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People's News Service, December 19, 1970

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People's News Service, December 19, 1970
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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OMH£ HIP ; i


Irr this icvduatrialized society, too often we forget -that the creatic-a of the capitalist society of today meant the destruction’ of the precapitalist society of iyesterday. ’ Too often we block otit the almost complete anihilation o£ the native American people, and consider ifc in te-nns of textbook perspective, "a mere excavaticn procedure", or "the price. of-progress", It .has been too long: that we -have considered the Indian people as being savages or barbariaas. It is time to analyze our fathers* attitudes regarding this gseeed: inspired -hatred, for the above descrip~ tioa surelyfits to.day*s. society rathdr than yesterday4s«
It is time, and past time that we begin to look on the history of this country and nete that the dishonesty-and bloodshed was deliberately provoked by the two faeed policy thisgovernaent carried on with the Indi an» "¥e must remember that almost ali of^the massacres, ccntrary to movies and TV shows, were blatant acts ofgehocide coBsaitted by the U*S* Army for land-hungry settlers who founded the present system» It is time to tanov that Indtan Agent John Bailor proposed an exterminatio® policy to kiil any"" Apache Indian old enough to carry a gun to the Confederacy, but was rejected only to find approval in the Union by our great President Abraham Lincoln,* It is time to recal1 that which istrue»
*This Information ean be found in a book called DEATR IN THE DESERT, by Paul I. tfellman, . -


The precapltalist soclety had short-comlngs , as any other'early sbciety» bufc it mst be understood that things sueh 'as greed, dishonesty, slavery, prejudice, disconcern f „ and the idea of private ovnership were not oa
the'liet ~agalnst~ them» ■ Probably. their mals* fault was that' of nat bein.g abis to adapt'their communal attltude .with Other tribes. -but wlthia eaeh tribe was displayed a true brotherhopd» and downrlght communiat ideology. The American indtan could not-, "unfortunately» work together as easily as. they, cpuld ba classified together* If £hey could have achieved the broadening of tbeir brotherhood they most sureiy could have defended their land effectively, however this brings out one other fault that- was prevalent in the natives’ attitudes, Some Indians, as displayed at Pljrmouth Rock, were willing to talk to the white man, they were willing to trust him, for the Indian could not compreheftd deceit* dishonesty, or greed. The. Indian had no use for such feeliags, and therefore was left tmdefende# agairvst the se insane taetics» Also the Indian' did not feel that the Isnd belonged to hia* Ile insteacS believed that it belonged to the great spirit. When the settlers made treatiea with the Indians, the Indians did not think that they were giving the land away, but instead believed that the settlers were asklng permission to use the land and would treat it with the kindness needed to preserve the wilderness.
The msnber of major large tribes throughout the country has been estimatedd at 130, but this does not count the numerous sraall and lesser. known tribes. This was one reaeon for the inability to unite as a whole, however,it is wrong to forget that, had the white man not corne to the New World, the natives most probably would have united in the future* This progression definitely showed itself in the Iroquois Natior, which-was the unification o£ 6 differing tribes under a sbcialist democracy. Here we begin to see that


the Indian people had, and were already using their potential to create a progressive world built on deraoeratic, cossaunist systesns. Each tribe through merit in wisdois and ability voted in a council and the council in tara voted in e chief ar chairman. These chiefs from each tribe then would >
participate in an intertribal council where these elected people would elect a national chairaan for the purpose of taking charge of the council meeting. At the council, matters of intertribal trade, hunting areas, and probi eras of conflict within and without the nation were discussed and solved. However the decisions were not binding unless 4/5 of the people supported them and if this was not the case a total national vote would be held.
4


This is very iateresting Indeed, to find that those '"ignorant savagas/#eo«ld perpetuate such a system. And here ve begin also to see that the "New World" vas to many nativas an old friend. It is int.eresting to note that their socialist society had grovn frotr» a natural progression of man trying to survive• Most primitive men have, because of the necessities of survival, relied on their brothers for survival, such as the bushren in Africa. This charact-ertstic can even be found in the wild, such as with volves, apes, prairie dogs, etc» Brotherhood, socialism, unity, are ali products of nature and the survival instinct.
The industriali2ation of society has definateiy given its contribution to man in terms of survival, or at least the potentia! is there* But it seems in this progression that there is a definite contradiction, for although the potential for contributing to the welfare of man is a reality, the Systems vhich perp^tuated this industrial revolution «re not as progressive as their discoveries. Because of the fact that these systems, mainly the capitalist dictatorship in the U.S., are stili ic control of the continuing industrialization. It is running wild, and is not vorking for the people. Again, as in times of old, ve are faced with the problem of survival. We, as the native American people did before, must search for ways of uniting» The American Indian vas almost anihilated, but let us rejoice that his ways of life, his means of uniting, as with the Iroquois bation, are stili alive.
For as with Che, and as with Ko Chi Minh, the people find life in the examples set by them, and we »find life in us.
Sammy Garcia


Im«
mmgelu
A coBssaittee calling itself ths DENVER COKMXTIEE ip FREE ANGELA DAVIS has recently been formed, and is circulating the following petiCionj
fo the Fresident of the U»SeA* and the Attorney-General of the U*S«A» —— Under the iJ.S. Constitution» state constitutionsj by congressione! law» statute» eonrt rulings, local and national and U.H. Resolutiori» any Citizen or otherwlse is equal and has equal rights under law,
The fact she or he is a person of color or harbors political opinions unacceptable to the doainant politica! groups» the fact that that person*s national origis may be alien to this shore or said person may clairo raligtous ¥ievs and/or mersi standards which do not conform, shall not constitute a barriei to his or her inalienable right to an equal opportunity to defend and "be defended before the law - not pre-tried by the Communications media»
For further Information,regarding the Deaver Committee to Free Angeia, Davis* call 355-4794. Petitions may be picked up at 1174 Race Street»
»


4


Metropolitan State College was created and organi sed as a traiaing grouad for Deriver’s big business. Its history over the yaars ciearly shovs that it is doing its job veli» Back in *63 the state legislature passed the law that created Metro* The decision to put a state college ia the Denver area vas basad on, you guesscd it, capitalistic economics. Two studies vere done then, one by the tfountain States Teiepfcone and one by the National Association of Manufacturers. These studies detennined how many, .and whafc kind of employees Denver * s bosses vould be needing to keep those prcrfits rolling in. With these two studies to go by, the bureaucrats deveioped the course structure ' at Metro. Since then it has gone frons a 2 year to a 4 year school, but it is stili Very much under the thumb of Denver*s owners. In a report dated Harch 1, 1965, by the trustees of the state colleges, thls little tidbit on page 7 illustrates that MSC* g purpose is to produce auto-matons for Denver’s big business;
In 1 Metropolitan area vhich is a seat of growing industry, reglcnal and nationai offices, multiple federal, state, and city govemaental functions and distribution and sales, cooperative work pro» grams need only the leadership to make them succeed.
All employers sre potential partners in work-study programs.
The report goes on to refer eo MSC students as "unseholarly unde rgradua te s ", and to the school itself as "an occupa-tionally oriented urban college".
The school administration was selected accordingly, and is doing everything it can to uiake sure MSC stays that way. The President, Kermeth Phillips, at $31,000 a year (plus $6,000 a year to pay his house rent), justified an attempt to censor the school newspaper last month with commenta like "we have had | very negative reaction (to the paper) on Capital Hili", and ”I*ve had business people stop tne downtown and teli me, and some very important business peopleor "It*s nice to say that you should not submit to politica! pressure, but that*s to live in a world that we*re not living in". ^


But the guy that really runs things internaily at Metro is the "Dean of the College", Keats McKinney« This dtr&e, at $28,000 a year, had the connections to.get the call to the big City from Adarns State College - down in AIamosa— vhere he was known, rumor has it, as "Mr. Ultra-Conservative", Hs taakes sure that no one gets hired on the faculty who mlght upset things in any 'way, If it should happen though, he threatens to fire thera to keep them silent and obediant till tenure-tirae comes j and then, in a nice subtle way, like making sure the trustees don’t give theta tenure, out they go* Don Hugdahl, a dynamic young teacher, went through this wringer last year, was denied tenure and so forced to resign* "They said I was non-loyal", he commented recently, "disloy&l to the school, and put ideas in kids' heads”.
We have a faculty Promotion and Tenure Couanittee, but it is powerless* To tnake sure it stays in line the chairaan of it is an ex-deputy sheriff turned psychology professor named John Mirich, To give you an idea where-his head is at, he publiciy proclaimed, right after Kent State, that "They should have shot ali the demonstrators, uot just four*', There are a few, very few, teaehers who cccassionally defy the System, but those don*fc last long, Aside from a couple of spineless moderatas, ali the faculty â–  that * s been here since Metro opened are conservative -though the shade varies slightly.
The next article will rap about the student body and what some students are doing to break the conservative __ dominatlon and the trade-school mentality they are forced to liye with,
Bob Smith, Secfy, Metro SDS
In his never ending fight for freedsm, justiee, aad the American way President Hixon has reversed a decision by ex-Sectetary of Interior Hickel to place eight species of whale on the Endangered Species List, This is probably because he realizes the he and his kind are doomsd to extinction and he will do everythlng in his power to take all,other forms of life, inciuding people, with him.
iMk



Hor
to
BOMB
8,To bosab or net'. boaH® that is the question."
To serae v h: dab&te is futile, for the botpbings «111
continue as^lbng es' - imperialis», w&r and social injustice exist* I for ese have no coptrol over such actions a® the ' recent ,Humble 011'Cosspae.y bstabing la New Jersey* Yet, as a xaeiaber o£ the moveraant , I as affected by the reaction the se attacks fering* I doaft believe ahy of as have any concern for the log«,,.of corporate property and our first thought may. well' b®:, Itight Orti 'Hewever, if ws are serious about ereat;ing I Rmolntton in this couatry,. we muift use. only the taciies'"Vhicti «ili- sorve thls purpose*- At this inornent wa arte'not inf a fwlly^devaloped revolutionary situation. bur job is to educate .psople, *stsaight5 as well as hlp'people» t-:> . seed fer a revolution* There is a
"real, danger Chat actions» espeelally ones where people are ihjured* m f n New _Jer§ey, which frighten and alienate middle Axaeflca, caxt be osed by Nixon-Agnev types to completely isolate us* "Our ’sovesent9 can then be crushed before the necessary hread*»based support can be aobilised»
We should. ,'attack only such institutione as we can demonstrate to be evil or oppressive» to large groups of Americaiis» braff- hoards$ inductioh- Centura» of course have no right to efttst and wifch the proper propaganda and explanation, toany would sympathiae with their destruction.
Napanha and"fragaentation bc®b sakers should be easy to
expose to the-public» No actions should ever be taken without *
a ."thorough wldely published political analysis, * I %
We could also take a lesson from the • t, in m
Uruguay and do a few Robin Kood trxps on Finance Corapanies 'JHL and other capitalist rip-off institutions, destroy records of debts, temporari-ly'liberate'Stores and distribute; to the poor, etei There, are many avenues stili unexnlorad 7- c1 such as alogas yrlting on walis using humor to ridicule' the estabiisiment.
If we really try we can relate to people and show that we are the ones whb really treasure human life above materia! values* We can expose the real mad bombers, the Pentagon-corporate death machine, for what they are*
Jira Do Ad
©r
J9>


ve are building coll@ctJ.ves in the dtty 1 reclaisrdng our lives we are building cotansunes In the country reclaiming the earth the simple
incoiap rehetas ib le lesson: we. are building there is no ons vay there is no One time a bag of rice a ray o£ aun £ fresh water
are part of our survival kit drawn hide drtsras transmi-t our message further & deeper than the
"lineola Underground*5 our network of athousand fold.membranas pulsatas with the planet news washing molecule agaiast molecule aeross arterias overlooked by the planners of. tomorrpw8s. yesterday some-call it woodstock . others remetnber 'chicago (jackson â– 
1 kent state) and the. infiatisimal ete, of this society's carnage our saemories lengthen «rith the unfolding morning
wtJlh__fafK i>aw

1
VfflflSby" rie& . red ooze death £1« aeross brown apartment floors across campus green,lawns thru prison b&rs & down jungle paths whlle our living blood coagulates* sufer of the currents of its own corpuscies whlle our madness dances In the leaves chameleon coloured disappearlng like the chesire cat before wonderlng eyes to reappear in anotber nomenfc of time laughlng at the noose so judiclally' prepared for the hanging ,


* The Black.Cultural Development .'Soclety isyan.orgaaisation that\. was developed by the bl&ck: impetes of Colorado State Peni-teatiary in Canon City. The purpose-”of the Black Cultural iteveiopment Society i® to create a cultural awareness in the prisoher '.hat wlll help hia ■'tcwards a gteatar tmderstanding ■'■qi hirae If and his ■ enylronaient m.d-' the forces. at: work. that sent hita to Canon City* The Black Cultural Develepment Society is -creating | pride and dignify . .
the black convict that will help hi® change his Outlook in crder to deal more effectively with our present d*y society* The Black Cultural Society naeds more community suppor1.1
’ The Organization for’ Solidarity and Freedom wishes to serve as au .organ to reunite these Brothers' with the communi ty. There fore, the' O.S.F, is' sponsoring a benefit concert for the Black Cultural Development Society. Welfare recipient children have been designated % fche B.C.D.S. to ,receiv® 40% of the funds do-natedat the benefit,' the B.C.D.S. will receive 30% for their

iuhii
programs, and the 0,5.F® will receive 30% for continuing the Free Breakfast and Transportation'Programs* In effect, the concert will benefit the whole community.
Ron Carter. reknown bass plaver, Al Batiste. and The Southern Jazz Quin te t fromBatm Rouge, La, ara. gcing to io their beautiful thing in memory of John Coltrane and Wes Montgomery. The.recita! will tske place at 3.|0Q p®9 December 27ih, in the Fine Arts Building at Templa Buell College. Donationi. 50 •
—±L-~


LEGAL LYNCHING
On November 19, 1915, Joe Hili was executed at the Utsh State Peaitentiary, after being convicted ori circura-stantial evideace of a murder of a Salt Lake City grocer,
Hili vas a metabar of the Industria! Werkers of the World and is veli knevn tbroughout the labor mo vernent for the organizing gonga' he has vrltten® Joe Hili had come to Salt Lake City in 1914 to organize the vorkers at the United Constructio» Coaipany in nearby Siagham® Before arriving in Utah, he had participated in the San Pedro dock vorkers strike, the San Diego Pree Speesh Movemenfc, a revolutionary msveiaent in Mexico, and an attempt to start a cosasune in levet California» Hili’» supporters maintain that he was framed by the copper trusis and the Hormon Church because of his organizing vork around Salt Lake City and that the only thing he was guilty of was being affiliated with the IWW*
The murder occurred on the evsning of January 10,
1915, whe» J«B, Morrison, and his two sons, Alving and Merlin, wete closing their grocery store» Two men tushed in with revolvers and fired, shouting, 'Ve*ve got you now*M Both Alving and his father died as a resuit of the shooting, Horrison was a former Salt Lake Sity policeman and had feared raprisals froa"two men he had once arrested. Merlin, the Ione survivor, testified later that before he was shot, Alving had grabbed a gua and vounded one of the bandits in the chest»
Two hours later Joe Hili arrived at the office of Dr. F*W. McHugh, five miles frora Morrison* s grocery store bleeding heavily frosn a.gunshot wound in the left iung»
Hili was carrying a gun and claimed that he had been shot during a quarrel over awomaa. He asked the doetor to keep quiet to protect the wosan?s reputation, McHugh Had'Hili driven home and .called the police» Later McHugh visifcM Hili and adiainistered a strong seditive. Soon afterward four policeaen arrived with guns dravm; one fired hitting the wounded and drugged Hili in the right hand and arm®
..3.3--


Although he was In crittcal conditlon Hili was taken to the County Jail instesd of the hospita! and was placed in solitary confinement for five months avaiting trial,
Long before the trial» Hili had been eonvicted by the. poliee and the Salt Laie City press. The trial itself was m&rked by cpnfusion» and contradiction marred the testimony of the withesses, No witness» ineluding Metrlin» could identify Joe Hi.ll as one of the two g urnae n. slug from
the gun allegedly fired by Alving could be found in the store* The bullet holes in Hill's coat were - lower than the wounds ia his body; his lawyere claimed that he had been shot while his hands were over his head. McHugh had cnly seen the hsndle of Hill*s gun and Hili stated that he threw the gun away after leaving the doctor's office® The veapon was • never found* The sales slip at the store where Hili bought the plstol did not include the caliber. It was never proven that Hili fired the fatal shot#* To the and he maintained that he had been shot during a quarrel over a woman and refused to testify to protect her reputafcion, The only rea! link was that Joe Hili was wounded on the same night as the omrder, Nevertheless ten days after the trial began, and despite irregularitias and unanawered questions» Hili was.declared guiity and sentsaced to.be exeeuted,
That was 55 years ago. It is only one example, but a very prominent one, Another would be the historical tfobblie trial in the esrlier part of the century. In fact» frota its inception» the labor movement has been beset by similer repressive actlons by business and governs?ent» The bandiag together of business and governsent in an attempt to destroy mass movements which threaten their interests through quasi-legal and unjust messa is not I aew phenomenon as this weil Illustrates, It is calied repression and i£ is currently being used in a systematic attempt to exterminate liberation saovemen t"s aerosI thi cpuntry.


. Witness the numetous attacks on Black Panther Party' offices* the Jtrumped up charges brought againsfc the Party*s leaders and the murdars and forced esita of its more prominent raeissbers* .Witness the conspiracy trials in Chicago and Seattle* '''Witness the • Siste tri&X in Low AngeXes, the struggle of the Chicano farta workers» and the trial of Denver Chicano Xeader Corky Gonzales in Los A^galas.
Witness .the plight of the Indlans since the European invasion of America* Witness the struggle of the Appalachian coal workers fchis past sunaner and fall against both union officiale and the coal industfy^to retain-their hospitalization caverage. Witness the fight of the L.A. Free Press for its life.against three separate court actions as a resuit of its publieation'of a list ©f 85 or so L.A. area narcotics agents. Witness the exhirbitant bail bonds and the ridiculously severe sentences for minor “crines,”• sueh as posssssion of a Jaint»''-et&forced agalnst the Great Societyrs dlssidents.
.. ~ /NA, repressi©» is not a new thlng. It has been going on in this country since bafore the Whiskey Rebellion* It is a highly !- i and've ry penser fui inst rumen t for the preservation of the status quo used by those who stand to profit the most in the existing System - big business and their puppet politicians. They carry it out in the name ■ of the people, Theyjplay on cmr. psychological desire for a free, happy and secure life. But in reality they'have no intentio» of'serviag' the people. They serve rather themselves* i The only way ve are- going to put an end to oppression in America is to educate ourselves to what government and business are up to and organize duiselves to put an end to it. Together ve can refuse to let the bullshit continue.
”15' Rick Burns


Frequently people are arrested for felonies wtthout a varrant having been iasued for their arrest. In Denver a person In these circumstances is generally booked for "investigation” of the offense of which they are suspected*
The Colorado Rules of Criminal Proeedure, which have reeently been revised, require that a person.arrested wlthcmt a warrant should be taken before a maglstrate "without unnecessary delay." In Denver, this "maglstrate” is a County Court judge sitting in the County Court room in the polies building. "Without unnecessary delay" means the first sesslon of court following arrest.
This initial court proceedlng is called the "first advisement" or the "rights hearing." It coiisists of informing you of your rights, which are the following:
X. The right to remain silent
2, The right to consuit a lawyar and the right to a free l&wver (Public Defender) if you can*t afford one
3» That anything you say may and will be used ftgainst
you»
Bond for most felonies is sst at $1,500,00 in the absance of aggr&vsting or mitigating eircusastances» At the Advisement the judge nserely reads the figure to the defen» dants* The County Court has recastly. begun a night court which runa frosa 5i00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. This is divided into three sections, the Xafcfc third being for rights advisement s» Also a judge is available fresa 8:30 a.m. to 5;G0 p.m. for advisements, rather than only in the early morning as in the past.
Previously bonds could be posted only between 8:30 a.m, and 5:00 p.m» Monday through Friday. Since December~l4th, the bailiff of the night court, and presumably the Saturday court, will be authorized to accept bond» Thus, if theory becomes practice, suspects ean now be advised and released on bond during an 18 hour period eaeh day , Monday through Friday, and during a 1/2 day period on Saturday.
16


Urit i 1 recently, defendants often vere not given their initial adviseraent for several days or more after arrest*
The intervening period vas often used by qfficers to elicit datsaging stateisents vhish occasionally found their way lato evidence at subsebosat trials. Supposedly ali defendants are belag broughfc before the court for their initial advise-isent at the next court session«
Tf you are in need of a lawyer and don't knov who' to call or if thera are deviatlons from the procedures outlined above, you should'contact the following resources:
People* s Defense Committes — 333^7875
Public Defendet —• 297-2881 Lagal Aid - Police Task Force — 292-6296
ACtU -— 825-1576
Sarrister bili
17


In the lasfc 'few year-s we have seen two great movernents emerge in the United States sweeping towards peace and freedom. One is a cuitura1 revolution of people who have turned an and dropped out of the pig estabiishmeat, looking for personal halance and internal freedom at the same time that maay of their brothers and sisters have- enlisted in the exteroal struggle, the political revolution. There cannot be one without the other. The political revolutionary who is cot tumed on is a political robot and the power systam he espouses will be no improvement on the robot System he "seeks to destroy. The political revolutionary must be turned on to seek and tap his intemal energy; by the same token, the hippie movement, a process of internal, discovery and personal religion, if it is not tied to a social move** raent becomes self-indulgent, self-preoccupied and the energies cannot be channeled and kept moving.
kChannel 6 KRMA features sorae of the best television ; jprOgraraming the're-ist including the weekly seriess HSan Francisco Hix,” aired every Tuesday at 10:00 p.m. On December 22nd* "SFM" will focus'onvthe subject' of .nLaugh’ihg’ and Crying*” withboth Laurei and Hardy and ' .
W*C* Fields film clips as well-as a visit to an acting schooi where exercises.are being.performed to' improve the actors* â–  Wl. abilities ih the fine art of laughing and crying. The', ili foilowing week,December 29th, "Dyi-ng" will be the topie
aof study. This is an outstanding Series* watch for it* Anything you wish to see agaln on Channel 6 you may requast by calling 244-8899, ext, 66.


The Peniagon has admitted | that it has been giving the nanas' and addresses of people that were foimd isaqoalified fer military Service due to drugs( to the Bureau of Narcotics snd Dangerous Srugs* This shit «as started irr 1964 at the request of the nares» The Information vas given out with the understanding that it wouldn*t be used for proeecution or for investi-gation of these individuals So what the fuck do they want it for? Also, in 1964 there were 391 people -rejected by the military for drugs. In 1965 it incre&sed to 631, in 1966 it was 834, in 1967 it was 1,064, in 1968 it was 1,624, in 1969 it was 2,635, and in the first 6 months of 1970 it is 1,164» Administrative discharges for drug usage are 3,766 in 1969, and 2,504 in the first 6 months of 1970» So if you are in one of these categories, or are trying to stay out of the military, ..remember, the pigs are onfco your game so keep a tight asshole and a ciean house,
Rick Butler


sfpl
gfni^
m
tkat iliis, lioliiag season protfes io k a time in trfiich ireamsani Impm uhll sprlng atiik emi emerge inio rtality.
Mayor and Mrs, Wifiiam h- McNichols, Jr. and Stephen
ima.
ms


ii

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, In this industrialized society, t')o often. we fo:::get that the creaticu of the ca.pitalist society of today meant the destruction of the precapitaHst society of .. Too often we block out the almost complete anihilation of the native American and consider it in tet:ms of textbook "a m-ere excavation. procedure;r, or "the price of It has been toe lcng that we have considered the Indian people as being savages or barbarians.. It ;s time to analyze our attitudes regarding this gzoeed iusplred hatred, for the above description surely fits today's society rathe:r than yesterday's. It is time, and past time that we begin to look on the history of this country and note that the dishonesty bloodshed was deliberately provoked by the two fac: ed policy this governm ent carried on with the Indian. We must remember that almost aU of the massacres, contrary to movies and TV shows, were blatant acts of genocide committed by the Army for settlers who founded tha present system. It is time to know that Indian Aeent John BaUor proposed an extel.mination policy to l{ill any Apache Indian old enough to carry a gun to the but was rejected only to find approval in the Union by our r,reat President Abraham Lincoln.* It is time to recall that istrue. *This 'information can be found in a book called DEATH THE DESERT, by Paul I. ioiellman. 2

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The precapltalht society had short-comingse as any other early society• but it must be understood that thingB such as greed, d1.shonesty, slavery, pt'ejudice, discon.cern for nature, and the idea of private o wne_rship were not on against them.. Probably their main fault was that of n.ot being able to adapt their c:otl'fi."Uunal attf.tude .with other but with:tn each tribe was displayed a true brotherhood" and dolmright communist ideology. The American Indian could not, 'Unfortunately, work together as easily. as they could be classified together. If they could have the broadening of their brotherhood they most have defended effectively, however this brings out one other fault that-was prevalent in the natives' Some as displayed at Plymouth , were willing to talk to the white man, they were willing to trust him, for the In.: :tan could not contprehend deceits _dishonesty, or greed. The Indian had no use for such and tharefore tHlS left u n defended against these insane Also the Indian cot feel that the land him., He instearl believed that it belonged to the g-reat spirit. When the setthrs made t:re<.ties with the Indians, the !nd:ians did n{}t think that they were giving the land but instead believed that the settlers were asking permission to use the land and treat it with the kindness needed to preserve the wilderness. The number of major large tribes throughout the country has been estimated at 130, but this does not count the / nwuerous small and le-sser known tribes. This was one reMOll for the inability to unite as a however,it is wrong to forget thatt had the white man not come to the !'iew orld, the natives most ptobably would have united ln the future. This pt:'ogression definitely showed itself in the Iroquois l Nation which was the unification o 6 differing tfibes : under a socialist de _mocraey. Here we begin to see that ...... ... 3

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the Ind!an and were already using their potential to create a progressive world built on democratic\) communist systems.. Each tribe through merit in wisdom and ability' voted i.n a council and the council in turn voted in a chief or chairman.. These chiefs from each tribe then w.Q-\ald ' partiGi.p'lte in an intertribal council where these elected people vc:n.tld elect a national chairman for the purpose of taking charge of the council At the councilt matters of intertribal hunting areas, and problems of conflict l-.rithin and without the nation were discussed and solved. However the decisions were not binding unless 4/5 of the people s upported them and if this W!J not the case a total national vote would be heldo 4

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; }> + "" This is very interesting 1ndeed, to find that those '•'ignorant savages''could perpet:uate such a syst-em. And here we begin also to see that the l.f'orldn was to many natives an old friend., It is int.eresting to note that their socialist so<:iety had grovn frorr. a natural progresSion of man trfing to survive. Most primitive men have. because of the necessities of survival, relied on their brothers for survival, such as the bushr.:en in Africa. This charact eri..qti'C can even be found in the such as with wolves, apes, prairie dogs. etc. Brotherhood, socialism, unity, are all products ofnature and the survival instinct. _The industrialization of society has definately given its contribution to man in terms of survival, or at least the potential is there. But it seems in this progression that the;r:e is a definite eo'ntradiction, for although the potential for contributing to the welfare of man is a reality, the systefl.lS which this industrial revolution not as progressi1e as their discoveries. Because of the feet that these mainly the capitalist -di.ctatorship in the u.s., are stilt in control of the continuing industrialization. 1t is running wild, and is not working for the people. Ag:!iin, as in times of old, we are faced with the problem of survival. He, as the native American people did befcre1 must search for ways of uniting.. The A.tnerican Indiao vas almost anihilated, but let .us rejoice that his of life, his mean& of uniting, as with the Iroquois are still alivee For as w1th Che, and as with He Chi Minh, the people find life in the examples set by themt and we lfind life in us .. Sammy Garcia ....... 5

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•ngela , A committee calling it3elf the DENVER CONMITTE TO FREE ANGELA DAVIS has recently heeu formed, and _ ,,.. is the following peti.Uon: To the President of the and the Attorney General of the Under the 1J,.S., Constitutiont ,_, state constitutions\} by congressional lawt statute'll co1-1rt ruHngsjt local and national and U.N .. any citi:ten or otherwt se .!!. equal a.nd has equal rights under la.• The faet she or he is a of color or harbors political opinions unacceptable to the dominant political the fact that that person • s national may be alien to this , shore or said person may claim religious views and/or moral standards which do not confo11n, shall not constitute a barrier. to his or her inalie-nable right to an equal opportunity to defend and'be defended before the law not pre-tr:ted by the communic:,ations media .. Fo:r further information regarding the Denver Committee to Free Angela.Davis, call 355-4794. Petitions may be picked up at'li74 Race Street .. ' /

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State College was created and organized as a training ground for Denver's big business. Its history over the years clearly shows that it is doing its-job well. Baek in '63 the state logislature passed the law that created Metro.. The dec:tsion to put a state college in the Denver was ba&ed on. you guessed capitalistic economics,.. Two studies 'vere done t;hen, one by the Hountai.n States Telepfaone abd one by the National Association of Manufacturerse These studies determined how many, and \
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But the guy that really runs things b1ternally at 11etro is the "Dean of the Keats Hc.Kinney$ This dude, at: a year, had the connections to_get the call to the hig city from Adams State College in Alamosa v.•here he was knovm• rumor has it, as "Hr. Ultra-Conservative" .. He makes sure that no one gets hired on the faculty who r::ight upset things in any 'way.. If it shc:mld happen though, he threatens to fire them to keep them silent and obedient till tenure-time comes; and then, in a nice subtle way, l:tke making sure the trustees don't give them tenure, out they go.. Don Hugdahl, a dynamic young teacher, went through thi.a last year, was denied tenure and so forced to resign .. "They said I was he commented recently11 "disloyal to the school, and put ideas in kids' heads". We have a faculty Promotion and Tenure but it is powerless. To make sure it stays in line the chairman of it is an ex-deputy sheriff turned psychology professor named :iohn Mirich.. To give you nn 1.dea where ... his head h at, he publicly pLoclaimed, right after Kent State, that "They have shot all the not just four". There are a few, very teachers who defy the system, but those don't last long$ Aside fr
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n'l'o bomb or not to b0'11$u. that is .:he questiono" To some extent, the debate is futile, for the bomb-iugs will continue as long as impe.tialismi; wur and soc:tal injustice exist., I for one have no cop,trl. over such actions as the ...... Of' xecent Hv.;uble O:tl Company bombing in New Jersey.. Yet, as :s member of the xoovement, 1 am affecterl by the reaction these attacks briugo I dcm t. beHtZ!".re any of m; have any concern "tOT for the lo1:HJ tJf property m;d our first thought may >?eU Ri.g;ht On! Howevert if i4'c.are sef.'ious about crea.-::ing a Revolut:LJ
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we a.re bu:Uding collectj.ves in the city reclaiming our lives we are building communes in the country reclaiming the earth the simple lesson: we are building there is no one way there is no one time a bag of rice a ray of sun & water are part of our survival kit drawn hide drums transmit our. message & deeper than the "Uncola Underground'' our network of a th9us and fold. membranes pulsates wtth the planet news washing molecule against molecule ac,ross a:rte.ries overlooked by the planners of tomorro"to:rQ s. yesterday some call it woodstock . remember (ja.cks:on ' & kent stgte) the infintisimal etc • of this society's carnage our memories lengthen witll the unfolding morning P-. 4"1"0 A 'i
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( flaooy leslied Jaws our folklt:n:e straps on muscle with each new day the thoughts of huey Po and chief joseph pass along trails cut under stone apartment buildings along trails running over forest between trees . that do not know the xneaning of ownership we have seen & felt our sisters & brothers, .red ooze death flow across brown apartment floors across campus green lawns thru pri$on bars & down jungle paths while our living blood coagulates, surer of. the currents of its own corpuscles while our madness dances in the leaves chameleon coloured disappearing like the chesi.re cat before wondering eyes to in artother noment of time laughing at the noose so judici.ally prep.ered for ti-e hanging

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'I' ",- • '' / • }_,,1 / The Black Cultural Development Society is organization that "laii> hy the black of Colorado State Peniar.y in Canon C:l. ty., The ptn:pose of the Cultural <)evelopment Soei.ety it to create a cult.ura11 ,awareness in the p:dt'lmit;r will help hiu a t.md•nstancl.ing of himsr.:lf and hh envit:o:rr:uent the forces s' work that sent tdJ'l r.:.o Canon City. The Bleck Cu:ltu::al lJe\H,tlcpment Society is C't"fHl.t.ing <1. pride and dignity in the hlack convict that will help hi.n change his outlook in cider t,'J deal roore out present d(W, societ\•. '!he 'llack Cul turd Sod.ety n.::leds more f;Oi:ru'nunity S\tpport., . , The Organization fox-Solidarity Freedom wishes to serve as an organ t'o reunite t.hese brothers r.vl th the community., Thete the o.,.s.F., is sponsoring a benefit 4:;onc.ert for t.he Black Cultural Developmen.t Society c Welfare recipient children have been designated li!J the to receive 40% of the funds C:onated at the benefit, the B.c .. o.s. receive 30% for their and the O..S_.F .. will receive 30% for: continuing the Free Breakfast and 'l'rtsnsportation Programs,. In effect, the concert will benefitfue whole !,a,Ca.rter,. reknow'n bass playet:1 . & and ,!he •• Quintet from Batm Rouge, !..a.., are going to do their beautiful thing 1.n memory of Jolin Coltrane and Wes The recital will take place at 3:00 pm,. December 27thl' in the Fine Bui LeUng at Temple Buell College., Donation,$2.50. .

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lEGAL. lYNCHING On November 19, 1915, Joe Hill was executed at the Utah State-after being convicted on circumstantial evidence of a murder of a Salt Lake City grocer. Hill was a member of the Industrial Workers of theWorld and is well knoWn throughout the lGbor movement for the songshe Hill had come to Salt-Lake Ctty in 1914 to the workers at the United Construction Company in nearby ainghamo Before arriving in Utah, he had pnticipated in
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Although he was in critical condition Hill was taken to the County Jail instead of the hospital and was placed in solitary confinement for five months awaiting ' Long before the trial, Hill had been con•victed by the. police and the Salt La•e City pressa The itself was marked by confusion, and contradiction the testimony of the witn'esses.. No including Met"lin, could identify Joe Rill as one of the two gurunf!u,. No slug from the gun allegedly fired by Alving could be found in the store6 The bullet holes in Hill's coat were 4" lo-wer thuntry

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Witness the on Black Panther Party office111• the trumped up brought against the Party's leaders #.i"d the murders and forced exile of its more prominent Witne$S the conspiracy trials in Chicago and Seattle. \Htness the Los tr:tal in Low Angelesf the struggle of the Chicano fa't:.n wcrkerst and t:he trial of Denver Chicano Co-rky Gonzales in Los All.!@ lass \.Jit .mHH> the )lli'f!ht of the Indians since the invasion of At!ierica.. Hi.t.ncss the of the Appalachian co&l workers this past stl.f!lmer and fall against both union ofHd.als and the coal to retain their hospitalization coverage"' Witness the fight of the L,.A. Fcee Press for its life aga:!:nst three ser.-arate court actior.s as a result of its publication of a list of 85 or. so L.Aa area narcotics agents. i-li tness the tant bail bonds and the ridiculously severe for minor s n such as possession of a enforced against the Great Society's dissidents. • Na, represston is n.ot ll new thing. It has been going on in thh_ cout1t:ry si.nce before t)]a whiskey Rebellion.. It iS a highly and ve:cy pewerful instrum:nt for the preservation of the status quo used by those who stand to profit the in the existing system big business and their puppet polit!ci.ans,. They carry it out in the name of the people., They play on our psychological desire for a free, _happy and secure life. But in reality they have no intention of serving the people.. They serve rather The only way we are going to put an end to oppression in .f.m.erica is to educate ourselves to what government • • and business are up to and orgau.ize ciu:selves to put a.n end to it .. Togethe:zr we can refuse to let the bullshit continuee -15-Rick Burns

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f IN CAPTIVITY Frequently people are arrested for felonies without a warrant having been issued for their arrest,. In Denver a :person ir:t these circumstances is generally booked ior ninvestigation" of the offense of which they are suspe1:ted .. The Colorado Rules of Criminal Procedul:"e11 which have recently been revised, require that a person arrested without a warrant should be taken before a magistrate "w:tthout unnecessary delay." In Denver; this "magistraten is a County Court judge sitting in the County room in the police building. unnecessary delay" means the first session of court following arrest. 11th initial court proceeding is cat.led the "fi:rst acl\?isementn or the. "rights hear:tngo" It corisists of you of your rights, vhich are the following: 1. The right to remain silent 2. The right to consult a lawye r and the right to a free lawyer (Public Defender) if you can't afford one 3. That anything you say may and will he used against Bond for most felonies is set at $1,500.00 in the of aggravating or mitigating ci:rcwustancese At the Advisement the judge merely reads the figure to the defen_da."lts. !he County Court has recQBtly begun a night court which from 5:00 p.m. to 12.;00 a,.m. This is divided into three sections, the la&t third being for rights advisements. Also a judge is available from 8:30 a.m .. to 5:00 p.m. for advisements, rather than only in the early morning as in the past. Previously bonds could be posted only between 8;30 a .. m., and 5:00 Monday through Friday. Since December 14th, the bailiff of the night court, and presumably the Saturday court, will be authorized to accept bond. Thus, if theory bacomes practice, suspects can now be advised and released on bond during an 18 hour period each day:.. Honday through and during a 1/2 day pedod on Saturday. 16

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Until recently, defendants often were not given their initial advisement for several days or more after arreste The intervening period was often used by Qfficers to elicit damag:f.ng statements which occasionally found their way into evidence at trials. Supposedly all defendants are being brought before the court for their initial advisement at the next court If you are in. need of a -lawyer and don't know who' to call or if there are deviations from the procedures outlined abov e 11 you should contact the. resources: People's Defense Committee 33J. Public Defender 297-2881 Legal Aid Task Force 292-6296 AC"..,U 825-1576 6arrister bill

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tim from algiers ln the last few we have seen two great movements emerge in the Unit(jjd States sweeping towardspeace and freedom., One is a cultural revolution of people -who have on and dropped out of the pig estahlil:lhment11 looking for personal balance and internal freedcYm at the same time that many of their brothers and sisters h.ave enlisted in the external struggle, the political revolution.. There cannot be one without the other.. 1"he political revolutionary who is not turned on is a poHtic:al robot and the power system he esp'Juses vill be no improvement on the robot system he seeks to The poHtical re,,olutionary must be turned on to seek and tap his interna..t. energy; by the same token, the hippie movement, a process of intet-nal discovery and personal rellgiont 1f it is not tied to a social move .. roent becomes self-i.ndulgent, self-preoccupied and the cannot be channeled and kept moving.. k a Channel 6 KRMA features of the best television _programming there -1st including the weekly series, nsan Francisco Mix•" aired eve:ry at 10:00 p .. m., On December 22nd, "SFM" ,-till focus 011 the subject of "Laughing and with both Laurel and and I.J.C. Fields film clips as well-as a._visit to an acti.ng school. where exercises are being performed to improve the actors' . abilities in the fine art of l _aughing and crying.. The following ,
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The Pentagon admitted that it has been giving the names' and addre$ses of people that found for militarY service due to drugs, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs. ?his shit. was started in 1964 at the of the narcs. The -given out with the understanding that it wouldn t be used for ' prosecution or for investigation of these individuals .. So what the fuck do they want it for? Also, in 1964 ther e were 391 people rejected by the military fca: _ drugs. In 1965 it i ncreased to in 1966 it vas 834, in 1987 it was l,064J in 1968 it was in 1969 -it was 2,635, and in the first 6 months of 1970 it is Administrative digcharges for drug usage ar. e 3, 766 'in 1969, and 2,504 in the first 6 months of 1970. So if you are in one of these categories, or are trying to stay out " l.}t the military f remember • the p!gs are onto your game so keep a tight asshole and a clean house. Rick B.utler

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s: t PJ ""' '< 0 , P> :::s -o. i* lj) (/) .... ..... (fj = ::-s <'+--"0 3 f'l:.> :r . v• __ . ,.,.iS;;, • '"e-7 \ r / ... ._ .,. o s:-t;::. ....... . .... 0 e:; 0., 0 () ""t')-ti c.., a ...... (\> '":!) .fl ... . W e}: • .. • -'? "\-'rH PEOPI..E:s SEP.VICE is conanun:l.t: