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People's News Service, January 9, 1971

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Title:
People's News Service, January 9, 1971
Series Title:
People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
Publisher:
People's News Service
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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In the narae o£ humanitarian actions pig America is now stressing the POW issue in hcpes o£ preparing the publie for intensification of the war once again*
BilXboards, bumper stickers and phone bilis are carrying slogans such as He Is Your Brother and Do You Care? National Qrg&nizations have sprung up In hopes of bringing to the American people fear that their vallant brothers are being fucked over by a bunch of raysterious* slant-eyed, barbarie primitive people» But examination reveals that the U*$« is the pig doing its best to get its people to hate the eneray in hopes of destroying a highly cultivated and honorable people Granted American pilots might be eccasionaily brutalized by the people of North Vietnam**»they donft get enough to


eat according to what ouf society has taught us* The North Vietnamese have shown restraint» have feeen much i?ore humase in not dlsposing of the pilots they have captured*
Being locked in a cell is a smaXX price to pay for dropping napalra on people»
On October 11t 1970» Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird said ve held 30»000 FOWs whom we are re&dy to exchange for over slightly 2»000 held in North Vietnam* November 24th he increased the nutabar on the other side to 3 »000* The lates t Pentagon figures as of November 28th give the total U»S* missing in action in Indochina as 966 and set the POW figure as 461*(379 in the north)* This is a total of 1427 in all of South East Asia* Laird has said there are a total of 3»000 in the north alone*
On ABC*s Issues and Ansvers (October 11» 1970) John Seal i asked Laird» MIf they got 30»000 prisoners back in one feli swoop won*t that help solve their manpover problem?** u Laird repied, **We are concerned about human beings**1 The 300 pilots held by Hanoi are the world*s most valuable and expensive soldiers* To train a pilot for an sdvanced aircraft like the F~105 being used in Vietnam costs about $471,400*
This does not include the $85,970 for his wings* It totals around $558,570*
The 339 prisoners North Vietnam admits to holding may veli represent an investment close to $150,000,000. It did not add to the hope of their relesse for Laird to teli the public that many of the captive men are ready to come back and fight again.
When Professor Sydney Peck, an anti^war le&der visited Hanoi recently» he inquired specifically about 17 men*
The North Vietnamese authorities checked the list and replied that one man was a POW, ten others had hever been captured in the North and six vere listed as dead,
Laird in his usually tricky way seized upon the new information from Peck to teli the press that a **key factor** in the final decision to launch the abortive POW rescue roission was the new Information received this month that **some of our men vere dying in POW camps.** What was neglected was the fact that the men could have been dead when captured or mortally wounded. A Washington official whom the Boston Globe (December 2» 1970) described as having ”Access to all Information concerning the prisoners»** confirmed the fact that there had been no Information or indication of maltreatment*


The Information wss mlsused to justify an act of war*
Inadequate medical treatment for prisoners is not surprislng in a country we have done our beat to bombback to the stone age* For centuries the Vietnamese have lived on rise and vegatables« When they take prisoner a man accustomed to meat and beer it becomes necessary for them to scrape extra food together in order fot the American to survivei enough so that the POW eats better than the Vietnamese soldiers*
"I had first-aid treatment next day and the fragments were removed fout days later* They treat us real weli~thatfs the main thing* No rough stuff of any kind* I never thought to be treated like that» a real surprise*"
Sergeant First Class McClure
"They treat us very well, but itfs difficult for them to supply us with the food we*re used t©*" Sergeant First Class Camacho
Lsird also failed to mention the story of Lfc* Frishman, â– > oxm of the most recently released prisoners whose right elbow was shattered when he was shot dcwn* Frishman believed at the time that his captors wouid amputate hi# arra, but it was saved by North Vietnamese surgeons*
The treatment of prisoners on our side hardly sets a good example* When Senator Fulferight brought up conditions at the tiger cage Con S&n prison in South Vietnam, Laird shut him off by replying, "Senator, I do not want to get that particular issue confused with the POWs*" But last July 24th the International Red Cross made public a report charging that 24 ifoffch Vietnamese soldiers were imprisoned in the camp* Seven of them had been mistreated in violation of the Geneva Convention* The report said they were confined to Cells all day, kept in chains 13 hours a day and were not given endugh fresh food or drinking water, (Facts on File, p*568 E-l-1970)*
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I have passed the last test concelved by |he U«$*A« for her selected mala ©ffspring. The test is commonly known to the public as the Vietnam Conflict*
The test lasts 365 days. It involves sleeping in muddy le&ch-filled ponds» carrying an 80 Ib* rucksack up and down hilis in 120 degree temperaturas» killing raen» women and children defending their country and other aspecte too numerous to mention. Not ali of the students pass» as the grading is on the curve. For examples
A « surviving the full 365 days unscathed
B - surviving 250 days with one purpie heart
C - surviving 175 days with one purpieheart and a permacent physiaal disability
D * surviving 60 days or less with amputation of 2 or more limbs
E - Beath under any circumstances
Hy grade was a Obecause I received a permanent physical disability and I cnly survived 45 days» Now that you have the grading understood» allow me to thank you for the privilege of fighting for Ood and Country» and at the same time for participatlng in the last of your barbarie tests congeived In your Political Mind.
Your interference in my life has been a bother to say the least» but now» I» the end product of your interference» is released upon you. I say to you» Be Not Critica! of my appearance nor my attitudes» as they are the end resuit of your interference with my formative years*
I neither condemn nor condpne your interference as it is the fast and I amthe Present ~ AND THE PRESENT IS UPON YOU• Power to All the People.


One of the most pervasive problema facing tenants is what is frequently called the ^lockout**f Often tenants who are slightly behlnd in their rent will come horne to find that the landlord. has ch&nged the lock on the tenantf$ aparttsent» added a new loek$ come in and taken persona! property of the tenant or any of innumerable variet ies of tacticSf ali Intended to accomplish the same end - denying the tenant the enjoyment of the apartment, he or she has rented*
After oyercoming the. initial shoek of. being locked out or having the contents of your apartmept ripped offt you are left with the practical problem pf how, to cope with your landlord1s illegal action* Xf should be understood that the landlord isrelying on ari obscure section of Colo-rado law which allow® the landlord to have a lien on persona! property of a tenant if the tenant rents furnished or unfurnished rooras or a furnished apartment unit*
Frequently landlords attempt to place liens on property other than’ the eategories 1isted above* If so it is strietly illegal and practically any means are Justified in regaining possession*
Even if the apartment fits wlthin the category that liens can be placed against there are several courses of action whicbTcan be pursued* First you Just take the lock off and act like nothing happened* since you can?t be charged with hreaking into your own apartment* Of course you might have to pay for any damages done# but once in* you1re home free* so to speak*


^ an
letter to
I have passed the last test concelved by |he U«$*A* for her selected male offspring» The test is commonly known to the public as the Vietnam Conflict*
The test lasts 365 days. It involves sleeping in muddy leach-filled ponds» carrying an 80 Ib* rucksaek up and down hilis in 120 degree temperaturas» killing men» women and children defending their country and other aspects too numerous to mention, Not ali of the students pass» as the grading is on the curve» For exemples
A - surviving the full 365 days unscathed B - surviving 250 days with one purp&e heart C - surviving 175 days with one purple heart and a permanent physical disability D - surviving 60 days or less with amputation of 2 or more iirabs
E - Death under any circumstantes
My grade was a G-because I received a permanent physica! disability and I only survived 45 days» Now that you have the grading understood» allow me to thank you for the privilege of fighting for God and Country» and at the same time for participating in the last ®£ your barbarie tests conceived in your Politica! Mind*
Your interference in my life has been a bother to say the le&st». but now» I» the end product of your interference» is released upon you» I say to you» Be Not Critical of my appsarance nor my attitudes» as they are the end resuit of your interference with my formative years*
I neither condemn nor condone your interference as it is the Bast and I am the Present*- AND THE PRESENT IS UPON YOU» Power to All the People*
america


In Cuba, cutting sugar cane is the Revolution•
American hostility - the blockade, the training by the CIA of Cuban exiles for periodic invasione, the refusal tosell spare parts for American-made machinery - is stili one af -the greatest factors the Cubans must deal with in building their Revoluiion. The fourth Venceremos Brigade, a brigade of Americana who pitch 'in with Cubans during the cane harvest, will leave in March* Those interested in going to Cuba with the Brigade, please contaet Dlck at 2442 EXiot Street, or call 333-7875 and leave a:.message® •
Repeatedcharges that the governraent has fallen back in its efforis to control hard drugs, was partially confirmed recently*. Dennis Orphan of the US Customs Bureau has admitted that the amount of'heroln,-cocaine-and opium confiscated l&st year "dropped very neticably.” Agents report that only 46 pounds of smack were seized.v**.this represents a drop of aimost 8J5%* ; Coca.ine and opium seizures dropped more than 25%.♦On, th.e other hand, marijuana shipments were seized in greater humbers than ever before* Customs agents confiscatae! an incredible 103,000 pounds of grass (aimost 50 tons) last year® Also noted was that hashish confiscations were up 600%.


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ALREAPy?,
fnawlfit erEKafnRa s "'oTfeficl scheduled for Janu&ry.
At Bs30 pm on Saturday* Jan* 16* the New York Rock Ensemble. will play in Denver at the Auditorium Theater. Tickets are 3* 4*, and 3 doliare at the May D&F box office*
Neil Young will appear in concert on the C*U* campus in Boulder on Wednesday» Jan* 27 at 8 pm* and perfdrming that Saturday* Jan* 30 at 8 pm will be Oordon Lightfoot* Both eventa AV-& scheduled for Mackey Auditorium* which is a poor place for music* Tickets will not be available until probably a week or less before the ghows* due to the administrationfs keep-it-quiet policy towards youth events. at C.U» Isaac Hayas will perform at C.S.U* in Fort Coilins on Sunday* Jan* 31« Tickets are $4*50* $5*30* and $6*00 and are available at the May D&F dovmtown and in the record store in Dahlia Shopping Cntr




The foXlowing article will explore the tara "politlcal. prisoner1* as appliad to persons convicted of erime* For simplleity» and to avoid nitpicking$ the term ^erima1* will be restricted to include osijy those offenses generally accepted as criminal in most socie£less murder# rape* robbery* the&t»
burglary» and aggravated assault* Narcotics offensesf beeause of their prevelance In this country» will also be included in this deflnition*
To illustrate why persons convicted of ftreal er irae” may be - in fact * political prisoners* a hypothetical sltuation provides the most conveniant and practical vehiclei
Suspect A is arrested for robbery* taken to police headquarters where he is interrogated* In accordance with legal procedures» A is informed of his right to remain silent and that any statement he makes may be used against him* The detective


assigned to interrogati A is convinced of A*s guilt and voices his belief» He is, however, more than willlng to listen to Afs story, hoping that A will confess outrlght, making his job easter, or trip himself up by fabricsting an alibi* A is unwilllng to make a statement. He is guilty of the robbery* but knows he is entitled to a fair and impartial trial according to the systern of justice in this country»
At this point§ the detective sttempts to convince A that A is oniy making it hard on himself by refusing to make a statement* The detective is careful not to commit himself, but he skillfully impiants the idea that if A will confess* he - the detective - will do his best to intercede in A*s behalf* He mentions the heavy caseload of the Coarta, implying that the cost of a long trial and the trouble a trial causas for everyone involved msy resuit in Afs re-ceiving a long prison sentenee instead of probation or a light jentence*
A persists in his refusal to cooperate and ssks for an attorney* The detective, with an ebvious show of disgust, finally terminates the interrogation and sends the suspect back to his jail cell with the commenti '%/e've got a place for guys like youlH
Subsequently, Suspect A is brought io trial, convicted of robbery and sent off to prison with a sentenee that approaches the maximum ealled for by statute*
This imaginsry resuit in an imaginary case would not be relevant except that it illustrates graphieally what happens in our Courts in far too many cases* Psychological coercion, bssed upon the assumptlon made by an agent of the State that the suspect is guilty, denies the suspect due process*
This dehi&l, important though it may be, is insignificant in the face of the retributive action imposed when the suspect refuses to be coerced* In the hypdthetical case outlined above, Suspect A is, 1) a firsf offendar, 2) econotnically and soclally' indigent, and 3) Black* The excessive sentenee he received is not in context with the seriousness of his crime* Lik&toost robbers, his profit was negligible* His crime netted him less than. 100 dollars* There was no persona! injury and he did not resist the arrasting officers* Obviously,

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the Court was influenced by f&ctors not overtj.^ eonnecfced tp the factual dat® at ifcs dispegal* Without ra%ionaliz*tionr based uponthis peripheral data* the sentence 'inijposed woul^i not be Justifled* &
,fReai Crime'% in this contexta cesses to be relevant*
It becorses only a symbol, an implied threat to the security and safety of the State# The Court» therefore* feels justifled in imposing a severe penalty upon the recalcitrant offender*
It is merely protecting its own .interests«
It has been pointed out that all criminal action is anti* socia!t but that not all anti-social action is criminal#
It has also been moted that fear and frustration prorapt aggressive action in humans# If application of these two observations is directed tow&rd the judicia! process in this country, a
conclusion ©an be drawn that the sentencimg of eonvicted criminal offendere is not based on the action of the offender alone but also upon the offenderfs attitudes and beliefs*


Brafting milllons of young men and forcing thera to bomb, burn, cripple, kill and destroy other human beings is one of the greatest crimes the world has ever known* War is the worst fora of force and violence*
Maintainlng an unjust econoraic system based upon owners exploiting workers is another great crime* In fact, it has been the basic cause of wars, slavery, poverty, oppression, high taxes, inflation, unemployment, depressions, and crisis after crisis that prevent the Solutions of our manv serious problems» Just laws shouid not force one class to do the work and live on low incomes so that an expioiting class can live in luxuries, accumulate wealth, and c&rry on wasteful wars in order to «perpetuate their unjust economic system*
A third great crirae is doing what is harmful or failing to do what is good for one*s self* Each person must go through life with himself - healthy or diseased, good habits or bad, educated or ignorant, a benefit or a burden to himself, family, friends and humanity* Becoming a slave to alcohol, drugs, and bad habits does not solve the problems pla^ed upon people by an unjust econoale system, they only deepen the miseries of poverty and disease and prevent the individual from working toward a real solution»
People who are willing to woife to help solve these three great problems shouid have a full-time job» This writer is explaining how to prevent wars and change our unjust system by teaching a class, "Economics and Political Science,H at Denver Free University. The purpose of the class is to glve students a good understanding of our problems, how to solve them, and become self-supporting while doing it*
Let us reduce that third great crime and increase out total enjoyment in living by harmoning our own efforts and cooperating with others to raake ail human life more beautiful, healthy, happy and useful*
Nathan L* Beatty


A tacent example of this was Attorney General John Miicheliss request to Congress for a ^no-knoek” statute ; which would peribit fche search and seisure of narcotlcs fro® a personfs person or resldence without a warrant* Fortunately» for ali peoplef the request was denled* This denial* however9 doesnft mitigate the intention of Attorney General John Mitcheil (with the support ©f Presideni Nixon) to politically usurp the Rights of the citisens of this country*
The poiiticAl nature of the law is even more graphicaliy illu8tra.ted hy the current attantion focused on the statutes governing narcotlcs use and abuse* Since the p&ssage of the Harrison Aet a&rly in this century* the State has been trying to control the use and sale of narcotlcs• Laws which provided -penaliles up to and ineluding death for the possesslon fnd/or sale of illicit narcotica were condoned and thought ■ptoper #
Since those indlviduals who suffered the consequences of these laws were* for the most parfc*.poor and politically Impotent* the State felt secure in wielding its power® In recent years, however» more and more narcotlcs offenders are nelther poor nor politically impotent* and itfs only necessaty to pick up a newspaper and re&d to galn an understanding of why the statutes in this area are undergoing change* The State is reacting to the dictums of polltical necessity* To perpetrate its ©w^ exiatanee* it is shifting its stance*
The ixtiportance of the politicai minortiy is thereby placed in perspectiva* In the next issue of this papert the non-polltical majotity will be analyred* Criminal offenders from this segment of our population (who constitute the majority of prison populations) have been politicallyIncarcerated*
In the next article, how and why this Is so will* hopefully* be clatified*
Percy 9,Chui” Jaggers* #39241' inmate* Colorado State Penitentiary, Canon City


Brafting millians of yaung men and forcing thera to bomb* burn* cripple* kill and destroy other human beings is one of the greatest crimes the world has ever known» War is the worst form of force and violence*
Haintfiitting an unjust econoraic system basedupon ‘bwners exploiting tibrkers is another great crime* In fact* it has been the basic cause of vars» slavery* poverty* opprassion* high taxes* inflationi unemployment* depressions* and crisis after crisis that prevent the Solutions of cur many sericus ptoblems* Just laws should not force one class to do the work and live on low incomes so that an exploiting class can live In luxuries* accumulate wealth* and carry on wasteful wars in order to perpetuate their unjust eeonoraic systera*
A third great crime is doing what is harmful or failing to do what is good for one*s self* Each person must go through life with himsblf - healthy or diseased* good habits or bad* educated or ighdrant* a benefit or a burden to himself* familyi friends and humanity* Becoming a slave to alcohol* drugs* and bad habits does not solve the problems placeo upon peopie by an unjust economic system* they only deepen ’ the mi seri es of poverty and disease and prevent the indiyidual from working toward a real solution*
£ Peopie who are willing tomotkto help solve these thfee great problems should have a full-tIme job. Thls writeris explaining how to prevent wars and change our uni jus t system by teaching a class* "Economlcs and Political Sdience**, at Denver Free University* The purpose of the class is togive students a good understanding of our problems* how to solve them* and become self-supporting whlle doing it*
Letus feduce that third great crime and incresse our total enjoyroent in iiving by hartnoning our own efforts and cooperating with others to raake all human life more beautiful* healthy, happy and useful.
Nathan L* Beatty


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Potters' & Craftsmens
About eight raonths ago, a group of vould-be potters in the Denver area saw the need for a second potterfs guild» A cooperative structure where those interested in pottery, and eventually other crafts, could have a common workshop not only to share costs of extyremely expensive equipment but also to share ideas, techniques, etc* and establish a craft workshop in the comraunity which could be the focal point for many activities.


After mueh werk and frustration the guild is fin&lly becoming a raaliiy® A building has reeently been proeured at 1035 E» l?th Avenue and operations will begin around January, I5th« Equlpment has bmn purchased by the group in the for® of eleetric and kiek wheels* kilns§ clpy and glaze tools and utenslls and luat about all necessary equiptaent for a potter?s studio* As 'soon as the dust setties in the nm building» there are pians for building a good-siaed g&s kiln for the guild® Necessary permite have been obtained for the kiln and also for a sales outlet in front of . the building» thereby glviag the members and perhaps non-members an outlet for their wares® There will also b.e an area in the workship designated for ehiid-ren ## that people eoming to work in the shop will be abia to bring children and have some type of amusement there for ihem* such as crayon§* felecks» books» etc*
A couple of long-range goals that the group sees ares employlng a professione! potter to glve lessons to members and non-membets* as weli as the teaching of other crafts; renting or subletting space wlthin the guild for other artisans* studios or workshops; ereating jobs for teenagers or youngsters in the community such as mixing clay» glazes* pmparing clay» b&bysitting* etc» either after school or during the sutmars with the idea that if they wanted to learn one of the crafts there the opportunity would be there for them; having seasonal sales or cooperative bazarre-type sales with other establishments in the area; workshops in all crafts opea to the public*
For more detailed Information calli Marilyn Foster» 322-0512»
* # *






Police-coramunlty relations being so important these dayst the Denver Police Department is going ail out in 1971 to ”protect and serve” you»
Just to prove to you they*re ”hip”, theyfre painting raeing stripes on the sides of their cars and repX^cing the red flasher on top with two haby blue lights* (That just makes it easier to gpot the pig)* In addXtion, the ”mod squad” cars come equipped with a small billboard on the back carrying a heavy message like ”drive defensively and live”#
As a purely defensive measure Chlef Pig Seaton (after puttlng In a request two or three years ago) has acquirad a used armor ed car from Brinks Inc* for one dollar* The vehicle has 300,000-plus miles on it,(4 prerequisite to Brinks giving it away), a heavy rust job, and is unsafe at any speed over 35 raph» Aside from that, it*s just a typica! arraored car, gun portholes, bullet-proof gl&ss, and a great vulnerability to the urban guerrilla» The ”em@rgency rescue unit” will attempt to stamp out sharp-shooters, mad bombers, berserk gunmen and ali such anarchist troublemakers« Heavy New Year»
-THE PBGPLE1S NEWS SERVICE is a'community newspaper, written, edited, and printed eollectively» It will be only as informat ive and imaginative as those who produce it can make it®
Do you take pictures, draw# or write? Can you obtain matcrisis a nawspaper needs? Do you want any coming events publicized In a calendar? DONfT JUST TALK ABOUT IT—DO ITl CALL 333-7875
Paul Zack
Illi


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. . ' . II In the name of humanitarian actions pig A merica i . s now stressing the POW issue in hopes of preparing the public far intensification of the war once again$ Billboards. stickers and phone bills are carrying slogans such as Y_ou! .. and .!?. .. National Oraanizations have sprung up in hopes of bringing to the Americ.an people fear that their valiant brothers are being fucked : ;over by a bunch of mysterious • slant-eyed, barbaric primitive people. But examination reveals that the u.st is the pig doing its best to get its people to hate the :i.n hopes of destroying a highly cultivated and honorable people, Granted American pilots might be occasionally brutalized by the people of North Vietnam ••• they don't get enough to

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v eat according to whai our society has taught use The North shown ._):lave c • .;humene in not disposing of the pilots they have . :-.::;. Beirig locked in a cell is a small price to pay for dropping napalm on people. ,On October 11. 1970. of Defense Melvin Laird s-aid we held 30.000 POWs whom we are ready to exchange for over sli.ghtly 2,000 held in North Vietnam. November 24th he increased. the number on the other side to 3,000. The latest . . Pentagon figures as of November 28th give the total missing in action in Indochina as 966 and set the POW figure as (379 in the north) t This is a total of 1427 in all of South East Asia. Laird has said there are a total of 3.ooo in the north alone. On ABC's Issues and Answers (October 11. 1970) John Scali asked Lairdr; "If they got 30.000 prisoners back fn one fell swoop won't that help solve their manpower repied t are concerned about human beings e u The 300 pilots held by Hanoi world's most valuable and expensive soldiers. To train a pilot for an advanced aircraft the F-105 being used in Vietnam costs about $471,400e This does not include the $85;.970 for his wings* It totals around $558,570t The 339 Vietnam admits to holding. may well represent an investment close to It did not add to the hope of their release for Laird to tell the public that many of the captive men are ready to come back and fight again. wnen Professor Sydney Peck, an antiywar leader visited Hanoi recently. he inquired specifically about 17 men, The North Vietnamese authorities checked the list and replied that one man was a PO\.J, ten others had never been captured in the North and six were listed as dead. Laird his usually tricky way seized upon the new information from Peck to tell the press th.at a "key factor" in the final decision to launch the abortive POW rescue mission was the new informat.ion received this month that ' :, . . " . "some of our men were dying in POW camps." What was neglected was the fact that the men could have been dead when captured : or mortally wounded. A official the Globe (December 2• 1970) described as having nAccess to all information concerning the prisoners.u confirmed th'e.fact that< there had been no i-nformation or indication 'of,m.altreatment.

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The information was misused to justify an act of war. Inadequate medical treatment for prisoners is not surprising in a country we have done our best to bomb'back to the_stone age. For centuries the Vietnamese have lived on rice and vegatables When they take prisoner a man accustomed to meat and beer it: becom.es necessary for them to scrape extra food together in -order fot the American to survive; enough so that the POW e1r a_t_. :: n -=:=h=e=--=V=i=e=t=n=--a=n--:::\_e::: =1 = ......... .. ;;;_ ;;::::: \i ur hat! first-aid treatment ne. x t day and the fragments were removed four days latere They treat us real well-that's the main thing. No rough stuff of any kind4.\ I never thought to be like a " They treat for them to to." Sergeant First Class McClure . us very but it's difficult supply us w i-th the food we're used Sergeant First Class. Camacho < J ... . Laird also failed to mention the stot y of Lt t . OtW! .of th' e most recently released prisoners whose right elbow \rUts shattered when he was shot. Frishman believed at the ti.rne that .his captors would amputate hie arrn.. but it was saved by North surgeons. The treatment. of prisoners o-n our side hardly sets a good example. When Senator Fulbright brought up conditions at the tiger cage Con San prison in South Vietnam. Laird shut him off by replying, "Senator, I do not want to get that particular issue confused with the POW's *" But. last July 24th t he International Red Cross made public a report charging that 24 Notth Vietnamese soldi.ers were imprisoned in the campe Seven of them had been mistreated in violation of the Convention.. The report said they were confined to c ells all day. kept in chains 1-3 hours a day and were not given enough _,fresh food or drinking watet.. (Facts on File, p.568 E-1-1970). Cor,rT. f',J EK\ K

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an open letter to . . . .. :.. _ ... _ ./ . -:: .::-; "'.it?.if" ,..... () 1 t\\ n . ,.... am . . I have passed the last test conceived by Che for her selected male offspring o The test. :f.s commonly known to the public as the Vietnam Conflict. The test lasts 365 It involves sleeping in muddy carrying an 80 rucksack up and down hills in 120 killing rnen, worrten and children defending 'country and other aspects too numerous-to mentionli Not all of the students pass" as the grading is on the curve. For example: A surviving full 365 • unscathed -t...ne aays B ..... survivinrl 250 . with one purp l e _ heart :-. : . c _,. survlYing 1"75 days with one purple. and -nermanent phystQal disability . t ., ' , ... ... .. D ..... _suryJV1ng 60 days less "fi th amputation of 2 ... . ) o . r more limbs E ....,. Death under any circumstance. s . . . :, . }!y grade was a Qr. because I received a permanent physical disability _and . . + only 45 Now a that you have the ;uriders_tood • allow n:ie to thank you for the pt"ivilege .Qod and Country, and at the same time for _ ; participa . tJng in the la1t of your barbaric tests vour Political Hinde Your my ltfe-has a bother to the least, but Ij the end product of your interference, is released upon you, I say to yoti, Be Not Critical of my appearance nor my attitudes. as they are the end result of.your interference with my formative years. I neither condemn .nor condone your interference as it is the !ast and I the Present,"AND THE PRESENT IS UPON YOU! to All the People. : .. . .; .

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' .. : . ;. . . .. ' '"' 5 r al One of the most pervasive problems facing tenants is "'rhat i s frequently called the ulockout Often tenants are slightly behind in their rent will hor.11e to find that the chang ed the lock on the tenant's apartment. add ed a new lock, come in and taken persortal property of the tenant or an.y of :lnnumerable varieties of tactics • $ill i .ntertded to accomplish the same d :I .t ' . • ... " en o e .ny .t.ng tne tenant, tne. enJ or tne a.partment c he o r she has rented. Aff".Q,w-l,.....,..t..,D;rt n -'l;;lA> . ........ .... .4.:;.1,_, • ... .. v. Mb ... ;:;; ...... Ou .I"'S '!!" \ . 1 O"H i ng 6-e n t o .(: If so it is strictly illegal and any means are justified in regaining possess io..n. . • . Even .if the apartment fits the category that liens can be placed •gainst there are several courses of action whtch'"'"can be pursued. First you just take the lock off ,and ac. t .liJ
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letter to 't{9 ... rrr6'{ b -t <;t ?\1 n. am ri I have passed the last test conceived by 'he for her selected male offspring. The test i.s cotnmonly known to the public as the Vietnam Conflict. The test lasts 365 It involves sleeping in muddy leach-filled pondst carrying an 80 lbO} rucksack u.p an.d do\.,n hills in 120 degree temperatures. killing men, women and children defending their country and other aspects too numerous. to mention. Not all of the students pass. as the grad i.ng is on the ct.n:ve 3 For example: A """' surviving Q.' "*ne full 365 days unscathed B """' survivin{! 250 days with one heart c C"OII> 175 days with one purple 1-ea,.,.. .... .l . ... "" and permanent phystGal disability D l}tilf.• surviving 60 days less with amputation of 2 or more limbs E --Death under arty circumstances Hy grade a G-because I received a permanent physical disability and I only survived 45 days. Now a that you have the grading understoodt} allow me to thank you for the privilege of fightina for God and Countryt and at the same time for partici.pating in the laiit of your barbaric tests conceived in your Political Mind. Your interference in my life has been a bother to say the least. but now, Ij the end product of your is released upon you. I say to you, Be Not Critical of my appearance nor my as they are the end result of your interference with my formative years, I neither condemn nor condone your interference as it is the Bast and I am the AND THE PRESENT IS UPON YOU! Power to All the People.

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in cutting sugar cane is the . tv .... blockade., the t:t"'ain.ing by the. CIA 1;,. "''VO . .-. '6;r w r,f the refusal to sell 't..4 .,..J'I !A \;;. """'"' 9 V, . t" c :..... 1:i' parts for t\rneric.an-made machinery .... ls s . til.l one. of f 1.... ,.,., -t rt 1 "' f bh .if n }...q Ji' 1 . .J no actors \,.pf..Joans mus ..:.ea. wl,t.L .t.t .. >o tl1eir fourth Venceremos Brigadei' a brigade eLf A.mericans who pitch ln with Cubans during the cane will leave in March$ Those interested in going to Cuba with , '! ,_ 'Y":"l.'lrt""' o ;r' the at: 4 -4 :c .LvL "' call 333-7875 and leave . I ' . charges that the government has fallen back in its eirts to control hard drugst was partially cofifirmed Dennis .or phan of the US Customs Bureau has admitted . . . -. that the aruo.unt of. heroin_,-cocaine and opium confis -cated _,_ last yt:ar Hdropped very not icab ly Agents report th' a t only potn1dS of smack Wel"e seized t;' t 0 . t . represents. a drop -of almost Cocaine and opium seiiures dropped m6re than hand• marijuana shipments were seized iri gteater than ever before* Customs agents confiscated an p0tU10S of grass {alm.ost, 50 tons) last year t Also that up 600%. 8

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awn scheduled for January. iS lT iNNI\TE Y POC:KET? .,. At 8:30 pm on Jan* the New York Rock Ense.mble will play Denver at the Auditorium Theater., Tickets a.:re and 5 d';llar.tt at the D&F box office. Neil Young will appear in concert or; the C • . u . • campus in Boulder on Wednesday, Jan& 27 at 8 pm, a.nd that Saturday, .Jan. 30 at 8 pm be Gordon Both schedule. d .. for Mackey Audi toriumt which is a poor place for musi.:.c. Tickets \.ill not be available until probably a week or less before the shows, due to the keep-it-ouiet policy towards youth events at C &U t; Isaac Hayes will perform at C U in l?ort Collins on Su:ndsy Jan$ 316 Tickets are and $6.00 and are avaitable. at. the Hay D&F a.nd in 1"'n _ •. St.,.... .(f r 4<" '---.... _ . ' '"' .. alll, •• pp..tn g

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. , /

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... ... . . : . ... r. r The following article will explore the t erm H,political as to persons conv:tc.ted of For and to avoid the t;eKm will be restricted to thcsf! offenses gerterally accepted as criminal in e rape$ robbery!!! thef, t !fi burglary, and aggravated Narcotics because of their prevelance in this country, will also b e included in this definition. To illustrate why persons convicted of ureal cri.men may be """ in fact ._ political p risoners ($ a hypothetical situation provides the most conveni . . ant and practical vehicle: Suspect A is for robbery. taken to police headquarters where he is interrogated* In accordance legal proc.edures • A is informed of _his right to rema.in silent and that stateme.nt he may be used against him. The detective

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;I ' ! r; 1 !I , / assigned to interroga,te A is convinced of A's guilt and voices h. is belief. He is, more than ing to 1 i , s ten to. A's story. hoping that A will confess making his 11 / I L--• k::::J job easiert or trip himself up by fabricating an alibi. A is unwilling to make a He, is guilty of the but knows he is entitled to a fair and impartial trial according to the system of justice in this At this point, the detective attempts to convince A that A is only making it hard on himself by refusing to make a state.ment. , The detective is careful not to commit but he skillfully implants the idea that if A will confess, he the detective will d6 his best to intercede in A's behalft He mentions the heavy of the itnplying that the cost of a long trial and the trouble a trial causes for everyone involved result in A's re.-.., ceiving a long prison sentence instead of probation or a light • . A persists in his refusal to cooperate and asks for an attotney. The detectivet \iith an obvit:>us shoY,T of finally terminates the and sends the suspect back to his jai.l cell with the uwe 've got a place for guys like you!" Subsequently. Suspect A is brought to convicted of robbery and sent off to prison with a sentence that a.pproaches the maximum calle.d fen; by . This imtginary result in an case would not be except that it illustrates graphically what happens in our Courts in far too many cases. Psychological coercion. based upon the assumption made by an agent of the the suspect is guiltyt denies the suspect due process. . This'denial, most robberst his profit. w :as negligible. llis crime netted him less than. 100 dolla;rsf There was no personal injuryt and he did not resist the Obviously.

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,. /6..,.. . I ({ -Ll '\....LJ !;he Court wa. s influenced by factors not connected . . t e O _ _ __ the factual date at its disposal. Without based upon;. t .his peripheral data, the sentence ,:-:imposed ' not be justified. '' "Real Crimeu, in this ceases to be relevant. It becomes only a symbol, an implied threat to the security and safety of the , The Courtt therefore, feels justified in imposing a severe penalty u :pon the trant offender. It is rnerely protecting its own _ i ,nterests. ' It has been poirited out that:all criminal action is but that not all anti=social action is criminal* It has also been noted that fear and frustration prompt aggressive itl If application of these observations is d lll 'fi'"(plnt' tpd 2'11 t: h 4 d i { ' 'a y-1 th .t a .r'\0 t r -""'"l.e ,;U -*'c"' .. a.t .. n .i..Q ..,_. un Q> . -":: .. , . . r . ..i • co.ncl'usion can be drawn that the sentenciu_g, of cOttvicted criminal is not based on the action of the offender . . . ...... .. alone but also upon the offender's attitudes and beliefs.

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Drafting millions of young men and forcing them to bombt burn, cripple. kill and destroy other human beings is one of the greatest crimes the world has ever known. War is the worst form of force and violence. Ma.tntaining an unjust economic system based upon o wners exploitin. g workers is another gr-eat In fact, it has btee\1 the basic cause of wars t slavery 7$ poverty 9 oppression. high taxes, inflation, unemploym .ent, depressions, and cri.sis after crisis that prevent the solutions of our many seriol-lS problems. Just should not force one class to do the \%'ork and live on low incomes so that an class can live in accumulate wealth • and ca:rry on 'tvasteful v1ars in order to perpetuate their unjust economic A th:lrd great crime is doing v1hat is harmful or falling to do what is good for one's self, Each person must go through life with himself healthy or good habits or bad, educated or ignorant, a benefit or a burden to himself, family, friends and .humanity. B e coming a slave to and bad habits does not solve the problems pla:ed upon people by an unjust economi4: system, they only deepen the miseries of poverty and disease and prevent the individual from working toward a real solutiont People who are willing to vO'dt to help solve these three great problems should haye a full-time This writer is explaining how to prevent wars and change our unjust system by teaching a class" uEco .nomi.cs and P9l i.tical Science til H at Denver Free Universitye The purpose of the class is to give students a aood understanding of our problemst how to solve and become self-supporting while doing Let us reduce that third great crime and increase our total enjoyment in living by harmonin.g our own efforts and cooperating with others to make all human life more beautiful, healthy, happy and useful. Nathan L. Beatty •

PAGE 15

._,,:• --.;-... . I ,;;::; iili & PL an trc& 1 M!ii!l . 2 . 1\Jh m: II' !ifl . llh!li I A recent example of this was Attorney General John } ;tttchell w s :request to Congress for a uno-kuoeku statute whi .ch would -oerlnit the s . eaJ:ch anq seizure of narcotics from a • person's person or residence wtthout a Fortunately, for all the request was This however, doesn•t mitigate the intention of Attorney General John Mitchell (with the support of President Nixon) to politically usurp the Rights of the citizens of this countryo The political nature of the law is even more graphically illustrated by the current attaation focused on the statutes governing narcotics use and abuse. Since the passage of the Harrison Act early in this century, the State has trying to control the use and sale of narcotics i; 't
PAGE 16

Drafting millions of young men and forcing them to bomb• cripple• kill and destroy other human is one of the greatest crirife s:-the world ha s ever knownot the .. worst form of force' and : ; ' MaintS:1fning an unJust economtc ;system base ' __ individual from working toward a real solutiont . . who are willing to von to help great . .-problems should haye a fulf-time job. , is . ,,e :xplaining to preve'nt war s and change our unJus: t . sy.stem by teaching a class .-nE conomfcs arid Po1 itical t u at Denver-University. _.The purpos. e of the class is to give stu.dents a good understanding: of. our prob : lems, how to solye them, and becom e self-support.inr, whfle. doing i _t.: . , " : :j < . Let:. us reduce tha.t third great crime and our total enjoymen-t in living by harlnoning our own efforts and others to make all human more beautiful, heal thy, (. ha.ppy and useful. .. Nathan L. Beatty ' . ... . ..... 1 i ; : : ; .: I ---.,.

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M I ' I I .Ll f I () i I f i I I ! PCJ \ . . . • . .. ,,.\ J t .: .\I! ... ".J I I I I I I . l ! I I

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Guild • • • • r ... About eight months ago, a group of would-be potters in the Denver area saw the need for a second potter's A cooperative structure where those interested in pottery, and eventually other crafts, could have a common workshop not only to share costs of extremely equipment but also to share ideas, techniques, etc. and establish a craft workshop in the community which could be the focal point for many activities. J l l i j l I

PAGE 19

/ . After much work and frustration the guild is finally becoming a reality., A building has recently been procured at 1035 E. 17th Avenue tflnd operations will begin around January .. Equipment been purchased by the group in the font1 of electric and kick cl" and glaze tools and and just all necessary equipment for a potteri s As soon as the dust settles in the new there are plans for building a good=iized gas kiln for the guil4$ Necessary permits have been obtained for the kiln and also for a sales outlet in fr:ont of the thereby giving the members and perhaps an outlet: for their wa.reao will also be in the workship designated for child ren 10 that people coming to work in the shop will be able to bring children and some type of amus .ement there for them* such as blocks • et:c tr A couple of goals that the group sees are: employing a professional potter to give lesaons to members and as \tell aa the teaching of other crafts; renting or subletting space within the guild for other artisans' studios or workshop9; creating jobs for teenagers or youngsters in the such as mixin.g clayJ glazes. babysitting, etc. either after school or during the summers with the idea that if they wanted to learn one of the crafts there the opportunity would be there for them; having seasonal sales or cooperative bazarre type sales with other establishments in the area; workshops in all crafts open to the public. For more detailed infonuation call:. t-farilyn Foster • 322-0512. .tt'

PAGE 20

,,. " Pol. ice-community relations being so importan.t these days, the Police Department is going all out in 1971 to and serveu Just to prove to you they'r e "hip", they're painting, racing stripes on the sides of their cars and repl$cing the flasher. on top with t\vO bab' y h lue lights'., (That • , .'flt..A • jus t makes it easier to S !pot the pig) • ln addition, the Hmc.H:i squad" carz come equipped with a small billboard on the back carrying a heavy message like defensively 1 i ' u .a U . '!';i 1.1 .' , . y . . As a measure Chief Pig Seaton (after pu tting 1 u a request two or three years ago) has acquired a annored cai from Brinks Inc@ for one dollar. The vehicle has 300,000-plue mile s on ity(4 prerequisite to H 'ti.I.lks giving it a way) • a heavy rnst: job t and is unsafe at any speed over 35 mpho from that, it's just a t y p ical armored car. gun portholes, bullet-proof.glass, and a great vulnerability to the urban guerrilla. The rescue unit" wil attempt to stamp out sharpmad bombers, berseri{. and all such anarc:hist ,,_ roublemakers e Heavy New Paul Zack l ; EOPLE' S NE\.JS SER\r!.CE is a -community newspaper, written, edited• and printed collectively. It will be -only as inform a.tive and intttginative as those who produce it can make Do you take picturest draw, or write? Can you obtain .t1. news .paper needs? Do you want any coming events publicized in a DON'T JUST TALK ABOUT IT! CALL 333-7875