K -2 1 - 1 2
YEAK A ’ill i> A Y 1 >17 107 | 88UD8) 18 7 000
YEARS UY' RECORD 1 3. 1 3. 1 4.
COLOR Alin ruw yi APS 1907-1980 kuk;;t,v»’J »»ti Nn. , blbbi lilVIMlH \
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6 3.0 7 2.4 9 3.0 8 9.2 80.‘1 7 9.0 SO . 6 4 3.7 0 1 . K
70.1 7 8.j 8'+.0 9 2.0 90.7 8 b. 1 7 2.9 b 4 . b 64.>• O M . 2
1 80 9 197 4 19 7 7 198 0 1 909 1 u 7 7 1 97S 1 •• / / t 9(13, 197 /
6*1.2 h 7 . o / b . 9 80.1 84.1 7 4.0 6 3.7 4 1 . + 37.0 0 2.2
i 47 3 19/8 1907 1 9b 7 19/9 1‘1/J 1 9 0 9 19/7 197 8 19/9
1 4 . 14. 14. 1 4. 14. 14. 13. 1 +. 1 4 . 1 3.
3 3.9 4 1.2 b 2.2 S 7 . 7 b 1 . / 4b.3 34.6 2 3.3 10.7 3 b . o
38.0 4 / . 1 So.b 00.0 bM..3 49.1 38.8 7o . b 7 4.0 to.b
1 90 9 18/7 197/ 1980 19o9 ) 909 19/3 1 >i 7 o 1 9 HO 19 / /
27.4 39.8 19.2 bb.O bO , 7 42.0 2' i. 7 1 8 .b 7.0 3 J . /
l 9oH 19m8 1 90 / 190 / 190 / 1971 1 909 1 o /') 1 97 b 1 9n8
1 4 . 1 4 . 1 4. 14. 14 . 14. l 1. 1 4. 1 4. l 3 .
18. H b /.H 07.9 7 3. b 70.9 0 2.2 bO. 7 30.9 29.7 ‘1 9.9
64.3 0 2.8 7 3.1 7 o. 0 74.b 0 h . 7 b b . 2 4 31.0 .3II . 6 b / . 4
1 909 I 87 4 1 >4 7 7 1980 19+.9 19/7 19/3 .1 <* 7o 1 9 CO 19//
17.9 b 4. 2 0 2.0 7 1.1 0 / . S S8.1 41.7 3 1.7 20.2 4 8.7
1 9o H 1+10 8 1 ’If, / 1 9t>7 1 90 / r»71 1909 1 >> / •/ 197 8 19/9
1 4 . 1 4 . 14. 14. 14. 1 4. 14. 14 . 1». 1 3.
4 91.4 2 J 1 , S 4o.7 4. 1 8.4 119.8 437.7 H 3 b . 4 IP 87. 3 +i*lllo . 8
0 6 b 3 17 107 2 5 20 7 38 7 1 0 1 " 1 1 1 480 b +> 1 .3
1 408 1 >1*, 8 1 9*i 9 1 >l 7 2 19 7 9 1 >'7 1 190 9 1 >i / 9 1 9 7 8 l'( / 9
314 9 7 0 0 >1 2 2 2 9 / / 16 8 1 0 b .3 *> l
1 909 19 7 7 18/7 1 9 H fl + 197 3 + 1 909 19 7 3 1070 1 9 8 0 19//
1 4 . l 4 . It. 14. 1 4. 1 •>. 14. 1 0. 14. l 3.
0.0 .7 8.9 IO.H 11 .0 7.0 0.0 II. 0 0.0 4 i . >t
0 4 1 8 71 2 0 1 0 it 0 >9
1 9o7 1 9+»o 1977 1 980 1909 1 9 8 0 + I 9+>7 1 907 1 90 / 1 oh 0
0 0 0 131 s 0 0 0 0 .3 1
1980 + 198 0 + 190 / 197 l 1 9 7 4 + 1 97 3* 1 980 + 1 9 (3 0 + lo8(,+ 1 9 0 m
14. 1 4 . 1 «. 1 J. 14. 1 4. 1 >1 . 14. 1 4 . • 7.
. 3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 . 3 7.9 6.0 7 2.4
2 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 1 1 >3 o
147 3 190 7 1 9 0 7 1 >107 19 07 1 9117 1909 1 9 / 6 + 1 97/ l 9 / 8
0 o II 0 0 1) 0 0 1 9
1980 + 1 9 8') + 1 >18 0 + 1 9 8 <) ♦ 1 '180 ♦ 1 9 It 0 + 198 0 + |97| + 1 9 7 0 1 9 7 /
14. 1 4 . 1 >1 . 14. 1 1. 14. 1 ‘1 . 1 1 1 . 1 3.
1J .8 1 .8 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 . 1 17.1 7o.o JO. 1 11* 0.8
2 4 s 1) 0 0 h 20 to 3 l 1 8 2
1 708 1 9.,7 1 9b / 1 "07 l 907 1 911 1 'If,9 1 9 7>l 1979 + 1 9+)*'
1 0 0 0 3> 0 3 2 4 2 fl 1 lb
1909 1 9 7 7 + 19 8 0 + 1 98(1 + l 9 8 0 + 1 9H0 + 1 9 7 4 â–º 10 8 0 1 07 7 1 9 / 4
14. 14. 14. 14 . l 4 . 14. 1 4 . 1 4 . 1 >3 . 1 3.
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1 0 0 II 0 0 0 2 ' 1 1 7 1
1 97b 1 90 7 1 907 1 907 I 90 7 1 00 7 1 9 3* 7 1 9 7 >> + 19 7 7 1 9 / 9
0 o 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
1 4 8 0 + 1 9 81) + 1 98*; + 1980 + 1 9 8 0 * 1 >1(3 0 ♦ 1 9 8 0 1 1 0 8 > 1 3 1 9130 + 1 *1 / o «
14. 14. 1 4. 1 1. 14. 14. 1 1 . 1". 1 I . 1 3.
8 b 9 3 9 9 1 0 3 1 07 9 7 hi 79 7 6
198371*18 7 4 7 8 197 704 197009+ 197600 1 1 u '/7 0 7 I 9 7 91) 7 1 >1111)0 7 1 9i>o; 7
1 4 . 14. 1 '1. 14. 1 4 . I 4 . 1 *1 . 1 > . 1 •+.
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19/602 19 7 8" / 197611 !97130 1 9 o 8 3 1 1 ,07 1 1 >1 191.91 >1 1 9 7 2 2 9 197 700
1 4 . 1 4 . 1 1 . 1 4. 1 4 . 1 1. 1 4. 1 t. 1 4 .
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DEPAR MEMT UY' A 1 DO'.+'i ERIC SC I EDO K
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SUMMARY OF MONTHLY CLIMATIC DAI'A FOR GREELEY COLORADO FOR YEARS 1931-1467 SUBSTATION Nil . 53516 1)1 VIS MIN 4
LATITUDE - 40 25 LONGITUDE - 194 41 ELEVATION - 4 650 1 FEET
JAN FEB MAH APR MAY JIIM JUL AUG SEP tier NI1V DEC ANN
MONTHLY MEAN MAXIMUM TEMP (F) AVE. 39.7 4 3.7 50.4 52.0 7 2.0 H 3.0 40.9 8 8.3 79.3 b /. 9 51.5 4 2.8 6 4.3
MAX . 51.2 58.7 59.5 n. i 8 3.2 40.1 4 7.6 97.3 86.0 7 4.5 64.5 51.1 /II . 4
YEAH 1934 1 951 1946 194 6 14 3 4 1933 14 36 19 34 1418 1963 + 144 + 1 4 13 14 3 4
M T N. 21.5 3I .2 4 1.5 52.6 61.5 75.3 II4.3 H 3.7 66.0 5 H . () 4 2.6 3 0.7 6 1.3
YEAH 1937 l 94 2 1958 195 7 19.35 195 1 145 8 19hJ 1965 1959 1955 + 14 32 19)1
YEAPS OF RECORD 36. 37. 36 . 36. 36. 36. 36. 36. 36. 36. 35. 3 6 . 34.
MONTHLY MEAN MINIMUM TEMP (F) AVE. 7.9 I 3.7 21.2 32.4 42.7 51.3 56.7 54.5 4 4.3 .3 2.5 19.4 12.1 3 2.3
MAX. 15.H 21,0 28.4 38.2 4 4.2 55.3 60.7 59.0 50.8 19.3 26,1 t 8.6 34.2
YEAH 1-55 l 9 5 J 1438 1943 1958 1956 1466 1934 1463 196 3 1 949 14 33 1 45M
MIN. -10.5 -.5 1 l .8 25.8 38.3 47.6 53.7 51.0 37.3 25.3 11.3 -2.4 24.8
YEAR 1 937 1942 193 2 195 3 1453 + 19 35 145 7 1950 1945 + 1952 1 <52 19 3 2 143 2
YEARS OF RECORD 3o. 37. 36 . 36. 36 . 36. 36. 3b. 36 . 36. 35. 3'*. 34.
MONTHLY MEAN AVERAGE TEMP (F) AVE. 23.8 28.7 35.8 47.2 57.3 67.2 73.8 71.4 61.8 50.2 .35.4 27.5 4 8.3
MAX. 33.2 3 4.5 4 3.2 54.6 64.6 72.7 77.1 78.2 66.1 56.9 4 5.3 35.0 52.0
YEAH 1934 1954 1 446 19 46 1934 1 456 1466 1934 1948 196 3 1949 19 33 1434
MIN. 5.5 15.1 27.4 10.8 49.4 62.1 69.9 68.8 53.2 4 5.0 7 8.2 11.4 46.2
YEAH 19 3 / 1942 1932 1 95 3 1435 1951 14 50 1956 + 1965 1959 14 52 14 32 1 9.» f
YEARS OF RECORD 35. J7 . 36. 36. 36. 34. 36. 36. 36. 36. 35. 36. 34.
DEGREE DAYS (BASE 65F) AVE. 1308.8 1033.3 925.4 539.9 213.9 53.8 2.3 12.3 162.8 4 30. 3 884..J 1131.8 6 / 4 4.3
MAX . 1553 1317 1 1 40 6 96 331 1 1 5 9 4 0 352 613 10 13 1315 / 135
YEAH 1453 1 955 1965 1957 1457 1955 1961 1 964 1965 1959 1955 1963 14 2 5
MIN. 98 1 807 741 42 7 140 3 0 0 55 2 44 7 5 1 4 8 | 0 3 2 S
YEAH 1955 195 3 1 4b5 196 2 146 3 l 95b 1406 + 1961 + 196 3 196 3 1462 1 457 140 1
YEARS OF RECORD 12. 13. 12. 12. 12. 12. 12. 12. 17. 1 2. 10. 12. 19.
NO DAYS MAX TEMP GTR OH F.O 90F AVE. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1 . 1 8.3 18.1 12.7 4.0 0.0 0.0 0.4 45.4
MAX. 0 0 0 0 6 18 26 23 13 0 0 0 6 8
YEAH 1948 1918 1448 194 8 146 4 I960 1455 + 1949 194 8 1918 14 4 9 1948 1448
MIN. 0 (I 0 0 0 1 5 4 0 0 0 0 2 /
YEAH 1957 + 1957 + 1965 + 1966 + 1465 + 1965 + 1958 1963 + 19 o 5 + 1966 + 1666 + 1466 + 145 1
YEARS OF RECORD 18. 19. 18. 18. 18. 14. 19. 19. 14. 18. 17. 16. 16.
NO DAYS MAX TEMP LESS OH EO 32F AVE. 10.4 5.1 3.7 .5 . 1 0.0 0,0 0.0 0.0 . 1 3.2 6.3 31.5
MAX. 22 11 9 3 1 0 0 0 0 1 9 1 2 5 2
YEAH 1949 1955 + 1965 1959 1954 1448 14 4 8 194 8 1948 196 1 * 1952 196 1 + 1455
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 19
YEAH 1955 1954 1961 + 1965 + 1966 + 1966 + 14 b 6 + 1 966 + 1966 + 1 9 6 6 + 1 949 + 1 957 1453
YEARS OF RECORD 17. 19. 19. 18. 18. 18. 18. 18. 18. 18. 1 /. 16. 1 1.
NO DAYS MIN TEMP LESS OR Ell 32F AVE. 31.0 28.0 29.1 14.5 1.9 . 1 0.0 0.0 1.6 14.8 24.0 30.9 18 1.4
MAX. 31 29 31 2 2 8 1 0 0 5 2 8 34 31 147
YEAH 1948 1954 + 1465 + 195 3 1453 1954 1448 194 8 1965 1952 14611 1 965 + 1452
HIM. 31 26 26 10 0 0 0 0 0 1 27 30 15 /
YEAH 1957 + 1951 1963 + 1965 1463 + 1 96*i + 1 9 b 6 + 1966 + 1 966 f 1 96.3 1464 + 1955 + 1 96 3
YEARS OF RECORD 18. 20. 19. 19. 19. 18. 18. 18. 18. 17. 1 /. 17. 14.
NIJ DAYS MIN TEMP LESS OR EO 0 F AVE. 8.1 1.2 1.5 . 1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .9 3.1 16.8
MAX. 21 10 6 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 7 3 /
YEAH 1955 1956 + 1460 + 1957 1448 144 8 1 448 1 4 4 H 1 948 194 8 1952 1961 1956
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 II 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
YEAH 1955 1957 + l 966 1- 1 966 + 1466 + 1 966 + 1 966 + 1966 + 1966 + 1966 + 1 966 + 1954 + 14 5 3
YEARS OF RECORD 18. 20. 19. 18. 1 8. 18. 18. 1H. !». tH. 18. 14. 13.
HIGHEST TEMPERATURE CF) TEMP 7 0 7 7 8 2 86 4 6 11)6 107 1 05 99 90 82 75
YEAR and D A Y1 9 4 3 21 + 1 9 3 2 2 7 1446 30 143825 1442264i 9 5424 193623 19 3801 195401+194/06+143406+14391S
YEARS OF RECORD 37. 37. 36. 36. 16. 36. 36. 36. 36. 35. 36. 35.
LOWEST TEMPERATURE (F) TEMP -3b -39 -JO -2 2 3 31 40 39 23 8 - 1 8 -30
YEAH AND DAY194205 195101 193212 1 94503 195402+194713 1957081196428+194527+193531 195227 193212
YEARS OF RECORD 35. 37. 36. 36. 36.. 36. 36. 36. 34. .35 . 36.
PREPARED HX ; CnMJHAD'1 CLIMATE CEMIEH
DKPAHMENT (IF A1MUSFKHJC SCIENCE COli* IK A|V(I ST A 1E UNIVERSITY FORT CHLL1NS, CU 8 057 3 (JOT) 491 - R545


SUMMARY UK MONTHLY CLIMATIC DATA KClH GREECE Y COLORADO i FOR YEM*S 1931-1907 SUBSTATION NO . 63540 o i v i s r • IN 4
LATITUDE - 4 0 25 LONGITUDE - 104 41 ELEVATION - 4050 1 FEET
JAN FEI1 MAR APR MAY .INN Jill, Aiir, SEP OCT MM V D+ C ANN
MONTHLY PRECIPITATION (IN) AVK. .33 .33 .71 1.33 2.4 1 1.63 1.27 .94 1.00 . 7H . 30 .31 11.42
MAX. 1.22 1 . 1H 2.05 1.32 6.7 9 3.99 3.73 3.77 3.61 2.95 2.00 1.50 1 H .08
YEAR 19 4 8 1942 1901 1944 1935 1902 190 1 1950 1966 1 947 1 9 4 h 19 3 1 196 1
MIN. 0.00 0.00 .12 .09 . 12 0.0 0 .00 .06 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.06
YEAR I 900 + 1951 1900 + 1965 196 3 19 3 3 1900 1949 1953 + 1956 + 1906 + 1961 + 1954
YEARS (IK RECORD 37. 37. 30. 36. 30. 30. 30. 36. 36. 36. 30. 3b. 30 .
GREATEST DAILY PRECIP (IN) AMOUNT .43 .42 .83 1.50 1 .8(1 2.08 1.31 1.83 1.60 .94 .49 .58
YEAR AND DAY 194826 195811 1 9 6 l 2 H 195702 1 91>4 30 190 2 30 196101 196319 196321 196019 195511 196812
YEARS OK RECORD 20. 20. 19. 19. 18. 19. 19. 18. 19. 19. 19. 18.
MONTHLY SNOWFALL (IN) AVE. 4.0 4.8 7.7 4.3 . 1 0.0 0.0 0.0 .3 .9 3.7 3.9 3 2.7
MAX . 10.0 12.0 1 H.O 27.5 1.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 9.5 21.5 13.5 5 2.1
YEAR 1949 194 2 1959 1945 19 43 + 1931 1931 19 31 19 59 + 194 2 1 946 194 1 1 944
MIN. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 U . 0 0.0 1 0.0
YEAR 1900 + 1 90 3 + 1940 + 1905 + 1900 + 1900 + 1960 + 1960 + I960 + 1966 + 1 965 + 1 959 + 1 93 3
YEARS OK RECORD 29. 28. 24. 29, 35. 36 . 30. 36. 36. 34. 27. 71. 18.
GRTST DEPTH SNOW UN GitND IN MON (IN) 9 6 18 14 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 12
YEAR AND DAY194904 190029+195920 195312 0 0 0 0 0 195100 195020 195613
YEARS OF RECORD B. to. 11. 1 t . 18. 19. 14. 19. 18. 18. 4. 1.
NU DAYS PRECIP GTR OR EG 0.1 IN AVK. 2.0 1.7 3.3 3.5 0.4 4.7 3.9 3.5 3.0 2.3 2.1 1 .0 39.4
MAX . 7 5 H 9 14 l 1 9 7 7 B 6 0 1 i
YEAR 1951 + 1948 194 8 1953 + 1952 1949 1951 1 961 1961 1 969 1952 1951 1961
MIN. 0 0 (1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 21
YEAR 1900 + 1907 + 1962 1902 + 196 3 1956 1960 1 960 + 195 3 1956 1 905 + 1904 + 1 9(1 4 f
YEARS OF RECORD 20. 20. 18. 19. 18. 19. 19. 18. 19. 19. 14. IB. 1 6 .
NO DAYS PRECIP GTR OR EO 0.5 IN AVE. .2 0.0 .3 .0 1.9 1.2 .7 . 5 .8 .5 0, ii . 1 6 â–  tl
MAX. 2 0 2 2 5 4 2 2 4 2 0 1 19
YEAR 194H 1S4B 1959 + 1952 + 1949 19 4 9 1965 + 196 3 1961 1 900 + 1 948 1958 1 9(4
MIN . 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 n '7
YEAR 1907 + 1907 + 1966 + 1905 + 1960 + 1904 + 1900 + 1 966 + 1962 + 1906 + 19661 1900 + 196 4
YEARS OF RECORD 19. 19. 17. 18. 17. 18. 18. 1 /. 18. 1H. 1H , 1 8. 10.
NO DAYS PREC IP GTR OR EO 1.0 IN AVE. 0.0 0.0 0.0 .2 .4 .4 .1 .1 .2 0.0 0.0 0 . II 1 . 1
MAX. U 0 0 1 2 2 1 1 2 0 0 0 3
YEAR 194 B 1 94 H 1948 190 4 + 1901 + 1 905 1905 + 1963 + 1900 1949 1 9 4 B 1 9411 1 960 +
MIN. 0 0 0 0 0 1) 0 0 0 0 0 n II
YEAR 1907 + 1907 + 1960 + 1960 + 1960 + t 904 + 1960 + 1 966 + 1905 + 1900 + 196 0 + 1906 + 1 9611 +
YEARS OF RECORD 19. 19. lb. 19. 19. 19. 18. 17. IB. 18. 18. 1 H . 1 1.
NUMIlKR OE DAYS WITH HAIL AVE. 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 .1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0,0 0.0 0.0 0.0 . 1
MAX. 0 0 0 0 1 (l 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
YEAR 1950 1 956 1950 1956 I960 1960 1950 1966 1956 1956 I960 1 950 I9 60
MIN. 0 0 0 0 (1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
YEAR 1907 + 1907 + 1966 + 196 6 + 1901. + 1906 + 1960 + 1 966 + 1966 + 1960 + 1 9f,6 ♦ 1906 + 1 965 +
YEARS OF RECORD 1 2. 12. 1 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 . 11. 1 1 . 1 1 . 1 1 . 10. 10.
*1 NOTE : MANY WEATHER STATIONS DO NOT RECORD ALL HAIL OCCURRENCES. THEREFORE THESE DATA MAY NOT HE REPRESENT A 11VE.
NO. OF DAYS WITH SNOW UN GROUND AVK. 0.0 0.0 99.9 0.0 0.(1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0 . U 99.9 99.9
(GTR OR EU 1 INCH ON GROUND) MAX. 0 0 999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 99 9 99
YEAR 1964 1903 0 1903 1963 190) 1 96 3 1 96 3 1903 1903 a <*b s u U
MIN. 0 0 999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1) 999 9 9 9
YEAH 1 966 + 1903 0 190 3 1900 + 1 966 + 19 66 + 1900 + 1900 + 1900 + 0 0
YEARS OF RECORD 2. 1 . 0. 1. 4, 4. 4. 4. 4. 4. 1 - o. 0.
PREPARED BY t Cfl|,lll(A|in CLIMATE CENTER
UKPAHNKHT 1JK AI 1U.SPI.tilC SCIENCE COLORADO ST A IK ON I V *• l

Meteorological Data Tor The Current Year
MvtR, Colorado
L3Qet2_____
Aver .tries
E
3
> E
Si
M.'j IT.8 ?7.3 33.1 ••3. SO. 7
58.9
59.8 99. 5 3 i • 0 22 18.7
S T API. r T ON TAUCONATIONAL AP
Standard iiinr used
Fltf/aliijii (ground) :
30
37.0
91.1 97.9
55.1
63.1
72.1 7 3.1
61.7 9 9,0
35.7 3U.9
2.0 | -.3
1.9 0.1
0.3
2.7 0.2 0.7
1.7 0.7
7.3
7.5
7.5 6.9 6."
8.6
CORRECTED AFTER PUBLICATION OT THE MONTHLY ISSUE.
Normals, Means, And Extremes
# Winds under Fastest Mile lietuHn^ are Fastest Ohs*.* 1-Minute winds with directions in compass points.
Temperatures °F Normal Dpgrpe days Has* 6b "F Precipitation in inches Relative humidity pet Wind ! i C a 0 o o l c i ? 3 2 > o U 2* Mean number of days
inal Extremes Wjtei equivalent Snow, Ice pellets 1 X 06 <1 2 X 11 oca 1 i n limr 3 B X 23 1 I II ? c c 8 i! <1- o Fastest mile Sunri-v n sunset E o u is i S -s| Is 1 1 % h a «. > T i o > * fe X :* len»i Max.
E | c E > 1 s 2 11 oc £ * is a \ a. 2 > ? s X ? I Z E ^ P B S § S E > ii 11 > I! 5 r< 2 .F 3 I > § 6 ii | If ic m •> >- ii 5 E | i n 5 >- ?, u li Q- U t) d u (1*) i> z »s •O !» Tn
98 98 98 98 88 98 90 ?? ?; 22 22 39 15 51 33 39 98 93 9“ 9e 9 8 ** 9? 27
.? 29.9 73 1992 -25 1963 1 0? 8 0 0.61 1 .99 1996 (3.01 1952 1.0? 1962 23.7 1998 12.9 1 96? 6 3 9 ‘ on 63 8.9 S 6 3 1 1976 7? 5.6 10 9 12 6 2 n 1 0
. 9 32.8 76 1963 -30 1936 902 0 0.67 1.66 1960 11. (11 1970 1.01 1953 16.3 196' 9.5 1953 65 9 92 69 9.1 5 9 V NW 1953 12 5.9 8 6 1? 6 ? * ? 0
• 8 37.0 89 1971 -1 1 1993 868 0 1.71 2.89 1999 0.1 3 1995 1.98 1959 79.7 1961 16.3 195? 6 9 9 (J 67 9.9 S 63 N w 195? 71 6.1 8 10 13 9 9 ♦ 1 (I
.9 97.5 85 I960 -2 1975 525 c 1 .73 9.17 1992 0.0 3 19b 3 3.25 1967 ?«.! 1936 1 7.J 195 / 67 3 39 6 ’ 10.3 6 56 NW I 96U 66 6.0 7 1 1 1? 9 3 i 1 (1
.6 5 7.0 V6 1992 22 1959 25 3 11 2.69 7.31 1957 0.06 1979 3.55 1973 13.6 1 95 C !0.7 1 9*0 >0 39 38 61 9.9 S 69 SE 1978 69 6.3 6 1 ? 13 1 1 • fc 1 *
.9 66.0 109 19 36 30 1951 80 139 1.93 9.69 1967 0.09 1980 3.16 1970 0 . I 1951 0.3 195. 691 37 35 59 9.0 S 9 ; s 1956 7? 5.0 in 17 8 9 n 10 • 6
.6 73.0 109 1939 93 1972 0 >61 1.78 6.9 1 1965 0.17 1939 2.82 1965 O.C 0.0 18 3 39 56i 8.9 5 56 sw 1965 77 9.9 9 ft. 6 9 11 * 16
.9 71.6 101 1938 91 t 969 0 203 1.29 8.85 1979 0.06 I960 3.93 1 951 o.u O.U 68 36 35 68 8.2 5 92 N 1 V 7P 77 5.U 10 19 7 9 0 « 1 10
.8 62. e 97 1960 20 1971 120 63 1.13 9.67 1961 T 1999 2.99 1936 21 . 1936 19.8 1936 (•* 3 3* 69 8.1 5 9 7 NW 1955 75 9.9 IT 9 8 6 • 3 1 2
.2 52.0 68 1 997 3 1969 908 8 1.13 9.17 1969 0-06 196? 1.71 199 7 31.7 1969 12.9 1 969 6 9 36 35 58 8.1 S 95 NW 1958 73 9 .9 19 9 P 5 i 1 1 n
.9 39.9 79 1 991 -8 1950 768 0 0.76 2.97 1996 0.01 1 999 1.29 J97S 39.1 1996 15.5 1796 68 'i IS 65 8.5 5 98 w 19621 65 5.9 1 1 9 in 5 2 • 1 0
. 9 32.6 75 1980 -18 1972 1009 U 0.9 3 2.89 1973 0.03 1977 2.00 1982 30.8 I97J 23.6 1987 69 9 5( 63 8.8 & 51 NE 1953 68 5.9 11 9 11 5 2 0 1 n
JUL FEB Ut SEP HAY NOV DEC JUL
.2 50.1 ! 09 1939 -30 1936 6016 680 15.51 7.31 1957 I 1999 3.55 1973 39.1 1996 23.6 1987 67 9 â– >? 60 8.9 5 56 SW 1965 7(1 5.9 117 128 120 88 18 91 in 39
NORMALS. MEANS. AW)) KXTRQiES TABLE NOTE(5) : 1. Extreme wind data is through l?Rl.
tli of record, year'., through the ent year unless otherwise noted, d on January data, and above at.Alaskan stations.
than one half, e.
NORMALS - Based on record for the 1941-1970 period.
DAK OF AN EXTREME - The most recent in cases of multiple occurrence.
PREVAILING WIND DIRECTION - Record through 1961.
WIND DIRECTION - Numerals indicate tens of deqrccs clockwise from true north. 00 h»*iic«t*?* ca!*.
FASTEST MILE WIND - Speed Is tastest observed 1-minute value when I he direction Is in tens of degrees.
Means and extremes above ere from existing and comparable exposures. Annual extremes have been exceeded at other sites in the locality us follows:
Tempexaturjg, l05 >n Au»- 18 78. Precipitation Maximum monthly : Minimum monthly : Maximum in 24 bouts: 8.57 0.00 6.53 In May in Dec. in May 1376 1881 1876
Wind l-astest mile: t»5 W in May 1933. Snowfall Tmx uiuiui monthly : 57.6 !n Dec. 1913


ANNUAL WIND ROSE 1977-lQ79
MEAN WIND SPEEDt 3.6 mph
360°
lao*
0.9'S


CLIMATIC DATA SUMMARY
SUNSHINE radiation TEMP. REL. HUM. PRECIP. SNOWFALL DD-HEAT DD-COOL
Hr/day BTU/sf•day “F % in. in. base 65 base 65


\
BIOCLIHATIC CHART

0
XtLATlVa HUKflOtrrV*


SUN POSITION CHART
attitude angles


The following pages are charts stating the solar position for the 21st day of each month of the year for each hour of the day. Given are the Altitude (AL) - the angular distance from the horizon to the sun and the Azimuth (AZ) - the angular distance between true north and the point on the horizon directly below the sun. The AL and AZ establish the sun's position in the sky. Also given are the USA -horizontal shading angle and VSA - vertical shading angle for each of the twelve months of the year and also three building orientations. Orientation 90° - East facing wall, Orientation 180° - South facing wall and Orientation 270° - West facing wall. On the following page are graphic descriptions of HSA, VSA, solar altitude and solar azimuth.


SUN ANGLES /SHADING - DEFINITIIONS
AS
(msa;
PLAN


SUN ANGLES/SHADING
DECEMBER
LOCATION * GREELEY SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION = 90
LATITUDE - 40 .5 LONGITUDE = 104.75
MONTH -12 DAY = 21
HR AL A7. VS A HSA
7.4 = SUNRISE
8 '•) •J M A~ 127.1 6.5 37.1
9 13.6 1 38.1 19.9 48.1
10 20.2 150.7 37 60.7
1.1 24.5 164.9 60.2 74.9
12 26.1 180 90 90
13 24.5 195.1 0 0
14 20.2 209.3 0 0
15 13.6 221.9 0 0
16 5.2 232.9 0 0
16. 6 - SUNSET
LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION » ISO
LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104.75 MONTH = 12 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
7.4 * SUNRISE
8 5.2 127.1 8.6 -52.9
9 13.6 138.1 18 -41.9
10 20.2 150.7 p p 9 -29.3
11 24.5 164.9 25.3 -15.1
12 26.1 180 26.1 0
1.3 24.5 195.1 25.3 15.1
14 20.2 209.3 '•> '*> n A., a’.. i» 7 29.3
1.5 13.6 221.9 18 41.9
16 5.2 232.9 8.6 52.9
16. 6 a SUNSET
LOCATION ■ GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION “ 270
LATITUDE * 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104.75 MONTH ~ 12 DAY * 21
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
7.4 - SUNRISE
8 5.2 127.1 0 0
9 13.6 138.1 0 0
10 20.2 150.7 0 0
11 24.5 164.9 0 0
12 26.1 180 0 0
13 24.5 195.1 60.2 -74.9
14 20.2 209.3 ~r ~r O/ -60.7
15 13.6 '•> '*> H O a'., a*.. .1. h / 19.9 -48.1
16 5.2 O *** '*> o A.. vJ A.. II 7 6.5 -37.1
16.6 * SUNSET


SUN ANGLES/SHADING -
JANUARY AND NOVEMBER
LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION - 90 LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE = MONTH = 1. j||| DAY = 21
104.75
HR AL AZ VSA HSA
7 m 8 = SUNRISE 7.7 124.9 9.3 34.9
9 16.3 136.2 23 46.2
10 n *7 0 A.. n V.. 149.3 40.1 59.3
11 27.B 164.1 62.5 74.1
12 29.4 180 90 90
13 27.8 195.9 0 0
14 0 7 O \i» H A*. 210.7 0 0
15 16.3 223.8 0 0
16 7.7 235.1 0 0
16.8
SUNSET
LOCATION ~ GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION * 180
LATITUDE - 40.5 LONGITUDE * 104.75 MONTH - 1 -4 |l DAY =21
HR AL AZ VSA HSA
7.2 * SUNRISE
8 7.7 124.9 13.2 -55.1
9 16.3 136.2 on 1 A. Am N .1. -43.8
10 23.2 149.3 26.6 -30.7
1.1 27.8 164.1 28.7 -15.9
12 29.4 1.80 29.4 0
13 27.3 195.9 28.7 15.9
14 23.2 210.7 26.6 30.7
1.5 16.3 223.8 22.1 43.8
1.6 7.7 235.1 13.2 55.1
16.: y = SUNSE T
LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 270
LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE » 104.75
MONTH = 1 4 || DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VSA HSA
7.2 » SUNRISE
8 7.7 124.9 0 0
9 16.3 136.2 0 0
1.0 23.2 149.3 0 0
11 27.8 164.1 0 0
12 29.4 180 0 0
1.3 27.8 195.9 62.5 -74.1
14 23.2 210.7 40.1 -59.3
15 16.3 223.8 23 -46.2
1.6 7.7 235.1 9.3 -34.9
16.8 =
SUNSET


SUN ANGLES/SHADING -
FEBRUARY AND OCTOBER
LOCATION » GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 90
LATITUDE » 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104.75 MONTH a 2^|O DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VSA HSA
6.6 a SUNRISE
~r 3.8 108.3 4 18.3
8 14.3 118.8 16.2 28.8
9 23.6 130.8 30 40.8
10 31.3 145 46.6 55
11 36.4 161.6 66.9 71.6
12 38.3 180 90 90
13 36.4 198.4 0 0
14 31.3 215 0 0
15 23.6 229-2 0 0
16 14.3 241.2 0 0
17 3.8 251.7 0 0
17.4 a SUNSET
LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 180
LATITUDE a 40.5 LONGITUDE a 104.75 MONTH = 2 4 \o DAY « 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
6.6 a SUNRISE
7 3.8 108.3 12 -71.7
8 14.3 118.8 27.8 -61.2
9 23.6 130.8 33.8 -49.2
1.0 31.3 145 36.6 -35
11 36.4 161.6 37.9 -18.4
12 t s CD 180 38.3 0
13 t 198.4 37.9 18.4
14 31.3 215 36.6 35
.1.5 23.6 n n o n «. A.. / «f C. 33.8 49.2
16 14.3 241.2 27.8 61.2
17 3.8 251.7 12 71.7
17.4 a SUNSET
LOCATION a GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION a 270
LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE a 104.75 MONTH a 2 i \o DAY â–  21
HR AL A 7 VSA HSA
6.6 a SUNRISE
7 3.8 108.3 o 0
8 14.3 118.8 0 0
9 23.6 130.8 0 0
10 31.3 145 0 0
11 36.4 161.6 0 0
1.2 38.3 180 0 0
13 36.4 198.4 66.9 -71.6
14 31.3 215 46.6 -55
15 23.6 229 - 2 30 -40.8
1 6 14.3 241.2 16.2 -28.8
17 3.8 251.7 4 -18.3
17.4 a
SUNSE ('


SUN ANGLES/SHADING
MARCH AND SEPTEMBER
LOCATION * GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION ~ 90 LATITUDE * 40.5 LONGITUDE = MONTH » 3 ^ °| DAY a 21 104.75
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
6 ~ SUNRISE
•7 11 . 1 100.2 11»3 10.2
9 22.1 1 10 9 23.4 20.9
9 32.2 123.3 37 33.3
1.0 40.8 138.6 52.6 48.6
11 46.9 157.8 70.5 67.8
12 49.1 180 90 90
13 46.9 202.2 0 0
14 40.8 221.4 0 0
1.5 32.2 236.7 0 0
16 22.1 249.1 0 0
17 11. 1 259.. 8 0 0
18 -.3 269.7 .3 0
18 » SUNSET
LOCATION " GREELEY SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION - 180
LAT ITUDE = 40 . 5 LONG ITUDE = 104.75
MONTH = 3 ^ DAY a 21
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
6 a SUNRISE
7 11 .1 100.2 47.9 ••-79.8
8 22.1 110.9 48.7 -69.1
9 32.2 123.3 48.9 -56»7
10 40.8 138.6 49 -41.4
11 46.9 157.8 49.1 -22.2
12 49.1 180 49.1 0
13 46.9 202.2 49.1 22.2
14 40.8 221.4 49 41.4
15 32.2 236.7 48.9 56.7
16 22.1 249.1 48.7 69.1
17 11.1 259.8 47.9 79.8
18 -.3 269.7 0 89.7
18 = SUNSET
LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION ~ 270
LATITUDE " 40. 5 LONGITUDE a 104.75
MONTH = 3 4 °\ DAY : = 21
HR AL. AZ VSA HSA
6 == SUNRISE
7 11 „ 1 100.2 0 0
8 22.1 110.9 0 0
9 32.2 123.3 0 0
10 40.8 138.6 0 0
11 46.9 157.8 0 0
12 49.1 180 0 0
13 46.9 202.2 70.5 -67.8
14 40.8 221.4 52.6 -48.6
15 32.2 236.7 37 -33.3
16 22 „ 1 249.1 23.4 -20.9
17 11.1 259.8 11.3 -10.2
18 •. 3 269.7 0 -.3
18 a SUNSET
ro ^


SUN ANGLES/SHADING -APRIL AND AUGUST
i
LOCATION - OREELEV SOLAR • TIME
ORIENTATION ~. 90
LATITUDE = 40.5 LONS 1 : T! IDE “ 104.75
MONTH = A ij g, DAY = « 21
HR AL A7. USA USA
5,3 - SUNRI SE
6 7. S 81 . 1 7,6 -8.9
7 18.? 90.7 18.9 '7
8 30.2 101. 30.7 i:i.
9 41.1 113.2 43.5 2 3.2
10 50.8 129.1 57.7 39.1
11 58.2 151.2 73.4 61 .. 2
12 61 .1 1.80 90 90
13 58.2 208.8 0 0
14 50.8 230.9 0 0
15 41 . 1 246.8 0 0
1.4 30.2 25? 0 0
1.7 18.9 26?. 3 0 0
18 7.5 278.9 0 0
18.7 - SUNSET
LOCATION - GREELEY ORIENTATION = 180 SOLAR TIME
LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE - 104.75
MONTH - 4 $ & DAY - 21
HR AL A Z USA USA
5.. 3 = SUNRISE
6 7.5 81. . 1 0 0
/ 1.8,9 • 90.7 87.9 -89.3
8 30.2 101 71.8 -7?
9 41 . 1 113.2 65.7 -66.. 8
10 50,8 129.. 1 62.8 -50»9
11 58,2 151.2 61.. 5 -28.8
12 61.1 1.80 61 .. 1 0
13 58.2 208.. 8 61.5 28»8
14 50.8 2309 62.8 50.9
15 41 .. 1 246.8 657 66.. 8
1.6 30.2 259 71.8 7?
17 18.. 9 269.3 87.9 89.3
18 7.5 278.9 0 0
18,, 7 » SUNSET
LOG AT ION - GRI EEl EY SOLAR TIME
ORIENTATION = 270
LATITUDE - 40 .5 LONG ITUDE - 104.75
MONTH = 4 la \ DAY = 21
HR AL AZ USA USA
5.3 ; â–  SUNRISE
6 7.5 81. , 1. 0 0
7 18.9 90.7 0 0
8 30.2 101 0 0
9 41.1. 113.2 0 0
10 50.8 129.1 0 0
11 58.2 1 51. . 2 0 0
1.2 61. 1 180 0 0
13 58.2 208.8 73.4 -61.2
14 50.8 230.9 57.7 -3?.. 1
1.5 41.1 246.8 43.5 -23.2
16 30.2 259 30.7 -11
17 1.8.9 269.3 18.9 -.7
18 7.5 278.9 7.6 8.9
18. .7 â–  SUNSET
>0 N


!
SUN ANGLES/SHADING -MAY AND JULY
LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 90
LATITUDE â–  40.5 LONGITUDE * 104.75
MONTH - 5 47 DAY - 21
HR AL AZ OS A MSA
4.7 SUNRISE
O 2 „ 2 A 5 „ 2 2.5 -24 „ 8
6 12.9 7 4 „ 4 13.4 -15.6
â– 7 / 24.1 83.5 24.2 - 6.5
8 35.5 93 33.5 3
<;> 46.. 8 104 „ 3 47.7 14.3
10 57 „ 3 119 . A 60.. 9 29.6
11 A 5.. 9 143.. 4 75.1 53.4
12 A 9.. A 130 90 90
1 3 A 5.9 21A .. A 0 0
! 4 57.3 240.. 4 0 0
15 4 6.8 255.7 0 0
16 35.5 2A7 0 0
1 7 24 „ 1 276.5 0 0
18 12.. 9 285.. A 0 0
19 2 - 2 294.8 0 0
19 3 ~ SUNSET
L 0 C A T10 N = G R E E L E Y S 01... A R TI h E ORIENTATION - 180 LATITUDE 40.5 LONGITUDE ~ MONTH =547 DAY =21 104.75
HR AL AZ OS A USA
4.7 * SUNRISE
5 2.2 65.2 0 0
A 12.9 74.4 0 0
7 24.1 83 „ 5 0 0
8 35» 5 93 85.8 -87
9 46.8 104.3 76.9 -75.7
10 57.3 119.6 72.4 "60.4
11 65.9 143 „ 4 70.3 -36.6
12 69.6 180 69.6 0
13 65.9 216.6 70.3 36.6
14 57.3 240.4 72.4 60.4
15 46.8 255.7 76 „ 9 75.7
16 35„5 267 85.8 87
17 24.1 276.5 0 0
18 12.9 285.6 0 0
19 2.2 294.8 0 0
19.3 = SUNSET
LOCATION ~ GREELEY SOL AR TIME
ORIENTATION - 270
LATITUDE ■ 40. 5 LONGITUDE “ 104.. 75
MONTH = 547 DAY â–  21
HR AL AZ OS A USA
4.7 = SUNRISE
5 2.2 65.2 0 0
6 12.9 74.4 0 0
7 24.1 83.5 0 0
8 35.5 93 0 0
9 46.8 104.3 0 0
10 57.3 119.6 0 0
11 65.9 143.4 0 0
12 69.6 180 0 0
13 65.9 216.6 75 „ 1 -53.4
14 57.3 240.4 60.9 -29.6
15 46.8 255.7 47.7 -14.3
16 35.5 267 35.5 -3
17 24.1 276.5 24.2 6.5
18 12.9 285.6 13.4 15. A
19 2.2 294.8 2 n \J 24.8
19.3 = SUNSET


SUN ANGLES/SHADING -JUNE
LOCATION * GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION ~ ?0
LATITUDE ~ 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104.75 MONTH = 6 DAY - 21
HR AL AZ USA HSA
4.5 5 = SUNRISE 4.5 62.7 s -27.3
6 15 71.7 15.7 -18.3
7 26 80.5 26.4 -9.5
8 37.4 89.7 37.4 -.3
9 487 100.4 49.2 10.4
10 59.6 114 . 9 62 24.9
11 68.3 139 75.7 49
12 72.9 180 90 90
13 68.8 221 0 0
14 59.6 245.1 0 0
15 48.7 259.6 0 0
16 37.4 270 „ 3 0 0
17 26 279.5 0 0
18 15 288.3 0 0
1.9 4 Ti 297.3 0 0
LOCAT ION « GREET.EY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 100
LATITUDE ~ 40.5 LONGITUDE -- 104.75 MONTH â– = 6 DAY = 21
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
4.5 = SUNRISE
5 4.5 62.7 0 0
6 15 71.7 0 0
7 26 80.5 0 0
8 37.4 89.7 0 0
9 48.7 100.4 81 -79.6
10 59.6 11 4 „ 9 76.1 -65» 1
11 68.8 139 73.7 - 41
12 72.9 180 72.9 0
13 68.8 221 73.7 41
14 59.6 245.1 76.1 65.1
15 48.7 259.6 81. 79.6
16 37.4 270.3 0 0
17 26 279.5 0 0
18 15 288 „ 3 0 0
19 4 „ 5 297.3 0 0
19.5 a SUNSET
LOCATION a GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION a 270
LATITUDE a 40. MONTH a ^ 5 LONGITUDE a DAY = 21 104.75
HR AL AZ VS A HSA
4.5 a SUNRISE
5 4.5 62.7 0 0
6 15 71.7 0 0
7 26 80.5 0 0
8 374 89.7 0 0
9 48.7 100.4 0 o
10 59.6 114.9 0 0
11 68.8 139 0 0
12 72.9 1 80 0 0
13 60-8 221 75.7 -49
14 59.6 245.1 62 -24.9
15 48.7 259.6 49.2 -10.4
16 37.4 270.3 37.4 .3
1 7 26 279.5 26.4 9.5
18 15 288.3 15.7 18.. 3
19 4 „ 5 297.3 IT, W 27.3


CLIMAT (MAHONEY TABLES) COMPUTER PRINTOUT
LOOAT JON GREE LEY COL
LONG ITUBE 104 75 W
LAT I TUBE 40.5 N
ALT I( ODE 4650 FT
TABLE 1 CL I MATH : DATA < DEG C )
MONTH MAX MIN RANGE
JAN 4. .1. -10.8 14.8
FE'.D 8.7 -6.8 15.5
MAR 1 2 - 6 -3.8 16.4
APR 12 1 10.9
MAY 22.4 6-2 16.2
JUN 28.. 6 11.2 17.4
JUL 31.7 14.2 17.4
AUG 30.. 5 12.6 17 „ 8
SEP 26 . 1 7.3 18.7
OCT 19.3 1.3 17.9
NOV 10.2 -4-9 15.1
DEC 6-2 -8.8 15
HIGH = 3.1 "7 n / LOW = -10.8
AMT - 10 . 4 AMR = 42.5
TABLE 2 CLIMATIC DA T A < RH,PRECIPr WIND )
MONTH MAX MIN AVE G RAIN
JAN 62 45 53.5 3 .48
FEB 67 43 5 5 3 . 28
MAR 69 41 55 3 .95
APR 69 34 51.5 3 1.94
M A Y 70 37 53.5 3 2.65
JUN 72 37 54.5 3 1.81
JUL 71 36 53.5 3 1.21
AUG 69 34 51.5 3 1.15
SEP 71 36 53.5 3 1. 13
OCT 65 36 50.5 3 .99
NOV 69 45 57 3 .76
DEC 66 45 55.5 3 .47
TOTAL
.1.3-02
TABLE 3 DIAGNOSIS
MAX DAY- UP LOW < NIGHT - MIN UP > STRI LOW D N
JAN 4 26 19 -10.919 C C
FEB 8.6 26 19 -6.9 19 c C
MAR 12.6 26 19 -3.3 19 c c
APR 12 26 19 1 19 c c
MAY 22.3 26 19 6.1 19 0 c
JUN 28.6 26 19 11.1 19 H c
JUL 31.7 26 19 14.1 1 9 H 0
AUG 30.5 26 1.9 12.6 19 H 0
SEP 26.1 26 19 7.3 19 H c
OCT 19.2 26 19 1.2 19 0 c
NOV 10.1 26 19 -5 19 C c
DEC 6.1 26 19 -8.9 19 G c
TABLE 4 INDICATORS
MONTH H1 M2 H3 A1 A 2 to i JAN 0 0 0 <1 J. O 1
FEB 0 0 0 1 0 :l.
MAR 0 0 0 •1 J. 0 :l
APR 0 0 0 1 0 1
MAY 0 0 0 1 0 0
JUN 0 0 0 •1 .1. 0 0
JUL 0 0 0 .1 0 0
AUG 0 0 0 1 0 0
SEP 0 0 0 1 0 0
OCT 0 0 0 1 0 0
NO v 0 0 0 1. 0 1
DEC 0 0 0 J. 0 1
TOTAL 0 0 0 12 0 6


tf tt ft tt *v ft tt St tf tt it it it L A Y 0IJ T it it tf)) ft tt it it itif tttftt ft ft ifft BUILDINGS SHOULD BE ORIENTATED ON AN
e a s r ~ w e s r a x i s, r h e i... o n g e l e v a t i o n s
FACING NORTH AND SOUTH TO REDUCE EXPOSURE TO THE SUN.
it it it tttiti ft tt ft ft ft ft S P A CIN G tt ft tt ft ft ft ft tt ft ft ft ft ft tt it ft ft ft
COMPACT PLANNING IS RECOMMENDED IF THE AIR M0VEMENT RE0UIREMENT IS SIGNIF1CANT.
ft ft ft ft tt ft ft tt ft AIR M 0 V E M E N T tt tt tt ft tt tt ft tt tt it tt It tt tt tt
IF AIR MOVEMENT IS NEVER ESSENTIAL ,
AMD IS DESIRABLE FOR NOT MORE THAN A MONTH, ROOMS CAN BE DOUBLE BANKED AS THERE IS NOT MUCH NEED FOR CROSS VENTILATION.
tt tt ft tt ft it it tt tt tt tt ft tt 0 p E NIN G S tt tt ft ft tt tt tt »* tt tt tt tt ft ft tt tt
'VERY SMALL', LESS THAN 20 % OF THE WALL.
tt tt ft ft tt ft ft tt tt tt ft ft tt tt ft ft tt ft W A I... L S tt tt tt ft if tf ft ft ft ft tt tt tt tt
DOTH EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL WALLS SHOULD BE MASSIVE.
tt ft tf ft tf ft ft tt ft tf ft ft f»tt ft tt R 0 0 F S tf ft tt ft ft tt tf it ft tt tf tt *t tt ft
A HEAVY ROOF, WITH SUBSTANTIAL THERMAL CAPACITY, GIVING A TIME LAG OF AT LEAST 0 HOURS.
tt ft ft tt tt tf it ft tf it ft (.1U T D 0 0 R S L E E P T N G ft ft ft tt ft ft tf tf ft ft
I tttttttttHMt tttftt RAIN PROTECTION ft tttt flit tiff ft it it ft
TABLE 4 DETAIL RECOMMENDATIONS
ft tf tiff tiff ft ft ft tt SIZE OF OPENING ftttff tiff tiff ft ft ft ft ft MEDIUM t 25 - 40%
ttitiittitfttiitttit POSITION OF OPENINGS ft ft ft ft tt it ft
tUt it it if if tttt it it PROTECTION OF OPENINGS tUftUUt
it tilt tftt If ftttff it WALLS AND FLOORS tttttttttttttifUttUt
HEAVY, OVER 8 HOURS TIME-LAG.
ft ft ft tt tf ft ft tt ft tt R 0 0 F S tt tt tf St tt tt f t tHI i! f ? ft ft tt t? ft tt tt tt ft ft tt
HEAVY, OVER 8 HOURS TIME-LAG.
It it It ft tut it tt ft tt E X T E R t! A I... F E A T U R E S it it it tt tf tf tt tt tt ft
END OF CL IMAT


DESIGN GUIDELINES BASED ON CLIMATE ANALYSIS
Greeley's climate can best be characterized by low precipitation, low humidity, a good amount of sunshine, but with a moderate range of temperatures throughout the year. Both climatic evaluation and analysis techniques point this out with the CI.IMAT recommendations being very specific with regard to design considerations. These recommendations are summarized below.
The building orientation should be on an east-west axis.
This layout will reduce the exposure to the sun in the morning and evenings. It also allows an opportunity to capture the abundant sun which can be used to heat in the winter and for easy control in the hot summers.
Ventilation does not seem to be a problem and therefore rooms can be double banked. The humidity is low enough, along with the daily highs so that there is no great need to move the air. This is especially evident on the Bioclimatic Chart where the temperatures are almost always below the comfort zone except in June, July and August. In June, July and August, this "discomfort" could easily be remedied by a small breeze and/or evaporative cooling.
The size of openings should be between small and medium, pointing out that the winters are somewhat cold and careful control needs to be applied to the summer sun. Through careful design, however, the sun can be admitted when desired and omitted when not desired.
Walls, floors and roofs should be heavy with an 8 hour time lag again points out the need to control warm summer temperatures and cool winters, both which can be done with massive walls and time lag. Mass helps to stabilize the large annual mean range temperature.
Rain protection is not a main factor in Greeley. The annual precipitation is not large enough to dictate special design considerations.
70


In summary, the most distinguishing aspect of Greeley's climate is its large annual mean temperature swings, but at the same time great potential exists because of the abundance of solar radiation. The swing is more of an opportunity and not so much of a problem also because of the low humidity. Greeley appears to have an ideal climate for solar design.




Before designing the Community Center for Recreation it is very important to understand who and when the building is used. That information is contained within this USER PROFILE section.
no


WHO
Simply stated, the building should be designed with the ENTIRE community in mind. In doing so, the building should be open to the general public but at the same time cater to the needs of specific groups within the community. Specifically, some of these special groups should include the Seniors of the community who share the site and could greatly benefit from the facility; civic groups who need meeting and banquet spaces frequently; the public school system who will use the swimming pool for competitive swim meets and have contributed financially to its construction; and, finally, handicap community who all too often are forgotten in our society. The Park and Recreation Department offices are also contained within the building, so it is very important to provide a good working environment for all these professionals. ALL the individuals who make up Greeley's community, however, should be considered when designing the building. It is also important to understand that these groups or many individuals will want to use various portions of the facility at the same time. Multiuse of the facility is very important.
WHEN The operating hours of the center must be very flexible
to accommodate all. the citizens' needs. Many people prefer to exercise or swim as early as 6:00 a.m. before going to work. Conversely, the city's basketball leagues may be active until 11:00 or 12:00 at night on the same day.
Much of the use activity patterns of the building will be determined by how the Park and Recreation Department schedules the building and what programs are offered. This again points out that the building should be flexible enough to allow the Recreation Department ot schedule what they want and now having the building be ci limitation to what can be done. The facility must be able to accommodate a large number of people or groups engaged in a wide range of activities on a year-round basis.
0'>




The overall planning of this unique downtown site is crucial for the success of the Community Center for Recreation, the future Community Theatre, and for the continuous success of the Seniors Center. This SITE DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA section establishes the phasing of development; the future size and need of the Community Theatre; various site relationships; and specific development requirements on the site such as service access, pedestrian circulation, parking, landscaping, exterior spaces, and solar energy requirements .


PHASING
PHASING Phase One of this site development is the construction of the Community Center for Recreation. During construction of the Center, the existing recreation facility must remain functional. After the new center is complete and occupied by the Park and Recreation Department, the old center is to be demolished allowing that portion of the site to be developed. Since no date has been set for the start of Phase Two, the building should be attractive and the site should not appear that it is only partially developed. Phase Two is the construction of a 500-seat Community Theatre. At the conclusion of this phase, the entire site would be fully developed and appear as if the site was developed at one time.
COMMUNITY THEATRE This facility should be designed to accommodate an intimate audience program of dance, theatre (both community and touring), classical soloists, chamber music, limited audience lectures, mime and puppet shows. A fully equipped stage and a 500-seat theatre should accommodate most of these events. In addition to the theatre, the Community Theatre should include support facilities for staging productions, meeting rooms, gallery space, public restrooms and a lobby area. For site planning purposes a building footprint of 120 feet by 120 feet should be used. The stage height would be between 40 to 45 feet high. The stage area needs to be accessed by vehicles up to semi-trucks with trailers. This access would require a space where a semi could be parked for a period of time while it was being unloaded and not disrupt either vehicular or pedestrian traffic.
SITE IMAGE Because of its prominent location, the image of the site should be very strong, inviting, one which speaks to energy issues, and one which develops the final site around in a way the community will be proud of. The site should give the appear ance of being a complete development after Phase One and again after Phase Two. Since it may be several years before the Community Theatre is built, the site should not appear half finished until it is completely developed.
86


SITE RELATIONSHIPS
SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS
The most important aspect to the entire site development is that all the buildings, parking, and landscaping and circulation should work together to make the site one unified place and not just a group of buildings. The Center and Theatre should respect the existing Seniors Center. They should try and respect its rather small massing and should not shade the entry or sidewalks leading to the entry. The Seniors Center is very successful and the future development should enhance it.
The relationship to the Greeley School is not as critical due to its large mass and because of the buffer its parking lot provides. The structure, however, is a beautiful old building and any way it can be enhanced and included in the development will be positive for the entire site. The portion of the site presently occupied by the existing recreation center is fairly close to the school and will be somewhat more crucial than the larger portion of the site.
The relationship between the two unbuilt buildings, the Recreation Center and Theatre, will be the most important. Each building needs to function independent of itself and at the same time complement each other. There may also be times when the two facilities work together. For example, dinner could be served in the recreation center's multipurpose room prior to a theatre production in the theatre. Because of this, the two facilities may need to be in fairly close proximity to each other. There also should be a feeling of entering the site with neither the recreation center of the theatre dominating the site.
Service Access: As previously mentioned, the Community Theatre needs access to the stage area by a semi-truck (backing in is adequate - no turnaround required). The recreation center needs access to the kitchen, trash area, and pool filter room.
Pedestrian Circulation: Pedestrian ways should link all uses on the site to each other as well as to the Civic Center, Lincoln Park, the central business district and the neighboring residential areas. There should be an


effort made to minimizing crossing conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles.
Parking: As mentioned under LEGAL CONSTRAINTS, only
thirty parking spaces are required on site, three of which must be for handicapped users. A parking area should also be provided for two school buses. All parking should be convenient to entrances to both buildings. Users will be required to enter the buildings through their main lobbies, A drop>-off area should also be provided in front of both buildings, if possible. The number of curb cuts should be minimized. It should also be remembered that most of the parking to be used for these facilities will be on street, near the mall, and across the street in the Civic Center parking (to be used at night), Several of the on-site parking should be dedicated to Park and Recreation employees. Parking lots should be visually screened from public streets and adjacent users by firms and/or planting.
Landscaping: The entire site should be integrated through
a consistent landscape treatment. All bxiilding entrances should be reinforced where possible with special landscape treatment.
Exterior Spaces: Exterior spaces which should be included on the site might include an outdoor sunbathing space adjacent to the pool, a meeting area adjacent to the multipurpose room, a play area adjacent to the Youth Activity Room, and an area adjacent to the crafts room. Other grand exterior spaces to emphasize entry and circulation should also be developed.
Solar Energy: All structures should be sited such that other structures and important pedestrian links are not shaded. Special care should also be given so as not to shade solar collectors for the pools heating system.


I
i


This section contains SPACE REQUIREMENTS for all programmed spaces to be provided within the Community Center for Recreation. This program is adapted from a program developed by the Park and Recreation Department for the City of Greeley, Colorado.


SUMMARY OF PROGRAMMED SPACES
Space Pesoription
* Lobbv/Lounge
â–  Reception/Control
' Gameroom
Vending
• Public Restrooms
. Multipurpose Room
â–  Food Service Kitchen Area
â–  Youth Activity Area Crafts Room
Secretary/Receptionists Directors Office Superintendents Office (2)
Conference Room Office Storage/Workroom Pe rsonno1 Off ice/Lounge Staff Lounge/Maii Room Supervisors Offices (3)
Facilities Manager Office Park Planner/Interns Locker Rooms Restrooms at Lockers (2)
Shower Rooms/Sauna (2)
Large Physical Activity Room
Physical Activities Office
Auxiliary Physical Activity Room
D an c e/Gymna s t i cs
Weight Training
Racketball Courts
Pool/Hatatorium
Pool Storage
Pool Offices (2)
Pool Filter Room
TOTAL MET ASSIGNABLE SPACE
UNASSIGNABLE SPACE (Walls, circulation, electrical spaces)
25% of Net
TOTAL GROSS SPACE
i
'I
Stjua re Foot age Keg ui red
1,100
450
300
1 Tfl X&U
2,000
2*500
1,050
700
2,000
240
.192
240
500
200
300
240
3G0
120
220
1,000
6 00
1,250
10,000
220
5,500
1,300
800
3,200
11,000
280
240
Kfjn
'J
49,722 SF
mechanical avid 12,430 SF
62,152 SF
a i


Lobby/Lounge
Nature of Activities: The primary function of the Lobby/
Lounge is to provide an open space at the buildings main entry where people can unite, read, relax, and sit. The space will also provide a gathering srea for people waiting to use the facility or to watch an event.
Number Involved in Activity: 8 to 120
Spatial Characteristics: As the main entrance to the building, the Lobby/Lounge should be inviting. Once inside, the space should feel spacious, cheery, and draw the person in and help orient him to the rest of the building. The feeling of the activities beyond should be present within the space. People should feel energetic and want to participate in the activities within the building. Congestion, even at peak use time, should be minimized and should not encroach on the waiting room.
Functional Relationships: Immediately adjacent to Reception/ Control, gameroom, pub Lie restrooms, and within close proximity to the pool, multi-purpose rooms, administration, nursery, and the activity rooms. Must be centrally located for both users and spectators. Strong relationship to the outdoors, exterior circulation and parking.
Accessibility: To all easily including the handicapped.
Furnishings and Equipment: Display case, bulletin board, several movable seats, couches, and tables, clocks, magazine racks, and public telephones.
Storage Requirements: None
Surface Treatments: Durable carpets with mats at entry doors, brightly colored durable walls.
Size Requirements:
1,000 SF with high ceiling.


Lighting: Natural daylighting desired. Zone lighting
at sitting area is separately controlled. 40 foot-
candles overall with up to 60 footcandles in reading area.
Acoustics: Softer sounds so sounds are riot loud.
Plumbing: Public drinking fountain.
HVAC: Normal, special heating at entry doors, some
ventilation.


Reception/Controi
Nature of Activities: The Reception/Controi area is both a key public relations and/or control point for the entire building. The area serves as the information center, ticket sales center, equipment checkout center, and a point of supervision over bhe Lobby/Lounge and Gameroom. It also serves as control point over circulation to all parts of the building for the user and spectators alike.
Number Involved in Activity: 2 to 5
Spatial Characteristics: Space composed of two distinct areas. 1) Counter which is interfaced between worker and building user; and 2) secured area for equipment storage and clerical area. Visual control from area to public must be maintained at all times. Tickets and cash registers should be out of the public reach. The area should be appealing and its purpose self evident to one entering Lhe building.
Functional Relationships: Directly adjacent to the Lobby/ Lounge, visually adjacent to Gameroom, and at key point to control circulation at all points of the building.
Accessibility: The front portion of the area should be
accessible to the entire lobby while the office and storage portion should be completely secure from the public. Entire area securable if desired.
Furnishings and Equipment: Two desks, two chairs, four stools, cash register, typewriters, copy machine, file cabinets, and equipment storage.
Storage Requirements: Equipment - balls, nets, tickets, etc., and also small office supplies, information brochures.
Surface Treatments: Soft floors, acoustical ceiling, light durable walls.
n a


Size Requirements: 450 SF
Lighting: 70 footcandles in clerical areas, accent
lighting at counter.
Acoustic: Isolate typing and clerical sounds from Lobby/
Lounge.
Plumbing: None
HVAC: Normal


Gameroom
Nature of Activities: The gameroom will house a variety of games including several video games, chess, backgammon, pool table, ping pong table, foosball, and air hockey.
The exact games could vary. The use could be casual drop in for all age groups, organized tournaments, or instructional.
Number Involved in Activity: Up to twenty
Spatial Characteristics: An enclosed room devoted strictly to electronic and traditional games. A portion of the room must be darker for video games and the other area needs to be better lit for table games. Space should not be cramped so activity around tables is not limited.
Functional Relationships: Visually controlled by Reception/ Control desk and directly adjacent to Lobby/Lounge area.
Accessibility: Available to all members of the community.
Some equipment (pool cues, chess pieces, etc.), available from Reeeption/Control desk.
Furnishings and Equipment: Video games, pool table, ping going table, foosball, etc., numerous tables for backgammon and chess, as well as seats.
Storage Requirements: None
Surface Treatments: Soft floors, soundproof walls and ceiling as much as possible.
Size Requirements: 800 SF
Lighting: Minimize natural lighting because of glare with
games. Provide direct downlighting at various table games and keep video games at darker level. Entire lighting on dimmer system.


Acoustics: Minimize all acoustical noise within room
and completely isolate room acoustically from Lobby/ Lounge.
Plumbing: None
HVAC:
Normal


Vending Nature of Activity: The sale od prepackaged foods and beverages from vending machines. Number Involved in Activity: One to six Spatial Characteristics: Small, isolated room with several vending machines. Functional Relationship: Near Lobby/Lounge and Reception/ Control. These foods not allowed in other areas of the building, especially pool and physical activity areas. Accessibility: Available to all members of the community. Furnishings and Equipment: Several vending machines. Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Walls and floors easy to clean. Size Requirements: 120 SF Lighting: 30 footcandles Acoustics: No special considerations. Plumbing: None
IIVAC: Normal


Public Restrooms Nature of Activities: Men's and women's restrooms for
the buildings users and workers.
Number Involved in Activity: One to twelve, each room.
Spatial Characteristics: Clean, hygenic, well-lit environment.
Functional Relationships: Adjacent to Lobby/Lounge and if it is determined a second level is desired, additional restrooms should be located upstairs. Will also be used by people using multi-purpose room, spectators in pools, crafts, and the building offices.
Accessibility: Available to users and workers of building.
Each should include handicapped fixtures.
Furnishings and Equipment: Mirrors, handicap grab bars in one stall, hand dryers, and paper dispenser.
Storage Requirements: None
Surface Treatments: Hard flooring with easy to clean walls and floors, solid ceiling.
Size Requirements: 2,000 SF (1,000 SF for men, 1,000 SF for women).
Lighting: 30 footcandles
Acoustics: No special treatment required.
Plumbing: Women - 6 water closets*, 5 lavatories
Men - 3 water closets*, 4 urinals, 4 lavatories
* Includes one accessible by handicap in each room
IIVAC: Normal with exhausting required.


Multi-Purpose Room
Nature of Activities: As the name implies, this room needs to be very flexible to accommodate a wide range of activities.
It should be designed to accommodate such activities as community service club meetings, luncheons, dining banquets, social dancing, square dancing, lectures, classes, craft: displays, slide shows, and other uses which could constantly change.
Number Involved in Activity: 20 to 250
Spatial Characteristics: Very flexible space. Space has capability to be divided into three subspaces, each of which can function at the same time. Able to have natural light; or made completely dark if desired. Possibly adjacent to outdoors space.
Functional Relationships: Very close to Lobby/Lounge and public restrooms. Immediately adjacent to Food Service Kitchen, must pass Reception/Control before entering space.
Accessibility: Control desired so that the room is accessible
only to group(s) who has scheduled its use. This degree of privacy should also apply to each separate room when large room is subdivided into two or three spaces. Each subspace accessible without entering other subspaces. All rooms access controlled by Reception/Control desk, or possible access from outdoors. Handicap access required.
Furnishings andEquipment: Two movable soundproof partitions, portable tables and chairs for dining and meetings, portable stage and podium, movie screen.
Storage Requirements: Coat storage (check room for 200 coats), chair and table trays, and stage storage. Provide some cabinets for storage along walls.
Surface Treatments: Hard floor not affected by street shoes, light walls, acoustic ceiling.


Full Text

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ARCHIVES LD 1190 Al2 198 4 838 RECREATION AN ARCHITECTURAL THESIS ROGER D. SAUERHAGEN SPRING 1984

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The Thesis of ROGER DALE SAUERHAGEN is approved. rman University of Colorado at Denver May 6, 1984

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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE INTHODLJC'I'IO N Introduction................................ ....... 7 Sta t ement o f Problem............................... 8 Iss u e s .............................................. 8 BACKGROrJND C omnmnity Descripti0n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Existing Recreational F acilities................... 1 3 Froj ec t IIi story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 SITE ANALYSIS Loca 1 : ion ............... . . ..... .................... . Downtov Jn Contex t .................................. . Building Immediate t o Site ........................ . . V ehicular Circulation ............................. . .......................... Utilit j _es ....... . , ........ e ••••• •••••••••••••••••• ............................. . Soils Report ...................................... . CLIMl\ 'l ' E 1\N.l\LYSI S 2B 28 36 42 43 44 44 50 Description and Summary...... ..................... . 57 Tabulate d Monthly Climatic Data f o r Greel ey........ 59 M eteorological Data for Denver..................... 63 Annua l Wind Rose ... , . •........................ 64 G raphic Summary of Climate Data.......... . ......... 65 D.i.oclimatic Chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 S o l a r Position .. ... . . . ............................ 67 Mahone y Tables ................ .............. 77 Design Guidelines Bas d o n Climatic A n a l ysis....... 79 U S ER P ROFILE Who ..................... ....................... 83 n . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . .. . . . 8 3 SITE D E V ELOPMENT CRITE R I A P h asing ............................................ 86 Community 'Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Site Image .... ............... -..................... 86 S i t e R elationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Specific R e quirem e n ts................ .............. 87

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rABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont 'd) SPACE REQUIREMENTS Summary of Programmed Spaces..................... 91 Space Requirements for Programmed Spaces......... 92 LEGAL CONSTRAINTS Greeley Zoning Ordinance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Uniform Building Code Analysis (1979) .. ... ..... .. 150 Regulations and Standards Governing Swimming Pools ....................................... 156 ENERGY ANALYSIS Energy Costs. . • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161 HVAC Concerns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 Swimming Pool Heating............................ 164 Building Load Characteristics ................... . Daylighting Potential ........................... . BUDGET Cost Estimate Analysis........................... 176 DESIGN SOLUTION ...............................•. . 177 CONCLUSION .•................... .•.....•........ . . . 187 REFERENCES Bibliography .....•....................... 191 Interviews .................................. . . . . 192

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INTRODUCTION "In the eyes of some social critics, America's dedication to physical well-being and self-fulfillment reached new hei9hts of narc.Lssism during the "Me Decade" of the 1970's. 'The pursnit o f health and happiness shows no sign of in the 1980's, but a look at recently constructed recreational faci_lities indicates that the guest is anything but escapist, or vain. For many of us, the gym , the tennis court, the campground, and the arts and crafts studio have ga:.ned new importance as centers for community life. At the same tim2 that people of all ages are increasingly eager to participate in sports, nature programs, and cultural1activities, the boundaries of recreation have expanded.''-Individuals are discovering, or rediscovering, that ones own body and mind are of primary importance in making us happy in our ever increasingly c omplex and stressful society. 'l'he notion of creative play for adults, as in children, is becoming more and more important. Communi ties and local gove.rnments are at the same time realizin9 that recreation is jus t one more thread that can be used to ti log ther the commnn : i t:y , creatinq and improvinr::f a conun ni.l: y spirit while at the same time improving the individual spirit. Paralleling this increasing need for recreatj_on in the 1 .970' s was the realization we must better utilize the energy resources available to our society. Since the energy scare of t h e early 1970's, society has st. artecl to look at the use o f eneryy from a eli f fe ent point. of viev.,; . Even though t :he s i tu.ation appears less critical today than ten years ago, c onscientious citizens realize that it is our responsibility to ourselves and futur e generations to consider energy usage as a high priority when designing for the future. -------1Brenner, Douglas, "Recreational Buildings wi.t:.h 'ream s ,irit," 0-rchitectura_ l Record, November, 1981, p . 102. 7

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STATEMENT OF PROBLEM ISSUES At this ti111e, Greeley, Colorado has a unique opportunity to address these recreation needs, the idea of community unity and and the energy issue in one project, which I am also undertaking as my Masters Thesis The city has proposed !:he development of a Community Center, initially consisting of a Recreational Facility and the addition of a Community Theatre in the future. These facilities are to be sited on a prominent one-block downtown site adjacent to an existing Senior Citizens Center and historic building, across the street from the City Civic Center and a two-block city park, and one block from the heart of Greeley's ceritral business district which is now being redeveloped with new pedestrian malls. This Community Center will help to add life and activity to Greeley's down-1 : own v lhile at the same time consolidating and .i.ncrea.si.ng the community' s recreational and cultural capabil.itj8s. Sp!clfically, this thesis will deal with the Jesign of the Community Center for Recreation. 'I'he center is approximately 60,000 square feet which will be the center of for all of Greeley. It must serve the cities youth, its old people, the singles, the mothers, school chilclren, professionals, in short-the entire Community. 'l'he center consists of physi cal activity rooms, administrative offices for the Park and Recrea.tion Department, arts and crafts, youth rooms, game rooms, a kitchen, multi-purpose rooms, and a natatoriwn which will serve not only the community, but also the cities high schools. The Community Center for Recreation must be sited in a nli'l.nner which \vi 11 allow for a Community Theatre containing 500 seats to be built on the same site in the future. The i .on Center should work well on its own, bu t once the Community Theatre is built the entire site should work as a cohesive unit. 'TheJ:"e are three main issues which must be dealt with and should be emphasized in designing the Community Center for Recreation.

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First, the facility needs to satisfy the individuals as well a:::; the entire cornrou lit i.es r.ecreat1on needs. 'I 'his requ1res hat the space be flex1ble to allow or a wide range of uses and ai: the . arne lime p :r.-ovide the nvironment the individual needs to improve both physically a n d mentally. The challenge is to allow the entire community to flow in and out of the bnilding, yet not compromise t:he individuals needs. Second, the CoMnunity Center for Recreation and the development of the entire site should have a very positive impact on the development of Downtown Greeley. Thedevelopment -should strongly relate to the new Mall, the Senior' s Center, the Civic Center and the Park. Since the site is such a key Downtown site, there are great opportunities and responsibilities in designing the Community Center for Recn:'!.:tt i..on, and for the future expancion on the site with the Community Theatre, so tha t the dovvut . own is enhanced. 'J.'he center should help the downtown become a fun place to be, day and night for everyone. Finally, the design should clearly and visibly the concern for proper energy usage. It should be a model of how a bullding should be dec1gned for those responsible citizens concerned with ene .gy. Citizens should be proud that their community has a solar recreation center, ur:der stand how it works, and demand that more buildings have many of its energy features.

PAGE 10

COMMUNITY DESCRIPTION Greeley, Colorado is a community of 56,000 located to the east of the front range of the Rocky Mountains, approximately 60 miles north of Denver and 50 miles south of Cheyenne, Wyoming, along U.S. Highway 85. (See map on following page.) Greeley's population has steadily increased from 20,354 in 1950 to its present 56,000. indications are that its growth will continue along with the other growth along the frOJ t range. is the county seat for Weld Cuunty, one of the most producti e agricultural in the United :3-t:ates which has a population of 124,000. Historically, ltas been the economic base for Greeley's economy, however, this has started to change in the last few years. This is due to developmen t of light indm::tries in an area Lo the west of Greeley and south and east of Fort Collins, known as the Poudre Triangle. Nithin this a ea, Kodak is located \.Jhicl.1 is the lct rges t employer for Greeley residents \vi h 3,100 employees. He wlett Packard also as computer manufacturing plant in this area, employs 485 Greeley employees. Greeley is also the home of the University of Northern Colorado, which provides diversity to the population bust. G reeley has recently shown great interest in i111proving its downtown areas. Thir includes the development of two shopping malls as well as the renovation and improvement of several buildings in downtown Greeley.

PAGE 11

_ R E '"'IONAL M AP

PAGE 12

EXISTING RECREl\ . TIONAL FACILITIES In terms of recreation faciliti s, most of Greeley's present recreation programs are geared to outdoor activities. Over 37,500 people in City-sponso-ed recreation programs in 1982. The city presently does huve a recreation Community Building, built in 1957, located on the site where the ne•w Community Center for Recreation is to be located, bu t is considered to be inadequate. rrhe ex. sting ComHnmi ty Building is a barrel vaulted, Quonset structure and even basic program requirements, outside of an adequate basketball court. Locker room facilities are not even minimal, and, as shown on the existing plan on the following page, little else but meeting rornns is available. There is an adequate kitchen and much fixed seating. The seating, howeverf is very rarely used.

PAGE 13

/ (Q)CQJW&:fJf1JJ@ ;--1= = ( IKJJ\vl@J p;le '-" J!= II ., ! r--r I l--..l t7l --, -I i _ i 1 l l/ I l-PLI If' t---)D t-lii.CV (\ "-./ Ir 1--I/I.J(tl7li .l311Q1.. llwt r--1/ !"----/ '--' ;;1)111\; u r'Q -1111IS tJq ,, 1--I l I '-I -
PAGE 14

PHOJECT HIS'.L'ORY The lack of proper recreational facilities in Greeley had been known for several years, but no real effort vTas made to correct the problem until 1978. In April, 1978, the Greeley City Council approved the hiring of consultants to assist a citizen's committee in reviewing and consolidating past efforts, programs, and plans to access public attitude relative to proposed capital improvements, and to recommend a course of action to the community. A second phase of this procedure followed this report and was entitled "Cultural and Recreational Facilities for Greeley-Phase II. II rrhis report prepared by citizens nnd consulting professionals gave a detailed evaluation of site-specific alternatives of cultural and recreational facilities for Greeley. The purpose of the work was to study the implications of several alternative combinations on the city-owned lund, and to identify what level of support existed among the general public. Without summarizing the entire work, there \vere several recommendations which carne from the report that reflect directly upon this thesis. First, it was recommended that a central downtown site b e used for a recreational facility. Specifically, the city owned, wo-block area w est of the Civic Center. Second, that the historic building on this site, the old high school, be retained and as a Cultural Arts Facility. Third, the cost of remodeling the existing recreation facility would cost as much as replacing the structure. Fourth, the development on the two-block site should be developed in phases for fiscal reasons, the idea being "pay as you go." Fifth, the phasing should be a Senior Citizen's Center, followed by a recreation facility and concluded with a Cul-tural Arts Facility. Finally, the report investigated five alternative development schemes of the two-block area of city owned land. The five schemes, Alternatives A through E with descriptions are shown on the following pages. The report recommends implementation of Alternative E, with Alternative A being rated second. The primary advantage of Alternative E over A is the retention of the historic school. Alternative E appears to satisfy all the needs desired by the community in a straight forward, organized site plan. t.l::

PAGE 15

ALTERNATIVE A SITE USES SITE PLANNING This alternative demolishes the existing school building and the existing Community Building. PHASE 1 Construction of a new Senior Citizens Center PHASE 2 Construction of a new Community Recreation Center with indoor pool, handball court(s), gymnasium and ancillary facilities. PHASE 3 Demolition of the existing Co1mnunity Building and the existing school building. Construction of a new Cultural Arts Center with a 400 seat community theater and ancillary cultural A schematic conceptual site plan for Alternative A is shown on the follow ing page. Provision is made for a new Senior Citizens Center at the corner of 6th Street and 11th Avenue adjacent to high density residential areas to the north and east of the site. A new Community Recreation Center is provided with indoor pool area. The build ing has been placed adjacent to lOth Avenue as close as possible to the existing City park to maximize public visibility. Both existing public buildings on the site are to be removed to provide space in the southern portion of the site for a new Cultural Arts Center with 400 seat community theater. The building 'is placed at the corner of 8th Street and lOth Avenue facing the existing City park for maximum public visibility. Major pedestrian . linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the site plan.

PAGE 16

LEGEP-1> l-=:J : : .: : -::. I 10 N PROPOSED 8ULDtNO PROPOSED PN'lK...,G MEA FROPOSED lANDSCAPe> AREA PHASE AREA BOUNDARY PHASE/PRIORTY IJTUTY EASEMENT PRINCIPl.E VatCULAR MOVEMENT PRINCIPLE PEDESTAIAH MOVEMENT ... BUII..DINO ENTRANCE ,. . . _, I i I --6 VEJ-ICLE DROP-oFF POINT VISUAL SCREEN SPECIAL LANDSCAPE TREATMENT POTENTIAL fOCAl PONT EXISTNl CITY HALL Jr 10TH AVE. 11TH AVE. PHASE 1 SENIOR CITIZENS CENTE R Building Coverage Parking 120 cars Open Space PHASE 2 . 32 ac. 1.0 ac. .5 ac. 1. 8 ac. COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER Building Coverage .8 ac. Parking 100 cars .8 ac. Open Space .5 ac. 2.1 ac. PHASE 3 CULTURAL ARTS CENTER Building Coverage Parking -165 cars Open Space .5 ac. 1.3 ac. .6 ac. ALTERNATIVE A TASK Ill SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO

PAGE 17

ALTERNATIVE B SITE USES SITE PLANNING This alternative retains both the Con-ununity Building and the existing school. PHASE 1 Restore the existing school building and convert it to use a both a Senior Citizen Center and Cultural Arts Center with 250 seat community theater. PHASE 2 Remodel and expand the existing Con1nunity Building into a complete Community Recreation Center with indoor pool, handball court{s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities. PHASE 3 Construction of a new Public library and new offices to house the public service functions of the City of Greeley. These facilities may be incorporated into one building if carefully designed. Pro vision of these facilities will free large amounts of space in the existing City Hall for expansion of police facilities, etc. The schematic conceptual site plan for Alternative B is on the following page. Both the existing Community Building and the existing school building are renovated and/or expanded and fully utilized. Retention of the existing build ings presents limitations to utilizing the site in an efficient manner. Because of the location of the existing buildings on the site, virtually all parking for the major uses (Senior Citizens Center, Cultural Arts and Community Recreation) must be accommodated to the north of the buildings in the central area of the site. Because insufficient land is available to provide an auto noJOOus lot for each use in close proximity to the building entrances, this alternative provides a single, large, multi-use lot for use by both the Cultural Arts Center and the Community Recreation Center. A Public library and Public Service Offices are combined in a single facilityon the northern portion of . the site. Each use has separate parking accommodations.

PAGE 18

8TH N -EGEND PROPOSED BUilDINO PROPOSED PAAIENTIAL 11TH AVE. PHASE 1 CULTURAL ARTS/ SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER Building Coverage .33 ac. Parking Cultural Arts 120 cars 1.0 ac. Parking Senior Center 120 cars 1.0 ac . Open Space . 77 ac. 3.1 ac. PHASE 2 COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER Building Coverage .8 ac. Parking 100 cars .8 ac. Open Space . 5 ac. 2.1 ac. PHASE 3 LIBRARY/PUBLIC SERVICE OFFICES Building Coverage Parking -library 45 cars Parking Public Offices 45 cars Open Space .25 ac. .36 ac. .36 ac. .4 ac. 1.4 ac. ALTERNATIVE B TASK Ill SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO

PAGE 19

AL TERNA.riVE C SITE USES SITE PLANNING This alternative retains both the existing school building and the existing Community Building. PHASE 1 Restore the existing school building and convert it to use as a Senior Citizens Center, Public Service Offices and Museum. Provision of these facilities will free a small amount of space in existing City Hall for expansion of police facilities. PHASE 2 Remodel and expand the existing Community Building into a complete Community Recreation Center \'lith indoor pool, handball court(s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities. PHASE 3 Construction of a new Cultural Arts Center with a 400 seat co1m1unity theater and ancillary cultural fa.cilities. A schematic conceptual site plan for Alternative C is shown on the following page. Both the existing Community Building and the existing school building are reno vated and/or expanded and fully utilized. Retention of the existing buildings presents limitations to utilizing the site in an efficient manner. Due to the location of the existing buildings on the site, insufficient land is available to provide parking for all the uses in close proximity to the building en. trances. Slight parking reductions have been necessary for the Senior Citizens Center and Public Service Offices uses as a result of the limited flexibility attributed to keeping the existing buildings. Parking for the Museum utilizes available curbside spaces. A new Cultural Arts Center is provided on the north edge of the site adjacent to the existing City offices. Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the plan.

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N . EGENl I PROPOSED ..: BIJILDINQ PROPOSED PARKING AREA PROPOSED . . AREA . A-lASE AREA BOUNDARY PHASE/PRIORITY UTUTY EASEMENT • PA1NCRE EXISmG MOVEMENT CITY HALL > O PR!NCFlE PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT ... BULDING ENTRANCE ......... , VEHCLE I DROP-oFF POINT ,., r...wmw VISUAL SCREEN ,--, SPECIAL ---r ;. LANDSCAPE TREATMENT POTENTlAL v FOCAL POtfT ll ---__ ..... ____ .,_ -===---' J 100 CARS .. .. ,. fUTURE RESUNTIAL 11TH AVE. ... ---...... ... PHASE 1 SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER/ MUSEUM[PUBLIC OFFICES Building Coverage .33 ac. Parking Senior Center 120 cars 1.0 ac. Parking -Museum 20 cars .16 a c. Parking Public Offices 4 5 cars .36 ac . Open Space . 61 ac. 2.5 ac. PHASE 2 COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER Building Coverage .8 ac. Parking 100 cars .8. ao. Open Space . 5 ac. 2 . 1 ac . PHASE 3 CULTURAL ARTS CENTER Building Coverage .5 ac. Parking -165 cars 1.3 ac. Open Space .6 ac. 2.4 ac. ALTERNATIVE c TASK Ill SITE PLANNING STUDIES GR.EELEY, COLORADO

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ALTERNATIVE D SITE USES SITE PLANNING, This alternative retains the existing Conmunity Building and demolishes the existing school. PHASE 1 Construction of a new Senior Citizens Center PHASE 2 Demolition of the existing school building. existing Conununity Building into a complete Center with indoor pool, handball court(s), facilities. Remodel and expand the Community Recreation gymnasium, and ancillary PHASE 3 Construction of a new Performing Arts Center with 1800 seat capacity and designed capabilities for symphony, opera, ballet and other performances. A schematic conceptual site plan for Alternate D is shown on the following page. Provision is made for a new Senior Citizens Center at the corner of 6th Street and 11th Avenue adjacent to residential areas to the north and east of the site. Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the site plan. The Community Building is to be renovated and expanded into a complete Conununity Recreation Center with indoor pool. The existing school is to be demolished and the available land utilized for parking for the recreation facilities. A new 1800. seat Performing Arts Center is placed directly north of the r e creation center adjacent to lOth Street and as close as possible to the existing City park for public visibility. Parking demands generated by this facility are approximately 600 cars arid cannot be accommodated on the site. Parking for approximately 170 cars is provided adjacent to the facility. The remainder of the parking demand (430 cars) must be met from available curbside park ing in

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N LEGEND PROPOSED BULDINO D PROf'OSED PARKING AREA D PROPOSED .: : .: ::: LANOSCAFEO AREA PHASE AREA BOUNDARY PHASEIPRIORTY UTLITY EASEMENT PRINCIPL.E VEHICULAR MOVEMENT , •• o PRtK:I'l.E MOVEMENT 8\.IUliNO ENTRANCE ,.-VEHCLE I ' ....... ) ORCP-oFF POINT OIJOOIDlll!J VISUAL SCREEN r-, SPECIAL "---' LANDSCAPE TREATMENT 0 POTENTIAL FOCAL POHT __ F'li1UlE ___ co_tA_RCJ_AL __ sm_va_ s_==1 10TH AVE . t1TH AVE. FUTURE RESIOENTIAL FUTURE RESIOENTIAL. PROGRAtii PHASE 1 SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER Building Coverage .32 ac. Parking 120 cars 1.0 ac. Open Space . 5 ac. 1.8 ac. PHASE 2 COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER Building Coverage Parking 100 cars Open Spa ce PHASE 3 .8 ac. .8 ac. .5 ac. 2.1 ac. PERFORMING ARTS CENTER Building Coverage Parking 210 cars Open Space .7 ac. 1. 7 ac. .8 ac. 3.2 ac. ALTERNATIVE D TASK Ul SITE PLANNING STUDIES GREELEY, COLORADO

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ALTERNATIVE E SITE USES SITE PLANNING This alternative ret.ains the existing school and demolishes the existing Building. PHASE 1 Construction of a new Senior Citizens Center PHASE 2 Construction of a new Community Recreation Center with indoor pool, handball court(s), gymnasium, and ancillary facilities. PHASE 3 Demolish the existing Community Building. Restore the existing school building and convert it to use as a Cultural Arts Centet with a 250 seat community theater. A schematic conceptual site plan has been developed for Alternative E and is shown on the following page. Provision is made for a new Senior Citizens Center at the corner of 6th Street and 11th Avenue adjacent to residential areas to the north and east of the site. A new Comnunity Recreation Center is provided with indoor pool area. The build ing has been placed adjacent to lOth Avenue as close as possible to the existing City park to maximize public visibility. The existing school is planned to be restored and converted to use as a Cultural Arts Center with a 250 seat community theater. The existing Cornmunity Building is to be demolished and the available land utilized for parking for the Cultural Arts Center. Removal of the Community Building will enhance the visibility of the Cultural Arts Center from the existing City park and the downtown area. Landscape area has been retained along 8th Street to enhance this visible connection. Major pedestrian linkages among uses on the site and to nearby off-site uses are shown on the site plan.

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LEGEND 6TH ST N 7TH ST . PnOPOSED BI.M.OINO PROPOSED f>AAKINO AREA I'ROf'OSEO LAI'IOSCIIPED 1-.REA PHASE AREA BOUNDARY f"HASEIPAIORITV UTl.ITY EASEMENT PAINCRE VEHICULAR MOVEMENT PRINCFI.E PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT t:XlSTNl CITY HAll. .. BUII..DINO ENmANCE IDlOOD r--, 0 VEHICLE DROP-<>f'F POINT VISUAL SCREEN SPECIAL TAEA TMENT POTENT1Al FOCAL POt-IT 10TH AVE . 11TH AVE. PROGRAM PHASE 1 SENIOR CITIZENS C E N TEH Bui 1 ding Coverage . 32 ac. Parking 120 cars 1.0 ac. Open Space .5 ac. 1. 8 ac. PHASE 2 COMMUNITY RECREATION CENTER Building Coverage .0 ac. Parking 100 cars .8 ac. FUru1E Open Space . 5 ac. RESilENTIAI.. 2 . 1 a c • FUTURE RESIDENTIAL PHASE 3 CULTURAL ARTS CENTER Ouilding Coverage Parking 120 cars Open Space .33 ac. 1. 0 ac. .5 ac. 1.8 ac. ALTERNATIVE E TASK Ill SITE PLANNING STUDIES COLORADO

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Since 1978, howev r , the site has n o t developed exactly as planned in Alternative E. A Senior Center was constructed , but on the northeast corner of the site not on the northwest corner as shown in .l\lternative E . 'rhe existing historic high school is presently being developed as luxury office spaces by a private developer and not as the proposed Cultural Arts Facility. It is good that the school has been retained, but the need still exists for a Cultural Center uvon this sit . The next step in the development process of this site is the purpose of this thesis. There are to be two steps in this thesis. One is to schematically design the site plan to accommodate the Community Center for Recr ation (Phase 1 of the development) and a five-hundred seat Community Theatre at a later date (Phase 2 of the development) . The second step is to design in detail the Commun i ty Center for Recreation to fit into this site master plan.

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LOCATION DOWN'l'OWN CONTEXT The Mall Lincoln Park The site for the Communj .ty Lenter for Fecreat'on and the Community Theatre is an "L" shaped site between lOth Avenue and 11th Avenue, nnd 6th Street and 8th Street. Excluded within these two blocks is the area taken by the Senior' s Center and its parking lot a n d the portion taken by the old high school building. Seventh Avenue, which presently bisects the site, will 1 e vacated ant) the entire right o f way may be developed. This tion also includes the land that the present recreation center a n d parking lot are using, b u t it can be assumed this facility will be demolished once the new Center for Recreation is completed. Tne site encompasses approximately 3 . 7 acres. The site is located at the interface between tl.c C:l !Omfncial/ public area of the dovn1t0\Ht core a n d the res.Ldential are.:ts that surround it. The core of downto wn is located just across two-block Lincoln Park. At present, both 9t. h Street and Oth Street between 9th Avenue and 8th 1-\venue are being redeveloped into sl1opping malls. This should greatly improv e the image and foot traffic in the downtown area. In conjunction \'lith this new mall, several buildings in dovl [ ; town are being remodele and improved. Lincoln Park is 3.lso bein9 improved as part of the downtown facelift. Impro'\remcnts are being made to the gazebo in the center of the park, making it more attractive for large groups for outdoor concerts, fairs, etc. 'fbe ci l:y is also constructing a running track around the perimeter of the park which will be used by the recreation center users. Lincoln Park is a large attractive which is the focus of down-

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THE 7th St. 8th St. 9th St. lOth St. ITE Greeley niversity of Northern Colorado '.S . .;._. City Offices 0 Lincoln Park D Court House County 0Building 0 United Bank of Greeley Greeley :"'a tiona! OBank 1st National Bank 0 University of 18th St. l '.S . .;._. Northern t-.. u. .............. .p ........ ........ . Colorado U .S . 8 5 Bypass E . .2Rth S t .

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CONTEXT OF DOWNTOWN DOWNTOWN URBAN DESIGN PLAN Gr Icy. Col o rad o lfGfNU ..... ....,... \1 ... ... ,...... ....... ' " r•l•t ,..,,..,.,., ...... ,.,u,...,,.tt)Oo ... t"'-I .... L...t ................... , "' .. . -'"nrht_.t, lnr MH• I'.' U : ,u,.hllf'\h /pl.t •tn.-", rn•t Cu llin,, Colu (o"',..unir.111ion A•••. tn c., llt.utltif'• , f "'" looo;• M & I , I nt., l ull rcu;nt, Crtlo. ''" . . ... 6 . .

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COMING SOON! 8TH STREET PLAZA Information kio s k, flow e r )lardPn>, circuiM playgrnund, hnsc:tulty r<• lail and rrstaurants and land scapi ng. ... ..

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Civic Center North and West South town. To its east is the downtown core and now the malls; to the south is the historic Weld County Courthouse and a new Weld County Office complex (both of which are large, attractive buildings) ; to the west are smaller scale commercial buildings, a church and a portion of the site; and, finally, to the north is the City of Greeley Civic Center complex. The site, therefore, has the unique opportunity to be the final site developed around this very important open space. The cities CIVIC CENTER is the eastern edge of the site as well as the north boundary of the park. This center houses many city offices, the library, the police department, and finally a fire station which uses doors directly facing the site. Immediately north of the site on 6th Street and to the west are areas which are primarily residential in use and are expected to remain residential in accordance with the City's Comprehensive Plan. The southern edge of the site is a mixture of quasi-public, residential and commercial service uses. This area is expected to slowly redevelop into commercial services that support the nearby governmental centers and the central busine3s district. A look at the following Downtown Urban Design Plans will make the above description clearer. Note that the drawing of the Senior Center is illustrative only and does not reflect what has actually been built.

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_ _ .!._."!:!' ' .......... I I l_ .. """"' ,1/ I' i j L _ I i I I ! I i J t tlt!S"'Itl(t:'f ' ' (-I I I I I I I f I I I : .I ' ' -,,..,lN.Js" • IKATIVE llOWNTOWN URBA N D I :')ICN 1 ' 1 A N r;rcl'ley, Col or;,do lh-( .... f •uutuunlr.alinn A t l t , Inc. , !nuhfet , 1 n l u , . ..... "'' ' . M & I , I nt., f••tll u llnu, C'o l u , -' , -, , . l c r,c n d l j R l•ll.lhtltt.tl11• t 1 t\to , ., l N t • w lHII\ IIIIC tt•Jn ... ........... A ... 'WI o ""' ... . ,

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... ,_, r -1 I l . I I PII/\SL I DOWN fOWN URBAN I ESII.N PLAN r eclcy, ' \ \tol••ll"tf Auhtlrt l 5 Su.-U A nuclatf!t , Inc, W .. letlnWII, '-'"" I 1011\ \lh.lltl) ''''' " f"nmmt,nh.•tim• Alf 1 , I nc . , ln•lilf'r, { ........... M 1.. I , tnt',, '"'' (.utllttt, Colo. 1 ' I L egend l I J "'"' ' ' ' " ' llh.' hnl'''"•' ''"''"'"' .......... -'6

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l_ rr---1: PIIASl II I I I UOWNTOWN UIWI\N Dl Si<,N l'l1\N A"''"',jl•••l llt!hllt•(l\ I ' ' "'"llh""'' , ... ll S .11.1•l A"lUI.IIf'l, ht(, , W•lerht\'1"• 1\t,u,., ( umuonnh .tlhlll o\th, lou., """'' '"'• ulu, ,,r. .. I 7 VIK .au:hllf'c:h • tll.tnnt• u , f m l (..o!li . n , luft t M A, t , lnr, ''', I ,-.flin• , f'ul". l.cgcnd I I , .. ( ,IIJt' "''!'''"" 11"'111\ 0 t\1111111• \tl'ol'• -------............... A "'' ... . ,.. ....

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BUILDING H1!4ED IATE '1'0 S I'l'E Seniors Center Greeley H igh School Building The Seniors Center was completed in 1981 and has been extremely successful since its opening. The building is approximately 18,000 square feet with gallery space, meeting areas, social halls, arts and crafts, and games all which are used by the senior citizens. The building is used by the S niors during the day for social interaction, activities, and programs geared for the Seniors. No senior citizens live within the building. A parking lot with 79 spaces is due west of the building, thus the Seniors Center occupies the entire half of the block. The Center is low in scale, rather flat but only 16 feet high. This scale is to relate to the houses directly north of the Center. The north and east facades are bermed with no entries. The main public entry is from the southwest and looks directly across the site. Access to the Seniors parking is from 6th Street. The architecture of the Center is not strong and is predominantly low in profile with a white roof and bland brick. Refer to the following pages for photographs of the Seniors Center. This building, located to the south a .nd to the \\7es 1: of our site, is a historic ucture tha t at one time housed Senior Citizen Center and a number of the city's recreation programs. The building is presently being converted to luxury office spaces by a private developer and is due for completion soon. Th east rn po tion of the building was built in 1895 and the entire building has been recommended for inclusion on the National Register of Historic Buildings. The building is very strong in mass, height 54 feet tall, and color -bright red brick. Parking this building is provided behind i t and immediately adjacent to the site, with access from llth Avenue. Refer to the following pages for photographs and drawings.

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LOOKING NORTHEAST ACROS S THE SITE TO THE MAIN ENTRANCE OF THE S E NIOR'S CENTER SOUTH ELEVATION OF SENIOR' S CENTER DIRECTLY ADJACENT TO SITE r

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ll 'ttl Architectural Thesis presented to the College of Design and Planning, University of Colorado at Denver in partial fulfillment of the requi.rewents for the Degree of Master of nrchi. t cture ROGER DALE Sl>RING 1984

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9TH STREET ELEVATION (FRONT) OF THE GREELEY SCHOOL UNDER RENOVATION REAR ELEVATION OF THE SCHOOL. THIS ELEVATION FACES THE SITE.

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Existing Recreation Building 1\.lso on t _he site pre sen t.ly is the existing recrea Lion building, hmV'ever, it is safe to assume this obsolete structure 1/Vill be d .molished upon completing the new Community Center fer Recreation, making this portion of the site available for development. On the following pages are photographs of the site and its surrounding context, and also a base map showing their locations.

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-l j f z UJ D. 1 r J SiTE '-----"' -.. ----r ; I t I c F, () -----. I __

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VEHICULAR CIRCULATION Present traffic volwne s on all streets around the site except 11th Avenue are significantly below capacity and present no limitations to development. Traffic volumes on 11th Avenue, while still well below capacity, are significantly higher than other streets in the area due mainly to its designation as a north-south arterial that traverses almost the entire city. Eleventh Avenue will be a primary route to get to t.he site. Seventh Street is being vacated allowing more room for development on the site. This entire right of way may be developed. Eighth is also being closed between lOth Avenue and 9th Avenue. This is being done as part of the mall plan and allows Lincoln Park to be a full two-block park. 'l'he diagram below illustrates how the circulation in the downtown area will be with the completion of the malls. TRAFFIC 7 th Slrl Oownto>wn Traffic Loop Uncoln 0 f"ark Ar,

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PARKING The city of Greeley has determined there are nearly 650 curbside parking spaces within a 1,000 foot walk of the site. Approximately 400 of these spaces are underutilized on nic;hts ancl weekends. The same can be said for the 190 spaces directly across the street serving the Civic Center. There are also two new parking areas serving the malls which at peak times could help support the Community Center. There appears to be adequate parking around the site most of which is to the east of the site. The parking for the Seniors Center (79 spaces) is also us2d infrequently at night and might be a source of additional nighttime parking. The parking for the Greeley cchool is private and cannot be used. The illustration below shows parking in the area immediate to the malls Rnd t .he follmvinq page shows available par ing areas arounc1 the site. A,..,

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U'l'ILITIES Utili ties in the area o . E the site are capable of accommodating all being considered for the site. Water is available in both lOth and 11th Avenues. Sanitary sewer lines are available in 11th Avenue or in lttility easement south of the Seniors Center. This easement also contains underground telephone and power services. Gas service is available in the 11th Avenue right of way. There presently ex'stR 'n e 7th Street right of way, gas, water, and storm sewer lines. Plans, hmvever, have been made to remove the lines and use the other available lines allowing for full development of this right of way. The site is essentially flat with only a foot drop over the entire site. The only significant vegetation presently on the site are four 20-foor high evergreen trees next to and north of the existing recreation building. Refer to the following map for UTILITY and TOPOGRAPHY/ VEGETATION information.

PAGE 45

SITE ANALYSIS ----- • -srt?r .. -;;. z. .o r•t-le Al90

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VIEW FROM LINCOLN PARK NORHTWEST TO THE SITE . VIEW DOWN 7TH STREET TO SITE. NOTE THAT 7TH STREET IS ALREADY BEING VAC ated. THIS PORTION OF THE SITE IS PROMINENT VISUALLY. r

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LOOKING ACROSS THE SITE AT LINCOLN PARK AND THE CBD . CHURCH ACROSS THE STREET TO THE SOUTH FROM THE SITE A7

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11TH AVENUE AT THE REAR OF THE SITE . LOOKING WEST FROM THE FRONT OF THE SITE r AO

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LOOKING NORTHEAST ACROSS THE SITE TO THE SENIOR' S CENTER AND THE CITIE'S CIVIC CENTER . SOUTH AND WEST ELEVATIONS OF CIVIC CENTE R AS SEEN FROM THE SITE r

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SOILS REPORT Scope Field Investigation Laboratory Testing The following report presents the results of a subsurface soil investigation on a po tion of Block 35, Greeley, Colorado. The property is loca ed near 7th Street between lOth and 11th Avenues. The invE!stigation \';as performed for a proposed municipal complex. The purpose of this investiga1 :ion \vas to obtain the technical information anCl oils property data necessary for the design and constructio.! of foundations for proposed structure::;. cone] usions and recommendations presented in tl.is repor-t are based upon . nalysic of field and laboratory data and wi tll similar soils in the general vicirti ty. The field investigation consisted of 10 borinqs at selected loca t ons on the site. 'Th e borings vlere advanced with il 6 inch diameter, continuous flight hollow stern, power auger. All borings were continued to penetration of weathered bedrock.. Complete logs of the boring operation are shown on t .he attached plate and 'nclu1e visual classifications of each soil, locat'on of soil changes, pcnetrat'ur1 test results, and water tabl. e measurement. As the boring opcrnt:on advanced, an index of soil relative density and consistency was obtained by use of the standard 1 :est, Standard Test D-1586. The penetration test result listed on the log is the number of blows required to drive the 2 inch split-spoon sampler one foot into the undisturbed soil by a 140 pound hammer dropped 30 inches. Undisturbed samp es for use in the laborat:ory were taken in t .hin wall sampleJ.:s (Shelby), pushed hydraulically into the soil. All samples were sealed in the field and 1 reserved at. na l :nral moisLure con ent until time of test. The laboratory testing program was to measure critical shear and consolidation-swelling characteristics of the soils. l'.ddi tional testing included tests necessary to verify visual classification and moisture content of soils from borings. Al.l tes t results are summarized in Table l .

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I I I Subsurface Soil Conditions Foundation Recomrnenda tions Soils encountered at the site uniformly consist of 3 to feet of clay, silt, sand and gravel ov rlying sand and gravel deposits that extend to depths of 26 to feet 'tlhere silty, sandy, '".vea tLered clays tone is encountered. Upper-level materials overlying the gravel deposits are in part undisturbed native soils; and in part, fills of expansive clays, organic debris, silt, sand and gravel, etc. The sand and gravel deposits are predominantly well-graded mixtures with maximum particle sizing of to 2 inches in most of the borings. The sand and gravel became finer (minus 3/4) past a depth o f 14 to 15 feet. Bedrock at the site exhibits shear strength values in the range of 20,000 to 25,000 p.s.f. and is otentially expansive. The selection of the foundation type for a given situation and structure is governed by bvo basic considerations. f' irst, the foundation must be desi.gned so as to be safe against failure in the underlying soils; and second, differential settlement or other vertical movement of the foundation must be controlled at a level. Two basic controls are available to us in selecting the foundation type and allowable loads. These are the standard penetration test and consolidation-swell testing. The ultimate bearing capacity of the foundation soil depends upon the size and shape of th12 foundation element, and depth beJ.ow the surface, and the physical characteristics of the supporting soil. We recommend that structures at the site be founded on continuouA spread footings designed for a maximum allowable bearing capacity (live loads plus dead load) of 8,000 p.s.f. bearing in uniform sand and gravel deposits. Our understanding is that anticipated footing elevations are approximately 12 feet below present grades, placing foot elements in competent bearing strata, and also at or near present groundwater levels. Care must be taken to protect the foundation and floor systems from moisture damage, i.e.: Sub-slab perimeter foundation drains; automatic sump pumps; and moisture barriers.

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As an alternate, the proposed structure could be founded upon a drilled pier and grade beam type of foundation system, with the piers bearing in the weathered bedrock. The piers should be drilled a. minirnwn cf 2 feet. into l:he bedrock. The piers should be designed for a maximum end bearing value of 20,000 p. s. f. , maximum side shear on t:hat portion of the pier in weathered, silty, sandy claystone of 2 ,000 p.s.f. , and a mini mum dead load of 10,000 p.s.f. A nominal amount of reinforcing steel should be used in all piers. Difficulty is sometimes experienced in achieving the desired minimum dead load. If this occurs, we suggest the piers be reinforced full length t o take the difference between the "desired" and the 11obtainable" dead load in tension. This side shear value given above may be used in uplift provided the sides of the hole are grooved. In drilling the piers the following design and construction details should be observed: 1 . Piers should be designed for the maximum end beat_:i ng pressure and skin friction specified in this report. 2. All piers should be designed for the minimum dead load pressure specified in this report. 3. .l\11 piers should penetrate a lliHlmum of 2 feet into the hard bedrock. 4 . All piers should be reinforced for their full length to resist tension. We recommend the use of at least two (2) #5 bars. 5. 1\ minimum of 4 inch air should be provided beneath all grade beams to insure the concentration of dead load pressure on the piers. 6. All piers should be carefully cleaned and dewatered before pouring concrete. Casing may be required.

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Floor Slabs 7. Most of the bedrock at the site can be drilled with normal heavy cominercia1 size pier drilling rig. Some of the b drock is hard and a p oble m may arise if the contractor attempts to drill the pier holes with small drill rigs. Refusal in drilling may be encountered in the lower bedrock. In case drilling refusal is encountered, the depth of penetration into bedrock may be reduced if design criteria are adjusted accordingly. 0 . All pier holes should be inspected during construction by a competent soil e ngineer to i nsure that pen tration is started at the proper depth and no loose materials remain in the hole. The following recommendation shoul d be followed in the design of the foundation and the footings. 1 . All footings should be below frost depth. 2 . Foundation walls should be reinforced with rebar to span an unsupported length of 10 feet. Rebar should run continuously around corners and be properly spliced. 3 . The foundation should be protected by a perimeter drain. t1. A l l footings should bear on the same type of soil . Slabs should be constructed "free floating," isola ted from • all bearing members, reinforced with wire mesh, and joi.nted frequently. Slabs on grade should be underlc in wi t . h a 4 inch layer o f clean gravel or crushed rock to help distribute floor l oads and provide a break. Positive drainage should be provided for the gravel underlayment to prevent pooling of w a t r beneath the slab.

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Landscaping and Drainage Every precaution should Le taken to prevent wetting of the subsoils and percolation of water down along the foundation elements. Finished grades should be sloped away from the structure on all side to give positive drainage. A minimum of 6 inches fall in the first 10 feet is recommended. Sprinkling systems should not be installed within 10 feet of the structure. Downspouts are recommended and should be to carry drainage from the roof at least 5 feet beyond the foundation walls. Backfill around the outside perimeter of the structure should be compacted optimum moisture, or above, to at. least percent of Standard Proctor Density as determined by ASTM Test D-698. 54

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This section contains various data, analysis and summaries relating to the CLIMATE ANALYSIS in Greeley, Colorado. Tl1is data base will hopefully allow the designer an opportunity to lenrn more about the climate in Greeley and make the Community Center for Recreation more responsive to the natural climatic conditions. Specifically contained within this section are: a w itten Description and Summary o f the climate in Greele y ; Tabulated Monthly Climatic Data for Greeley; Meteorological Data for Denver, Colorado (to supplement data not available specific to Greeley but which s ould be similar) ; an Annual 'tJind Rose for c::reBley; a Graphic Summary of Climate Data; a Bioclimatic Chart; a Solar Position Chart; a compu er prjntout showing Solar Altitudes, Azimuths, the Vertical and Horizontal Shading Angles for various building orientations at all times of the year; a computer nrint:.out of recommendations based on the Mahoney Tables (produced by the CLJMA T prog r am) ; and finally D E SIGN GUID ELINE S BASED ON CLIMATIC A NALYSIS. This CLIMA.'TP. ANALYSIS seci:ion will poin t out i :he key of Greeley' s climate and serve as a good data the design of the building.

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DESCRIPTION AND SUMMARY OF THE CLIMA'l'E OF GREELEY Greeley is l ocated on the northern high plains of Colorado, near their western edge. The foothills of the Rocky Moun ta.'ns rise from the plains about 25 miles to the west, and the main ranges of along the Continental Divide rise to alti t udes between 11,000 and 12,000 feet, with peaks over 14, 0 0 0 feet, at a distance of about 50 miles west of Greeley. The Cache la Poudre River flows along the northeastern edge of the city, and joins the South Platte River about 5 miles east. Elevations in Greeley reach over 4 , 80 0 feet at the southwestern edge, and slope graduall y downward toward the northeast to about 4,630 feet along the river. Separated from the Pacific Ocean by distance and a l1igh mountain barrier, and located a long distance from any other major source o f moisture, the climate of Greeley is characterized by low hmnidity, low average precipitation, and abundant sunshine. The prevailing air movement is from the west, with most of the moisture lost in passage over the mountains. Invasions of cold air fro m the north in winter are also relatively dry, so that winte r precipitation averages are low. Circulation patterns interrupt the westerly flow ana bring moist air from the Gulf of Mexico into the area, most frequently in the spring and summer. Spring and summar thunderstorms are occasionally severe and accompanied by heavy hail, although the frequency of severe storms is less for the Greeley area than f o r areas farther to the east. Tornadoes may occur in the area, but are also less frequent and less severe than they are farther to the east. Precipitation varj.es widely from year to year. Extremes in temperature come with interruptions of the prevailing westerly flow of air -cold outbreaks from the north in the winter, and dry desert air reaching the area from the southwest in the summer. Th e highest temperature in the entire Greeley record was 107 in July 1936, and the lowest was 450 below zero in February 1899. In more than 50 yeGrs of record, the maximum temperature for the summar has been less than 100 in one year out of two. Winter temperature minimums have reached lower than 18 below zero n one year out of

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Although the average rainfall of less than 14 inches places the area in a semi-arid classification, heavier precipitation and winter snow accumulations in the mountains to the west provide a s y of water for an extensive irrigation system which has transformed the region into one o f the highest producing agricultural areas in the country. The dry and generally mild climate, with warm summers and open winters, together with an abundant water supply, provide unusually favorably conditions for a wide variety of agricultural activities. SPRING is the wettest, windiest, and cloudiest season. Severe storms usually come from the north with northeasterly winds. About 42 % of the annual precipitation occurs in spring, and much of it falls as snow. Stormy periods are usually of short duration and are often followed by sunny and mild weather that removes much of the snow cover. SUMMER precipitation amounts to about 31% of the annual total, and much of it falls from scattered thundershowers during the afternoons and evenings. Mo ning s are usually clear and sunny. Cloudiness increases markedly after mid-morning, and i . s noteworthy because of the mod erating effect on the afternoon t e m peratures. is the mast pleasing season. Precipitation during this period amounts to only 8 % of the annual total. Local thunderstorms are over and invasions of cold air from the north are intrcqnen t . There is less cloudiness an a greater percent. age of possible sunshine than at any other time of the year. Periods of unpleasant weather are usually brief. WINTER has less precipitation than any other season, with about 9% of the annual total, almost all in the form of snow. \\Tinter storms are at times severe but are usually of short duration. 'rhere is more cloudiness than in autumn but somewhat less than in the spring months.

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SIJ A H Y UF' WtHIII,Y Cl.t J) fl I' fl r111l (;II ,t; y C.fll,llf ll\1!11 rllf! n : fiiL<; I 'Hl-1 i .Jij ilt;j -1 'J4 4 1 t: I,F ; V 1\'l'lllN -nYT J At-1 n;B MIIH II PH t l/1 y .JIIN J llf.J 1\IIC: Sf; I' IIC'I' r : n v flt.C' /\Nil MfJNTIII, V M EAN MAX I n:HP ( f ' ) H,7 4.!.1 50.1\ 52. 0 .., " } 0 H3.ll 'Ill. Y H H , . l 7Y.J b ' '1 'll. 5 h • l • I X • !) 1 • 2 7 !) 'I .!> 11. 1 ti ;-) 'Ill , I •n ,,) ':J7. 3 116.11 7 4 . '• h4,':> !J I • J / II • 7 !'> • • 11'1. 3 U]. 7 l>h, IJ 5H, h l l h lf1.7 o I • J n : AH 1437 19'!2 1'J')Ij l9'i1 1'1.1::. 1YSII !YhJ 1 (lb!) l-t 1-:ll:t l " . , l YF.A f/ S or 3o. 31. 3h, 3 6 . Jf>. ]b. Jft. )11 . • 3b, Jh. 35. .1' 1 • M E I\N TEIH' (F) 1\VL 7,9 1J. 7 2 l.?. 32.4 42.1 51.3 r, r,. 7 5 11, s 411, 3 : n . '> l ':1. • 1 I 7.. 1 Yl. . 3 HIIX. I ':l. H 21 . 0 2>1. 4 j!J . '). '1rl.2 S!;. 3 ti\J. 7 5':1,0 !> (). fl J'l • . i I >1. I, 3 •I. :t Y t:..f>S 1<11,] 1 Y3K 194.1 1'1S6 1 h 1934 1'!63 196. l 1 '144 l() 1 '!4 5 • I I !J 2 1 y J 1 'IJ'). Yt::IIHS rw HE.:CIJHI) 3h. 37. )fl, 31). J (,. i ,.., . 31'>. ]b. ]h. .3o, JO.,, J • tW WI' Ill, Y n:rw ( F J 2J.I:l 2B.1 JS.fl '17. 2 57. 3 b7.?. 73.8 71. II h I . H 3 5 . 1 27.'1 , , , , . 3 HfX . 3J. 2 34,') 43.'). 54, 6 6•1. h I'J. . 7 77.1 1fl . 2 hb. l 5h, Q !'>I.,U n : A \1..134 19S4 1ll4 h t 'Hf> 1 <;34 I tl!)f) 196h 1':134 191•1 1 ':JhJ I •1'!4 I Y : u l Y 4 !>.5 1 s. 4 :n . 4 1 0 . II 49, 4 &? • I b9, Y f>fl,H 53.2 tJ.!),f) J.l:l.7. l '\) 1\h. ' l Y 1YJI 111 12 1 Y .i'l 19!l3 1 QJS 1\151 l 'L 0 1 9 'n+ 19b5 1'-l:'<; ':l2 1 '1)). ! 4'1. H :IIHS IIF IH;Cill!!l Jf:l. J7. 3h. 3 h . 3 6 . J o . Jh. 3t>. ]h, 1h, Jti . liJ. . I . • 1)/, y s < o5n fl V F : . 13Ull .l:l l!I]J. 3 Y'l!> , tl s J '1. •) 21 L'J 2.3 12. j lf12, H 1\JU,; (j H 'I, l i I . j " t • I t ; I, J t1/IX , 1b'd 131 . , 11 4 0 h9h J.il II 'j 9 40 h 1 3 \I) J 3 I J I "i . , l JS H;I\K 1 4t>3 1Y5b 1Q!)7 \961 1961\ t 9h!. ; 1 Y!>') 19hJ 1\1'>':> MIN. 9111 l:l07 7111 127 14\J 3 u 0 5!> ) 114 7 ')I 'IHI n . IJ.'> YI :AI< t Yu•; lYhJ 14bh 19b'l 1 ., 'l MfiX. u () I) 0 b 1 U 26 :7.3 t 3 I) u r l u;_ ; vI::: /II! 11141:1 1 9 111 1Q4H 1 941:1 1l.lh4 1'1') b 1 1':J4 9 194 lj 19111 1 • ) 4 f l )'JI H J 1Yfl+ 1 'l l ,b+ 1 ' l !> l VF.ARS l)f' I U . 1 9 . l R , I H . Ill. 1 4 . 1 9 . [Q. 1<1, 1 tl • l 7 • 1 .. . 1 ;J. NU UAYS MAX Tf:Mf.> IJH EO nr fl v 1 0.4 ,., • 1 3.7 .!l • l o.o 0,0 11,0 \) .(l • 1 3.2 r,. 3 J I • !> HIIX. n 14 'I j I 0 \) 11 0 l y 17 !>2 A II, 1944 l ':i'1'H 196S 1 ' ) !i9 1941:1 ] '14 A l tl 1 <)'! H I ':It ; 1 , . t2 19fd . 1 'I::.., l N . u \) 0 () u n 0 () I) 11 I) 0 19 Yl:fll! 1 '165 1 9'54 19bl+ 19h5+ 19h61 11 19!:1l J • 31 26 26 10 0 () 0 ll ll I ?.7 31) 1 !> I H :AI! 1 9o 1 1Y51 19o + 1965 lllb)+ 1 yr,,,,. 14or,-. 1 'jh{t+ J9h] 1 'lh'l-t t-t 1 96.1 n :Ans IJF' RCCURil I A , 2 i l . 1'.1. l9. t 9 . 1!1. Pl. ill • 1 fj • 1'1. 1 I • 1 . , • 1 4 . NIJ IJA\'S I'! IN l,f.SS OR EO 0 F A V t::. H, I 1. ). l.!> • I o . o o .o \J. O o . o o . o 0 , 0 _t,l 1 l t>,ll Mil X . 2 1 1 0 6 J u 0 u 0 0 i) 6 'I J I n:AH l ' 1 !>5 J95b+ 14h0+ 19!>7 1':1411 l'lo111 )44H l':l4H I '14R 1':14!:1 145'1. I Yli 1 MIN . 0 I) 0 () 0 0 () f) 0 r) 0 (! 5 n :11K 1 'J6!> 1 'Hi ? + 1 + l 41lh+ l l.lhfit 1 9!''1+ I'J :> .:l YE/\HS OF' HF.CilHII Ill. 20. 1 y . l!l. 1 II. Ill. 1 A, I H . 111 • I H. 1 H , 14. I J • IIIGHf:ST T EMPl::RA'fUIH; ( f ) 711 7'1 ll2 f)h <1t> ll!h IU7 IIJ'> qq 90 f12 'IS yt;Ail II Nil l446lO t93fl?.5 l '14:1. . l !:1. 1.1 l i'IF.S1' TEMP '!'II k 0 ' ) -Jo -3'.1 -3() 2 '). j .ll 4 0 ] ' . l ).3 II -JH -JO H :AH 1\NIJ IJAY\9420!> 19!)101 1 '137.17. 1 ':J45ll3 I 11 5 41J'l. t I '11'7 1 3 l
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Cllf,IIRTHHl FIJH YEI\IlS 1.9J1-l4b7 40 l'JI\ <\1 F:l..t:VI\Tfi i ;J-4h50 fEI: T n : u MIIR APR 1 4 II Y dill, IlliG SF. I' IJCT NIIV I•IIJNTIII,Y I:'Ht:C1P1TA'I'IrJN (ltl) 1\H: , ,JJ ,)) . 7 1 1.33 2 .111 l.h . 1 1.7.7 ,<}4 1.01) ,71l .Jt, , 31 II. 4:1. \ U .Iltl 1'-lul 11/\X. l,2:l 1.1H 2 , f)'j 1,32 'l.7'1 3.7J 3.77 3,1> 1 7..0h J,!lO Yt:/IH 1Y42 1961 19 44 14JS 1Yb2 14bl 1956 1466 144 1 J91h IYJ7 HlN, 0,111) 0,00 .12 .09 ,.12 11,\Jil ,Of. ,(l') () ,()() U,l)ll u,••O 0 , ()0 1 ' / J h . YEIIH l'll>h+ 19hh+ 19?5 l'lfd 1YJ3 I-t 1 'J'JI+ YEI\IlS OF' IH:CiliW J7, H. 36. 36. Jr,, J 6 . 36. Jr,, )r,, 3h. l o , Gf!EATEST lJAlLY PllCJI:' (IN) AIWllin' .43 . 1\2 ,U3 1,50 I.!JO 2.bll 1,31 1.8 3 I. >0 .<14 ,49 ,!l11 Yt:AH ANil ll11Yl941J'l(, 195fll1 1Yb\2H 19!l707. 1Qb4JI! l9fi230 19bl U I 1 911319 1 9h3:l1 196UI 'J 1Y'•t!t2 Y F.III t I N • 0 • 0 0 , 0 '.l • 0 0 , r . t H : /IH 1 Qbh + 19fd+ 1941H, 1 91>5+ H : AH:; llf' HF.CIIHIJ 7.9 . ?.fl . 24. 29, GHTS'l' DEPTH , N(Jio/ UN GUilD IN (IN ) 6 18 1'1 V E A R 1\Nf) ll!IY \<)49(lt f lYn0lY+195Y2u 19S312 llf H ECfllt 70, . 2 l. 19411 u J. 'If> 7 i 1 < J . o.o u 0 1':167+ 14, 1.7 5 I 9 4tl 0 1 9 67+ 'lO. tJ. O 0 194H 0 19h'7-t l+ 1'1. o .o () l 94U 0 1 1/t> fi I I tl • .i. 9 19!>3+ 1) 19fi2 t 1 9 . , b '1. 1952+ 0 1965+ 1 B . . 2 t 1.964+ 0 1 ')f;fl+ I !l. 1 1 . 0 l ltl ( , . 1 '1 • " /. 1'1111+ I) 146(, + 14. O,ll u ,I) 1 4 3 1 o . o 1 91: 6 3t>. I) 0 1Q, ". 7 l t 194'1 1 1 l':l. l./. 4 1 ' 1 4 (J n 1 ':lh ll t ll • • 4 '1. lYU5 I) l'lh1+ u . n 0 ,1) 1 4 31 \) ,() 19f>fi-+ 3h, 0 (1 1 • 3 , 9 9 1Y!ll 0 1 ':16n 1'1. • t J u 141)6+ 1 H . N llli H 0 F 1J II Y :-; WI Ttl I I A llo A V ' • 0 • I) o.o u.o o.o .1 IJ,(l o.u MAX. 0 Yl:.lll< 1 filii, (I vr:11H VEAHS Of HECIIHO I 'i.. 1<1 : w r:IITHI::I( llU IW, llf' 1)/\Y::> W11'11 UN t;IH l iJtiiJ (GTI< UH !o.tl 1 HICH !IN GIH.IUNIJ) 1 11\X. :tEAl< MlN. YEAH IW o . o u l 'll>4 il l () u l : ;r-,7 ; 1 9 b 6 t 12 . 11. NUT /ILL, o.o u 1 91-.) 0 1%3 \ . 99. l':l!>h (l (I f) 0 l':lb6+ t4bb+ 1 9bG+ 11. 11. 11, 11. 11. 1\1 f , (),() u \ 9h] 0 19h3 1. o .o \) 19113 0 lQbh+ 4. 1),() 1 ) l'II>J 1) 1 96()-t 4 , u . o tJ I Y I J I I) 1 ., . o.o C),() 1 y 31 o . o l 4 + l 2 1 'I 'I h I Y I 0 • 0 () • I) v • u ll -0 t46h t 1 911b+ t 'l'>'l + 3 b . 21. '' () ? 1 (I 1 ? o Jll!>lllh I h'Lo t':l'iot J J H . l U . \I 1. 3,0 7 1Yh1 () 1 y . . tl 4 l'Jhj I) t q6?. + 111. • 2 2 l'J () 1 '1!>6 j '1. . s 2 1 9h()+ 0 19h('t+ 11;!, o . o 0 1948 f) l9h6t lll. 2 . 1 b 1452 0 1 'lh' ) + 1 II, 0,11 (I 1'14H 0 I ' l bl:l I 1 tl • o.v u 1 '14> 1 u 141:>6+ l • 1 • r, h 19'11 ll I !/1'.'1+ 1 tl . • 1 1 1 Y'l!l n I Y"h • I " . f\,11 0 1 'J 11 1 !1 1':1t>tH l k . J l. , .l • . , l1 Ll )\lh4t In. \). ,, l'J 1 Cj ' 1 '1!, 1 l l o , I • . I .) l'lnh+ 1) 1 'Jntl+ I I. O,l) fl, C l 0 1956 u.o o ,n .1 () 19!>1i 0 1 [) 1Yhb+ ll. I'IIJT 1 I • DATA IIAY o.o 1) 1h+ 4 , '' 0 n 1 Yr,J ll 4 . 0 I) l Jh t 11. 1\J, l!l. IH. I' Ill' [ VI::, 11,11 " l I) 1 'iC>5 1 . 9(). 4 IJ ()')4J ll u . 9 'l. '1'1'-1 u 'I') 'l 1) <), Cfii , IIU IIIII I C l d 1'1': t< Dt :P,iiiN J ;rl'l' IJF II I t! lC ::.c I Ct. CIII,I/HIIIJII t: llt J I I T l Ctl (]OJ) 491

PAGE 63

Y [Jil 1 COlOJi'AO O -lQfi.L----l cmf)era l m'! • F \ V1..'1.tge$ I t x uemes E > > . : 0 .'3 a ,. J: 0 11. JO, 3 1 J 2 6 -J 1 3? .a II Z2 I S 5 "1 68 2 8 11 1 jj . 1 -7 " B l II 20 21 tq,j !>5. l •• n 32 6 s o .l bl. \ 91 19 • I . 56 .1) 72.7 99 21 sc 10 S9. A ., 3.} 9j I s• 25 119.$ t..t.1 9' • ;;I J O J5 .o . . . 80 1 , . 22.1 JS,l 12 6 II 2• J8. 7 JU, 9 6 9 11 -1 J O Meteorological Data For The Current Year SHPL(TO N AP S l.mda rd lin 'M'u s:ai : MOUill & IN l g " c ] o.g > ' G >.!< F E 0 n 0 T:o• 9 " I . II ! 9 II 2 II 10 1 --. I' I l 0 I n 1 II 0 " I n 1 12 I I I n I 1 0 0 0 I n 0 1 e I 1 6 0 • u 0 0 ll II u ' " 0 ? 0 ' I 2 I S . s 0 8 0 I? , . J 1 0 1 2 I" 0 I• I 6 0 I • I ' II g • I I 0 1 2 II 8 r I I c 0 0 , l l 1 0 0 " 2 n I s I' I J . J 0 u n 8 I 2.001 .JUl rn O[C I 211 6'1 .. '"' 7 ) 0.7 11. 1 1 o r r l 2't IJ&N I Zf, I I J6. 2 &19 .] 99 21 l < 6208 6 1 1 J 2 . o o 2" 11Qo8 2 1 • bb i 6012110 •• 11. • •• l.j 714 10 1 • I 98 1'1 • .,, • 7 1 ,. CORRECTF.D AFT E it I'USLTCATlON OF THE MONTitT.Y I S SUE. I \olind s unde r F n:" t e-: t H i l c h('udl11y, f'A<>tc•st Ob<4• . • • • winds with cJ i n polnLR . -----" F lilA ;-, -I (,,.,,.., e > , E :::; •• • 2 29.9 lJ 1982 196] .. JZ.a 7 6 196) JO 1 ?lb • 8 J7 . o 84 1911 -II 1?113 .9 111.5 85 I 960 -2 197 5 .6 s t.u Yb 19141 2Z 1 ?5lt ,9 . o 1 o • 19H '" 19SJ • 6 lJ . o 10• 19J'l ., 1972 • 4 11 ., I O l 1938 ., 1 '1611 • 8 62 •• 91 19&0 20 1971 • 2 52 . o 68 19ltl 3 196.9 .. ]q .14 19 19SO .. 1 2 • • 15 11180 1 8 1971 Ul FEB . 2 I 50.1 I 04 l ?J? JO u : n th o f record, throu g h the ent _ yP&r otherwtse note d , d on d.,h. antt e b"Ye than one ha 1 f. .. No rm a ls, Mean s , And Extreme s ----------:---" " ' rreci p ltatiu n 1 0 i nc:het R e iMtiv e hurmdi t y pe L W i nd Me;on ltUi nbfi. r o f d;t y , . r,_,S.md 'f! a lav" 65 " F Ww•• equiv11l"nt Soow, len •--I 1 I • s ---r-----J 1 r .. , ..,,.,,. il l < J: :r. l l .; J I E c i F c E !: . ; c: H .... z :E . s ,.. ------1-- • e :o; 1088 0 Oofd t ... lt U"8 O o O I 1951 lo07 . 1962 902 0 o . r,7 I . 6 6 1960 u . 0 1 1970 loOI l9!d 868 0 lo7.1 loA? 9" O.tS l t .•& l 95Q 525 0 I .. 9] ... 17 1 91&2 o .ol l9bl ;t, 196 7 BJ II 2.6 .. 7.11 1957 o .o & 1 07 .. J. 55 1913 eo 0 llb I.?) If ob9 196 7 0.09 1980 3 . 1(. r 970 '?61 ).71 (,.Ill 1965 o . 17 19JQ I.. '"2 1965 0 120 •o• 76ft lUOll 6016 20) ) . 2? .--t; 1979 r l ... ' ., I .IJ .. . 67 1961 T I'Hif z " 19 36 8 I oll ... 11 J ,.,, 0 .oc;. 1 O(t2 1 ' t "'"' I a 0 .76 1 91 l91f6 o.ot t 9tt9 l o29 1915 u CJoiiJ 2 . a .. 191 J 0 .0] 1 977 z .on I q82 r .. [P . ., 680 IS, 5 1 1 oll II S 1 I 11qllft ) , 55 19 7 J ' ltOR!W.S Base d 011 re<:ord for the period . DAlE Of M EX1REHEThe NIOSl fn llf rulllp1e occurren c e . PREVAILING WINO DIRECTiOH • Reco t • d 1963. WIND IHRECTI()tf Indicate tens of deqrecs cloc kwise frOI'I t r u " north. Otl ir; J tc., tf'l'i calm, FASTEST MILl WINO S p e e d ts tastr.H ooset ve d value when the directi o n 1 n l e n s of degrees . E > ! 4e 2Jo t•'l 18. l06C 2?. 1961 18. UL IJ, o. o . c o.u 21. !OJ )I. 19& JO , 19• JO . 191 NOV J?,l 19• E ! ::! . E •• 1 z " 9 . s I b ,J I I .J 10.7 Dol o . c o.u 19.11 1? ... IS. 23 . b !! I Jloc;tlumel -.F.l >-J• IS lll l 22 63 195 "! ,, : 61 'J J J 19C>Gj1 J '8!U\ 19S a b J , .5 S9i (, l lit s b l l !>8 : . !l :: :::4 :l ;1 t9sJ ,.,, , bel 8.9 9.1 •• 9 tO.l 9 •• 9 . o 8 •• e .l e. 1 8.1 8.5 e . 8 8. 9 1 s 51 .9 S6 50 • S b • 2 ., •s •e 51 5• 191 NW 195 uw 19S 19b U78 S 195&1 s v 1965 N pne NW Nw l9 5e N[l :::2 JUL !oW J?(, N O I '..'tALS . !1EhNS. A li h F:..<1"Rr.JotF.S TARL. HOTE(S/: I. l:xtremc win d datn is throPr.h 191H. l9 1 ! I ll 9 11 1' I 13 II I e 9 •' • ' l '" 1 u e , . . ll 1 0 11 II '" J '" .... b 1 0 II 'I { ollo w s : flTo;J•ccLO 1\15 'n Au:;. 1878. Wir l d S n owfpll mile: tiS Win f'IAy L933. 8.5 7 ln 11.• y 0.00 ln l lo,c . 1881. 6.5) lnflay 1876. Jl. 4 .!11 Dec. l
PAGE 64

. NNUl L WIND ROSE 1977-lG?Q WIND SPEEDt J . G m h 5.3r.

PAGE 65

l ' ' ' rt. .q.-6 N , CLHt 'l'I C DATA SUMMARY R D IATION BTU/sf d a y TEnP. .. F REL. HUM. PRECIP. % in. It\ N -C) SNOW:PALL in. DD-HE1T base iS5 DD-COOL base 65 I I I I ; h Q l 16 I il?-; I o lij j l 1

PAGE 66

I , B IOC L H 1 ATIC CHART ,120 .. ... . .. ' '> : . ... 80 i 70 ' 50 JO 20 -----------------•. .. --. r I .... \w• I ... . . ................. \ ......... _ _ ' . -' "" "'' -410....... .,,w .. --, , , " •, . . --':" •' 11--.. _: .. .. ...... --lO --"' --. ... ' """" r -':1\.1 -•..t,.,.,, 1:1------' .. -Ill---------l ' ... -1---------. .... --,.,. :_:::: ----------_ _ . . , .... ... __ ,. 'X4 , ,---------' "-(-:.1:"8 ::::::---_ tl'"' zo' I I , " "' -:--;:..-., 10 : , --... . . . -------------------. . . ' ' """ ...... !-. .... , ,, . . ----------=--1---------.. ..... ... . 1'-. -----I "' ... ,. . o '000 0,. ' '"-'-. -J •'10 o )D 100 tT v /'"'OU! A&,IAhCI't : i\. "''""' ! '.. If 1 00 I l"A "\.. C>O "" !00 i ' 1 I :--.. Af'l(. I '•'!'.!..Jal \th4 ------------------;,;.:r--------.. I Ml'$.. i' NCV. 0 10 20 30 40 so 80 9b /00 ...IAtJ:--. HVWtDfrT

PAGE 67

. . ... UN POSITI N C RT 40 NL ...,--...,-r-..,.-,--. oo --t----t r-;---t---t---t---t-,,----+--t --+----t----+-------1 --1 eo

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The following pages are charts stating the solar position for the 2ls t day of each month of the year for each hour of the day. Given are the Altitude (AL) -the angular distance from the horizon to the sun and the Azimuth (AZ) -the angular distance between true north and the point on the horizon directly below the sun. The AL and AZ establish the sun' s position in the sky. Also given are the IIS.l\ -horizontal shading angle and VSA -vertical shading angle for each of the twelve months of the year and also three building orientations. Orientation 90 -East facing wall, Orientation 1800 -South facing wall and Orientation 2700 -West facing wall. On the following page are graphic descriptions of HSA, VSA, solar altitude and solar azimuth. co

PAGE 69

SUN {}.DING -D EF'INITIIONS 5ECTIOI>J PL-AN $01-.D.P.:. ,ll.I..I/TlJDE ----1 .ANI.!.l-1:. f JlN(.,L(:i. Of INC I P eNCe f3 / /1/ / ----.,,.----------,.. / . / / , / / / / I --r---1-+' E I SoLAIZ: .AZ . / MU 11...1. I ..AtJbt-E o( '-........,; BUIL..DIN0 ,. / ' ____ _ /-.!01Z I Z '-'IJ 1 t1 'SUAOOW 41JC::.LE J (HSA) VSA ; US 1-lotr rzcfi.J7!lL Sl-lAPiA.IG Cl;:VICE 'vt=tzl I c ll L 51-lADOW AAJ&LE (VSil)

PAGE 70

SUN ANGLES/SHADINGD ECEMBER LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 90 LATITUDE 40.5 LONGITUDE = :1.04.75 MONTH 12 DAY = 2 1 A Z --------------------------------.. , . ' • -mJNF7" :1. 6. 3/' .. 1 ' " ,,_ 9 :1.3 .. 6 :1 30. :!. t9.9 4B. • .L 60. ... J() 0 n l!::;o.7 3 7 / :1.1. '"> .(J c: • . . I • ,.J l .c+ . \J 6() .. 2 71+. 9 :1 ' : > 6 .. :L :t.no 'jl() <;() :1.3 4 .. f:i :1.9 :1. () () :1.4 : :.>.o .. 209 . 3 0 () :1. :1. . 9 0 () :1. I. !5 " 232. 9 0 0 :1.6 .6 .... !... 0 C A T I IJ N :::: G E E 1 .. E Y !1 01 .. T I ME ORIENIAfiON = 180 I... AT I T UOE === "'' :1.2 LONGITUDE = 104./5 DAY == AI... 7 • ft .•. I.:!E D c: . ..) " •"") , .... 9 1.3 .. 6 :1.0 20 '") . ,,; .. :1. :1. 1:: . . .. ' . \,;1 :1.:?. Q :1. l3 24 1 ::.. , J lf+ " '") ....... 1. :1. .. 6 16 t : : . .1 r ) 11 .... • .. :1.6 " 6 . ... s JNGET A .. , i . . :1 ,., r . . : 1.3B J () :I.BO 20? :1. " :1. " :1. " . .,. I . 9 " :1. • .9 .9 n .. 6 :I.B 9 26 . :1. ..,,. ""l .. ,.J . ' ' ,.,,., 4 .. .'1 1.!3 B .. 6 UJCA r "I: ON ..., GREEI . . . E Y SOLAn 1 H1E ORIEa lTf.1TIDN == 270 .... " . 3 :1 , , . - ••. J . :1. () : i . . .i. ""l .. ,.j .-.:!. " 'l ..::'1 ' \ "{.y •• J .:. LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGil " UDE = 104.75 = = = 1 2 DAY == 2 1 HI=\: AI . . . A:Z: V Sr-\ .. , 4 ... . SUNF'J!:lE / .. '"' r:;-r\ l () () C) , J ,. ,.:. . 9 1.3 . 6 :1. l () () :1.0 20.2 :1.! ' .';0 . 7 0 0 :l:l. 2 4 " :1.64.9 0 () :1.2 , . , ' .... (] " l :I. GO 0 () :1, 2:i I!!" :1. CJ :=:; :1. <.!)()-2 . 9 • ,J . :!Ji 2 () .. .. 3 -,. _, 60 .. 7 1. :=:; :1.3. 6 '"lr) I .'1 :1.9. () -40 .. l 4 ' •• •. ' ' 16 .. 2 2 . . . <"? 1.) n !5 .. 1 . :1.6 • . 6 OnO !:iUNBE:T

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.SUN ANGLES/SHADING JANUARY AND NOVE BER LOCATION = SOLAR TIME OriENTATION = 90 LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104.75 MONTI ! = :1. II DAY = 21. .... -........ -----.................. ............ _,_ -..... -...... ...... .................. HR Ai... AZ VElA H S A ----------------------------7 ':1 .. "' .... ,:uwn:sE B 7 . 7 9 " x.tf. !'.'j • '") :ll + u 2 2:1.0 .. 7 :1.!' . ) :1. 6 .. 3 2 w (1 :1.6 7.7 .. l :1.6 .. LONGITUDE :::: DAY ,, 2:1. Vf:iA 0 0 0 0 () .. 5 '+0. :1. 9. .... •:_:; . l +3 " El <5 0 " 7 -:1. " 9 () l:'.'i ( " " 7 43 " B r.:r _ ... ,_, .... , .. l :1. 0 -•+. 7 ! 7 i 0 0 () () () :1. -CJ n : -'.2 -<5'+"
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.SUN ANGLES/SHADINGFEBRUARY AND OCTOBER LOCATION = GREELEY SCLAR TIME DF'IENTATION :::: 1.1'() I .. ATITUDE :: :: '+0.!5 MONTH ::" 2 .{ 10 LONGITUDE = 104 .. 75 DAY == 21 HR AI... A Z VSA Hf:)f.'l 6.6 ... SUN ISE ., 3 .. B lOU.J 4 1.f3 .. :3 / B :1. f t " : s 1.1.0.ti 1 6.2 2a.n 9 ., :1. .. B 40.8 :1.() 3 : 1.. 3 1. .It 6 • (., t::-1:: .... }"'.J U. 4 1.6:1. .6 f.>6 .. 9 7:1..6 :1.2 .. 3 HlO 90 90 1. ; 3 ' • 1.90.4 0 0 1.4 :u.3 2:1. () 0 :1. I C" .J 23. 6 2 0 0 1 6 lf+. 3 241. :?. () () :1. 7 :LB :1. ..; 0 0 • I :1.7 .. 4 ... l .JCATION = GREELEY SJL A R TIME O PIENTAfiON = 1 8 0 LATITUDE'"' 'tO.!S U:JNGITUDE::: . ONTH :::: 2 * !0 DAY "" 2:1. H R r 1L 6. 6 ... s umn:sr::: 7 3 .. B B 9 6 1.0 :31..;',') : 1 .:1. 36 .. 4 ::sa .. 3 :1.3 :36 .. '+ '1.4 :1. . • ) AZ :1.00.3 tto .. n 1.30 .. B :1. ft !:'i :1.6:1. .. 6 HlO 21!'5 16 14.3 17 3.8 251.7 1.7 . 4 ..... 3UNBET 1 :> . -27.0 33.0 36.6 3?.? 313. 3 36.6 LOCATI 1 N = GREELEY TIME = 270 Hl:)A 11. .. 7 .. -6:1. .. 2 .... ftCJ.2 .. .. .... :1.0 .. •t 0 :I.B.4 6l .. :::. 7:!..7 LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104.75 MONTI ! = 2 IO Dr1Y = 21. l .. m AI ... AZ HBA 114 6 .... SUN r.:ISE 7 3.8 108.3 0 () n :1. L; "3 U . B .. O 0 0 ? 23.6 :1.30.B 0 () l.O 31 • j /J t ::• . + •• J 0 0 :1.1 4 :1.6:1..6 () () l :;: 3B.3 :I.BO 0 0 t : 3 I t :1.9B.ft 66.9 -1:1. "6 : i . ' • : 5 :i. .. 2:1. ::; .ft6 .. 6 ... 55 1.5 6 9 tt 30 -AO Fl 16 lf+" 3 2 J'+:f. " ) .. -1.6.2 -2B. B :1.7 3.B : : 2 :::i .1. .7 4 :1.7 .. • .... S UN l:;C'f'

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SUN ANGLES/SHADING MARCH AND SEPTEMBER L.OCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 90 LATITUDE = 40 .. 5 LONGITUDE = :1.04 .. 75 MONTH == ::.'i 9 DAY : ::: 2:1. ----------------------------------M .. b ... . I . . , l :1. 1 f . 0 •")'' ) ............. " :1. 9 ,, 2 :1.0 '+0 .. B : I . l <+I> .. ? :1. :? l t E 7 1 l :1. 100 " I '. ? . . .. .. : : . > . l :1. 10 " if ' +0. 7 9 " ' ' ) ,.,. :1.23 " 3 '+B. 9 :1.0 ' • 0 .n : 1 .3tl .. 6 49 1 :1. 46. 9 l!'.'j7 " B •+9" :1. :1.2 4'?. :1. : 1 . no 4<7 .. :1. l 3 ' • 6 . 9 202 " ,., ...... '•(7 .. :1. :1. .t+ 40 .. B ::.! l . , , 49 l 32 , . , 236 7 ' • 8 .. 9 .. ,.;,, . : 1.6 '')' ' ) :1. :1. '•!3" .. , .. .,,.;, , tf . I :1.7 :1. l " :1. <,:J . B '" 9 :I.B . ... .. 3 269 . 7 () :I.B . . . . LOCATION = G REELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 270 .... 7('1 . H .... " :1. .. .. ! ' . 'j(:, .. . .. ,' .•. . .(. :1. .. , , . " ) ..... () , .,,. , "'' ': . . " 2 4:1. " 4 • . . . , 7 . :.JC I .. 6<"1 .. :1. 79 . 0 U9 " 7 LATIT UDE = 40 .. 5 LONGITUDE = :1.04 .. 75 t 10NTH :::: :.3 9 DAY = 2:1. HR AZ b .... l 7 :1.:1. . : I . :1.00.2 () 0 B '') '') :1. : I . :1.0.9 0 () ,;,. 4' •• " 9 •") :1.23 .. 3 0 () .. :1.0 40 .. B :1.30 .. 6 () () :1. :1. 4 6 .. 9 :1. B 0 () l .<+? . l :1.00 () () :1.3 lt6" ( 7 202 .. 2 70. !'. ) .... 67 .B :1. '• t40. B :1. . ' • !:-j " (:) .... 4B. 6 :1. 32 .. '') :? l > . 7 37 <3: ' 3 " 3 . ... :1.6 " )'') . . ,. .. .. :1. 2<+9 .. :1. lt .. .. ::>.o .. 9 :1./ :1. l " :1. 2!'.'i9. B :1. :1. .:5 .... :1.0. 2 lB ....• 3 2b9 .. 7 () ... . 3 l B ....

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. SUN ANGLESjSHADING -RIL AND AUGUST 1... 0 C 1:) r T UN :::: t ; F' FE 1 ... E !3 n 1 .. r:) F' T I M E OF'[E N 'T'ATJON = i ... ATJTUOF : :: t+<) .. LDNGITUI:i[ "= :1.0•+.7!'3 t10NT I I :::: 4 8 :OAY :::: 2:1. (:lj l. I ! ' .. I 3 .... .s / . . 1 :: ._,) 0:1. .. :i. 7 . 6 .. -.. '? :J.D . ? ( 0 ''I' l ? .. , . I .. . , • l;) 30 " ' ' ) , .. : . . : 1 . o : r . 30 .. .. , . I :1.:1. q 4 t :1. :1. '1.3 .. '') t.+ ? : t : ; • .. " . : .. " d l O ::=iO .. B :1. 1:: .. , '') ' : : s 9 . . ,J I .. I :1. l " '') 1. :1. . ' ' ) , . . l''l' ...} " /.l 6l " :1.::?. 6:1. " :1. :l.f:!O 9 0 () 1.3 " .. n () 0 l '• (i . f.l " 9 () () :1. ; . l l D 0 0 . . . . : 1 . 6 :5o ' ' ) 0 () . ., :1.7 :I.B '? 26(;> 3 0 " . " \1 :1.8 / 1:: .. , , J 27B " 9 () 0 :I.B .. 7 .. .. I.Ji • ''\ ' 7 2 :1. " ) .:. :::: G r\LLL.E Y GDI ... I .. I"\ TIM E Cl h' T E: N T 'I T 0 1 ! :::: :1. U 0 I. . f.) T T T U D F :: :: " I 0 • I...CJNGJTI.J[!E :::: r ICJN T'H : ::: 4 8 DAY :::: AI.. . A Z 1:: 3 .... .I:S E "' " f.l 7 .. r:: ,,) H:l. .. : 1 . () ..... l B 7 90 ... t'\ .. ,. S ' / " . . ' .:> , . n D :::;o : 1 . () :1. 7:1. n .. .. • . , 1 i f t :1. :1. :1. :1.3 • " ) { "'' 7 .. " .... _ (.) ,,J " :1.0 !'.) () " B :1. <;> .. .1. 62. n :1. l t ::'l') ' ' ) l .1. " ) 6:1. .. ... JCJ" , , ; .. .. A,, • :1.2 "S :1. .. :1. :tno 6:1. .. l :1.:5 '') 20B B 6:1. J:: " .. .. ,,J .1. ' • :::io ('\ 'I") B " " . , Cl. .. " :1. 4:1. " :1. <'t 6 " B .. 7 '1.6 30 .. '') ,. .. •';> 7:1. .. B :i./ :I.B " 'I 269 .. 3 B :t .. ? :I.:J 7 .. ,:; d 7 .. 7 . 1:: • .J HJ .. '1. () 0 "1 lB. C;' 90 " 7 0 f) ' " l n 30 " " ) ...... :1.0.1. () 0 4:1. " :1. : 1 . : 1 .: 5 .. ,., ... .. 0 0 : 1 0 () .. El :1. .. :1 () 0 :1. l ") l !'.'i l ") () 0 " : . . .. -:1. 6:1. " :1. :I.BO () 0 :1. :5 , ... '3 " ) 20G 4 ""ll l " ) : ... t " , .. ., .. " '" ....... :1. ... ! ;so 0 230 9 .. , 7 ... J ' ' / :1. .. .. .. .'II " " :1 4:1. :1. 2'+6 ('\ ,{J .. , r:: .... '') .. " 0 + , ) .. .. ) " ,., , :1.6 ) .. '') 9 3 0 "T .... :t. t '' ... " / '1.7 lB 9 (,
PAGE 75

SUN ANGLES ,!SHADING MAY AND JULY LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME === 6 :1. :30 , . .. '} • " ) :1. l . " ... .. ' . . } <+ 1::;. 3 2 .(f () . .J I . 1:: •+6 H '"\J::t:: .. } " . :. ,_J • .. } 6 " J :; • .. ! ,::.)' ::1. . • " H l ,., q o"'){: )t:: t.'., " ,. • • (.1\.J '! '') ' ' ) 2 '-/ .( + ,\ .. " .... .. : I . 9 " 3 . ... LONG I TUDE === VElA •") '') I;;' .... . . ... .. " . . J 4 1 " ' f 2 4 " •") ... . . ''tL:' .1!:' ... , .. _ , " .J ! + 7 .. , .. " I " (:) 60 " ') " ,(f ' ' ) 'I:; l . .J " :1. 90 " 6 () " 0 y () " / 0 " •:: , , } () " 0 " :J 0 :f.O.tt .. HE> A .... :?"t " El .... l " .••. \,} " •,,. 1 3 " 3 •''JC) l:) ...... I " " -'+ ?0 0 0 0 ( ) () () () LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 180 LATITUDE = 40.5 LONGITUDE = 104 .75 t10NTH "" 5 4 7 DAY === 21 -----------------------------------HR --------------------------------------4 .. 7 " " I , ;; "") • ' ' ) .. } . . .... .: .. b 7 ;?.t+. :1. B .. 9 46 .. 0 :1. () !5;r .. ll .. () 12 .. c> 1 3 .. 9 .. 3 •+6 .. B 1 6 .. ::'i :1.7 2-'f .. l :r.n 12 .. 9 :1.9 }.2 1 9 .. 3 === !:>UN!:>ET ,;: ( .)d .. l' .tf .. B3 .. 93 lOA :1. :1.9 :1.43 lBO : 1 . 6 2.t+O !:5 267 J') ''1 , .:./ C> '') ...... () .(. () c: ,,} () .. B .. 3 7 f.> .. 9 . 1.> 7': > . .. " 4 .. .(+ 70. 3 69 .. ,f, \.1 .. 6 70 .. : . .It /) .. 4 .. , 75 .. 9 .. I' .. 0 1:: 0 .. .. } .. 6 () .. n () LOCATION = GREELEY SOLAR TIME ORIENTATION = 2 7 0 LATITUDE = 40 .. 5 LONGITUDE = MONTI--I :::: 7 DAY :::: 2:1. HF< AL AZ 4 " 7 . ... I l:>E 1 :: '') ,., ,( o:: '') () ,,} ...... " ,,; .. \J ... J " ,. .. lj :1. '') ;.',, " 9 JA " A 0 7 24+ " l B3 " • : : d () !:_:; " e : : .. } 93 () 9 .. B :1. 04 .. : : ) 0 l () .. 3 :1. :1. c; . 6 () l : 1 . " 9 j.-'f3 " .t+ () l ,., 69 6 l. B() () .... : .. l :5 I •= .. ) •. .! " 9 2:1.6 .. l > " :1. :1. 4 .. 2 .If() " .! + I> 0 " 9 :1. n 7 4? .. , " " .. I J:: -'') I ••y c: '1.6 •v .. , , } ........ / . ..} :1.7 2.1+ :1. 276 1:: '')/. '') " .. ,,} .:. -'+ . ,;, , l n 1 ':) ...... " 9 " ,-s l:-5 " .!+ :1.
PAGE 76

SUN ANGLES ;SHADIN G 1.. U C 'i' l f'l N :::: r.:.; E: E 1... E Y D 1 ... t1 F • : T I t11:: u h : :n:: N'i'f.'d I t:l 1 ''" 4f::l " 7 :1.00 " I t Hl ... 7? .. 6 :1. () :':i9 .. 6 :1. :1. 4 9 ... c.i I / , ;: I. " ' .. J . • .. \ ., . . J .. :1. : 1 . .. D :1. : r,? . .,. . . . .., .... " t :1. I .. .. / :1. ,., 7:,!. ':> lOO 72 9 0 .. ' " I. 3 " n :1. 73 .. )' A ' I . I • :1. .!t 1::... ,.1 r .. 6 '') t:: . ... i ,,) . :1. 76 .. .! (:} .. :1. :1. :.; . . , () () .. .. / 9 .{ 1 0 .. 7 :1.00 " "+ 0 () :1.0 .. b :1. :1. ,(f ( ) 0 () " ' I :1. B l 3<7 f ) () . . . .. :!. .. 9 :1.00 C) 0 :1. 3 6 0 . . n 22.1. 7:': j .. 7 ..... +9 :1.4 6 '"),1. r : : .. •' • . , I .. :1. i > ? .... ::::4-" 0:_:) :1. AB .. , : ? /.; •t < t . . " :-5 L 7 \,; "')''.' ..; .. ; .. x ,.:

PAGE 77

CI,n..A T ( MAHONEY '11ABLES) COl:1PUTE R .. RIN'l10Urr 1._ T l UN I...DNGTTI.JDE L.r-,T J TI.JVE A I ... TT ruoc c;rCEL.EY COL " ) 104 .. 75 w ' +I) .. N 4.!1:50 FT ............ ........ ... .......................... . . ......... ........ -.... .... ........... ..... -. ................ .. .. ... . " lADLE 1 Cl...lMA TIC DA .fA .. :1. :1. <;.>" 1. 0 " 6 .. 2 H I C H :3 1 .. 7 Ar1T , :t.O.'• -:I.O.B f.> .. B . ... : .. (3 :1. :1.:1. .. 2 ? 1.3 It .. 9 --8 .. B 1 If,. j] :1. • :"5 1 6 .. 4 .LO .. 'J> :1.6.2 : 1.7 .. ( . 1.7 .. ( + :1./ .. B 10 .. / 1 7 .. <"f :1. :':i .. :1. J. LOW --1.0 .. 0 f.'r H 1:-.: :=: '• ;?. .. TADL.E 2 CLIMATI C DATA CRH ,F'RFC IF' ,WIND> tH:JNT I I M l N A'JE . . FEB AFr( i'1 r"l"r' • ,.JUl... AUG !3EF: UCT Cl DI:::C TOTAl ... J '') C l , .• 6 7 t./1 69 IJ + ,.} 1+ :l. .. , ' •• J 37 37 l :: t :: .,J, .. a 1 :: ;. 4 :: .... J""''t " ... J " c:'"'JW c:: •. J .. f!;' • • ,.. • "H l : • 3 3 1 .. 94 .. 1 r ) I , . ., -.. J A,, ,. (;) ... J 3 :I. .. Ul 3 :1. .. 2:1. 3 l. .. :l.5 3 3 .<;9 " 7 6 3 . Lt/ :t3 .. 02 TABLE 3 DIAGNOSIS . ... ... .... ........ .... . ....... ... .......... . . ....... ............. -. ....... -••• • ...... . ......... . . . . ...... 0 ... . . ... -... . < -D A Y > < N J C H T > , 1 T E f ) UP 1... MIt UP l..l .ll.J D N ...... . -•••••••• ... .......................... . ............... ............................ -•••• - •• • 0 •••• •••• . .JUN 20 .. 6 JUL 3:1. .. / 26 r:":-tl.JC 3() .. 26 :;:6 .. 1. 26 O C T :1.9 . 2 NOt,' :1.0. :1. DEC ! ,.,:1. 26 :1.9 :1. 'i. :1.9 :1. .. :1.. 2 1.9 1.9 -U .. . . ... l . . . 1 . I .1. :t. I .1. :1. :1. t .1. :1. :1. 0 () 0 0 0 () () () 0 0 0 () 0 :1. : 1 . :1. :1. () () () 0 0 0 :1. :1. b c C' c c c c c 0 c H C H ;] H n H C u f"' c ("' c c

PAGE 78

B 1...1 I 1 ... D :r (" ;:; !:) H D 1.11 ... D BE 0 f;: I E I T D N A THF.: I _ O IIG F C I:Nr: ANn !30UT I I TO ):;:EDUCE Tr:J THE SUN .. H HU aU a ;:;F 1:":)C I NG H HHHUHtfHHHH *I HH COMF' F'I ... ()NN It .r; T !:; I J7 TI-fF T o 'c t 1 r: NT En u I F E t 1 c t y J s I c; 1 r: 1 c (. N .. ,.. • • HHHHHUH#M Air MDVEt.ENT HHHNHHHHHHHHH I r: 1 : ) Mr:J' E1 ENT IS E 1E I:;: J nl_ , [S DF.:S.I:RABLE FOR NOT MURL l 'HAt A t 1l:JN 'H, F-:Dr:Jt1H C?4N BE OO!,Lr!...E Bf. t 1 S THERE IS NOT MUCH NEED FOR CRCSS 'VERY SMALL' , LESS THAN 20% or THE WALL. tHHHHiMHUHHHHHMHHH WALLS HMHHHHHHHtHHHH BDTI I AND HHEI 'NAI_ I,JAI . I ... :) S HOULD BE MASSIVE. A l i:ClOI' .. , WITI I SUEjS'ftlNTif.IL. THEF{MAL GIVING A TIME LAG OF AT 0 .. MEDIUM : 25 40% HHHHH#HtHH PROTECTION OF OPENINGS HNHHH H [ \...' Y , ( J 'v' C l:J I 0 l J T J t 1 E -LAG • I I E(.')UY, OVE f.l HO T I t1E FID OF CLIMAT .....

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DESIGN GUIDELINES BASED ON CI.IMl\TE ANALYSIS Greeley's climate best be characterized by low precipitation, low humldi-ty, a good amount of sun but with a moderate range of temperatures throughout the year. Both climatic evaluation and unalysis techniques point this out w th l :he CJ.H1AT recommendat:ions being very specific with regard to design considerations. These are summarized below. The building orientation should be on an east-west axis. This layout will reduce exposure to the sun in the morning and evenings. It also allows an opportunity to capture the abundant sun which can be used to heat in the winter and for easy control in the ho t summers. Ventilation does not seem to be a problem and therefore can be double banked. The humidity is low enough, along with the daily higlts so that there is no great need to move the air. This is especially evident on the Bioclimatic Chart where the temperatures are almost always below the comfort zor.e except in June, July and August. In June, July and August, this "discomfort" could easily be remedied by a small breeze and/or evaporative cooling. The size of openings should be between small and m pointing out that the winters are somewhat cold and careful c nLrol needs to be applied to the summer sun. Through careful design, however, the sun can be admitted when desired and omitted when not desired. Walls, floors and roofs should be heavy with an 8 hour time lag again points out the need to control warm summer tempera tures and cool winters , both which can be done with massive walls and time lag. Mass helps to stabilize the large annual mean range temperature. Rain protection is not a main factor in Greeley. The annual precipitation is not large enough to dictate special design considerations. 7Q

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In summary, the most distinguishing aspect of Gree ley's climate is its large annual m ean temperature swings, b u t at the same time great poten ial exi s ts b ecause of t h e abundance of solar radiation. The swing i s mo e o f an opportunity and not so much of a problem also because of the lmv hu.llidi ty. Greeley appears to have an i deal climate for solar design. on

PAGE 82

Before dccigning the Center for Recreation it is very important to understand who and when the building is used. That information is contained within this USER PROFILE section.

PAGE 83

WHO WHEN Simply stated, the building should be designed with the ENTIRE in mind. In do'ng so, the building should be oper to the general pu lie but at the same time cater to the needs of specific groups within the community. Specifical . y , some of these special groups shoul6 include the Seniors of the conununi ty 'AJho share the site and could greatly benefit from the facility; civic groups who need meeting and banquet spaces frequently; the public school system who will use the swimming pool for competitive swim meets and have contributed financially to its construction; and, finally, handicap community who all too often are for gotteil in our society. The Park and Recreation Department offices are also contain d within the building, so it is very important to provide a good working environment for all these professionals. ALL the individuals who make up Greeleyrs c ommunity, however, should be consid red when designing the building. It is also important to understand that these groups or many ind'viduals will want to use various portions of the facility at the same time. Multi use of the fa.c'lity is very important. The operating hours of th cent r mus t be rery flexible to accommod t .:.. all the citizens 1 needs. Many people to exercise n r swim as early as 6 :00 a . m . before going to work. Conversely, the city' s basketball leagues may be active until 1 1:00 or 12:00 at night o n the same day. Much of the use activity patterns of the building will be determin d by how the Park and Recreation Department schedules the building and what programs are offered . 'l'his aga i . n po:i nts out t.hat the building should be flexible enough to allow the Recreation Department ot schedule what they want and now having the building be a limitaion to whRt can be done. The facility must be able to accommodate a lilrge number of peo p l e or groups engaged in a wide range o f activities on a year-round basis.

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The overall planning of this unique downtown site is crucial for the success of the Community Center for Recreation, the future Community Theatre, and for the continuous success of the Seniors Center. This SITE DEVELOPMENT CRITERIA section establishes the phasing of development; the future size and need of the Community Theatre; various site relationships; and specific development requirements on the site such as service access, pedestrian circulation, parking, landscaping, exterior spaces, and solar energy requirements.

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PHASING COMMUNITY THEATRE SITE IMAGE Phase One of this site development is the construction of the Community Center for Recreation. During construction of the Center, the existing recreation facility must remain functional. After the new center is complete and occupied by the Park and Recreation Department, the old center is to be demolished allowing that portion of the site to be developed. Since no date has been set for the start of Phase Two, the building should be attractive and the site should not appear that it is only partially developed. Phase Two is the construction of a 500-seat Community Theatre. At the conclusion of this phase, the entire site would be fully developed and appear as if the site was developed at one time. This facility should be designed to accommodate an intimate audience program of dance, theatre (both community and touring), classical soloists, chamber music, limited audience lectures, mime and puppet shows. A fully equipped stage and a 500-seat theatre should accommodate most of these events. In addition to the theatre, the Community Theatre should include support facilities for staging productions, meeting rooms, gallery space, public restrooms and a lobby area. For site planning purposes a building footprint of 120 feet by 120 feet should be used. The stage height would be between 40 to 45 feet high. The stage area needs to be accessed by vehicles up to semi-trucks with trailers. This access would require a space where a semi could be parked for a period of time while it was being unloaded and not disrupt either vehicular or pedestrian traffic. Because of its prominent location, the image of the site should be very strong, inviting, one which speaks to energy issues, and one which develops the final site around in a way the community will be proud of. The site should give the appearance of being a complete development after Phase One and again after Phase Two. Since it may be several years before the Community Theatre is built, the site should not appear half finished until it is completely developed. 86

PAGE 87

SITE RELATIONSHIPS SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS The most important aspect to the entire site development is that all the buildings, parking, and landscaping and circulation should work together to make the site one unified place and not just a group of buildings. The Center and Theatre should respect the existing Seniors Center. They should try and respect its rather small massing and should not shade the entry or sidewalks leading to the entry. The Seniors Center is very successful and the future development should enhance it. The relationship to the Greeley School is not as critical due to its large mass and because of the buffer its parking lot provides. The structure, however, is a beautiful old building and any way it can be enhanced and included in the development will be positive for the entire site. The portion of the site presently occupied by the existing recreation center is fairly close to the school and will be somewhat more crucial than the larger portion of the site. The relationship between the two unbuilt buildings, the Recreation Center and Theatre, will be the most important. Each building needs to function independent of itself and at the same time complement each other. There may also be times when the two facilities work together. For example, dinner could be served in the recreation center's multipurpose room prior to a theatre production in the theatre. Because of this, the two facilities may need to be in fairly close proximity to each other. There also should be a feeling of entering the site with neither the recreation center of the theatre dominating the site. Service Access: As previously mentioned, the Community Theatre needs access to the stage area by a semi-truck (backing in is adequate -no turnaround required) . The recreation center needs access to the kitchen, trash area, and pool filter room. Pedestrian Circulation: Pedestrian ways should link all uses on the site to each other as well as to the Civic Center, Lincoln Park, the central business district and the neighboring residential areas. There should be an

PAGE 88

effort made to minimizing crossing conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles. Parking: As mentioned under LEGAL CONSTRAINTS, only thirty parking spaces are required on site, three of which must be for handicapped users. A parking area should also be provided for two school buses. All parking should be convenient to entrances to both buildings. Users wlll be required to enter the buildings through their main lobbies. A drop-off area should also be provided in front of both buildings, if possible. The number of curb cuts should be minimized. It should also be remembered that most of the parking to be used for these facilities wil. l be on street, nenr the mall, and across the street in the Civic Center parking (to be u""ed at nigLt.). Several of the on-site parking should be dedicated t o Park and Recreation employees. Parking lots should be visually screened from public streets and adjacent usex-s by firms and/or planting. Landscaping: The entire site s l1ould be integrated through a consistent landscape treatment. All building entrances should be reinforced where possible with special landscape treatment. Eterior Spaces: Exterior spaces which should be included on the site might include an outdoor sunbathing space adjacent to the rool, a meeting area adjacent to the multipurpose room, a play area adjacent to the Youth Activity Room , and an area adjacent to the crafts room. Other grand exterior spaces to emphasize entry and circulation should also be developed. Solar Energy: All structures should be sited such thnt other structures and important pedestrian links are not shaded. Special care should also be given so as not to shade solar collectors for the pools heating system. 00

PAGE 90

This section contains SPACE REQUIREMENTS for all programmed spaces to be provided Hithin the Community Center for F.:.....crea tion. Th s program is adapted a program developed b y thg Park and Recreation Department for the Ci y o f Greeley , Colorado.

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Lobby /Lounge ' Reception/Control Game room Ve1 ding Public Restrooms • Multipurpose Room Food Service Kitchen Area Youth Activity Area Crafts Roorn Secretary/Receptionists Directors Office Superintendents Office (2) Conference Room Office Storage/Workroom Office/Lounge Staff Lounge/Mail Room Supervisors Offices (3) Facilities Manager Office Park Planner/Interns Locker Rooms Restrooms at Lockers (2) Shower Rooms/Sauna (2) L
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Lobby/Lounge Nat:ure of 1\cti vi tios: primn.ry function of the Lobby I Lounge is to provide an OJ e n space at the buildings main entry where people can unite, read, relax, and sit. The space \vill also pro,..ride a gathering for people wait ng to use the facility or to watch an event. Number Involved in Activity: 8 to 120 Spatial Characteristics: As the main en ranee to the building, the Lobby/Lounge should be inviting. Once incide, the space should feel spacious, cheery, and nraw the person in and help orient him to the rE:st of the building. The feelin g of the activities beyond should be present within the space. People should feel energetic and want to participate in the activities within the building. Congestion, even at peak use time, should be minimized and should not encroach on the waiting room. Functional Relationships : Immediately adjacent to Reception/ Control, gameroom, public restroorns, and within close proximity to the pool, multi-purpose rooms, administration, nursery, and the activity rooms. Must be centrally located for botl1 users and spectators. St.rong relationship i : o the ou'cdoors, exterior circulation and parking . . i\ccessibi li ty: To all easily :i nclud j ng the handicapped. Furnishings Equipment: Display case, bulletin board, several movable seats, couches, and tables, clocks, magazine racks, and public telephones. Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Durable carpets wit l mats entry doors, brightly colored durable walls. Size Requirements: 1,000 SF vJi th hig h ceiling. Q?

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Lighting: Natural daylighting desired. Zone lighting at 8ittin9 area is separately controlled. 40 foot overall with up to 60 footcandles in reading area. Acoustics: Softe r sounds so sounds are not loud. Plumbing: Public drinki.ng fountain. HVAC: Normal, special heating at entry doors, some ventilation.

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Reception/Control Nature of Activities: The Reception/Control area is both a key public relations and/or control point for the entire building. The area serves as the inforn1ation center, ticket sales ce. , equipment checkout center, and a point of supervision over the Lobby/Lounge and Gameroom. It also serves as control point over circulation to all parts of the building for the user and spectators alike. Number Involved in Activity: 2 t.o 5 Spatial Characteristics: Space composed of t .wo distinct areas. l) Counter which is interfaced between worker and building user; and 2) secured area for equipment storage and clerical area. Visual control from area to public must be maintained at all times. Tickets and casl1 registers should be out of the public reach. The area should b e appealing and its purpose self evident to one entering the building. Functional Relationships: Directly adjacent to the Lobby/ Lounge, visually adjacent to Gameroom, and at key point to control circulation at all points of the Accessibility: The portion of the area should be accessible to the entire lobby while the office and storage portion should be completely secure from the public. Entire area securable if desir8J. Furnishings and Equipment: Two desks, two c'1 .i.: ':-:;, four stools, cash register, typewriters, copy machine, file cabinets, and equipment storage. Storage Requirements: Equir;,ment -balls, nets, tickets, etc., and also small office supplies, information brochures. Surface Treatments: Soft floors, acoustical ceiling, light durable walls.

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Size Requirements: 450 SF Lighting: 70 footcandles in clerical areas, accent lighting at counter. Acoustic: Isolate typing and clerical sounds from Lobby/ Lounge. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Game room Nature of Activities: The will house a variet y of games including sevLral video games, chess, backgammon, pool able , ping pong table , foosball, and air hockey. The exact games could vary. The uso could h8 casual drop in for all age groups, organized tournaments, or instructional. Number Involved in A .cti vi ty: Up to twenty Spatial Characteristics: A n enclosed room devoted strictly to electronic and traditional games. A port.ion of the room must be darker for video games and the other area needs t o be better lit for t.:tble games. Space not e cramp d so activity around tables is not limited. Functional Relationships: Visually controlled b y Reception/ Control desk and directly adjacent to Lobby/Lounge area. Accessibility: 1\.vailable to all members of t h e community. Some equipment (pool cues, chess pieces, etc.), available from Reception/Control desk. Furnishings and Eq u prnent: Video games, pool tw.ble, ping poin g t able, foosball, etc. , numerous tables for backgammon and chess, as well as seats. Storage Require ments: None Surface Treatm e11ts: Soft floors, soundproof walls and ceiling as much as possib.le. Size Requirements: 800 SF L.igh ting: Minimize na tun.tl ligh tinq b e cause of glare with games. Provide direct downlighting at various table games and keep video games at darker level. Entire lighting on dimmer sys t e m.

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Acoustics: Minimize all acoustical noise within r oom and comple t ely isolate r oom acoustically from Lobby/ Lo unge. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Vending Nature of Activity: The sale od prepackaged foods and beverages from vending machines. Numi:Jer Involved in Activity: One to six Spatial Characteristics: Small, isolated room with several vending machines. Functional Relationship: Near Lobby /Lounge and Reception/ Control. fooJs not all wed in other areas of the building, especially pool and physical activity areas. Accessibi lity: Available to all members o f the community. Furnishings and Equipment: Several vending machines. Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Walls and floors easy to clean. Size Requirements: 120 SF Lighting: 3 0 footcandles Acoustics: No speciul considerations. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Public Restrooms Nature of Activities: Men's and women's restrooms for the buildings users and workers. Number Involved in Ac ti vi y : One to tvle 1 ve, each room. Spatial Characteristics: Clean, hygenic, well-lit environment. Functional Relationships: Adjacent to Lobby/Lounge and if it is determined a second level is desired, additional restrooms should be located upstairs. Will also be u sed by people using room, spectators in pools, crafts, and the building offices. Accessibility: Available to users and workers of building. Each should include handicapped fj_xtures. Furnishings and Equipment: Mirrors, handicap g ab b a r s in one stall, hand d ryers, and paper dispenser. Storage Requirements: None S urface Treatments: Ha d flooring wjth easy o clLan and floors, solid ceiling. Size Requireme nts: 2,000 SF (1,000 SF for men, 1,000 SF for women ) . Lighting: 30 footcandles Acoustics: No special treatment required. Plwnbing: Women6 water closets*, 5 lavatories Men water closets*, 4 urinals, 4 * Includes one accessibl e by h cmdicap in each r oom HVAC: Normal with ex'lO.Ll!=:cing r equired. .... .....

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Hul ti-Purpose Room Nature of Activities: .i'\s the n a me implies, this needs to be very flexible to accommodate a wide range of activities. It should be designed to accommodate such activities as community service club meetings, lunch.ons, dining banquets, social c .ancing, square dancing, lectures, classes, crafl: displays, slide shows, and other uses which could constantly change. Number Involved in Activity: 20 to 250 Spatial Characteristics: Very flexible space. Space has capability to be into three subspaces, each of which can function at the same time. Able to have natural light: or m a d e completely dark if desired . Possibly adjacent to outdoors space. Functional Relationships: Very close to Lobby/Lounge and public restrooms. Immediately adjacent to :tood Service Kitchen. must pass Heception/Cont ol before entering space. Accessibility: Control desire d so that the room is accessible only to group(s) who has scheduled its use. This degree of privacy should also apply to each separate room w h e n large room is subdivided into two or three spaces. Each subspace accessible without entering other subspaces. nll rooms access controlled by Reception/Control desk, or possible access from outdoors. Handicap access required. FurTtLsuings and Equipment: rrwo mo, Table smmdproof partitions, portable tables and chairs for dining and meeting s , portable stage and podium, movie screen. Storage Requirements: Coat storage (check room for 200 cha'r and table trays, and stage storage. Provide some cabinets for storage along walls. Surface Treatments: Hard floor not affected by street light walls, acoustic ceiling.

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Size Requirements: 2,500 SF (with each subroom approximately 1/3 of the total size) . Lighting: Variable lighting, with up to 70 footcandles. Each subspace zoned separately. Capability of making space completely dark. Acoustics: Good speaking space, when room is divided each space must not acoustically interfere with adjacent spaces, soundproof portable walls, even at high noise level. Plumbing: None HVJ\C: Normal, provide some exhausting for smoke removal. Provide with its own zoning.

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Food Service Kitchen Area Nature of Activities: This area receives and food, provides space and equipment to prepare and serve the food, and an area to wash the dishes. There is also a restroom and furniture closet adjacent, yet removed, from the main ki .chen area. All the food that is prepared here is served and eaten in the multi-purpose room. Number Involved in Activity: 2 to 10 Spatial Characteristics: Compact, functionally well organized, well lit work space. Functional Relationships: Located for ease of service to directly adjacent, yet visually removed, from the multi-purpose room. Food should not be carried a great distance or across a hall or other space where people may be congregated or passing. Directly adjacent to service entrance so that deliveries can be made and waste removed independently of the main lobby or heavy traffic areas. Accessibility: Accessible only to kitchen workers and delivery people. Del'veries made directly from outside to storage area within kitchen. Furnishings and Equipment: The kitchen should be divided lnto three distinct areas: storage, preparation, and dishwashing. Each area has distinct, specialized equipment which sl1ould be J _signcd by a kitchen design specialist. Storage Requirements: Food, equipm nt, and dish storage. Surface Treatments: Hard, waterproof walls and floors easy to clean. Size Requirements: 1,050 SF for storage, preparati011 and dishwashing; 60 SF for restroom and furniture closet. Lighting: 60 footcandles, no natural light required.

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Acoustics: Noise of kitche n should not interfer e with adjacent multi-purpose room. Plumbing : Miscellaneous dishwashers and sinks, as well as water closet and lavatory in restroom. Gas to major cooking appliances. HVAC: Makeup air for ventilation in winter, exhaustion required.

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Youth Activity Area Nature of Activities: n child care area for users of the facility who wish to bring their children to the facility. Age ranges from infant to eight. Activities include drama, game, hob ies, m odel building, singing, hand crafts, special education classes. Activities are numerous and varied to suit the wide range of children. It should also contain a small restroom for the children. Number Involved in 1\ctivity: Up to,25 Spatial Characteristics: The room should be cheerful, bright, and warm, encouraging creative play. It must be very flexibla and be able to different age groups and numbers of children. The space should open upon an outdoor play area. Separation of children into smaller groups, especially by age groups is desirable. Functional Relationships: Located near exterior space which can serve as outdoor play area. Located in quiet area of build ng a1 d close to Lobby/Lounge. Accessibility: Available only to users of building for the time they are in the building. Care must be given to insure the childre n stay withi n the room and outdoor play area. Furnishingsan d Fixed base cabinets, chalkboards, tackboards, movable chairs, tables, cribs, and movie screens. Storage Requirements: Coats, various art, game, and hobby supplies, toys and blankets. Surface 'l'reatments: A portion of the flooring carpei: and a portion tiles because of wet crafts. Acoustic ceilinas and durable bright and cheery walls. Size Requirements: 700 SF Lighting: 30 footcandles with natural lighting desirable. Room must be able to be completely dark to show movies.

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Acoustics: Outside noise should be kept out so as not to disturb sleeping children, as well as cryJng children should not be heard n otler area. of the building. Plumbing: One toilet with sink and a small drinking fountain. Also, sink is low countertop to wash hands and get water for crafts, etc. HVAC: Normal

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Crafts Rooin Nature of Activities: The crafts room should provide space for creative, constructive, enjoyable crafting either in class or independently. This area must facilitate participation in many different crafts inclllding, but not limited to painting, ceramics, weaving arts, and jewelry, as well as supplying special storage and equip nlent. rhe room should be divided into three distinct areas; wet crafts, dry crafts, and a kiln room. Number Involved in Activity: Up to 40 Spatial Characteristics: Durable, flexible, cheerful and relaxed. Easy to clean and maintain. Functional Relationships: Convenient to Lobby/Lounge with control at Reception/Control as to who may be to the space. Should avoid direct contact with very noisy area. Possible outdoor patio/work area directly adjacent to space. Accessibility: Easy delivery access, control over who can use space at Reception/Control desk. Handicapped should have easy access to space. Furnishings and Equipment: \'lork tables, stools, potters wheel: kiln, drying racks, sinks with clay traps, counter space, black boards, display areas, easels, etc. Storage Requirements: For general supplies and tools as well as work in progress. Surface Treatments: Durable, waterproof walls and floor that will withstand harsh treatment and cleaning. Size Requirements: Wet crafts 900 SF (includes storage) Dry crafts 900 SF (includes storage) Yiln Room 200 SF TOTAL = 2,000 SF

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Lighting: Natural daylight requirement but no direct sunlight desired. Even levels of illumination with daylight characteristics. Acoustics: Must keep loud, outside noise out of room. Plumbing: Two compartment sinks in wet area. HVAC: Normal, some exhausting in kiln room.

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Secretary/Receptionist Nature of Activities: Office area which receives the public. ceparates all other administrative offices (City Park and Recreation Department) from the general public. Wai ting area for thos e \-'lho are to see people in administration. Number Involved in Activity: 2 to 5 Spatial Characteristics: Pleasant working area with open feeling to person entering the administrative area. Functional Relationsh'ps: Control point to the administrative offices. Immediately adjacent to administrative offices nd wor:k room <'lncl close t:o Lobby /Lounge. Accessibility: Since the administrative area houses offices for the Park and Hecreation Department, the secretary /receptionist should he convenient for the public, including handicapped. It should avoid the feeling of remoteness to the visitor. The area must be secured after normal office hours. Furnishings and Equipment: Built-in counte r , movable desk (1), cha'rs, typewriters, filing cabinet, computer terminal, small storage area. Storage Requirements: Small coat closet, small amount of storage for office supplies. Surface Treatments: Soft floors, light walls, acoustical ceilings. Size Requirements: 240 SF Lighting: 70 footcandles, good working ligh t required l:h no glar e from direct sun. Na tural lighting desired. Acoustics: No special requirement. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Directors Office Nature of Activities: Provide an office for the Director of the City Park and Recreation Department. Number Involved in Activity: 1 to 5 Spatial Characteristics: Fully e nclosed, pleasant office working environment. Some degree of visual privacy. Functional Relationsh'ps: Immediately adjacent to administrative secretary and superintendents office. Jl.ccessibility: receptioni st. Control provided by adrninistru.t:Lve secretary/ Handicap uccess required. Furnishings and Equipment: Desk, sofa, c offee table, lamp, table, two side chairs. Storage Requirements: Coat closet, movable bookcase. Surface Treatments: Soft floors, light walls, acoustical ce.iling. Size .equirements: 192 SF Lighting: 70 fooi:cand .es, natural lighting desirable. Good \VOrking light with no glare or direct sunlight on working surface. Acoustics: Soundproof frorn adjacent spaces. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Superintendents Office Nature of Activity: Two offices required for Superintenden s within the Park and Recreation Department. Numbe:r:Involved in Activity: 1 to 5 (each office) Spatial Fully enclosed pleasant office 'ilorking environment. Some degree of visual privacy. Functional Relationships: Each office next to each other and also immediately adjacent to secretary/receptionist, director and work room and other administration offices. Accessibility: Control provided by secretary/receptionist. Handicap access required. Furnishings and Equipment: Each room -desk, two file cabinets, 4'0" round table, three chairs. Storage Requirements: Movable bookcase Surface rrreatments: Soft floors, light walls, and acoustical ceilings. Size Requirements: 120 SF each office 240 SF total Lighting: 70 footcandles, natural lighting desirable, good working light with no glare or direct sunlight on working surfu.ces. Acoustics: Soundproof from adjacent spaces. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Conference Room Nature of Activities: Meeting room fer administrative staff. Number Involved in Activity: Up to twenty Characteristics: Pleasant, enclosed, quiet workjng space. Open feeling or full privacy may be desired. Functional Relationships: Centrally located in area of administration offices. Accessibility: Available to a.dminist.rative staff, controlled by secretary/receptionist. Accessible by handicapped. Furnishings and Equipment: Base cabinet with sink, protector platform and hidden screen, chalkboard, pin-up space, movable conference tables and chairs. Storage Requirements: Storage under sinks for small items. Surface Treatments: Soft floor, light walls, acoustical cei.li ng. Partially open with glass. Size R equirements: 500 SF Lighting: 70 footcandles with ability to make completely dark for slide projection. Variable dimming. Acoustics: GooG acoustics required to keep sound in and outside sound out. Plumbing: Sink in cabinet. Nonual with some ventilation.

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\ Office Storage/ Workroom Nature of Activities: Office materials and supplies storage, work preparation, and copy machine. Small work a r e a with some s torage. Number Involved in Activity: One Spatial Characteristics: Enclosed, efficient work and storage area. Functional Relationships: Central to administrative offices. Accessibility: Only accessible to workers within aruninistrative office area. Furnishings and Equipment: Base cabinets with sink, adjustable shelving, and copy mach'ne. Storage Requirements: None, other than in base cabinets and adjustable shelving. Surface Treatments: Hard, easy to clean floor, light walls, and acoustical ceiling. Size Re quirements: 200 SF Lighting: 50 fcotcandles, natural light not required. Acoustics: No special concerns except to minimize noise from copy machine. Plumbing: One sink HVAC: Normal

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Personnel Office/ Lounge Nature of Activities: This office/lounge is the personnel office for several hundred part-time and seasonal employees of the Park and Recreation Department. These employees range from lifeguards, youth support, football and baseball coaches, and various league officials, just to mention a fevl. The office is the only interface between this large group of employees and the Park and Recreation administration and is frequently used. The office disseminates information while the lounge offers a place for waiting and socializing. Number Involved in Activity: 3 to 5 Spatial Characteristics: Pleasant enclosed working and lounge area which js invi ing to the employees upon entering the Lobby/Lounge area. Functional Relationships: Adjacent to Lobby/Lounge area. Accessibility: Easily accessible to all employees, including handicapped and easy to find once inside the Luilding. Traffic cansed between the main entry and this area should not interfere or congest other functions within the building. Furnishings and Equipment: Desk, filing cabinets, bookshelf, tables and chairs. Storage Requirements: None ::;urface Soft floors, light walls, acoustical ceiling. Size 300 SF Lighting: 70 footcandles, natural daylighting desired. Acoustics: No special considerations. Plumbing: None I -IVAC: Normal

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Staff Lounge/Mail Room Nature of Activities: Information diRtribution center and Lelaxa ion area for employees working within the building. Number Involved in 1\ctivity: Up to eight Spatial Characteristics: Fully enclosed, pleasant relaxed environment. Congregation poirt for employees. Functional Re lationships: Located in general area of administrative offices, and Accessibility: Barrier free access to all employees in the building. Furnishings and Equipment: Six foot counter with sink, 24 mailbox x l!;z"H x 1'2"D), 4' x 4' bulletin board, 8 chairs, two 3' x 3' tables, coffee machine, and refrigerator. Surface Treatments: Soft floors, light walls, and acoustic ceiling. Size Requirements: 240 SF Lighting: 50 footcandles, natural daylight desirable. Acoustics: Noise within should not disturb neighboring spaces. Plumbing: One sink. HVAC: Normal . ..... .

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Supervisors Offices Nature of Activities: Three separate offices required for three supervisors of the Park and Recreation Department. Number Involved in Activity: One in each office. Spatial Characteristics: Fully enclosed pleasant office working environment. Some degree of visual privacy. Functional Relationships: be located in the general office needs to be in the to the pool offices. Two of the three offices should administration area. The other pool area and directly adjacent Accessibility: Control to two of the offices provid c1 by secretary/receptionist and by the Receptionist/Control area for the supervisor in the pool area. 'rhe latter should not have to enter the pool area (deck area) to arrive at his office. All offices barrier free. Furnishings and Equipment: One desk, two chairs, and a bookcase 'n each office. Storage Reguirernents: None Surface Treatments: Sof t floors, ligh t walls, and acO\ .Istical ceiling. Size Requirements: 120 SF each office 360 SF total. L.ightin_g: 70 footcandles, natural light desirable. Acoustics: Soundproof from adjacent spaces. Plumbing: None BVAC; Normal

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Facilities Manager Office Nature of Activities: 1\.n office fo:r. the manager of the recreation building. Number Involved in 1\.ctivity: One Spatial Characteristics: Fully enclosed pleasant office working environment with ability to view other portions o f the building. Functional Relationships: Since the manager is in charge of the entire building, his location should be central. Close to Lobby/Lounge and the Reception/Control area. Accessibility: Not accessible to general public. Control to office by Receptionist/Control. Furnishings and Equipment: One desk, two chairs, and fi.ling cabinets. Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Soft floors, light walls, and acoustical ceiling. Size Requirements: 120 SF Lighting: 70 footcandles, natural light desirable. Acoustics: Soundproof from udjacent spaces. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Park Planner/Interns Nature of Activities: An office for park planning, drafting of designs and general office work. Number Involved in Activity: Four Spatial Characteristics: Fully enclosed pleasant office working environment. Functional Relationships: Within Park and Recreation administrative office area. Directly adjacent to one supervisor. Accessibility: Barrier free access with control by secretary/ recept'onist. Furnishings and Equipment: One desk, three chairs, three tables, three drafting stools, bookshelves, and filing cabinets. Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Soft floors, light waJ .ls and acoustical ceiling. Size Requirements: 220 SF Lighting: 70 footcandles, natural light desired. 1\coustics: Soundproof from a.dj a cent spaces. Plumbing: None IlVAC: Normal

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Locker Rooms Nature of Activities: Changing area and storage space for both men and women . Two rooms must be provided. Number Involved in Activity: 80-100 men, 80-100 women . Spatial Characteristics: Brightly colored, clean, sanitary room. Should be plenty of room for people to dress and move about. Visually removed from public areas. Functional Relotionships: Entry to locker rooms should be from a point which is easily controlled by the Reception/ Control desk. The locker room is directly adjacent to reslrooms at lockers and in very close proiximity to the various physical activity rooms. Accessibility: Locker room should be completely barrier free. People will only be able to enter locker rooms after passing the Reception/Control desk. Furnishings a n d Equipment: 105 lockers for men (43 12" X 12" X 72") (62 12" X 12" X 36") 105 ockers for women (43 12" X 12" X 72") (62 12" X 12" X 36") Fixed benches provided in front of all lockers, wall mi rors. Countertops with m'rrors for makeup and hairdrying. Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Non-ski
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1 I F RE: U IRE.O :'_JAN-i. ORVI G WET TOILET L4VS ,-SH.LF .C.NO M I RR::::. R i! 0 0 (! c: 0 u tt-rrrr r 1 1 t 1 , 1 [[.l'!llll•"m o:::;),, :, : . • . . . m o o oo CRESSING ROOMS• 1 J T T r j 1 ___ 1 I ! i I J i ! j ( -+-c:_ "F! O I Z 0 _,o ouo " ' :i -r-cr 0 a: t:: 0 0 >a: 0 TO G 'fM EETIN:3/ LOUNG_ / ------9ASKO:T STORAGE ENTRY I.JNIT TO SERVE GYMNASIUM ANO JDOOL NOTES T h e best arrar.gement of locker s i ; tlle bay 3Ystem. w i th a minimum 4 ft circul ation ais la ct end of tl'l: '"ays . Ordinarily, tne maximum number of ICJCkers : n a bay i s 16. Locate dry ( shoe) t rnff i c at one e!'t:i of the bays and wet (barefoo t ) traffic; at the end. o' bas w i th a t;cnch, makt 3 ft bred sat 15 It i nterva ls. Sucerv i sion of s:hool lockers i s eas i3st i f thP.v Me l oceted . i n sirtgle banks alcng tna two l on9 .va l ll, provid ing on e or mora bays that run the h!r' gtn of th e rvom . The of lockers in a locke r room depends on t;e anttCipa t!d number of memoers a ;;dlvr ; i ze of c . as.;es. SF.parata locker areas should be encouraged. i n small bu ilding ; i nterconn!.'Ct i ng doors p ro vide 'lell i bility and a llow for the of peak l oad!l . Indivi du a l dress ing and shower compart ents may be fo r women's and g irl s' locke r and showe r rooms and for men' s clubs. Jl, stall or th ! be requi r ed. TOILET SHOWE..,S UNIT F'OR F'OOL r TOOLET 1 I :: TRY JANITOR FIRST .<.t O _j SHOVvERS DRESS!I'.G AREA SHOWERS TOWELING DRESSING TOILET TOWEL ROOM I PASS • '.VJNOO\JV 0 0 INOIC-"TES DRESS ING LOCKER INDICATES STORAGE LOCKER I'IDICATES FIXED GYMNASIUM ROOM Ba sket storage, if in;;lud oo. i s seliservice . Maximum heic;ht i s 8 tieM. A syst e m sho uld be provided to dry out basket contents overnight . Sep arate auxi l i ar-1 lo-:lw,;;-;:s the drains. Concrete floors (ronslip surface). if used . snould be treated w•th a hardene r to avoi d t 11t.! penetra t ion and mo isturl!. Walls should b a of material s r!'Sistant t o moisture and sr•ou l d ha"t; surfaces that ;;r c cleaned. A,ll i n the locker rooms shoul d be rou ndP.d Heavy duty, rr.oisturc resiotant doors a t locker room entrances and exits should ba of sufficient size to handle the traHic flow and form natural vis1f.ln bar r i ers. Entrance/ ex i t doors for the locker; shoul d he equipped with corrosio n resistant Ceilings in area s should be of ceramic tile or other mater ial impe r ;i.;.us t o moistura. Locxer room ceili:1gs shoul d b e acoustically treated wtt h a mattriill impetV iou s o mo1sture and breakage. F loor drai rn should ba kept out of the line of traffi c whe r e

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I LINE G I ... Y-O' ---,1'-PLAN GF!OWF' S!-!OWE:F!S r1ere must be a sufficient number of shmvM heads . :jucat•onal iacilit ie:! with constrai nts should hJve l v show e r heads for thu f irst :!0 persons an d 1 !hower 1 ee.d for e ve ry 4 additional l t l r ecrHat i o n dl l ac t l it . es 1 shower head for each 1 0 dressi ng lockers is 1 minimum. T !mperature controls are nece!sar( to ceep Nater from e x ceeoing 110 F . 8oth i nd1v 1dual 1nc :'!'lJste r cont ro ls are needed for g rllup showe rs . PI..AN AISLE SF'jjoCE: Dt=(EtSSINQ A ISLE SPACE I "' B c I 1 ' 8 " 3 ' 6 " I 2 ' 6 " 4 ' 0 " 2m the f l o o r. Traffic brea k s 3 ft m inimum ide at maximum interv a l s of 12 rt. IIIIa in traf f i c disl e to be ._ idwr for numbe r of locker bays. o\1:at ed with to height and ;;rrang& me t of loc!<.ers. 15. Vi 5 uaJ supe:r.rision ftom oojace nt o ff ic! . 0 I"L.AN ROOM WET TOIL.S:T T h e dry in g room silou l d have about the same area as t e showe r room. P r ov i s ion for drai n age should be ma e . Haavy dury towel rails , approximately 4 It f r o m the f lrJor. are re commen d e d . A foot drying led g e 18 i n . high and 8 in . w ide as i n he orawing, i s desirable. An aojacent wet toi let i s su g gested. Avoid c:..rbs between dryi n g room and adjacent space . Towel i s desirabl e in a sc h o ol. Size of area var ies w i t material to c e sto;aa (can be used for d istr ibu t i ng uniforms). with 200 sq f t being suffic ient. I t= ._c _ _ _____ 3 PL. AN El-EVAT ION BASKE:T OOM ANO BASKET RACK Basket r a c!cs vary from 7 to 10 t i e s i n height. W id e baskets requ ire 1 h ;hct f space, small baskets 10 i r • . sht>if space, both fit 1 to 1 ' / • ft d eep she! I . eaclo:-tobacoc shelv i n g i; 2 f t 3 i n . w•de . He ight sn e l f-tO > h el " i s 9'/• in . RECOMMENDED MOUNTING HEIGHTS Shower_v_a_l v _ e ______ _ Shower head Men Women Chi ldren Hand dryer c u t !et Mn Women T eenagers Pr e eens dryer out l et Wo!T'en T eenagers P reteens C l o c k Robe hook , o we! bar 4'0" 6 '-6" 6 '0 " 5 ' -0" 3-a 3 ' -E" 3'-1" 2'-!!" 6'-0" 5'-E' ' 5'C" 5 '-0 " s . ,-.in . b I ;, PL. AN INOIVIOUAI.. SHOWERS ANO Oi'!ESStNG ROOMS INDIVIDUAL ROOMS MINIMUM OPTI UM Showers 3'-0" ,( 3'6 " 3'-6" X 3'-6" Dres s ing Roo m s 3' 0 " )( 3'-6 " 3'-6" X 4'-0" !ndivio • Jal dressing rooms and showers on be com bineo i n a var iety of configurations to c b ta i n 1 : 1, 2 ; 1 , 3 ; 1, and 4 : 1 ra t io s, respecti ely, STOR.AGE LOCKERS STANDARD SIZES ORe:SSII'-10 W idth 9", 12", 15", 1 8 " D epth 12", IS", 18" Height 60 ' ' , 72" ; o v e r all) F o r s c hools, standard storage locker is 9 in. or 12 i . x 12 in . x 12 i n . to 24 i n . One sto ra!je locker -'!< s:uc!!:l! enrolled plus 10% for expansion. Standaro locker:; are 12 i n . x 12 in. x 50 in. o r 72 in . NurntM!r of dressing lockers should be equal t o the peak peric.i load plus 10 to 15 % for varia t ion . TOILET Ctz il! \ I SHOWER ) PORCH I ? io I eel I 1 L---------JI -r-1 4 ' 0 " M I N . .l i I CASANA.S

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I Acoustics: Acoustically treat e d ceiliny. Plwubing: Floor drains throughout space. HVAC: Normal heating, 6 to 8 air changes per hour for ventilation, no air cooling required.

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Rast:cooms A t Lockers Na ture o f Ac tivities : Re troom faci lit es for both men and wrnnen u sing the pool and physical activity rooms. Number Involved in Acti vi ty: Up to eight in each room. Spatial Characteristics: Bright, clean, and hygenic enrironmen'-. Functional Relationships: Adjacent to locker rooms, convenient to showers, pool area, and physical activities areas. Accessibility: Barrier free access for all users of pool and physical activity area. Furnishings and Equipment: Plumbing fixtures, toilet stable, hand towel dispensers, and wall mirrors. Storage Re quirements: None Surface Treatments: Non-slip,water resistant flooring, ceramic walls and acoustically treated waterproof ceiling. Size Requirements: 300 SF for each room, 600 SF total. Lighting: 20 footcandles Acoustics: Acoustically treated ceiling . Floor drains in both. Womens 4 water closets and 4 lavatories; men's -2 water closets, 3 urinals, 4 lavatories. Each room should have on handicap water closet. HVAC: Ventilation required.

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Shower Rooms/Sauna Nature of Activities: Showering before entering and leaving pool rea, showering after using physical activities areas. A drying area is to be prov!d J prio to entering locker room area. Sauna area also adjacent to shower room. Saunas are required for men and women separately. Number In ol ved in Ac ti vi ty: Up to eight eacl shower area and four each in drying area, wi h ten each in sauna areas. Spatial Characteristics: Bright, cle3n, and hygenic environment. Information reln.ting to sauna on following paqe. Functional Relationships: Adjacent to restrooms, drying area, locker rooms, and Lhysical activity areas. Directly adjacent to pool swinooers must pass directly past the showers prior to entering pool. Sauna directly a to the shower area. Accessibility: Barrier free access for all us rs of pool and physical activities area. Furnishings ar.d Equipment: Soap dishes. Storag e Requirements: None Surface 'I'reabnents: Non-slip, water resistant floors, walls and acoustially treated, waterproof ceilings. Saunas redwood covered surfaces throughout. Size Requi:r:ements: 625 SF each room, 1250 SF tot.al. (Refer to locker rooms for a shower room layout and following page for sauna room requirements.) Lighting: 30 footcandlcs. Acoustics: Acoustically treated ceilings. Plumbing: Floor drains, 8 shower heads each room. IIVAC: Ventilation required to remove vapors, no o.ir conditioning.

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12 " IrA l! II, O::NC H REQUIR'C:ME:NTS I ..,. I ,.I!:I'I&ONS 2 ,.1!:!'\00NS 2 P11!BONS INI SAUNAS-TYPI C A l.. PI....A N L-AYOUTS I 7'-e• f J jn__ ---,.r-' I , 1 _l-/ I ! -..... ('-, --:--=== 5 I'"ERO O N 8 7 I'" E Rts;ONS SAUNAS-TYF'ICAI.... I....AY OUTS oo-• DESI G N CONSIDERA T I O N S t.A, S LIS:... I C SAUNAS :;;,..,UNA ROOM COt STMUCTION TN> fundamenta l p urpos a of the is to panpirnio n ; the higher the temperature, the rr o r e quickly perspiration will begi n . Tne drier the the more heat one ca n stand. Tem peratur es o n tho J:la1iorm ca n be as high as 2 1 2•F , 230 F, and 240'F. A littoe w a rm .-.ater thrown over the sto'Je st:Jnes just bi!tore l! auna produces a slightly humi d wiVe aor that sudd'J!lly seems hctte r and enve lops the bather w ith an i nvis i ble glowing c louo, pleasantly stinging the skin . It i s to lie than to > i t, for t ne temoer.lture rises rcusho y 18 F fo r Very ft above the floor l e v el ; if one l ies, is over t he entire body. When I ing d wn ono may wish t o raise one' s feet the wall o r c e i l i ng . The expanded hot a1r 1n m e sauna com:;in s proper tionately l e s s oxyge n than he censer atmosphere outside. S J!hers so.-ne t i mes expenence ia i ntness un l ess the air i s c h a nged rt'gularly . A n amount of fresh air enters eec h time the doo r i s o per.sd; tr.is 1 s insuffic ient , howeve r . Ncrrr.all y two ad j us-rable ventilator; are built i n t o the wai's . One, the air i n le t , is uS'.Jally p lactd low near the stove . F air shoul d be draw n from o utside and not frcm ad joming rooms where odor s can be oresent. eu •'T """' I $200 !.?0 C • 2'5 I 7500 .... $ 111\0 STO E:: 1 " l. .OCATION 0 I I A SUOG!:ST0 P'A.TT!:RNS c fn , . I' ,,, ! ':J B F'ANE L SAUNA VE:NTILATION NATURAL VE:NTILATION A i r rro.Jst flew freely into the roomin let anc normally are on opposite w;;Jis a n d a: approx i mate!/ the same l e vel. The iniet unde r me stove a strong updraft. A. A flue or duct provides a c!'limney a<:tion that will pull a i r otf :he floor and out. B. In let i s ioN on the wall, with out let hi;J an;i dire-::tly above i t. Thi s ensures ventilation even oi wind press ra e x ins on wall con ain i ng t n a t w o because of t h e dii in oir tempera at two openings ar d tne c ffect of norr..a l convection. C . S u ggest fresh a i r from extario r w itn ou:tet !h roug h anomer room, fen, or 'irepl ace. HEATER : The heater depends on c o nvec t ion for a • r ci r cula t i o n. It i s tne meth o d. for the a i r in o sauna sho ld be as as poss ibl e t o r.eat sauna in 1 to 11/2 hr. I TERIOR AN E LING : Tongue and grO':l'l;ooc should be . be c:>mpiete ly vaporproof and heat resi>-:3r:: . M e! > convl e ior sauna const r c t i on. They chosen bas ed o n the i r r esi s tance to spli:ting a n::t decay, col o r o f t"'u VIOOd . and t hermal caoac.tv of the w o:>d. T h es;; woods stain badly by metal and persp i rat ion. CEI LING HEIGHT: The b i gger m e mere heat reou ir ed ; hence , keeo tne eilin9 as low as w i thon the lomits i mp o sed b the benc h es . Th2 ma i n p l atform or bench wii! be :;g ;r,, above floor i n a fam ily saun a or a t l aas t 60 i n . i'l a la;ge sauna. The ce i l i ng i s about in. a::ov
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Large Physical Activity Room Nature of Activities: Activities in this room include basketball, volleyball, fitness, gymnastics, and large group ac .i vi ties. At spectators will also Le using t his space to vie\v events or tournaments. Number Involved in Activity: Up to 300 Spatial Characteristics: One of the imrortant elements of this spacious room is its great flexibility. Several differen 1 : g:tmes can be played with simultaneously or at different times. The space should be well l.:i.-t .brightly colored, and cheery to help stimulate physical activities. Volleyball courts should be dividable by drop nets. Functional Relationships: Adjacent to locker rooms, storage, physical activities office, auxiliary physical activity room, and exercise room. A portion of the space should be set aside for telescoping bleachers for spectators. Con rol over entry to the space either participant or spectator should be by Reception/Control desk. Accessibility: Accessibility to space should be from different po'nts for both spectator and participant. Both, however, need to be controlled at Reception/Control desk. Spectators should be routed in such a manner that they do not cross the playing courts or other activity areas in the space. access should be barrier free. Furnishings nnd Equipment: Six backboards; four cross court, all backboards retractable. Two drop nets between volleybnll courts. Movable bleacher sets (120 seats). Storage Requirements: 150 SF located directly off of the space to store activity equipment. Surface Treatments: Wood flooring, hard wall surfaces which have no projections. Light colored walls.

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Size RGquirements: 10,000 SF with a minimUJ.-n 26 foot ce.i ... ling height. The space should have room for three volleyball courts, two cross-court basketball courts (Junior High) and one large basketball court (Senior High) . Refer to layout of courts on following page. Lighting: 70 footcandles evenly distributed over entire floor area. Natural light might be used but special care should be used to be sure glare or direct sunlight does not interfere with activities. Acoustics: Wall and ceilings must be acoustically treated to minim'ze noise wJ.thin the space. Plumbing: Drinking fountain and cuspidor. HVAC: Provide air movement at rate of tl1ree air changes per hour and at the same time changing entire air volume once per hour with outside air.

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I LARG.c. PHY !CAL R OOM • I \..f/\ll f.iP"'\CED S l H : r----FO!..O I NG BACKSTOP I --nEAH BHACE D ----------I BAO;\o/,li.RD F O LDI N G ' A D J . HGT. BAti'STO P ; iBA::..s;:_ I I I I I I I I I 11 l I I II l I I 1 I I I 1 1 1 I ]DI I /"111 I ' ! ' 1 / I i I I ! I io ' ' ! , o I I I ' 1 / I I II I "-L-t-----1 I I I I I I I I I I I i I I I I 1 1 L ___ -_j I : ____ ' -_ j j l__ ____ J _ _ _ ____ j I --------------.. -. --I o I o ! L =-=-_j PLAN . I I I J I L 421Y.74' (BASKETBALL) (JR. HIGH } -]01X601 (VOLL EYBf',LL ) "----501X841 (BASHTBA.LL) ( fl. H I G H ) -:------GYMN.'\S I Uf\ D IVIDE?, 17" " 1 --11 • .1.1 c l -.: I • I u -..!)I I "' ' :..

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Physical Office Nature of Activities: Office Rpace for instructors and storage space for equipment. Number Involved in Activity: Tvw Spatial Characteristics: Fully enclosed office environment, open visually to large physical acti v ities space. A por ion shall be divided off to store game equipment. Functjonal Relationships: Directly to large Physical Activities Room. Accessibility: Barrier free access through Ja g Activity Room. hysical Furnishings and Equipment: Storage cabinets for ball s , nets, etc., two desk s and two chairs. Storage Requirements: See above. Surface Treatments: Durable, lightly colored walls and floors. Requirements: 220 SF Lighting: 50 f ootcandles Acoustics: No special requirements. Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Auxiliary Physical Activity Room NaturG of Activities: Activities in this room include basketball, volleyball, fitness, large dance classes. and occassionally used for very large meetings. Number Involved in Activity: Up to 75 Spatial Characteristics: This space should be well lit, brightly colored and cheery to help stimulate physical activities. Functional Relationships: Adjacent to locker rooms, large physical activity room, and exercise room. Accessibility: Barrier free access to the space should be controlled at the Reception/Control desk area. Furnishings and Equipment: Two removable backstops. Storage Requirements: 450 SF located directly off of t.he space to backstops, gymnastic equ'pment, and chairs. Storage room common with Dance/Gymnastics room. Surface Treatments: Athletic floor surface, hard wall surfaces, which have no projections. Light colored walls. Size Requirements: 5,500 SF (i11cludes storage area), with minimum 26 foot ceiling. The space large enough for 50' x 74' basketball court (Junior High) and one volleyball court. Refer to following page for layout of courts within this space. Lighting: 70 footcandles evenly distributed over entire floor area. Natural light might be used, but special care should be used to be sure glare or direct sunlight does not interfere with activities. Space should also have capability to be completely dark if desired (for large group meetings or movies, etc. ) .

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AUXILLARY PHYSICAL ACTIVIT IES ROOM PLAN _=:J(_ i[ SECTION _______ j ( VOLLEYBALL) (BASKETBALL) ( . JR. HIGH) '----------wA.Ll B R /\ C E D ' SIDE FOLDING BACKST O F 0 I ...n N / =:----JI y I 0 J

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Acoustics: to minimize Plwnbing: Wall and ceiling must be acoustically treated .oise within space. Drinking fountain and cuspidor. HVAC: Provide air rate up to 8 air changes per hour and at the same time changing entire <1ir volwne once per hour with outside air.

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Dance/Gymnastids I Nature of Activities: The activities in this multi-purpose room range f:corn aerobic dancing, jazzercize, adult fitness class, stretching, and ski ondit.ioning to youth gymnastics and to martial arts classes. Number Involved in Activity: Up to 40 Spatial Characteristics: This space should be w ell lit, brightly colored and cheery to help stimulate physical activities and at the same time should offer some privacy from the rest of the buiJ. ding. One entire \>iall should be mirrored to allow participants to watch themselve. Functional RelationshiLs; ose proximity to locker rooms and other two physical activity rooms. Accessibility: Barrier free access to the space should control ed at Lhe Reception/Control desk area. Furnishings and Equipment: Movable gymnastics equipment, movable tumbling mats, and mirrors along one wall 1;vi th ballet b ars in front of mirrors which can be covered by a Storage Requirements: The 450 SF storage room in the Auxiliary PhysicEll Activities room should be common \vith this room to store floor mats, equipment, and a stereo system. Su1:face Treatments: hthletic floor, a hardwood flooring; hC!rd, durable wall surfaces which h ave few projections. Light colored walls wit h one wall heing mirrored. Size Requirements: ceiling. 1,800 SF with minimum 20 foot hig h Lighting: controls. to glare. 50 footcandles with capability for variable Na.tural light: desirable with special care given

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I Acoustics: Walls and ceiling must be acoustically treated to noise within space. Space should also be able to be acoustically isolated from other rooms in the building. Plumbing: Drinking fountain and cuspidor. HVAC: Provide air rate up to 8 air changes per hour and a t the same time changing entire air volume once per hour with outside air.

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Weight Training I I Nature of Activities: Weight training through free weights and machines, weight lifting mats, and a certain amount of stretching and other exercising. Number Involved in Activity: Up to twelve Spatial Characteristics: The space should be well lit, and cheery to help create an environment for intense physical workouts. A portion of one wall should have mirrors to allow participants to see himself work out. Functional Relationships: Close to locker rooms. Accessibility: Barrjer free access to the space should he controlled at the Reception/Control desk area. Furnishings and Equipment: Movable benches, weight stands, weights, and weight machines. Storage Requirements: Smnll area for additional equipment. SurfacTreatments: Very durable floor covered with carpeting, walls durable and able to support weight machin s, acoustically treated ceiling. Size Requirements: 800 SF with minimum 10 foot ceiling height. Lighting: 30 footcandles, daylighting may be desirable. Acoustics: Acoustically treated ceiling. Plumbing: Drinking fountain and cuspidor in close HVAC: Provide high air change rate, 8 per hour, with complete air change once per hour with outside air.

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Racketball Courts I Nature of Activities: Four courts for racketball and handball games either individual, instructional and organized tournaments. Number Involved in Activity: Up to four per court. Spatial Characteristics. Well lit, very formal, rigid space which is required for competitive handball or racketball. An enclosed space except for the bacJ'. wall from a point approximately 12 foot to the ceiling and the width of the entire space. One championship court with glass along entire side for spectator viewing. Functional Relationships: Close to locker rooms and other physical activities rooms. Accessibility: Accessibility to tl.e four courts needs to come from several directions. First, controlled access to the entry of each individual court to be used by the participants. T\vo, to a corridor located irrunediately above, and at; leas t 12 foot high, which may be used by an instructor or as a spectator gallery. Finally, to a spectator area next to one of the courts which will serve as the championship court. Access to this spectator area should not cross or interfere with other physical activities areas. Furnishings and Equipment: None Storage Requirements: None Surface Treatments: Hard plaster ceilings and walls, hardwood flooring. One championship court is to have glass along the entire side for spectator viewi11g,all surfaces must be flush. Size Requirements: EDch court (four courts required) is to be x 40' x 20' high at the front and a 12 foot minimum height at the back. Circulation space required above for instructional use and additional spectator viewing. Total 3,200 SF. Refer to following page for drawings of court configuration.

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rLUSH DOOR VISION PANEL-j I I C.LEV. OF' F'RONT WALL I REAR WA l.. DOT TEO I t\t...L LINES ARE l1/2" WIDE FLOOR L INES .:.HE: WHI IE OR FlCO RECEIVING LINE O N EACH S IDEWALL I REO FOUR WALL COURT TOP Of" PLAYING WALL ELEV. or 81011: WALL. .qQ'-0 " __ _ _ _ ____ 0 Cl< WALL 0 ' ZONE -...' SIDEWALL. PLAN FOR HANDBALL AND RAC:QUE:TBALL ' i . f-=--=--=--=:, ! II 1 1 1 I I I II II ' I I , II II _ _ __ _ lJ= __ ----L __ _ l I I PLAN --i.,_ __ _ SECTION r 201-011 I j , 0 I 0 -'l L l -

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I Lighting: Very good, even lighting required for participants safety. 100 footcandles. Natural lighting desirable in court area, indirect natural light okay in spectator corridor above and to the rear of the court. Acoustics: Entire racketball court area should be acoustically removed from other areas of the building. Plumbing: Drinking fountain in close proximity. HVAC: Well ventilated space. Eight air changes per hour with a comP.le,te volume of outdoor air at a rate of oncPper hour.

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Pool/Natatorium I Nature of Activities: Basic swimming and diving instruction, fun swim, therapy, wa er shows, competitive swimming and diving, water polo, and spectating. Greeley Public Schools will also use this pool for swim meets and swimming and diving practice. Number Involved in Acti vity: l\pproximat.ely twenty five to one hundred participants, up to six hundred spectators. Spatial Characteristics: Large, spacious, open active recreation room. Functional Rela ionships: Directly adjacent to showe s and locker rooms. Adjacent to exterior open space for sunninq, pool fil erin g r oom, pool offices, pool storage and lobby/ lounge. Strong separation between pool and spectator area. Accessibilit y : All entries barrier free. Must have access ibility through showers for participants. Spectators must have controlled e ntry from lobby/lounge and possibly from outside, and should be allowed to walk on only a portion of the deck. Accessibility and contro l from sunning space outside. Furnishings and Equipment: Two one-meter divi1g boards, access ladders and grab rails, guard and instructor towers, bleachers (movable for 600 spectators), starting platforms, timing clock, movable bulkhead, and benches along one wall. Storage Requirements: s_e Pool Storage Room . Surface Treatments: Non-skid deck, water resistant finishes, sound control material on walls and ceiling. Pool marked with lane markers, turnabout squares, depth indicators and u istance marks. Size R quirements: The natatorium will have three distinct: pool areas, but not necessarj.ly three separate pools. One pool a::::-ea is for an 8 lane x 25 meter competit.ive swimming pool (adjustable to 8 lane x 25 yard pool with movable bulkhead) . 'l'hi s area should be minimu m foot at one end and the last 1/3 deep, 8 feet maximum . T\.;o-thirds of

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the pool should be shallower than four feet. Each swimming lane is 7 feet wide with an extra one foot on each end lane, therefore, the total width must be 58 feet. The second pool area is the learn-to-swim pool area which should be about 58 feet by 20 feet and from to feet deep. The third pool area is the diving area for two one-meter boards. The pool should be 11 feet deep, a minimum 15 feet headroom over the board. Its dimensions are to be a minimum of 31'0" in depth (from under board to side opposite board}, 10 feet on either sides of the boards and 10 feet between the boards, all minimums. Ceiling height is a minimum of 15 feet but should be higher for a more spacious feeling. Decks must completely surround the pool. For side decks, the minimum width is five feet, but the side used for instruction and spectating should be wider. Decks at both ends should be minimum 13 to 15 feet wide. Refer to "Regulations and Standards Governing Swimming Pools," in LEGAL CONSTRAINTS section. Also refer to graphics on following pages for pool requirements. TOTAL 11,000 SF in pool area. Lighting: Adjustable lighting with 70 footcandles maximum. No light fixtures over water. The light source should be different to avoid glare on the water surface. Natural daylight can be used only with special consideration since sunlight can reflect on the water surface, making it difficult for lifeguards to see swimmers. Glare can also be a bid problem for users of the pool. Acoustics: All wall surfaces and ceiling surface should be acoustically treated. Plumbing: Drinking fountain and cuspidor, floor drains in deck area. HVAC: Controlling of the humidity is essential. Introducing dry heated air and removing moist air should produce a comfortable environment. Temperature must be kept constant and at a minimum of When spectators are present, temperature should be lower. Air velocity -

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I should be kept low to avoid chilling wet skin. The entire natatorium should be isolated because of high humidity in its air.

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----------GENERAL RECOMMENDED DIMEN S I O N S Publ i c poo l s are !Jenerally cons i dered to be t h ose that be l on ; to municipali tia s , sch o s , country c l ubs. h otels, mot ols, and resorts . Perm i ts for tl'>ei r construction are requ i red i n most ar e as f rom l ocal ar.d state boards of health as well as t he departmems o f b u i l din g , plumbi n g , an d e lectri city. C o mmunity pools should be i ntegrated w it h ex 1 stmg and recreational f acilitiP.S, su c h a> picnic ano for max imum usage . Tra nspor.ati or. access shou l d be good, and t her a shoul d be amp l e parote, e nough shade shou l d be provided, particularly i n the l ounging areas, and be so l ocifted m a t it can be eas ily convertP.d to spectator !::JJCe by erecting bleachers . RELATED DIVING EQUIPMENT MAX. MAX. HEIGHT BOARD OVER LENGTH WATER 1 0 ' "h m 26 " ---r---,; . m 1 2 ' 30" 16' 1m 1 6 ' 3m o, o , I 2.13m 2.59 m 7'-0" 8'-6" 2.29 m 2 . 7 4 m 7'6 " 9' 0 " 2.59 m 3 .05m 8 '-6" 10'-0 " 3 .35 m 3 .66 m 11'" 12' 0 " MINIMUM WIDTH O F MINIMUM D IMENSIONS POOL AT: R I L , I L, I L , L• L s I PT. A I F T .l3 I P T C 1 .6 8 m I 0 .76 m , 2 . 44 m 1 3 . 2 0 m 2 . 1 3 m 8 . 53 m , 4 . 8 8 m 5 . 49 m i 5.49 rr. 5' 6 " 2' 6 " 8' 0 " 1 0 ' 6 " 7'0" 2 8 ' -0 " 16' 0 " I 1.83 m I 0 . 9 1 m 2 . 74 m 3 .66m, 1 .22m 8.53 m , 5 . 4 9 m 6 . 10 m , 6 . Om 6'-0" 3 ' 0 " 9 ' 0 " 12 ' 0 " 4'-0 " 28' -0" 1 8 '" 20'0 " 20'" 2 . 13 m 1 .22m 3 . 05 m 4 . 57 m 0 . 61 m 9 .45m 6 .10m 6 . 7 1 m j 6 . 7 i m 7'-0" 4' 0 " 10' 0" 15' 0 " 2 ' 0 " 31' 0 " 2 0 ' 0" 22 ' " 1 2 2 ' 0 " 2 . 59 m 1 .83m 3 .20 m ,6.40 m 0 11.43 , 6 . 7Cm 7.3 2 m , 7 .32 m 8 ' -6" 6' 0 " 10' 6" 21' 0" j37'" 2 2 ' 0 " POOL DESIGN Data sou r ce : Natrona ! Sw1mm1ng Poo l Institute. Formerl y most were designed to compet i tive swimming requiremenu. T'1e trend today is t.J provide f o r all-around use. The follo wing should be con s 1 dered : L, , L3 , and L. combined represent tt. e min imum distance f rom t he t i p of board t o pool wall o p p o s ite divin g tqu ' pm ent . For board heights exceeding 3m in eight or platform d i ving shall comply wit h dimens ional requir ements o f FINA., 1 AAU , NCAA, N . F ., etc. 1 . Ratio of water to deep water. Formerl y 6())(, of pool area 5 tt deep and l ess was con sidered to be adequate . ow 80% i s cons i dered mo r e rea jbti c . :t. Rat io of loutlgers to bathers. Generally, no more man one-third of peopl e anendi ng a p u blic pool are i n me water at one t i me . Conse:;went ly the 6 t o 8 tt walks formerly surroundi ng pool s a nd used for have been e., l arged s o that I ounging a ; ea n ow approximates pool s i ze. 3. For copac ity f ormu l a see ",:>ublic S Ca;:, ac ir/' d ia gram on t,nothe: page . i mrr.i ng Po:;l r-----, l L s r-SHAPED POOL I s OR 81 s F';ovi des l arse shallow a r ea ( s). D i v ing ar e a o H to cne s ide. Water i n lar ge part oi poo l from 3 ft 6 in. to 5 ft deep, adequate for regu l ar c ompeti t i !\!II:0U. L-AND Z-SHAPED POOL T hE'Se two shapes g e n erall y d es i red for l a rge 50 m pools. RECTANGULAR POOL Standa f d design . Good for compet i tive sw1mmi ng and indoer ,:.'Col des i gn . Shallow area ofte n i nadequate. AL!...O W S F":: R :::.OMPTI T I V E ME:E:TS FAN SHAPED POOL S uccf!Ssful where t here i s a high percent age of ch i ldren . Largo;lst area for s hall o w depth. Deep area be roped oH o r separated py MULTIPLE ?OOLS ( T Y01CAL P O S I T I O N OF I P O F ====60AAC RELATIVE T O F>OI,..I T A n • MAX. S LOPE: A 8 'NATERI....INE, •I '""' t4! M4T s-o •c: a I 1 .,4 I C (O..'.l.X S!_OP!: C LASS<: I NOTE : Pla cem ent o f boards s hall observe t h e fo llowin g min i mu m d i n e,s ons. 1 W ith multi p l e bean: i nstallations m inimum pool widths mus t b e increa.;ed accor: llng ! y . l 1 m or deck leve l board to pool side 9' ( 2 . 74 ml 1 3m b oard to paul s i d e i 1 ' ( 3. 3 5 m ) ; 1 m or deck. l eve l board to 3 m board 1 0 ' ( 3 . 0 5 T 1 • 1 m o r deck l eve l to another 1 m or deck le vel boar d 8 ' ! 2 . G 4 m l : 3 m t o another 3 m oo a d FREE FORM POOL 1< idney and oval sh ape5 are the most common free forms . U se onl y competi tive meets a r e not a consids1 at ion. 10 ' ( 2 .!:!!5 m ) s MOD!FlED L POOL Provides for s eparate 0 1 v ing a re ; . Shallow a rea wit h 4 min . ma y b e r o p e d o f f o r comf: e ti!I ' J e . . I v 0 s I I Se p ara t e pool s for beg i nners. di'l'!rs an d swirrmers. U l timate i n d e!ir a bility espec i a l l y if pool i s i nten de d for l;;rse numb'!rs of peop l e . V a riat i o n at left shows sir.g l e pool an d . bulkhead over i t w i t h t ha t sw i mmers a re kept ou t of a rea reserv ed for beg inr.er>. Bmh des i g n s mzy use com mon f i l t rat! o , , WADING POOLS I Ge n erally prov i ded i n con n ec t i o n w i : h 1 and f am i l y :IU:, poo l s . P l ac e d a wav fro m s w "1mtn-; i ar a a to avo i d con gest i on . If n e a r swi mmi-.g poo1. v.d u I ing are a sh ou l d be fer:c1, 0 = beginn e r ' s c o ol. I ! I I I ! I

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LENGTH OF POOLS 2 5 yards is the mini m u m length fer Amer ican records , a nd meets i nterscho lastiC and intercolleg i ate requ iremenrs. (Pool shou l d te 75" 11h " lono o allow fer t i m ing p ane l s a t one end. } ... for In ternat i onal Compet"tivn a r e s h own on 50 m2te r pe e ! pJge. WIDT H O F POOLS Drawing below shows 7 ' lanes, with pool width of 4 5' ( 6 lanes). Str ictl y -.omperi t iv e pool s shoul d hav e 8' l a nes, with pool v ic!t h of 83 ' ( i O lanes). Mintm u m w idths inclu d e addit i onal 18" w idth outside lane:: on both sides o f pool. NOTES Gutters a t sides of pool are desi rable to reduce wave act ion i n swi mmi n g meets or water pol o . See s tandards and diving boaro standa rds o n otn er pages o i this s er i e s for addi t i onal requ i rements f or compet i ti v e poo ls. P COL DECK RECOMMENDED 7 'MNIMUM BARS ANO PLAN MN. L ENGTH ( AMEi>ICAN RECORDS I SEE STANDARDS FOR D IVING F"ACI L I T IES ON "-NOTI-E R P;>GE OF THI S S:!:RIES f ..---... W ATER LEVEl-I 0 o I / 2 ' AACI <3 TAKEOFFS 30" ABOVE WATER L E V E L (SEE ANOTHER PAG E FOR DETA iLS) I}) I w w z z < <( .J J • 0
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Pool Storage I Nature of Activities: Pool storage for deck, maintenance, safety, and racing equipment. Number Involved in Activity: None Spatial Characteristics: Durable, enclosed, s ecure room. Functional Relationships: Directly adjacent to pool room. Accessibility: Only by authorized personnel from with' n p ol area. Furnishings and Equipment: Storage for pool area including starting platforms, lane ropes, 'Jacuum cleaner and p 1 m: houses, and timing equipmen t . Storage Requirements; See above. Surface TreatiJlents: Durable, water resista11t f irlishes. Size Requirements: 280 SF Lighting : 30 footcandle s Pltnnbing: None HVAC: Normal, minima l

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Pool Offices I Na+ur e of Activities: Two offices for office space for instructors, visual supervision of pool, and first aid. Number Involved in Ac 'tivi,ty: One or two Spatial Characteristics: Pleasant office envl om1 1 e n t visible to and from pool areas. Functional Relationships: Directly adjacent to pool and supervisors office. Accessibility: Accessible from pool area. Furnishings and Equipment: One desk, two chairs. Storage Requirements: Cabinets for special equipment, balls, nets, etc. Surface Treatments: Waterproof floors, walls, and ceilings. Size Requirements: 120 SF each office, 240 SF total. Lighting: 50 footcandles Acoustics: No special consideratio n Plumbing: None HVAC: Normal

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Pool I Nature of Ac tivities: Pool flltration and chlorination equipment. Number Involved in Activity: One Spatial Characteristics: Secure, durable, enclosed area. Functional Relationships: Direct a ccess from outside for delivery of chlorine tanks, and other chemicals. Also accessible from withi n building. Accessibility: Directly from outside truck delivery area and also from within building. Furnishings and Equipment: Filtration system, and chlorination system. Storage Requirements: For chemicals Surface Treatments: Water resistant wall and floor finishes, non-skid walkways. Size Requirements: 500 SF Lighting: 3 0 footcandles Acoustics: None Plumbing: Sink and floor drain HVAC: Exhaust fans to exterior. Heating minimal.

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I 'J'his section contains LEGAL CONS'rRZ\IN'l'S which will directly affect the design of the Community Cente r for Recreation. There are three areas of concern: GREELEY ZONING ORDINP,NCE, 19 79; UNI FORM BUILDING CODE and REGULA'l'IONS; and STANDARDS GOVERN ING SWIMMING POOLS by the Colorado Department of Heal t .b.

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GREELEY ZONING ORDINANCE I Zone Building Height Building Setbacks Open Space Parking C-4 within the Downtown Redevelopment District. Being within t e Redevelopment District, the city waives all fees and requirements for drainage, parks, and fire department. 60 feet. 25 feet front. (Hmvever, hj stod cn.lly it has been 15 feet and that would be acceptable.) 25 feet on side streets. 0 on interior side. 15% of the site must remain in permeable open spaco. The first ten feet immediately adjacent to the right of \Jay must be permeable open space (except for driveways). Swnmary of Requirements for 'Tota l Site D evelopment 1) Parking Required for New Recreation Center (estimate) 355 2) Parking Required for Future Community Theatre {estimate) 180 3) Credit for Previous Parking Under Development -315 4) Use of Civic Center Parking -190 Net Required on Site 30 Explanations: 1) Recreation Center parking is based on one space for eve1: y three participants or spectators a n . d one space for every 350 SF of office space (Zoning Code requirement) . The 355 spaces assumes 600 people in the pool area and nominal usage elsewhere.

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I 2). Community 'I'heatr parking is based on one parking space for every three seats and one space for every 350 SF' office space (zonin g code requirement) . The 180 spaces ass runes a 500 seat theatre. 3) The Greeley Planning Office has credited development on this site with 315 rking spaces. This stems from the fact that the present recreation facility was deficient 315 spaces nd the future Recreation Center and Theatre should not be responsible for making up a deficit which has been existing for 25 years. 4) Greeley Planning has also that 190 spaces directly across the stre t used by the Civic Center can also be utilized by the Corr@unity Center. The reasoning here is that peak usage of the Community Center is \ihile usage of the Civic Center is during the day. Of the thirty required parJ ing spaces, three should be designated for handicap vehjcles. The city also feels it has seven hundred on-street parking spaces with a 500 foot radius and, therefore, the 30 on-site spaces should be more than adequate.

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I UNIFORM BUILDING CODE ANALYSIS (1979) Table No. 5 A Table No. 5C S e c . 505 OCCUPANCY GROUPS A-2. 1 A-B-2 REQUIREMEN' r Any building or portion of building having an assembly room with an occupant load of 300 or more without a stage. Any 1 ullding or portion of hu'ld'ng h aving an assembly r om with an occupan\,.. load of less than JOO people without a stage. Office spaces with occupant load l ess than 50. Allowabl Floor OCCUPANCY RASIC Z\LLOWARI. B FLOOR AREA (SF) STORY BUILDING) of. Construc;:tion I-FR II-FR II-1 hr III-1 hr IV: H'r V-l hr ---Z\-2.1 Unlim ited 29,9 0 0 13, 500 13, 500 13,50 0 lO,S O O A-3 Unlimited 29,900 13,500 13,500 13,500 10,500 B-2 Unlimited 39 ,900 18,000 18,000 18,000 14,000 The area of a one story building shall not exceed the limi s of the above table. The total area of all floors of multistory buildings shall not exceed twice the area allowed for a one story buiJ.ding and no single floor shall exceed tbat permitted for one s tory. Basements should not be included in this allowable area.

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1'able No. 5-A I Table No. 17-A Wall and Opening Protection Based on Location on Property : Bldg Type Occupancy II-1 hr A-2.1 & v A-3 B -2 III,IV All Fire Resistance for Exterior Walls * 2 hrs -less than 10 feet; l hr elsewhere 2 hrs less than 5 feet; 1 hr elsewhere 1 hr -less than 20 feet 3/4 hour less than 20 feet Opening in Exterior Walls* Not permitted less than 5 feet. Not permitted less than 5 feet Not permitted less tha n 5 feet Not permitted less than 3 feet for Group E occupancy * Distance from property line Types of Construction Fire Resistive Requirements (Hrs) Bldg Element Type II III Type TV 'l'ype v FR 1 HR 1 HR H.T. 1 HR Exterior n . _ ear1.ng Wc-d.ls 4 1 4 4 1 Interior Bearing Walls 2 1 1 1 1 Exterior Non-Bearing Walls 4 1 4 4 1 Structural Fran1e 2 1 1 1 or H .T. 1 Partitions Permanent 1 1 l 1 or H .1' . 1 Sh<:1ft E:ncl. 2 2 1 l 1 Floors 2 1 1 H.T . 1 Roofs 1 1 l H.T. l ..lew :

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Sec. 506 I Tabl e No. 5-B Table No. 5-D ALLOWABLE AREA INCREASES Separation on two sides wher public space, more than 20 feet in width extend along and join two sides of the building, floor areas may be increased at a rate of 1!-t% for each f oot. The minimum width exceeds 20', but the increase shall not exceed 50%. Separation on three sides where public space, more than 20 feet in width extend along and join three sides of the building, floor areas may be increased at a rate of for each foot. The minimum width exceeds 20', but the increase shall not exceed 100%. Separation on all sides Where public space more than 20 ' in width extends around the entire building, floor area may be increased at a rate of 5% for each foot over 20 ' minimum. Such increases shall not exceed 100% . REQUIH.ED SEPARATION OCCUPANIES vHTHIN BUILDING Between A-2.1 and A-3 None Between i\-2 . 1 and B-3 One hour Between A-3 and B-3 -None MAXH1UM HEIGHT OF BUILDINGS Building type of II-1 hr, III1 hr, IV is 65' The number of stories are two for occupancies A-2. 1 and A-3 and 4 for B-3.

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Sec. 1904 I Table 33-A Sec. 3302 -)-MEZZANINE CONS'l'RUC'l'ION Floors and supporting members shall be of one hour construction. Not more than two mezzanine floors in any room and it shall not cover more than 1/3 of that room. MINH1Uivl EGRESS l1ND ACCESS REQUIRE. HEN'l'S Use Conference H.ooms Gymnasiwns Lounges Classrooms Minimum of two exits other than elevator are required where number of occupants is OVE;!Y; ----------------------Kitchens (Comm) Locker Rooms Mechanical Equipment Nurseries 50 50 50 50 30 30 30 6 30 50 Offices Shrimming Pools Others 50 EXIT REQUIImMEWrS Squaxe feet: P e r Occupant 15 15 15 20 200 50 300 50 100 50 for pool 1.5 on deck 100 Each mezzanin e greater than 2,000 square feet or if more than 60 feet in any dimension shall have not less than two stairways. rl'hree exits required a minimum for 501 to 1, 000 occupaHts Four exists required a minimum for 1,001 to Nin : ill" rn exi-t: Joor width is 3 1 0" and 6 1 8'' high occupants The number of exits required for each story shall be determined by using the occupant load of that story plus 50% of the occupant loads for floors immediately above or belmv which exi t through this level.

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I Sec. 3304 The total width of exits in feet shall not be less than total occupant load divided by 50. This width shall be approximately equal among separate exits. TO'l'AL OCCUPZ\NT/LOAD = 'l'O'l'AL WIDTH OF EXITS IN FEET Exit arrangement placed a distance of not less than the length of the diagonal of building or area to be served. Exit doors swing in direction of exit travel for occupant load of 50 or more. Disti'lnce to exits -'l'he maximum distance to an exit door, exit passageway or enclosed stairway shall be 150 feet or 200 feet in a building with a sprinkler systen. The dis tances may be increased 100 fee::. when the 1 t 150 feet is within a corridor described in Sec. 3304. (Exit corridor) . Exit from a room may open into an adjoining room or area, provided such adjoining room is accessory to the area served and provides a direct mean s of egress to an exit corridor. CORRIDORS Every c orrido r serving an occupa1.t load of 10 or more cannot be interrupted by intervening rooms. Width is not less than 44" and 7 ft high and shall be 1 IlR fire resistance construcLion. When more than one exit is required, they shall be arranged so it is possible to go in either direction from any point in a corridor to a separa exit, xcept for dead ends not exceeding 20 feet in length. Foyers, lobbies, and reception rooms meeting the construction requirements of corridors may be c lassed as corridors. 'I'he total area of all. openings other than doors, in any portion of an interior corridor shall not exceed 25% of the area of the corridor wall of the rornn which it is separating from the corridor.

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Sec. 3305 I Sec. 3306 Sec. 1716 Table No . 23-A Figure No. 1 S'l'AIRS width-Stairs serving an occupant load of more than 50 is not less than 44 inches. Stairways serving an occupant load of 50 or less may be 36 inches wide. The use of every step shall not be less than 4 inches nor greater than inches. The run shall not be less than 10 inches. There shall not be more than 12 feet vertically between landings. Every landing shall have a dimension measured in the direction of travel to the width of the stairway. RAMPS Width the same as stairs. Slope One vertical to 12 horizontal. Landings One every five feet in rise. GUARDRAILS All unenclosed floor and roof openings, open and glazed sides of landings and ramps, etc. , more than 30 inches above grade shall be protected by a guardrail of not less than 42 inches high. UNIFORM BUILDING LOADS Assembly areas with movable seating Offices Storage Light Classrooms SEISMIC ZONE 1 125 PSF 50 PSF 125 PSF 40 PSF

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I REGULATIONS and STANDARDS GOVERNING SWIMHING POOLS COLORADO DEFARTt-1ENT OF HEALTH Adopted September 19, 1973 section 3:1 DESIGN CRITERIA -Shape, Design, f lopes The slope of the bottom of any portion of the swimming pool having a water depth of less than f ive feet shall not be mare than one foot in 12 feet and said slope shall be uniform. In portions at the break where the shallow end goes into the deep end of the pool, the slope shall not exceed l feet in 3 feet. Walls of a swimming pool shall be either {a) vertic a l for water depths of at l east six feet; or (b) vertica l for a distance o f three feet belovl 1 : h e water level below which t:hc wall may be curved to the bottom. The dimensions of the swimming pool in the diving area shall conform to the followi n g table: Height of Board Meters 0.0--1.0 2.0 2.1--3.0 3.1--5.0 Minimum Water Depth At End of Board and Beyond 9 f t . 10.75 ft. 11.75 ft. 12.75 ft . . Minimum Pool w'dth At End of Board and 12' Beyond 20 f t. 20 ft. 30 ft. 30 ft. At least 15 feet free and unobstructed head room s hall be proviued above boards. Horzontal separation of 10 feet s h all be provided be ween diving boards and side walls except may be reduced to 8 feet for surface boards less than me ter. The minimum depth of water i11 the swimming pool shall be three feet except for special purpose swimming pool s , or for restricted or recessed areas which are designed primarily for the use of small children.

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3:2 I 3 :18 3:19 3:20 3:21 DECK AREAS The deck of a.L.L swimming pools shall have a minimum o five (5) feet of unobs ructed deck width. DRESSING ROOHS The dressing rooms shall be located to the locker or checkroom and showers. The layout of the bath house for the exclusive use o f shall be such that the bathers on leaving the dressing room shall pass the toilets and shor.vers enroute to the c:w'mming pool. TOILETS Toilet facilities for each sex shall be provided at a ratio of: water closets one and one urinal for each sixty men and one water closet for forty women expected at maximum load. SHOWER FACILITIES Separate shower facili t .ies shall be provided for men and v1omen and when provided for the exclusive use of swiimners sha.ll be so located that bathers must pass from the shower room di ectly into the swim1ning pool area. The minimum number of showers provided shall be in proportion of one (1) Lo each forty (40) bathers expected t the time of maximum load. SWJMr"'ER LOAD Maximum swimming loading shall be determined by the follm.ring standards: a) Diving area: max mum of two persons v?i thin a 10 foot: radius of any diving board. b) Swimming area: one person for each 24 square feet of pool which is deeper than feet. c) Non swimming area: 10 square feet o f pool for each person in that part of the pool less than feet deep.

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Sect.' on 4: 1. 9 I CHLORINATION EQUIPMENT HOOM A separate house or room at or above ground level must be provided exclusively for chlorination purposes. The door should have a 1 foot square "one-light" window to allow observation of cowlitions in the room prior to entering.

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As pointed out earlier, energy concerns are to play a leading role in the d esign of the Continuni ty Center f o r Recreation. This ENERGY ANALYSIS section with five different areas of energy concerns. These f ive areas of concern are: Energy Costs, HVAC Concerns, Building Load, Swimmin
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ENERGY COSTS TW•.) sources of purchasable energy are available t.o our site; gas and electricity. Gas service is available from 11th Avenue and will be purchases from Greeley Gas Company for $ .40212 per 100 cubic feet. The gas is rated at 880 BTU/cubic foot. Electrical power is purchased from Home Light and Power Company and is available underground in the easement north of the site. Two types of rate structures are available to this type of bui] ding depending on the elect.rical design and demand for electricity within the building. The first rate is called Secondary General Service which is served to customers whose demands are less than 4000 KvJ for lighting and power service supplied at secondary distribution voltage. The monthly rate for this service is: 1) D 11•c nd Charge -all kilowatts of b lUng demand r $13. 36 per KW, plus 2) An on energy charge of $ .01814 per KW for all kilowatts used. I11 the Secondary General Service, the Billing Demand Charge shall be determined by metered measurement for the average kilowatts used during the fifteen minute period of maximum use during the month. The second type of service available is called Secondary Air Conditioning Service which is applicable to curtailablc air conditioning service for Commercial and Industrlal customers supplied at secondary distribution voltage. This service allows the power company to curtail service to air conditioning during periods of area wide peak d emand. The monthly rate for this is: 1) DeOI< nu Charge -all kilowatts of building d emand, $7.03 per KW, plus 2) An energy charge of $ .01814 per kilowatt used. In the Secondary Air Conditioning Service the Billing Demand Charge shall be determined by meter measurement for the maximum fifteen minute integrated kilmmtt demand use during the month.

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HVAC COW"'EHN S When thinking of HVAC concerns in a recreation buj.lding, the building can be thought of as three distinct zones: office/public areas, phy ical rooms, and the pool area. The office/public area of the building HVAC requirements are fairly straight forward. The areas should be zones such that individuals may have a certain degree of control over the area they are in. Outside fresh air should be brought in at about a rate of one air change per hour but in meeting areas the air should moved at a greater rate to remove smoke and o ors. 'rhe physical activity spaces are .Large volume races whose main HVAC concern is t:o circulate the air enough so fresh air is always available to the user. The air should be c'rculated at a rate of 6-8 air changes per hour and at the same time changing the entire volume of air with out siCle air at a minimum rate of one change per hour. T.hs design of tl.e HVAC within the s;.dmiT'.ing pool area of the center is involved. The materials t o be ; ::.:-r:.d in -ructi o n of 1 :he walls, floors, and J:"oof, and their tnt::lhod of application, must be carefully analyzed and selected to assure that the building \•:ill not be damaged by the humid, corrosive environment or by condensation. Excessive .:tir motion or drafts in the pool area must be avoiued. Generally, pools require humidity control to maintain comfort con(li ti ons . Pool ai -hand ing systems are designed to use up to 100% outdoor air for cooling and/or dehumidification. On a winter cycle, when outdoor temperature and humidity are below pool design conditions, the amount of outdoor a:i r ca. n be controlled by a humidistat to maintain the de::;i:red humidity level. It is advisable to provide spectator areas with their own air supply and avoid exhausting or returning pool air through the spectator area because of its high moisture content.

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I Air changes per hour should be between 6-8 with the amount of outdoor air required dependent on he amount of hwnidl ty c:on trol desi ed, with a minimum of one volume of outside air introduced into the space per hour. The ideal indoor air temperature for the swimming area is between 75 to 85 degrees F with a relative humidity of 50 to 60% . The selection of rna rial and equipment for pool construction is of prime importance. The deleterious effects of condensation and corrosion from the humid, corrosive atmosphere of the pool can cause damage and even failure of materials and equipment within or serving a swimmin pool. Ferrous metals should be eliminated from all ar as of pool construction. Insulation on roofs or walls musl be protected by a vapor barrier. Suspended ceilings should be discouraged as they provide a high hum dity enclosure that requires separate ventilation. Despite such ventilation, the ceiling and appurtenances such as lights, supports, etc., are subject to hidden corrosion. The pool. should be maintained at a slightly negative pressure of 5 to 101!, to help prevent. moisture from entering other: areas of the building. Pool air may be used as a rrake-up for showe s and toilet rooms, but a separate system is more desirabJ.e. Locker rooms and offices should have separate supplies and have a positive pressure relationship with respect to the pool. Openings from the pool to other areas should be minimized and passageways should have a vestibule (air lock) or some other arrangement to discourage the passage of air and moisture. In cold climates, the combination of high humidities and the use of glass requires careful design and engineeriny to avoid condensation problems. Double or triple glazing combined with radiation or, p referably, blanketing the glass with an air stream are mei :hods of avoiding' condensation and eliminating downdrafts. Glass walls or exposures make cold draft conditions and condensation difficult and expensive to eliminate.

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SWIMMING POOL Wl\TER HEA'I'ING I One of the greatest potential areas for saving energy is with the use of solar energy for the heating of the swimming pool w ter. It has particular appeal in low temperature applications, where solar collectors operate at highest efficiency and may be purchased at the lowest cost. The cost of heating swirruning pools with oil and natural gas is fast becoming prohibitively expensive. We have witnessed a rapid rise in energy costs over the past few years and can expect, particularly with deregulation, escalation to continue. Today, active solar energy systems are used extensively to heat swimming pools. The feasibility of solar energy should always be one of the alternatives considered as a potential means of energy and cost savings. As an added b f' , a well-designed Rnd opera e d solar system on a municipal pool provides a highly visible demonstrat'on of the practical application of the solar alternative, thereby promoting its consideration for other applications throuyhout the community. One publication which deals specifically with the use of solar energy is Solar Heating for IViunid pal St Jim.•rting Pools -1\ User' s Guide, by McCaughy and Sm1th Energ y 1\ssocirites, Jr1c. approach taken in the guide was to select nine J..ocations which represent most of the climate found in the western s tates. The basic energy needs for pool hea1:ing were deter mined by using a 50 x 75 foot pool a s a model. Also investigated were various combinations of collector type, tilt and area. The location which most clearly simulated Greeley' s clirr.ate was Grand Junction, Colorado. A summary of the reports findinys are listed below. Pool Performance Characteristics: Pool water temperatur e should be between 72 and 75F for competitive swinuning and between 75 to 80F for pleasure swimming. th a conventional (non-solar) system, i t is simple to control water temperature withon one degree o f this set point. With a solar system backed up by a conventional boiler, this control range must be increased to give the solar system "room to operate." Experience has shown that the semperature at which the boiler is turned on should be about 4 lower

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I than the temperature to \vhich the solar systew is expected to heat the pool. Otherwise, the boiler may be heating the pool, instead of the solar system, even though there is just enough solar energy to maintain a comfortable pool temperature. Furthermore, pool temperature may tend to vary over a wider range when operating on solar alone. Because the pools acts as its own "storage tank," it must absorb enough leat during the day when the sun is out to make up for losses during the night. This will often result in having the pool at a comfortable temperature the following morning without having to fire up the boiler. Solar Collectors: A collector for swimming pools will usually be of the flatplate variety, consisting of a blackened sheet with integral or attached water passages (waterways) . maintain the lowest losses and at highest efficiency, water f1ow rates must be such that temperatures leaving the collector are kept low --only a few degrees above pool temperature. It is also recommended that the collector be glazed because Greeley's recreation cen er's poo will be used year round and the winter months are cold. Glazed collectors are much more efficient for this application. Collector 'I'il t: A rule-of-thu..llb often applied to solar collectors is to tilt the collector at an angle equal to the latitude minus 15 degrees for best summer heating, at an angle equal to the latitude for all-year heating, and latitude plus 15 degrees for winter heating. Since the Community Center for Recration will have an all year pool, the tilt should be 40 from the horizontal. Collector Area: A collector area equal to one-third to two-thirds of the pool area in warmer and cooler locations respectively, is probably optimum. A larger system will save more energy thereby providing higher cost savings, but may require a longer payback. Since Greeley is a fairly cool location, but at the same time has a good availability of sunshine in these cool months, between one-third to onehalf of the pool area should be provided in collector area. ...,.._

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I Solar Economics: The final decision regarding solar use in heating the pools water will probably come down to an economic decision. Because there are so many variables involved in an economic analysis, it will be assumed that to provide heating with a glazed solar collect o r system would be economical and should be provided in the design of the building. Should a closer look at economics be desired, the following two examples can be used to demonstrate two economic models. In each method the energy savings can be estimated by using the concept of a Solar Index (SI) . This j . s the amount of useful energy saved in therms (one therm = 100,000 BTU in natural gas) for each square foot of collector. The ter m "useful" i s important. Energy collected and discarded or used to overheat the pool does not count. Energy saved means the equivalent in terms of natural gas r eplaced by solar. Assume a gas boiler efficiency of 65 percent. Therefore, solar energy used for pool heating would be divided by 0 . 65 to find the equivalent gas saving. .Generally, the higher the SI, the better for a s olar pool heating system. The solar index for Greeley is approximately 4 . 3 for an indoor pool with glazed collectors. The first economic method is SIMPLE PAYBACK in which the cost benefits of the system are directly related to the SI. For example, if the SI is 4 . 5 , this means that each square foot of solar collector saves 4.5 therms, equivalent, (450,000 BTU) in natural gas for pool heating, on the average, each year. If gas costs $0 .50 per therm and we have 1250 sq ft of colLec tors, the savings amount of $2812 per year. Furthermore, if the i nstalled cost of the system is $10/sq ft, sirople payback js 1 0 (0.50 x 4 .5) = 4 . 44 years. Simple payback is caluclated as follows: cos t of sys tern n = first year fuel savTngs Simple payback is simply the time it takes to recover the initial solar investment in terms of cost savings without considering the variation of economic factors with time (i.e. , the cost of money). A more accurate anaJysis would incorporate such things as interest and escalation of fuel prices to provide the DISCOUNTED PAYBACK, the second economic

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I BUIIJDING LOAD CHARACTERISTICS model. Such an analysis is hj.ghly speculative and the results are very sensitive to the assumptions made. The discounted value may be calculated by balancing the following equation: A X B X C = ( D X C) -( E X C) -( F X G) Where: A B c = = -energy saved per year unit of cost of energy the first year 1 1(h-i)n h = rate of fuel price escalation i = rate inflation D = initial solar system cost E = operating energy cost (pumping) F = maintenance cost G = ( 1 +e) n e = rate of pwnping energy escalation n = years to payback The final consideration in pool water is of conseration. Most energy in pools is lost through e vaporation, up to 6 5%. To help reduce this, the pool should be covered during non-use periods. The pool should also be well insulated to the surrounding ground. When designing a building it is important to understand its load Load refers to an imbalance of heat between inside and outsj.de Lhat makes a building skin necessary. If a bui ding has a "heating load" that means the building must be provided with heat. Conversely, a building with a "cooling load" will need to be cooled. 'l'he ext:ernal temperature at which internal loads are enough to adequately heat a building is called the "balance point temperature" for that building o r p ortio n of a buildin g .

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I • So, if the balance point of a given building is 40, the building must be cooled when the external temperature is above 40, and the building mgst be hea e d when the external temperature is below 40 . The balance point depends on the climate, the internal gains, and the skin/ volume characteristjcs. Determining the "balance point temperature" is useful to the designer at an early stage so that he may make conceptual design decisions regarding desirability of solar gain, use of natural daylighting, building orientatio n , building configuration, HVAC systems needed, and skin characteristics. In determining this building load and balance point a process from Insideout, by Drown, Reynolds, and Ubbelholde was followed. The first step in understanding the building load characteristics is to determine the interal building loads. s.,;.nce within a s'ngle building there can be several different characteristics it is first important to zone the building into areas of similar usage. For the recreation center, I the building into three zones: Pool Area, Activity A e s , and Office/Public Ar0,s. nternAl loads can come from three sources -people, lights, and machines, On the following page is a s ummary of the internal gains for each zone.

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SU!VI.MARY OF INTERNAL HEAT GAIN I Heat Zone Source Area (SF) X UNI'T/SF X B'TUH/UNIT = BTUH TOTAL Pool People* 302 people 580 = 175,160 58% Lights 15023 2.5 Watts/SF X 3.41 B'TU/T,vATT = 128,071 42% 303,231 TOTAL BTUH/SF = 303231/15023 20. 1 Physical People* 301 people 580 = 174,580 40% Areas/Lockers Lights 30463 2.5 Watts/SF X 3.41 = 259,698 60% 434,278 TOTAL BTUH/SF = 434278/30463 = 14.3 Offices/ People* 375 people 250 = 93,750 55% Public Lights 16665 1.5 Watts/SF X 3.41 BTU/WATT = 85,241 45% Machines 2500 1.0 Watts/SF X 3.41 BTU/WATT = 8,525 5 % 187,516 'TOTAL BTUH/SF = 187516/16665 = 11.3 * Based on average usage, not maximum

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I The next step is to see how the skin area of each of these three zones i nteracts with the climate outside and the heat gains inside. 'rhe volume is ""lso important, because i t is so often directly related o the amount of internal heat produced. At this point, a skin areajvolwne ratio must be estimated. Of course, at this point in the design process, neither the skin area nor the volume is known and must be estimated. It was estimated that the large volume the pool and physical activity areas skin/volume ratio is about 0 .1-, and the smaller volume spaces, office/public is 0.13. To interact the skin/volume figure with the climate, t h e Insideout book has developed Balance Point Charts, page 3-25. A chart for 600000 is presented on the following page. This Balance Point Chart shows that the balance point Lemperature (BPT) in the g aol area is 15, 32 in the physical activities areas, and 4 2 for the offige/public areas. It should be realized that the BPT of 15 in the pool area m y not very accurate because the charts are based on an internal temperature of 65 degrees F and an inside temperature of 0 would be more desirable. Therefore, the pool BPT 's adjusted to 35. The next atep in understanding how the building interacts with the climate is to plot these BPT with the average monthly temperatures. This is also done on the following page. As can be the p ool and physical activity areas are predomi nantly load dominated requiring heat only from approximately late November to February. The office/public spaces might require heat from October to March. This clearly shows a need for cooling throughout the building in the summer months. Daylighting appears to be a valid approach to decreasing the lighting load, thus reducing the internal load. The BPT also points out the need for careful design of sun control devices, ventilation, and the use of mass within the building. It should also be recognized that the interral loads due to people loads could vary greatly and have a significant impact on the loads within the building.

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&f.BE: 1..-f-->( t::ooo D &:Jo 9-J" tla" -,d zo" I \U .? .-;_:, t'ff-1--f--H---1---l/-...1-----{ ' g_ , 17 \[) ' t 1 --l........l--U--:t1........g -!--J-.. --1---' 0 1 0 t.:..O 10 S') CAIN f1 l.J fOif--lT C 1 ... / --/" .,. "sr , •-j -----I ' " ... ' ------I .. . ..y' """ _ __, o nt.e:.. E.f1--4z."' I _... f'Hf71 (./\ ,At..,-; r..w r1'? 7z/' u J r Ht...,_ HJ..J A?ONv L l fDll' v?. AY0;

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DAYLIGHTING PO'rENTIAL Daylighting appears to be a valuable tool in controlling heat gains within the building. Insideout gives a method to determin• " f G . eeley's climate offers potential for daylighting,and if so, what size windows would be appropriate. This is a function of the inte. nal lighting requirements, av ilable exterior daylight and the size of windows required to gain the required internal lighting from daylight sources. The first step is to determine the sky condition from NOAA climate data {note: Denver's data must be used since this data is not available for Greeley) , and graph the cloudy days and the clear days. This ha• L een done on the following page. From these two graphs it can be seen that Greeley' s climate is mostly cloudy in March, mostly clear in June and September, and equally clear and cloudy in December. The next step s to graph a v ailable exterior footcandles ove r a typical day. For seasons when clea sky dominateg (June and September) both north and south walls should be graphed. For March and December, cloudy seasons, only the south exposures need to be graphed. The graph of these available exterior footcandles is on the following page. (Data gain d from Mechanical and Electrical Equ!pment for Buildings.) A rule-of-thmnb; large windows (which amount to a total window area of about 20% of the total floor area) will produce indoor daylight levels of about 10% of outdoor levels. Small windows (total window area of about 2 % of total f loor area) will pro-duce indoor daylight of about 1 % of outdoor levels. The following table lists various tasks and also the Minimum Required Exterior Illumination for 10% and 1 % of exterior lev21.

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f-f--r-B 1 0 I-I I I 0 t-L lt--ITf-P.: O!Z--f07fc. JC.t?a'D .. Y'l z_ry & Je> !"-l"t Jl-J O (J 8 :\\" 0 4 z_ 0 ---f--ff--f.--f--,.,..,_ , _ --r-f---1 -!"\ l,o "--f--i--30?0 Z100 Z40t/ : Z.l \}\ L\ 7._ 1700 :t !ZOO I \ I 'I __,____ l l\ _ _ _j itr I I ' \ \ \ I f I \ \ T r1 \ . /!. ,' /' .. H C!J . .ovt. 4 . ' \ ' . I I I , . \ \ \ ------7, , .. I \ \ I ) l'"f (.'t? f-1-f---i i I I 7 I; CL1b f-. !:J?Oun!D ft, \ \ I I : fti'L/<7 foOO ?;00 0 1-1 -I-, _ f-!-I-1-i-i---fI-. 1 -1 --1 -I -!-f--I--1-IJ 1 -, _ I-1 Jr' .... 1-ro.. """" 'I 1I-... --I , (ZC/1, r71i47 l I I I I 1 \'f I WtJ t-1 bf:::..-.-.JUJ --1. / !}-,-It I r.J I \ ' I cldi{HOH'-[J \ I \

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I RECOMMEND INTERIOR TASK FOOTCANDLE LEVEL MIN. REQUIRED Circulation Pool/Gym/Offices Lounges 10 70 40 (If interior=lO%) Exterior Level (Windows 20%) 100 700 400 EX1'ERIOR ILLUMINATION (If interior=l%) Exterior Level (Windows 2%) 1,000 7,000 4,000 These values are graphically shown on the available exterior footcandlcs chart. Conclusions: From the 1\vailable Exterior Illumination Levels chart when Interior Footcandles Required are plotted it is apparent that daylighting shortld work very well. hll spaces could be daylight if the windows are 20% of the floor a rea and the corridors (circulation) coulJ even b e lit wh e n windows that are 2% of floor area. This shows that the potential for daylighting exists, but it should be remembered that when using daylighting, problems with glare and direct sunlight could arise. This is especially true in the pool and physica l activity areas. However, with careful thoughton the use of daylighting, the internal load caused by lighting can be reduced substantially.

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I COST ANALYSIS One necessary constraint which is always a major consider ation in dcsign'ng is the BUDGET. Listed below is a plete l:udget for the construction of the Community Center for Recreation. The cost/square foot figures for building were gained by talking to several local arch' .tects involved in s'milar projects and in particular Hobert Schreve from Arix Corporation in Greeley. The rewaining percentages a1 : e from P nas' Problem Seeking . A . Building Costs -Physical Activity 30,463 Grss SF @ $57/SF= $1,736,391 Lockers -Public Spaces, Offices 16,665 Gross SF @ $ 50/SF= $ 833,250 Natatorium 15,025 Gross SF @ $78/SP = 1,1.71,950 $ I . I 59 1 B . Fixed Equipment (8% of A)......................... . ---299,327 C. Site De v e lopment (15% of A ) .................. ..... . D. TOTAL CONSTRUCTION COSTS (A+ B +C) ............. . . E. Demolition ............................. .... ....... F. Movable Equipment (8% of A) . ........ ...... ....... . G. Professional Fees (6 % of D) ..... . ........ .. .. ..... . H . Contingencies (10% of D) ........ ............... ... . J. Administration Costs (1% of D) ... . ......... ....... . K. TOTAL BUDGET REQUIRED (D thru J } .................. . 561,239 50,000 299,327 276,129 460,216 46,022 $5,733,851

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I a community center for recreation an architectural theala p reaented by r oger d . aauerhagen may a . 1&&4 urban design plan J _j l site plan =-G C? / G ' \ \. 0 a: /) "N '--<"-I I --...;, I ...... I j.....__ /' 1'. I I' ,...._ 5-./", ,r, ' 178

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I axonometric

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I ,c (. .. I lo\Ner level plan n.__n_r---"1 0 ,. :_ii(o I ' I 3 .. ! I -; I il C::!: • r' . .=: I J ___J I I _[ I • i legend , lobby a reception/control 3 nuraery 4 ga,aa s meetlng..,exhlblt • kitchen 7 vending • reatroorn a outdoor deck '10 apectator aeetlng .,., racketball court .,. dance '13 locker roorn 14 storage us office .,. natatorium 17 weight• ,. gymnaalurn • ., circulation aplne aa aervlce a3 emergency a:Kit: circulation key athletaa 15L"51 public 180

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I . -----------------------, L _____ -------------------------, upper level plan n legend 1 outdoor deck Iii crafta a atorage 4 kiln e admlnlatratlon • boiler/mechanical apectator aeatlng reatroom • circulation '\0 emergency exi t circulation key athlatea public

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I section perspective section 182

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I interior perspective

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I north I l l ' ] II I east west south elevations n_ru--"1 0 ,. 184

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I upper level L I •tcaal oot, .. .,,. and beam a y atarn &c;o auppor"t a tael r-oof t,.u•••• and panallaa d ••t ... lar w all ayat a m / structure upper level / v • v •v•tam ova,. lobby, oraft a ,a..,.. adtnln. a laawha r a unit 1-oaall:ar"a with hot water-heat aour"oa , .aonornlaar oyola , roof ••t.a u a t . aolar oollaotol'a on r"Oof co l"'aat pool w a ta,.. / hvac / lower level / ,.. , .. f-a d aono,..•c• a l a b D" vact., / a taal aolu""'n and baatn ayatarn to aupport: w all .,.d Uoo,. a y a t a.na lower level Y ar-labla air volume • v •t•"'-holl: water haat aQ\.Ir"Oa , OC>QIIng '" rnaoha.,loa l .-aotna uppa,. l a v al, o alllng ,. ..... ,... air, roaf • '\auat key exterior isometric 185

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I After having completed the entire thesis project, I feel I learned much more than I ever thought I would. In addition to learning directly about architecture, I also learned a substantial amount about myself and my design process and have a very positive sense towards the entire project. In this conclusion, I would like to talk about two general ideas; first, how I feel I responded to the three thesis points I established in the introduction, and second, share some general feelings on how this project will affect my attitudes and process towards solving future architectural projects. As established in my introduction, my three thesis points can be summarized as: 1) to satisfy the individual as well as the communities recreational needs, 2) to have the entire site development have a positive impact on Greeley's downtown, and 3) to clearly and visibly establish proper energy usage in the building. I feel that I very successfully solved the first two thesis ideas, bu t somewhat weak in solving the energy thesis idea. This is not to say, however, that I feel the entire project is weak, but I realized early in the project that the second thesis idea, relating to urban design, must be adequately solved or everything that followed could not be successful. I spent a great deal of my design time solving this larger site design issue, feel I solved it very successfully, and because of this success feel the project is successful. Having established this, solving the internal space planning, which is essentially the first thesis point, became simpler because each decision could always be checked with respect to the larger urban design and site concept. Each needed to reinforce each other to make the design stronger. The idea of relating internal circulation directly with site circulation,which in turn relates to the larger downtown circulation, became the main concept I began to reinforce. 188

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I The third thesis idea, relating to energy, somehow began to get lost in what I felt were more critical issues. Initially, I placed equal importance to all three thesis ideas, but I now feel that the energy issues, although important, were not nearly as important as the first two and, specifically, the urban design thesis. I did respond to energy, however, in two strong ways --through daylighting throughout the building and by providing solar collectors to heat the pool water. I think part of the reason energy became of lesser importance than I initially thought was because I really did not understand the true energy needs of the building. I anticipated a heating problem and in reality the energy issue turned out to be a cooling problem. Therefore, I did try to attack these problems, but not in a visible manner as I had anticipated in the thesis. A further understanding of the buildings needs should have been established before the energy thesis was established. There are two important ideas I learned that I will use on my next architectural project. First, and most important, is the need for a simple, clear design concept. So often I have a tendency to complicate a problem or feel the need to make the building complex. I learned, however, that good architecture is a well stated, simple (not simplistic) concept. Throughout my thesis project, it was a constant struggle to simplify. The second idea that I learned was that one must clearly solve all the large design issues, such as urban design, before one can ever begin to solve the smaller scale architectural problems. All this can best be summarized by saying design is a truly cyclical process involving constant polishing and refinement on one or a few clearly stated conceptual ideas. 189

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BIBLIOGRAPHY I Breener, Doug las, " Ro.::crea tion Buildings with 'l'eam Spirit, " Archilectural Record, 1981. Brown1 R .ynolds, Ubbelholde, Ins'de Out -Desjgn for Passive Environmental Tech.nolo
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I INTERVIBWS Olgyay, V ictor, with Climate: Bioclimatic Approach to Architectural Regionalism, Princeton PLess, Pena, WilJiam, Problem Seeking, Cahners Books Inter natiOilal, Houston ;--'I'exas, 1977 . Ramsey and Sleeper, Architectural Graphic Standards, Seventh Edition, John. wiiey and .. Sons, Inc. , 19 81. Schlupp-Perguson and Associates, "A Recreu.tion PL: m for Colorado-A Guide for Growth," 1973. Uniform Building Code, International Conference of Bu1lding f979 Edition. Woolard, Dr. D. Stafford, Building Energx Performance Software, Boulder, Colo-ado, 1981 Erickson, Vicki, Director! Greeley Downtown Development Corporation. Gengler, Stan, Director of Greeley Park and Recreation Department. Jamison, Ann, Planner I, Greeley Planning Depu.rtment. Miles, Paul, Architect Barker, Rinker Seacat and Partners, P . C . Osbaugh, Rick, President Osbaugh/Miller Associates, Inc., Mechanical Consulting .Enginet:!rS. Sasorky, Sam, Assistant to the City Manager, Greeley, Colorado. Schreve, Robert, Architect, Arix -A Professional Corporation. Reeky, Director of Ci 1:y of Greeley Planning Depa tment. Yingling, Les, Vice-President Togerson-Yingling Inc.