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People's News Service, January 16, 1971

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Title:
People's News Service, January 16, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
"Our foreign polle must alvays be an extenslon of thls nation's domestlc policy. safest gulde to what we do abroad is a aood look at what we a e dolng at horae,"
LYNDON BAINES JOHNSON


rising cdst of innocence 3
i like to thtnk of harriet tubm.an 6
rcedical Services 3 Wholesale' terrorisn 10
caleridar 15
slx nonths or leave ||M 16
don't tread on me 17 r.i*r>, book review 13
THE PEOPLE1S NEWS SERVICE —
Is put together by a loose collective of people frora the Capito! Hili community« Our purpose is to serve and act in the interests of the people in this and other communities in the area who are trying to deveiop alterna-tives to the existing political, social and cultural structures* The PNS has maintained a policy of aistributing the paper free —- but the bread it takes to put it out'doesnft fall out of the sky as we ali know. To be fcruly community based the paper must be produced through the cooperative effofct and support of the members of the community. Right now we need articles of interest to the people in our area, as well as writers, artists, photographers, printers and people to help distribute PNS each seek. We are also desperate for donations to pay for the 20 reams of paper and other materials necessary for production each week. We*ve kept ahead so far but it*s getting pretty tight.
Ali decisions are made at the open paper meetings each week. Anyone who wants to can come and participate. Contact PNS at 333**7875 for Information.


The rtsing cost #f tnmmem
I have been in the City and County Jails in Denver three times in the paftt tvo raonths and have committed only one crime against you, the people of Denver - hitchiking! My story begins in early Sefsteoher of this year.’ I have lived in the Southern Colorado Rockies for the previous three months and was about to retura* having taken care of the matters for which I had come. At the time it was my habit to carry a hunting knife, a tool which proves invaluable in the wilderness areas. While friends were making flnal preparations for our departure I walked down Coi fax to get a magazine and was arrested for unlawful carrying of a deadly weapon, Although the law pertaining to this matter contains severa1 subsections* one of them (#2) allowed that my actions were completely legal, and despite my explanations to the arresting*officer I was jailed.
The arresting officer (Amory) failed to appear at my trial. I have not» despite repeated attempts, been able to recover my knife* and I am $100 poorer due to legal aosts,
About one month later a narcotica raid was made in the apartment above mine. A detective entered . my apartment and ordered me to the upstairs apartment.
1 was then arrested and charged with possession of narcotics* conspiracy to possess narcotics* and pcssession of narcotics for sale* all felonies and all bearing the pofential for extremely harsh penal-ties* particularly the last one. All this was done without a warrant and with no evidence as I was carrying nothing illegal. The only authority


required was the whim of an officer by whom I was threatened, shoved about, and charged wlth serious crimes (according to a law created out of a propaganda scare with no basis) which I had not committed. I was held for a day in City Jail, which contains mostly Chicanos and Blacks who have committed such crimes as illegal left turns and drinking. Between the time I entered City Jail, on a Thursday night, till I was moved to County Jail, the following Saturday, I was allowed to sleep 4 hours. Z spent the next three days in County Jail until 1 was released on $1500 bond put up by my parents who have to this date put out $2500 for me. And my only crime has been hitchiking. For this offense against humanity I was also jailed.
I have since had all charges dropped but that doesn't make me feel any better about the near thousand dollars lost permanently after bonds are returned, and it doesn’t make me feel any better when I'm on the Street and wondering whether or not that cop's going to start it all over ag&ln today, and it doesn't make me feel any better about my brothers whd've been framed and locked up by pigs, and it doesn't make me feel any better about the children that Uncle Sam kills every day. Wake up people, when you hear someone call the police pigs, when you read about Angela Davis in above-ground papers, realize what's happening, realize srhat I and others are seeing as only too obvious.
It “is only too obvious to me that law enforcement agents ahcl the courts are prejudiced against me and anyone else who does not fit into the well-off, short-haired, white class that makes up American government.
It is also obvious that without my parents' $2500 worth of assistance I would stili be in jail as so many of our brothers and sisters are. I have tried to beat them legally and will continue, but as time passes I realize that there must be revolutioh, for even the Deciaration of Independence States that it is the right and the duty of the people to over-throw any government system which is intolerable.
Dave Downs


1950 - Zinc mines in New Mexico - strike for better conditions, A court injunction prohibits the miners from picketing. To save the strike the wotnen take over the picket line*
The film **Salt of the Earth" was made about this struggle* It shows how the system separates people;
Chicano miners from Angio miners* men from women*
It dramatically explores how the struggle effects people’s lives and guts and doesnft just preach down a correct line* This inspiring film* banned from the people for years» will be shown at the Free U* (125 E* 18th Ave*) Friday» January 22» at 8:00 and 10:00* Benefit for the Organization for Solidarity & Freedom» and People’s News Service.
See calendar» page !S# for times this movie will be shown.
URCENT? If anyone knows the new telephone credit card prefix letter for ’7l* please report it to the paper at once* We w.ish to do an article on the rumored practice of ripping them of for long distance calls* Young people must be warned against this practice* It is our duty to protect Bell Telephone interests at all costs* Cod knows they need every penney they can get to survive.
FREE HEALTH CLINIC
There is a new free clinic that St, Andrews has opened up* so if you haye problems like strepthroat» congestion in y-our chest, clap» or pregnancy* or other problems that people have» and you don’t have much coin, check it out. It is at 828 East 22nd Avenue» about a half block from Safeway where Clarkson crosses it*
Their phone number is 825-5517, The hours are 7:00 to 9:00 every night* They also need a dental technician» so call if you know of anyone>who would donate their Services*
Many good wishes to fchose who serve the community*


I like to think of Harriet Tubman.
Harriet Tubman who carried a revolver,
who had a scar on her head from a rock thrown
by a slave-master (because she .
talked back), and who
had a ransom on her head
of thousands of dollars and who
was never caught, and who
had no use for the law
when the law was wrong,
who defied the law. / like
to think of her.
/ like to think of her especially when 1 think of the problem of feeding children.
The legal answer
to the problem of feeding children is ten free lunches every month, being equal, in the child ’s real life, to eating lunch every other day.
Monday but not Tuesday.
I like to think of the President eating lunch Monday, but not Tuesday.
And when / think of the President and the law, and the problem of feeding children, I like to think of Harriet Tubman and her revolver.
And then so me times
I think of the President
and other men,
men who practice the law,
who re vere the law,
who en for ce the law,
who live behind
and operate through
and feed themselves
at the expense of
starving children
because of the law,
men who sit in paneled offices
and think about vacations
and teli women '
who se care it is
to feed children
not to be hysterical,
not to be hysterical as in the word
hysterikos, the greek for
womb suffering,
not to suffer in their
wombs,
not to care
not to bother the men
because they want to think
of other things ‘
and do not want
to take the women seriously.
/ want them (to take women seriously.


I want them to think about Harriet Tubman and remember,
remember she was beat by a white man and she Uved
and she Uved to redress her grievance,
and she Uved in swamps
and wore the clothes of a man
bringing hundreds of fugitives from
slavery, and was never caught,
and led an army,
and won a battle,
and defied the laws â– 
because the laws were wrong, / want men
to take us seriously.
I am tired wanting them to think about right and wrong.
/ want them to fear.
I want them to feel fear now as I have felt suffering in the womb, and / want them to know
ihat there is always a time
there is always a time to make right
what is wrong,
there is always a time
for retribution
and that time
is beginning.
Susie Griffi Reprinted from “It Ain't Me Buhi ty


MEDICA i SERVICES
I. GENERAL MEDICAL FR08LEMS & NOK-EMERGENCY XLLNESS AND ROUTINE CHECK-UPS '
A, William Millet Free Clinic, 820 East 22nd Ave»
244-2162 7 - 9 p,m. Monday thru Saturday»
B, Denver Qen^raT^Hospital, 893-7226 for appolntment
C, Hip Help, 13th & Elati, 222-3344
8s00 p*m* - 10 p,ra* Monday through Saturday,
D, East Side Neighborhood Health Center 529 29th St., 244-4661. (East Side only)
E, West Side Neighborhood Health Center 990 Federal Blvd,, 292-9690.
For those who live west of the river,
II, GENERAL SURGICAL PROBLEMS
m Denver General, 893-7229 for appolntment*
B. East & West Side-llealth Centers III, MOTHER-BABY CARE
A, Denver General, 534-6209 for appointment*
B, East & West Side Health Centers (no residence restrictions)
C, Health Stations - 893-7228 to find out the location nearest you*
IV, FEMALE HASSLES (including pregnancy tests)
A* Denver General — 534—6209 for appointment,
B, East & West Side Health Centers
C, William Millet Free Clinic, 820 East 22nd Avenue, 244-2162.
V, CHILD CARE
A, Denver General - 893-7228 for appointment*
B, Children^ Hospital, 19th & Downins,
244-4377 (serves 10-block area from Children*s for geheral care)
C, East & West Side Health Centers
D, Weil-Baby Clinics (for routine check-ups and shots) - 534-6209 (ask for day, time & location of clinic nearest you)
E, William Millet Free Clinic - 244-2162.
VI, VD
A. William Millet Free Clinic B* Denver Health Cllrtic (basement of old DG) 893-7232, 7s30 a.m.-9:30 a.m. Mon.-Fri,


VII* BIRTH CONTROL
A* Planned Parenthood, 2025 York Street 388-4215 (smali fee if you can pav)
3* Family Planning Centers at Denver General,
East & West Side Health Centers & Health Stations. 534-6209 (ask for Center nearest you)
VIII, ABORTION COUNSELLXNG
A, Ministerial Council - 757-4442
(24-hr, answering Service - 3 rninisters take calls, 3, Woraen*s Liberation - 534-0069,
IX* EMOTIONAL CRISIS
A, Denver General Psychiatric Etnergency Room 893-7001 (for eroergencies or to find out which Mental Health Clinic is nearest you)
B, Fort Logan Mental Center
32250 W* Oxford* 761-0220, (for crisis or longer terra care)
C, Wi Iliam Millet Free Clinic (see above)
Dft Hip Help* 13th & Elati* 222-3344
X, BAD TRI? .HELP
A* Comitus, 10550 E, Alameda, 364-3317 8, S,0.S,, 2801 E, Coifax* 377-8022
C, Sequettef 2570 W, Main, Littleton 794-9764
D, Hip Help, 222-3344
E, WiIliam Millet Free Clinic
XI* PROGRAMS TO HELP KICK DRUGS OR ALCOHOL
A, Third Way llouse, 377-0061
B, Hand of Hope, 278-1722 C* Cenikor, 238-8333
D, Methadone Programs
1* Crispus Attucks, 2520 Washington St,
623-4104
2, Model Cities, 3031 Downing, 623-4214 XII, 0THER EMERGENCY NUMBERS
A, Poison Control - 893-6000
B, Suicide Prevention Center - 244-6835
C, Suicide Prevention Clinic of Denver 757-3731, if no answer call 789-3073 if stili no answer call 757-0988 *


i
*


HML&tLEr TEIpOtoSft
The first half of this article dealt wlth the myths and exaggerations which the American warmachine has tried to perpetrate concerning the issue of American prisoners of war in Horth Vietnam. This continuation will discuss in turn the treatment which POVJ*s from the North receive in â– American and South Vietnanese camps.
In training, the American soldier is given pamphlets savlng that he is goinp to Vietnam to save those people from communism* He is taught to make frienas with the Vietnamese, to treat fcham as equals because unles-s the tnlnds of the people can also be won the war will be lest. But once the soldier gets to Vietnam it is a different story. The soldier is told not to associate with or trust the ,,s>obksM• ile is told that it is inpossible to dlstins?uish between the Vietnamese and the Vietcong; the re fore the only good. pook is a dead gook•
If Bell Telephone is gcing to continue to believe apd perpetuate the idea that the North Vietnamese are in violation of the Geneva Conventlons then it is pur dutv to show the public, until we off such corporations that BT is Iving to us along with the governmcnt...whi ch is in actual violation of the
1949 Geneva Convention which States that coercion is a war crine* It speci fi cally States that prisoners must not be harassed or coerced.
And yet*.•
"Electrical torture is quite common in Vietnam f1’ testified Peter Martinsen before the International War Crines Tribunal held in Roskilde, Denraark (Nov*-Dec* 1967)• Martinsen, a Vietnam veteran in 1966-67 was awarded four medals during his tour of dutv* Martinsen» an interrogator spoke of how his command-ing officer forbid any torture which left narks. ile also talked of hundfeds of cases where wires from a field telephone were placed on the sex organs of prisoners. He mentioned that oftentimes POWfs dled due to lack of medical attention because of the need of the interrogators to find out the Information first.
DaVid Tuck (Vietnam vet 66-67, 3rd Brigade, 25th Infantrv Division) said that


mos t times tortures are super~ vised by American officers.
They teli the South Vietxjamese what to do* In February* 1966, at Camp Holloway* he saw a Vietnamese being tortured by knife being slid under his toenails and eyes with no results* So they put hira on his hands and knees in a small barbed wire cage*
It was so small that if he moved 1 inch in any direction the barbs would cut into his skin* In November of 1966 he reported that a pilot of a Huey helicopter which Tuck was on got pissed off at a prisoner and told the shot gunner to throw him out which the shotgunner pro-ceeded to do* The copter was traveling at an elevation of 2*000 feet*
It has becorae a silent spoken order that soldiers should only keep prisoners they have determined to be officers and to murder the rest*
Xnterrogators are trained in two ways? psychological and physical methods* These first classes are used to teach the soldier to act much like a courtroom lawyer* At the . U.S. Array Special Warfare School in Fort 3ragg* N*C* the soldier is also taught the latter* One of the reference manuals used is the N.K.V.D* manua1 used by
the secret police in Russia*
Ali of these classes are taught behind guarded doors*
In teaching the instructor approaches the course from the standpoint that;he does not approve of the methods* that it is ,good to know what the eaeniy is doing* with shallow references that it might be a last recourse» The methods taught at Fort Bragg are also to be used by the student to teach his counter-part in Vietnam* The teacher often jokingly telis his students to use their imagi-nation and go beyond customery torture*
Donald Duncan, an exspecta! Forces instructor, once in the higher echelons as a coordinator of the Creen Berets* author of the New Leglons is now the military editor for Ramparts magazine* and States in his book several instances of American abuse of prisoners*
One is where a North Vietnamese prisoner,under interrogation is disemboweled because he refused to talk* (This occurred at a Special Strike Forces canp* Trang Sui* near the city of Tav Ninh)« Instances where the squashing of the male genitals* buckets being placed over people*s heads and then they are beaten* isolation* hot-cold treatments and destroying a


prlsoner,s relation to time occut almost daily and are alsowritten about*
Duncan said that the good interrogator is one who supervises the torture and lets his South Vietnamese counterpart do the actual work*
The International War Crimes Tribunal held in Benmark in 1967 concluded six charges against the U*S. government*
They naturally did not respond to the indictments* Instead they issued orders that the counterparts are the onlv ones to do the torture*
The POW must receive humane treatraent under conditions which are defined by the Geneva Convention of 1949 which the U.S* has signed*
The North Vietnamese have cotoplied with the se rules but fche U*S* has not*
Tortures, mutilations and serious phygical and tnental coercion take place daily*
The killing of wounded on the battlefield and summany executions are frequent* MI these happen in the oresence and under the direction of American soldiers*
Even though the U*S* hands prisoners over to the South Vietnamese , the power which engages in renression aecompanied by acts of torture is stili in contempt of the provisions of the Geneva Coavention*


It is no accident that the soldier is seldom given a history of the Geneva Agfcee-ments of 1954* It is no accident that the people in the Mnew life" refugee caraps eat only what they can salvage from the garbage dumps of our bases* It is no tr.isfcake that on March 23,
1967, that Lt« Coi* Saul Jackson said to new troop arrivaIs in Vietnam,"! want to see Vietnamese blood flowing upon the earth*" It is a mistake that pig america can*t keep its genocidal program behind closed doors*
We must keep exposing the myth of a just America* If we don*t we will surely walk down the halls of history reserved for those who possess porter without compassion, might without morality and strength without sight.
Solidarity with our Vietnamese Sistera and Brothers*
The first verdict was returned in the series of trials stemming from the Hy Lai-Song My massacre* Sargeant Charles Hutto was acquitted» The defense maintained that the responsibility rests with the superior officers who issued the orders or set general policy* But the courts have refused to indict, or even subpoena for testimony, Nixon, Westmoreland, or anyone above the rank of Captain*
H


Sunday Jan» 17th
Monday Jan* X8tn
Wednesday Jan* 20.th
Thursday Jan» 21st
Friday Jan* 22nd
Saturday Jan» 23rd
Sunday Jan* 24th
3:00 p,m* - Mike McCarthy playing folk-country-rock music ac DFU* 18th & Sherman*
50c donatlon*
BsOO pem* - Film Classic - "Duck Soup" starring the Marx Bros* a£ DU student lounge*
50c adraission*
10:00 p*m* - "Fanfare" on Channel 6
7s30 p*m* - Open meeting ahout the Radiea1 Information Froject Bookstore* 1174 Race Street,
8:00 p*m« - Electronic Music, featuring Mr* McCluskey International House* 1600 Logan. $2*50»
7s30 p*m« * "Salt of the Earth" at Denver University*
& 9:30 p*m* Call People*s News Service for location* Donations Requested*
8;00 p»m* - "American Wilderness"* Channel 4*
8:00 p*m. - "Salt of the Earth" A benefit film will & 10 p*m* be shown at DFU* 125 E, 18th Ave» Donations Requested»
8sQ0 p*m. - Nigeriaa student will speak:on neo-colonialism in Africa* at DFU* 18th & Sherman,
*** "Salt of the Earth" atC*U*in Boulder.
Call People*s News Service for further Information* This film will probably be shown elsewhere soon at the Folklore Center & Metro U* The dates and times have yet to be announced* Call PNS (333-7875) for further Information.
8:00 p*m. - Jan Johnson* contemp» folk* 50c donation. DFU* 18th & Sherman*


I am sorry to report that we have lost one of our newspaper collective metnbers* Rick Butler* resuiting from a grass bust in September* He Was given the choice of $ix months or 24 hours to leave town* I especially feel the lo.ss as he was also my brother* We had been separated much of our lives and more or less on different trips* However* in the last year being into the new culture and politics together had made us very close*
About September 20* he and three friends were arrested for possession of *04 grams* or about a roach* of grass*
They were stopped* searched (person and car) and then arrested* all being supposedly iilegal* One of them objected to the personal search and was kicked about* the car was impounded* damaged during the search* and while being towed away* the keys were ripped off including my only house key; and never returned* The pig of course denied taking thera* one of raany lies to come* The total bond for this •04 grams was $6*000*00*
At the preliminary hearing* one of the guys who could afford a lawyer got himself and two others off. However* the swine who testified, Ramsey* tried to say he saw Rick (the driver) stick the roach in the ashtray (at night from about 20 feet away)* He also clairaed he had been informed about them transporting narcotics just after seeing fchem 15 minufces before* Most of his testimony was so ridiculous the judge was forced to dismiss the three other cases*
I believe one reason they tried to hang Rick was because they found a 10-Point Program from the White Panther Party and other radical literature in the car* He was questioned in jail about this* but of course he gave them a lot of off«the-wall answers* Plead guilty* says the Public Defender* to a raisdemeanor* and get off* Six months or banishment was the resuit. Some day the table will be turned*
I ask all of you who now use their authority to abuse young* poor and minority groups to remember what happened in Cuba to those of your ilk* After the Revolutlon the cry was Paredon* or as we say* Up Against the Wall* Motherfucke


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Who Rules America? By G» William Domhoff, 156 ;.pages i $1,96 When ve were high school students we took American History, and Civica, and Problema of Democracy, Jhere we were taught that America was governed of, by, and for Che people. Remember? They told us that this was a democracy, because when we voted wa could chpose'; between Republicans and Democrats, but the Russians could only vote for Communlsts, and therefore weren’t frsei
Eventually, in spite of all this power and freedom we had, we people ran into some questions we couldn't answer with "of, by, and for the people," For example, if the people controlled everything, why were millions of people too poor to go to the dentlst and the doctor?
Why were the public schools so crowded and so boring?
Why couldn't poor people find decent housing?' Why were women (a majority of the people) discriiainated against, insulted and exploited iri so many ways? If the people had the power, why were the factorles allowed to pollute the people's waterand the people's air? Why were there no subways? Why were people forced to buy cars that feli apart? Why were there no dayycare center for the children of working women? If the people had the power, why did the people's gqvernment spend billibns of dollars of the people's monsy to build a super-sonic transport which only rich persons could afford to fly on? Why are the jails full of poor law-breakers, while rich crlmi-nals go free? If the people have the power, why does their government send them off to die in a war they either don't understand or actlvely oppose? Why do politlcians and policemcn make taoney off the heroin trade, while -thousands of the people go to prison for smoking marijuana,


which the people know is harmless? If the people have so much freedom and power, why are their faces full of hate and fear?
These questions and a lot more demand answers.
Domhoff and his students at the University of California have found some, which they run down in this well~researched and non-rhetorical book* There is an American ruling class which makes up about 2% of the population. Its members mostlv go to the same exclusive prep schools and the same elite colleves* Their names are in the Social Register and they belong to the same clubs. Most of them are white, English-descended, and male. They are altnost ali very wealchy. Q.2% of the U.S* population owns over 65% of ali publicly held stock, meaning that they control the economy. This same ruling class exerts extensive financial control over both major parties , especially in national elections. They control the important opinion-making bodies like the Council on Foreign Relations, the Committee on Economic Developraent, and the National Advertising Council. Besides the Presidency, which is controlled by the ruling class through the parties, the most important positions in government are the Departments of State, Treasury, and Defense. These departments have been staffed at the highest levels by members of the ruling class or the business elite, which is recruited and employed by the ruling class. Through their control of the federal executive branch, the ruling class is able to dominate the FBI, the CIA, and the Pentagon.
Why don’t the people do something about it, we wonder. Surprise! The ruling class Controls the important news media. News coverage, even in smaller papers, magazines, and broadcast statione, is usually scattered and confusing. Liberals chatter about "reforma" and "public apathy" and "progress", There is no serious attempt to answer the questions raised at the beginning of this review. A paper or a TV station which truly served the people’s need for Information would get no advertising contracts.
To serye the people, a paper must be supported by the people. The people must educate each other, and tbey must take control over their lives, together.
The RIP Collective


In Fairfax, Virginia, £h@ pigs have ©ne of the fuzziest problema in the country» A couple reported that they «» in their car when they were approached by a 5*8M bunny who told Chem Chat they were treapagsing and £o split* Apparently they varen't splitting fast «nough for “Bugsy" because ha gmashed their vindow t ad split ineo che night» A fev nighcs later a cop saw the bunny trashing a new housing project with an ax, V ;sn the pig confronted the rabbit, it told the pig to t Ait or he'd chop hia head off wlth the ax, and then th huge fuzzy thing hippity-hopped into the nearby vc ds«
The animals are reaching a high leva! of consciou/ less ever since Smokey the Bear joined the Weatherman ider-ground.
Ranger Rick


Full Text

PAGE 1

"Our foreign polic must always be an extension of this nation's domestic policy. )ut s afest guide to what we do abroad is a go o d look at what we a e do:tn g at home." LYNDON BAINES JOHNSON

PAGE 2

rislnq cost of 1 i 1 ike to think of 'la-rri.<:t t ub r.an 6 medical services wholesale terrorisM 10 1 ') six or leave to•m 1 6 don't tre ad on ne 17 book r e view 1q THE PEOPLE'S NE\.JS SERVICE -Is put toP,ether b y a l oose collective of people from the Capitol Hill community, Our purpose is to serve and in the interests of the people in this and other commu11ities in the area who are trying to develop alternatives to the existing political, social and cultural structures. The PNS has maintained a policy of distributing the paper free--but the bread it takes to put it out doesn't 'fall out of the sky as we all To be tru l y community based the paper must be produced through the coo perative effort and support of the members of the community. we need articles uf interes t t o the people in our area, as well as writers, artists, photographers, printers and people to help , distribute PNS each seek, 1-<'e also desperate for donations to pay for the 20 reams of paper and other m aterials necessary for production each week, We've kept ahead so far but it's getting pretty tight. All decisions are made at the op en paper meetings each week. Anyone wants to can come and partfcipate. Contact P:'>IS at 3 33oo787S for infor m ation .

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e rising eost of innoeenee. I have be e n in the City and County Jails in Denver three t imes in the past months and have ccmmitted only one crime against you. the people of Denver -hitch.iking! My story begins in early September of this year; I have lived in the southern Colorado Rockies for the previous three months and was about to return. having taken care of the matters for which I had c ome. At t he time it was my habi.t to carry a hunting knife, a tool which proves invaluable in the wilderness areas. \mile friends were making final preparations for our departure I '"alked dmm Colfax to get a magazine and was arrested for u n la11ful carrying of a deadly weapon, Although the la1 pertainin g to this matter contains several subsections, un e o f them (tl2) allowed that my actions were c ompletely legal, and despite my explanations to the arrestingofficer I was jailed, The arresting officer (Amory) failed to appear at my trial. I have not, despite repeated attempts, been able to recover my knife, and I am $100 poorer due to legal costs. About one month later. a narcotics raid was . made in the apartment above mine, A detective en t erecj , m.y apar; t inent and ordered me to the upstairs apartment, I wa.s then ar.rested and charged with possession of narcotics, consp_iracy to possess narcotics. and possession of naicotics for sale, all felonies and all bearing the pot:ential for extremely harsh penalties, particularly the last one, Ail this was td;thout a tvarran t with no evidence as I was nothing. illegal, The only au .thori.ty

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required was the whim of an officer by whom I was threatened, shoved about, and charged with serious crimes (according to a law created out of a propaganda scare with no basis) which I had not committed, I was held for a day in City Jail, which contains mostly Chicanos and Blacks who have committed such crimes as illegal left turns and drinking. Between the time I entered City Jail, on a Thursday night, till I was moved to County Jail, the following Saturday, I was allowed to sleep 4 hours. I spent the next days in County Jail until I was released on $1500 bond put up by my parents 1o1ho have to this date put out $2500 for me. And my only crime has been hitchiking. For this offense against humanity I was also jailed. I have since had all charges but that doesn't make me feel any better about the near thousand dollars lost permanently after bonds are returned, and it doesn't make me feel any better when I'm on the street and wondering 1o1hether or not that cop's going to start it all over again today, and 'it doesn't make me feel any better abou t my brothers whd've been framed and locked up by and it doesn't make me feel any better about the children that t.incle Sam kills every day. up people, when you hear someone call the police pigs, when you read about Angela Davis in above-ground papers,. realize what's happening, realize 'il'hat I and are seeing as only too obvious. . It only too obvious to me that la1o1 enforcement agents' an'd the courts are p .rejudiced against me and anyone else who does not fit into the lvell-off, short haired,_ wqite class that makes up American government. It is a'ls' 6 obvious that without my parents 1 $2500 worth 'o'.as'sistance I would still be in jail as so many of our brothers and sisters are, I have tried to beat them legally and will continue, but as time passes I tealize that there must be revolution, for even the Deciaration of Independence states that it is the right and the duty of the people to overthrow any government system which is intolerable. Dave Downs

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1950 Zinc mines in -strike for b etter conditions, A court injunction prohibits the miners from picketing. Io save the strike the women take over the picket line, The film "Salt of the Larth" made about this struggle. It sho...,• s the system separates people; Chicano miners f rom Anglo 1:1iners • men f:r.otn loiO!'len. It d ramatically explores how the s truggle effects people's lives and guts and doesn't just preach down a correct Une. This inspirinR film. banned from the people for years, ' " ill be sh01m a t the Free u. (125 E. 18th Ave.) Frida y . January 22. at 8:00 and 10:00, Benefit for the for Solidarity & Freedom, and People's N ews Service. Se e page 15, for times this movie will be shown, lJR(;ENT? If anyone knot1s the ne'..: telephone creel it card prefix letter for ' 71, please report it to the paper at once, We wish to do an article on the rumored practice of rtppin? them of for distance calls. You nq people nu1st be warned against this practice, I t is our duty to protect Bell Teleohone interests at all costs, God knows they need every penn ey they c a n get to su z v i ve, FREE HEALTH CLINIC There is a new free clinic that St. Andrews has opened up. so if you have problems like strepthroat, congestion in your chest, clap, or pregnancy, or other prob lern8 that people have, and yo u don • t have much coin, check it out, It is at 828 East 22nd Avenue, about a half block from Safeway where Clarkson crosses lt. Their phone number ls 825-5517. The hours are 7:00 to 9:00 every night. They also need a dental technician, so call if you kn01 cf anyone , would donate their services. good wishes to those who serve the co mmunity,

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\ to thinl . of Harriet Tubman I like to think of Harriet Tubman. Harriet Tubman who carried a revolver, who had a scar on her head from a rock thr own by a slave-master (because she talked back}, and who had a ransom on her head of thousands of dollars and who was never caught, and who had no use for the law whc . n the law was wrong, who defied the law. I ! ike t o think of her. I /ike t o think of her especially when 1 think of the problem of feeding children. The /ega/ answer to the problem of fe . eding children is ten free lunches every month, being equal, in the child's rea/life, to eating lunch every other day. Monday but not Tuesday. I like to think of the President eating lunch Monday, but not Tuesday. And when I think of the President and the law, and the problem of feeding children, I like to think of Harriet Tubman and her r evolver. And then sometimes I think of the President and other men, men who practice the law, who revere the tinv, who enforce the law, who live behind and operate through and feed themselves at the expense of starving children because of the Jaw, men who sit in paneled offices and think about vacations and tell women whose care it is to feed children . not to be hysterical, not to be hysterical ai in the word hysterikos, the greek for . womb suffering, not to suffer in their wombs, not to care . not to bother the men beruuse they want to think of other things and do not want to take t h e seriously. I want them ,to take women seriously.

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I want them t o thi n k about Harriet Tubman and remember, remember she was beat by a white man and she /i;•ed and she lived to redress her grievance, and she lived in swamps and wore the clothe s of a man bringing hundreds o f fugitives from sl a very, and was never caught, . and led an army, and won a battle, and defied th e laws beca use t he laws were wrong, I want men to take us seriously . I am tired wanting them t o think about r ight and wrong. I wan t them to fear. I want them to feel fear now as 1 have felt suffering in the womb, and 1 want them to kno w that there is always a time there is a l ways a time to make right wha r is wrong, th ere is alway s a time fo r retribution and that time is beginning. Susie Gritf i ; Reprinted from "It Ain't Me 88/J,• •

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I, GENERAL H EDICAL PROBLE'-!S & AND ROUTINE CHECK-UPS • A, \Hlliam Hillet Free Clinic, 820 East 22nd Ave, 244-2162 7 9 p.m. Monday thru Saturday, B, Denver :Hospital, 893-7226 for ap pointment. C. Hip Help. !3th & Elati. 222-3344 8:00 p.m. ;... 1@ p.m. Saturday, D, East Side Health Center 529 29th St,, 244-4661, (East Side o n l y ) E, Side Health Cen ter 990 Federal 3lvd,. 292-9690, For those w ho live of the river. . . ' II. GENERAL SUR<";ICAI. PROBLEHS A. Denver General• 893-7229 for appointment. 8, East & West Side-Health Centers I I I, CA1U : A, Denver General, 534-620 9 for a p p ointment. B. East & West Side Health Centers (no residence restrictions ) C, Health Stations -893-7228 to find ou t the location nearest you, IV, HASSLES (includin
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VII, BIRTH A, Planned Parenthood, 2025 York Street 388-4215 (small fee if you can pay) B, Family Planning Centii s at Denver General, East & \{est Side Health Centers & Health Stations. 534-6209 (ask for Center nearest you) VIII, A, Ministerial Council 757-4442 (24-hr, answerinR service-3 take calls, Liberation 534-0069, IX, CRISIS A, Denver General Psvchiatric Emergency Roor'J 893-7001 (for emergencies or to find out which >lental i!ealth Clinic is nearest you) B, Fort Logan '!ental Center 32250 Oxford1 761-0220, (for crisis or lon?,er term care) . C, William Millet Free Clinic (see above ) D, Hip Help. 13th & Elati, 222-3344 X, BAD TRI:' HELP A, Comitus. 1 0550 E, Alameda, 364-3317 B, s.o,s., 2801 E . Colfax, 377-8022 C, Sequette. 2570 W, Littleton 794-976t. !), Hip Help , 222-3344 E, William Millet Free Clinic XI, PROGRAHS TO HI::LP iGCK DRUGS OR ALCOilOL A, Third Hay House, 377-0061 B, Hand of Hope, 278-1722 C, Cenikor, 238-3333 D, Programs 1, Crispus Attucks, 2520 Washington St, 623-4104 2, Cities, 30 31 D01m ing, 6 23-4 214 XII, OTHER L!lERGE:-;cy A. Poison Control 893-6000 8, Suicide Prevention Center 244-6835 C, Suicide Prevention Clinic of Denver 757-3731, i.f no answer call 789-3073 if still no ans1ver call 757-0988 9

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' 1 -P< }!I> p '

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TI1e first half of this article dealt with the mvths and uhich the A;nerican • . . has trfed to pen1etrate concerninossiblc to distin?uish benn;en the \'ictnRmese nrtd the t:lerefore t11e only f!OOk is a If Jell is to continue to helicve and perpetuate the idea that tite Vie tna. !llese are i!1 violation of the Geneva Conventions then it is our dutv to show the rublic, u n t i l we off such corporations that ST is t o us h'i th the r . overnr.1cnt .... uhich is in actual violation of the 1949 Geneva Convention which s tates that coercion is a war crine. It specifically states that prisoners nust not be harassed or coerced, And yet.,. "l.:lectrical torture is quite cornnon in Vietnam," testified Peter Martinse n before the International War Crimes Tribunal held in Roskilde. 1967) , '!sr tinsen, a Vietnam veteran in l96A-6 7 1-1as four durin? his tour of duty. "artinsen, an interro gator spoke of ho1-1 his COP1r:1and officer forbid any torture which left rarks. lie also talked of hundreds of cases where wires from a field telephone placed on the sex orn;ans of prisoners. He mentioned that oftentimes died due to lack of medical attention because of the need of the interrogators to find out the information first. Da\•id Tud: (Vietna!'\ vet 66-67, Jrd 25th Infantr y Division) said that

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most times tortures are supervised by American officers. They tell the South Viettprnese what to do, In February, 1966, at Camp Holloway, he saw a Vietnamese being tortured by knife being slid under his toenails and eyes with no results. So they p u t him on his hands and knees in a small barbed wire It was so small that if he moved 1 inch in any direction the barbs would cut into his skin. In of 1966 he reported that a pilot of a Huey helicopter which Tuck was on got pissed off at a prisoner and told the shot gunner to throtv h !m out which the shotgunner proceeded to do, The copter was traveling at an elevation of 2.000 feet, It has become a silent spoken order that soldiers should only keep prisoners they have determined to be officers and to murder the rest. Interrogators are trained in two ways : and physical methods, These first classes are used to teach the soldier to act much like a courtroom lawyer. At the U,S, Army Special Warfare School in Fort Bragg , the soldier is also the latter. One of the reference manuals used is the N,K,V,D , manual used by 12. the secret police in Russia. Al l of these are taught behind puarded doors. In teaching the instructor approaches the course from the standooint that. be does not of the thods, that it is good to know what the eneny is doinP,, with references that it miP,ht be a last recourse, The methods taught at Fort are also to be used by the student to teach his counterpart in Vietnam, The teacher often jokingly tells his students to use their nation and ?,O beyond custonary torture, Donald Duncan, an exSpecial Forces instructor, once in the r echelons as a coordinator of the Green 3erets, author of the Legions is now the military editor for maP,azine, and states in his book several instances of American abuse of prisoners. One is where a Vietnamese prisoner,under interroP,ation is disemboweled because he refused to talk, (This occurred at a Special Strike Forces canfJ, Tran?.. Sul, near the city of Tay Instances where the squashing of the male genitals, buckets beinR placed ove r people's heads and then they are beaten, isolation, hot-cold treatments and a

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prisoner's relation to time occur daily and are also'written about, Dun c an said that the good interrogator is o ne who superv ises the torture and lets his South Vietnamese counterpart do the actual work, The International War Crimes Tribunal held in D en mark in 196 7 concluded six against the u.s. iney naturally did not respond to the indictments. Instead they issued orders that the counteroarts are the only ones to do the torture. The PO'-'! must receive h u mane treatment under conditions which are defined by the Geneva Convention of 194 9 which the u.s. has siqned, The Vi.etnar.:ese have complied with these rules but U.S, has not. T ortures, mutilations a nd serious phyaical and menta l co ercion take place daily. The killing of woun ded on the battlefield and executions are frequent . All these happen in the presence and under the dir e c tion of America n soldiers, Even thoup;h the u.s. hands prisoners over to the South Vietnamese , t he power which engages in repression accompanied by acts of torture is still in contempt of the provisions of the \,eneva Couven tion, 1 3

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It •is no accident that t he soldier i s seldom give n a history of the Gen e v a Agt ee ments of 1954. It is n o accident tha t the oeople in t he " n e'" life " refuf-e e camp s eat only ••hat they can s alva:;;e from t he ?,arba>!e d umps of our ba ses. I t is no that on March 23, 196 7 , that L t . Col, Saul Jackson said t o new trooo arrival s i n Vietnam,"I '"a n t to see V ietnamese blood f lmvin g uoon the earth," It i s a m istak e that pig america can't keep its genocidal pro gram behind closed doors, \-Je must k eep exposinc; the myth of a just Americn, If we do n 1 t >-Ie wi 11 surely walk down the halls of history reserved for those r,;ho possess omver 1-1i t h ou t co mpass ion • mi ',>,h t without morality and strength without si<;ht. S olidarity 1vit h o u r Vietnamese Sisters and U r others, The firs t verdict was r eturne d in the series of trials stemming from the Hy LaiSon g :1y massacre, Sargeant Charles Hutto was acquitted, The defense maintained that the responsibility rests with the superior officers issued the orders or set general policy , But the courts have refused to indict, or even subpoena for testimony, Westmoreland, or anyone above the rank of Captain,

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calendar== jan. 17-24 Sunday Jan, 17th Jan, 18th Vednesday Jan, 20th Thursday Jan, 21st Friday Jan, 22nd Saturday .:!.!n• 23rd Sunday Jan. 24th 8:00 p,m, Mike McCarthy folk-countryrock at DFU, 18th & Sherman, 50 donation, 8:00 p.m. Film Classic "Duck Soup" starring the Marx Bros. at DU student lounRe. SOc admission, 10:00 p,nl, -"Fanfare" on 6 7:30 p,m, Open about the Radical Information ?reject Bookstore, 1174 Street, 8:00 o,m, -Electronic Music, featuring Mr. McClusk ey International House, 1600 Logan, $2,50. 7:30 p,m, -"Salt of the Earth" at Denver University, & 9:30 p,m, Call People's Service for location, Donations Requested, 8:00 p,m, "American Wilderness", Channel 4, 8:00 p,m, " Salt of the Earth" A benefit film will & 10 p.m. be shown at DFU. 125 E, 18th Ave, Donations Reque sted, 8:00 p,m, Nig;:;riaa student will speak, on neo colonialism in Africat at D Fu, 18th & Sherman, *** "Salt of the Earth" at C,U,in Boulder, Call People's Service for further information, This film will probably be shown elsewhere soon at the Folklore Cente r & U, The dates and times have yet to be announced, Call PNS (333-7875) for further information, 8:00 p.m. -Jan Johnson, contemp. folk, SOc donation. DFU, 18th & Sherman.

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Six months or leave town ! I am sorry to report that we have lost one of our newspaper collective members, Rick Butler• resulting from a grass bust in September, lie was giyen the choice of s .ix months o:r 24 hours to leave town, I especially feel the lo.ss as he was also my brother. had been separaied much of our lives and more dr less on different tr.ips, However, in the last year being into the new culture and politics had made us very close. About September 20, he and three friends were arrested for of ,04 grams, or about a roach, of grass. They were stopped, searched (person and car) and then arrested, all being supposedly illeRal, One of them objected to the personal search and was kicked about, the car 1o1as impounded, damaged during the search, and while being towed away. the keys were ripped off including my only house key and never returned. The pip, of course denied taking them, one of many lies. to come, The tota l bond for this ,04 p,rams was $6,000,00. At the preliminary one of the guys who could afford a lawyer got himself and two others off. However, the swine who testified, Ramsey, tried to say he sa Rick (the driver) stick the roach in the ashtray (at night from about 20 feet away). He also claimed he had been informed abo•Jt them transporting narcotics just after seeing them 15 minutes before. }lost of his testimony 1..ras so 'ridiculous the judge was forced to dismiss the three other cases, I believe one reason they tried to hang Rick was because they found a 10-Point Program from the Panther Party and other radical litetature in the car, He was questi.oned in jail about this• but of course he them a lot of off-the-wall ans1.1ers. Plead guilty, says the Public Defender. to a misdemeanor, and get off, Six months or banishment 1.1as the result. Some day the table will be turned, I ask all of you who no w use their authority to abuse young. poor and minority groups to remember happened in Cuba to those of your ilk, After the Revolution the cry was or as we say, Up Against the \.Jall, '!otherfuckers!

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radical in ation oroiecl book review wno Rules America? B y G, William Domhoff, $1.96, When we were high school students we took &"llerican History, and Civics, and Problems of Democracy. !here w e were taught that America was governed of, by, and for the people, Remember? They told us that this was a democracy, because when we voted we could choose, between Republicans and Democrats, but the Russians could only vote for Communists • and therefore weren't fr. ee Eventually, in spite of all this power and freedom we had, we people ran into some questions we couldn't answer with "of, by, and for the people." .For example, if the people controlled everything, why were millions of people too poor to go to the dentist and the doctor? Why were the public schools so crowded and so boring? \,'hy couldn't poor people find decent housing?. ' were women (a majority of the _people) discriminated insulted and exploited 1ti so many ways? If the people had the power , why were the factories allowed to pollute the people's water and the ;people's air? Why were there no subways? \-Thy were people forced to buy cars that fell apart? Hhy were there no. day .. care center for the children of working t•ornen? .. If the people had the. power, why did the people's spend billions of dollars of the people's money to build a super-sonic transport which only rich _persons could afford to fly on? Why are the jails full of poor law-breakers, while rich criminals go free? If the pe 'ople have the power, why does their government send th . . em off to die in a war they either don't understand or actively oppose? Why do politicians 1nd policeme n make money off the heroin trade, while 'thousands of the people g o to prison for marijuana.

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which the peo?le know is harmless? If the neople have so much freedom and power, t Jh y are their faces full of hate and fear? These questions and a lot more demand answers, Dot1hoff and his students at the University of California have found some, which they run down in this well-researched and non-rhetorical book, There is an ruling class which makes up about 2% of the nopulation, Its members mostly to the same exclusive prep schools and the same elite colleRe9, Their names are in the Social R e gister and they belong to the same clubs, of them a r e white, E n glish-descended, and male, They are almost all ve.ry wealcny, 0,2% of the U.S, population owns over 6 5 % of all publicly held stock, meanin g that they control t h e econom y , This same ruling class exerts extensive financial control both majo r parties. especially in nationa l elections, They control the imoortant o pinionmaking bodies like the Council on Foreig n Relations, the Committee on Economi c ::levelopment, and the Advertising Council, Besides the Presidency, which is controlled by the ruling class through the parties, the most important positions in government are the Departments of S t ate, Treasury, and Defense, These departments have been staffed at the highest levels by members of the rulinR class or the business elite, which is recruited and employe d by the ruli ng c : ass. Through their control of the federa l executive branch, the ruling class is able t o dominate the FBI, the CIA, and the Pentagon. don't the people do something about 1 t, we wonder. Su r p rise ! The ruling class controls the important news media, News coverage, even in smaller papers, magazines, a nd broadcast station$, is usually scattered and confusing. Liberals chatter about "reforms" and "public apathy" and "progress". There is no serious attempt to answer the questions raised at the beginning of this review. A I I paper or a TV station which truly served the people's n eed for information would get no advertising contracts. To the people, a paper must be supported by the p eople. The people must educate each other, and they must take control over their lives, together. The RIP Collective ,. i'.

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In Virginia, pigs ha ve one of t he f uzziest p roblem s in t he country. A couple reported that they were in their car when t hey were approached b y a 5 '8" bunny who told them that they 'Vtere trespauing and to split. Appar ently t he y veT.en•t splitting fast eno ugh for 11Bugsy11 because he amlo'lshed their window tnd split into the night. A few nights later a cop saw the bunny trashing a new housing project with an ax . 1 en the pig.confrontecl the rabb it, it told the pig tor ,:;lit or he'd chop his head off with the ax, and then th huge fuzzy thing hippity-hopped into the nearby we ds. The animals are reaching a high level of c:onsciou1 1ess ever since Smokey the Bear joined the Weatherman , ground, Ranger Rick