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People's News Service, January 25, 1971

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Title:
People's News Service, January 25, 1971
Series Title:
People's news service
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People's News Service
Place of Publication:
Denver, CO
Publisher:
People's News Service
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
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reft barri boycott....3
Safeway, boycott..»... S life culture..........6
free angela...........8
strawberry fields....lO
teli bell tel........1^
blcycles.............13
rip book review......16
calendar.............18
poem................. 30
I'm supposed to write a collective statementI i I. speaking for us all. But this time somethlng different. We're a collective; but we.don't all live together, except in our hopes and beliefs. We arefrom Capitol Bili. Our purpose is to serve and act in the interests of people who are trying to develop alternatives to the robotic, enslaving structores of this society. Tbis paper is a kind of mirror to our personalitles | we xsake these pages as truthful as posslble, we make them. as Creative as we ean within a limited framework of facilities. Now, a subtle pitcb for raoney. This newspaper is free. We dig donations.
donations, we doh't neeessarily mean money. If you don>tâ–  have any spare change we would enjoy your,contributing your talents - writing, artistry, photography, printing presses and a "nose for news". If you happen to have -twenty reams of paper sitting around I*m sure we can arrange, to pick them up.
We need your support. If you have any ideas sbeut, or want to help with distrlbution let us know. Wef ve kept ahead so far hut its getting tight. We thahk the people who have ealled | in over the past week with Information, assistance and to those who came and saw the filia "Salt of the Earth"| It sounds like the babies playing on the floor are gurgling right onl
Mass Marvel,
People'i Hews Service 333-7875
—a»


boycott red barn!
The harrassment of long-hairs has been going on for a long time. At the Red Barn the uniformed Denver pigs always have harrassed the freaks espeeially as its across the Street frc® Mammoth Gardens. Also the undereover Narks hung around there quite often. Now it seems that the managers are turning into pigs. If you buy a eoke or a cup of coffee and if you have long hair you have fi ve minutes to get out* Because of this there vas picketing and a boycott launehed against the place headed by St. Andrews. Now the picketing has stopped, but the boycott continues, and the struggle now xnust be taken up by the comsrunity. The refusa! to eat Red Barn manure vili be done by us.
This is a move against the repression that has been coming down on the long-hair community in Denver on East Colfax espeeially, and now the accelerated repression at Red Barn.
As Father John of St Andrews says, the Red Barn is right smek in the middle of the long-hair community. It is very mueh dependant on this community. The least they can do is treat us as people.' It Is time people started getttng their shit together against repression and become more like a community working together or eis e go under. Also, as most people know, there are hardly anv restaurante in this City that serve decent food. As an, example of vhat can be done ab out this situation, a group of people are setting up a cooperative natural foods restaurant at l8th and Clarkson. If anyone knows of a licensed electriolan (che&p or free) or of any kitehen equipment or furniture, let us know and we?ll get you in touch with the right people.


(Note: The following introduction is a quote taken from ,fEl Malcriado" by Sister Ursula, a social worker in Tulare County north of Delano.)
"Have you seen the places in which they live? There are county regulations against such housing, but the laws are not enforced. Nobody comes to see; nobody cares, The highways are beautified and the people live in roach-infested slums.
"Most of us are drowning in materialism, although we preach love, We close our doors and eyes to the poor.
"The poverty programs are little more than lip Service to their needs, so little real help filters down through the bureaucracy to them, EI Rancho, where I*ve worked, is like Biafra. You see children with tummies swolsn with hunger there. In the winter, it’s beans and tortillas, beans and tortillas* No meat* No milk,
"People just don*t care, though. They donft care."
For so many years the sufferings of migrant workers have been silenced by those who.feel that the workers can be couhted as less than human, Fallacies propagated by ignorance have helped to perpetuate the conditions of the workers; defined them as lazy, dirty, happy gypsies who cannot speak
a word of English. For many years none of the growers even
considered including the "braceros" in union contracts.
Now these workers are uniting in a non-violent struggle to represent themselves, protect their rights and dreams for brotherhood and dignity for ali Americans.
Right now they are striking against growers in Salinas and Santa Maria, California, attempting to gain recognition of the union which they have chosen to support them. The
growers have refused to sign contract with the United Farm
Workers Organizing Committee and got an injunetion from loca! courts to hold Cesar Chavez in jail until he called the boycott off.


Yet* the farm workers * power lies in consumer support of their union which means publicizing and sducating people to the facts; informing them about the various relationships hetween corporations, and what some of those affilliations mean in tevm of United Farm Workers* rights. A major issue affecting^he boycott right now centers around a major non~union grower, Bud Antle, Inc, Bud Antle is an affi liate of Dow Chemical which provides the pasiicides used in the Antle fields, the wrapping used on the Antle lettuce, and 17*000 acres of land used by the Antle Corporation, Since Bud Antle* Inc. is a very large grower, much of the boycott is concentrated there.
At this point, the Defense Department is trying to break the Bud Antle lettuce strike. Department of Defense direct lettuce purchases increased last quarter from under 10% to 30% of their total purchases and are stili increasing, In addition, the Defense Department is paying more for it,
Last month, other wrapped iceburg lettuce sold for 7.5c per pound while the govemment bought Antle lettuce for 16.06C per pound. Statements by government agencies using Antle lettuce say that they wish to remain neutral toward the dispute. Paying for non'-union lettuce at more than the prevailing market prices is not an expression of neutrality,
.The UFWOC contract is trying to be fair to workers.
It provides a salary of $2.10 an hour, grievance procedures, provisions for medical insurance, and pesticide control.
Migrant workers lead very hard lives - families must survive on around $2,340 per year. They are tr&ated as second class citizens or simpiy ignored by most of the American people.
They are struggling for their dignity, their health, in many sensas their lives, Bud Antle, Inc. is striving for greater profifc» The goverr,ne*x should not remain neutral., but support the workers in gaining the rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States against the monopoly of power which has been denying those rights for so long*
The Farm Worke s are in need of support right now# They are boycotting Safeway for carrying non-union lettuce and need people who are * j.lling to give time between 10 and 4 each day# The UFWOC would like some people living in the area of the Colfax and Pearl Safeway to take pve** the boycott so that they can move their people elsewhera. So much needs to be done and there are so few people to do it, that any help is welcoraed* For Information call 222-4371, Chester Ruiz*


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Our community is not an old community. It is not, .however, a new community, for its culture can be traced to the early beats in Greenwich Village, and its ideas can be found as far back as man felt th£ need to express' himself. Our culture, and our pecples* needs are not .separate, in fact they are so interwoven that neither ‘seem to get along without the other. Ours is a culture interwoven with the lives of its people, it is Life Culture.
It seems to me, from looking back, that the hip community has been established for definite reasons.
The first .reason, from my view point, is the breaking down, or overcoming of the barriers that stop a personTs self expression. These barriers are often enough found within us, and self realization has been a pursuit of almost ali, but it should be realized that man and woman are not separate from their environment, just as culture should not be separate from the people. We must remember that the search for finding oneself within, is also the search for onefs place with others. We are not alone in the problem and we cannot be alone in the solution.
Secondly, and because of the first, the people who have made the above realization and who then are part of the Life Culture, come in direct contrast with the Death Culture stili enslaving many. People who believe in self'determination, people who oppose the Death Culture, people who speak their heart, and people who dare hope of a new day, must stay together» must protect each other, and live together.
The third reason is in l.ne with the others and is the fruit of the Life Culture, it is the. love that has been nurtured in the warmth of Our awareness of each other. It is this love of brothars and sisters that will make our survival a reality* We shall struggle, fight, express, and live for love of our brothers and sisters.
I believe that it is good to struggle against an insane Death Culture, whose goal to not only shut the refreshing flow of thought, but also to shut off and destroy the root of life, the Earth* But I believe that it should not be the hate for this Death Culture that moves us\ but insteadN the love for our Culture of Life. •
Sammy Garcia


Angela Davis, young black woman, respected scholar, former UCLA professor of philosophy, a member of the Communist Party» fighter against the oppression of her people and ali people, today fights for her life from behind prison bars. At the time of her arrest, she was leading the effort to free the Soledad Brothers and other political prisoners; to eliminate the inhuman and degrading conditions existing in the prisons of California. Angela is a vietlm of a racist frame~up, instigated by highest authorities of State and Federal governraents. If allowed to succeed it will resuit not only .
In death for Angela Davis but in a most critical loss of
STATEMBNT MADE BY ANGELA DAVIS AT HER ARRAIGNMENT ON CHARGES OF HHRDER AND KIDNAPPING, MARIN COUNT*' COURTHOUSE . JAN. 5, 1971
As a preface to my brief remarks, I now declare publicly before the court, before the people of this country that I am innocent of all charges which have been leveled against me by the State of California. I ara innocent and thersfore maintain that my presence in this courtroom today is mirelated to any criminal act,


I stand before this court as a target of a political frameup which far from pointing to my culpabil-ity inplicates the State of California as an agent of political repression. Indeed, the state reveals its own role by introducing as evidence against me my participation in the struggles of my people, Black people» against the many injustices of this society - specifically my involvement with the Soledad Brothers Defense Committee. The American people have been led to believe that such involvement is constitutionally
In order to insure that these political questions are not obscured I feel compelled to play an active role in my own defense, as the Defendant, as a Black woman, and as a Coramunist. It is my duty to assist ali those diractly involved in the proceedings, as well as the people of this state and the American people in general, to thoroughly comprehend the substantive issues at stake in my case.
These have to do with my political b^liefs, affiliation, and my day to day efforts to fight all the conditions which . ^ have economically and politically paralyzed Black America.
No one can better represent my political beliefs and activities thatt I. A System of justice which virtually condemns to silence the one person who stands most to lose would seem to be self-defeating.
It is particularj.y> crucial to Black people to combat this contradictioninher^nt int the judicial system, for we have accumulated a wealth of historical experience which confirms our belief that the scales of American justice_are out of balance.
In order to enhance the possibility of being granted a fair trial, of which at present I am extremely doubtful, it is imperative that I be allowed to represent myself. I might add that my request is not without legal precedent.
If this court denies our motion to include me as co-counsel in this case it will .be aligning itself with the forces of racism and reaction which threaten to push this country into the throes of fascism, and the many people who have become. increasingly disillusioned with the court system in this country will have a further reason to solidify their contention that it is no longer possible to get a fair trial in America.
FREE ANGELA DAVIS AND ALL POLITICAL PRISONERS COMMITTEE meeting Tuesdays 8 pm East Side Aetion Center, 2300 Welton





I
Istartled and iss of cur jand inclinations. rhen we restrain [e judices and Ithey are quite kg ideas which iightful, jfeel differently Ihey should do, p should go tr feelings are ' ate to thero-arned also that, beople with re amenable to |ts of others pse rights.” trawberry Fields tatement
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On Tuesday I spent the morning at Strawberry Fields, a free school in Denver. Peoplers News Service has already run an article describing the school and its philosophy (12/12/70). This piece is written simply to teli you what I saw and thought while I was there.
Today the children are making a store and filling it with pictures of things they think should be in a store. Someone hands me a sheet of drawing paper. When I was in grade school there was a "right wayM to draw, and I couldnft manage it, so I never draw — it embarasses me. Today, on my sheet of paper, I make several orange circles with a crayon. The circles don’t look much like oranges, but nobody seems to mind here and I begin to relax.
After a few minutes of orange circles, a little girl comes over to me and asks me to help her with arithmetic. She telis me she is seven. Her name is Athana. "My names are all


Greek," she says. "My brother’s name is Constantine but he wants to be called Ray because he doesn*t like his Greek name.** Athena is very small, and she has pale freckles and her real teeth are just coming in, She smiles easily and she looks at me when she talks. There is no 'shyness and no cuteness about her» just honest. intelligence and enthusiasm. She telis me about her family, and about the public school she used to attend.
—* "it vas full of straight people." Athena may have to go back to public school unless she can learn some academic skills at Strawberry Fields, so we sit on the floor and do addition and subtraction. We do our work in the midst of about twenty other children, three or four parenfcs, and Donna» Strawberry Fields* only full-time teacher. Some of the children are drawing, some are wrestling, some are setting up a puppet theatre they have made from an old refrigerator crate,
Once Athena comments that the mathematics problems are boring, but she works without a break for over an hour, until I have to leave. As she figures, she rocks back and forth over her paper. Her hair is reddish-gold, thick and curly. I don*t know many children, and to me she is utterly beautiful.
Other children drift in and out of the arithmetic lesson. Greg is a tiny boy with long, floppy brown hair. He isn’t interested in arithmetic» but he sits on my knee and s-hows me how he can crack peanuts with his incredibly small hands. "I just squeeze them hard like this," he says» and is amazed to find three peanuts in one shell. Athenafs brother Ray comes over. He is ten, with long blond hair, and he makes a condescending remark about the simple problems his sister is struggling with. Ray does a few division problems which I give hira, and he starts to make a multiplicat ion table, but abandonS. it when two small boys appear with a set of walkie— talkies. They think they can hear polIce broadcasts.
A very small girl named Jennie sits down with us and begins to write her numbers, first-grade style, except that they ali face the wrong way, I teli that they1re backwards and she writes them agajn» stili backwards.
Finally I realize she!s putting me on. She laughs at me as she writes the number again — this time !,t.he right way,"


Meanwhile, Athena has worked about thir.ty problems which she says are harder that what she had in public school* She learns very quickly. She has learned to check subtraction by adding it up, and she has learned to ”carry the two*” Nineteen years later I can stili remember the fear and hurailiation I felt vhen my third grade teacher discovered that X couldn*t ”carry the two.” Here, among her friends, Athena learns it in five minutes*
”Know why I donft want to go back to public school?” Athena asks me as she eats her lunch. ”Because in public school everybody has to do the same thing and eat the <} * same thing. Everybody has to drink milk, even if they want tea instead. They’re almost ali straight there.
Sometimes X get frustrated and X have to say something like Toh shit' at public school they send you to Mr.
Rogers? room.” When I ask Athena the difference between hippies and straights, she explains ”Straights are striet but hippies are peaceful people and they don*t believe there are any bad words." Athena is going to take ger arithmetic papers home tonight to show her rnother what she has learned. Perhaps she will be able to stay at Strawberry Fields.
This little school is part of something blg. Here and there around the country people are breaklng out of the prison that is Old America. They are breaking the chains of racism and sexism and capitalism and had-wordism. They are raaking liberated areas — free spaces where nex*? people can breathe and learn and grow. The free spaces are in people’s heads, in their house, in storefronts and underground papers. Strawberry Fields is a free spaee for young children. There are more all the time, A new America is being born and nothing can. stop it,
&****&&&**&**&*
Straxtfberry Fields needs money and a house that will pass the building code, Xt needs people who are comfortable with children and who have special skills like Science, art, music, and arithmetic.


ITi THE NEXT BEST THING
TO BEING THERE!
Berkeley rumor mongers are spreading the word that the telephone monopoly has gone and changed the credit card system, makiiig it more oomplicated for would be thieves to gefc away with credit card frauds.
However, the word is that the se ininoral louts have found out the key to the new system. They say that the letter now comes at the end of the number instead of before it. In addition, there are nine different letters in use this year, keyed to the sixth number of the credit card. The key» reportedly stolen by these jackanapes» is this. If the sixth number in the card is one, the letter is nQ”. If it is two,
,,A” is the letter at the end. Three corresponds with
four is five is "J", six and nine are "N", seven is f,R",
eight is "U" and zero is "Z?t.
For example» if the card is 621~7328~158, the sixth number is two, and the letter at the end would be nAtf.
Gtherwise it is stili the same. The first seven numbers are the phone number of the card holder» the last three are keyed to the city* The key remains the same as last year,
San Francisco is 158, Boston is 001,NYC is 021, Minn* is 126, Pittsburg is 030, Philae is04l,Chicago is 09T, & D*C, is 032*
The dangerous criminals who use phoney cards are careful that the first three numbers of the prefix is a real prefix in ‘the area the card purports to be from, and the fourth number should never be fr9,f because that indicates a pay phone.
It is scandalous that if they sound sure of themselves over the phone, and xnake up a realistic number, they are never caught* Of f*ourse they are careful to not call in traceable patterns, talk for longer than fifteen minutes on the call, talk to anyone who would turn them in when the operator later calls and asks who just cal.led them, or use anyone*s full nairte in the conversation.
f
Water pollution killed an estimated 41 million fish in US waterways In 1969, nearly 3' times more than the year before the Environmental Pratection .Afeency reports, Happy fi§hing.


CGRRECTION; In the article last week about our brother Rick, who had bo leave town beeauae he got caught with a a?©aoh# we raentioned a pig narsad Ratasey, who testified against Mm. ^ell, it seems the dude's naase wasn*t Ramsey at ali, but Raadrez, (ap.?) so apologiea to any Ramsey's min&s we taay have U —v " v,v *** ** *“ *'*'**** *
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The Free. World Colos sus; A Critlque of American Forelgn Pollcy in the Cold War by Pavid Horowitz, $2*45 (RIP price $1*96)*
Most of us have Xived our whole lives in the Cold War*
Many Amaricans are dedicated antiaeomrfrixnx sts on the basis of cold war history as they have learned it* Re~examiniag this history is almost indispensible to understanding who we are and who we can becotne*
The Cold War began before World War II was over* and reached its full dimensions by 1950, On M&Xch 12, 1947,
Harry Truman defined the Cold War confrontation in a famous speechs
One way of life is based upon the will of the majority, and is distinguished by free institutions, representative government, free elections, guarantees of indlviduft.1 liberty3 freedom of speech, and religion and freedom from polftical repression*
The second way of life is based upon the will of a minority forcibly imposed upon the majority* It relies upon terror and oppression, a controlled press and radio, fixed electlons, and the suppressiori of personal freedoms***
Most of our elders have accepted Truman*s definitlon and they have lived their political lives according to it. Anti-communism, the American position in the Cold War, went Virtually unehallenged right up to the escalation of the Vietnam war in 1965, the year this bo*ok was pubXished, Then Vietnam forced the questions **Why are we doing this?” New we are working backwards taking the myth apart, The search takes us bask to Diem, to Guatemala, to Korea and China, to Berlin and Greece, to Potsdam and Y a11 a«


The first part of Free World Colossus covers the period of the Cold War frcm tha death of Roosevelt to 1948, when Stallnfs fears made the iron curtain a reality, For 20 years the American people have understood this period as a time of naked Soviet aggression* Horowitz makes it ciear that the Soviet rigidity was largely a defensive response to American fchreats and provocations• It isn’t really hard to understand defensiveness on the part of a country that has just lost 20 mi Ilion of its citizens and 40% of its industry at the hands of a western invader» Read this section of 75 pages — it will turn your head around*
The middle section of the book is a series of case studies of US activities as "Leader of the Free World: 1950-63.
Horowitz examines American interventions in Korea, Vietnam, Guatemala, Iran, Greece, Turkey, Lebanon and Cuba. His conclusion includes these comments on the Alliance for Progress: Only by seeing that the primary function of the Alliance was to defend private US vested interests in L-atin America a4. is it possible to understand the total failure of the United States to honor a Cardinal principis of the Alliance program; the commitment to political freedom* (p.233)
The fina! section surveys America1s nuclear diplomacy and the use of atomic biackmail* Horowitz analyzes the evolution of the American containment policy through the death of Stalin and the Hungarian rebellion up through the Cuban missile, crisis* After 1962, the American, cold warriors finally recognized the Soviet Union for its essential conservatism, and the anti~ communist spotlight was refocused on new demons* Russis, grown too fat to play the arch-villain, is retired to a supporti roie* The book ends as we are asked to fight the new, leaner communists of Indochina, for the same old reasons.
David Horowitz is an extremely valuable writer* Since Free World Colossus he has edited three fine collections of essays on communiam, capitalism and the Cold War* He has just published a new book, Empire and Revolutione A Radical Reinterpretation of Contemporary History. He is an editor of Ramparts* and his articles appear there regularly. His writing is generally ciear and precise* Read him1* he will arm you for your own revolution*


CALENDAE
t»«s.
8:00 pm
10:00 pm
JAM 26-31
Channel 6 "Science 1970", "The Not So Silent Minorities" - The new roles of women, ycuth, and radicals in the scientific worid.
Channel 6 "San Francisco Mix", "Traveling" unusual trips in 'Frisco.
w«d.
*h«rs.
7:00 pm - "Cat Ballou" Lee Marvin, Jane Fonda & 9:00 pm at DU Student Union, 75c 8:00 pm - Neil Young in concert, Maekey Audit.
CU, Boulder, ticket info not avail» 8:30 pm - Channel 6 "The Great American Dream Machine" far—out collage of america,
8:30 pm - "A Flea in Her Ear" classical French bedroom farce, DU campus theatre, reserve tickets by calling 753-2518.
8:30 pm - Channel 6 "NET Playhouse", Arthur Miller's "A Memory of Two Mondays" Estelle Parsons & Jack Warden in a portrayal of blue-collar life in the 1930's, Ist part of a 6 part series.
10:00 pm - Channel 6 "Soul!" singer-composer Leon Thoaas and Vivian Reed.
SPECIAL RMINDER

Let us know as soon as you hear ot anytbing going o|| Call 333-787$*
MI
Sflt.
Suti.
7:30 pm | Gay Liberation meeting, at Denver/lfree UniTersity; l8th and Sherman*
8:30 pm Jf "A Flea in Her Ear", see Thursday
8:30 pm - Channel 6 "The Toy that Orew Up" #25 "Judith jjf Bethelia" | "The Lonedale Operator" old, old movies.
9:30 pm - Channel 6 "^liek Out" films by Dick Bartlett, recommended for the acid-head with a color TV, ,
8:00 pm i Jan Mingus talk on "Eckonkar, the anclent Science of soul travel" total awareness, responsibility| and freedom, DFU 18th | Shsrman, 825-129?
8:00 pm - Gordon Lightfoot concert* Mackey
audit. CU, Boulder, ticket info not available.
8:30 pm - **A Flea in Her Ear", see Thursday
8:00 pm - Max Krimmel lecture on guitar making and concert, DFU, 18th & Sherman 50c donation asked, call 825-1297
8:00?pm - Issae Hayes concert, Fort Collins,
CSU, $4.50, $5.50, $6.00, May D&F downtown & the record store in the Dahlia Shopping C.enter.
10:00 pm - Channel 6 "Fanfare", "Orpheus: then and now" Claudio Monteverdi!s "Orfeo" dated 1607, and "Orpheus' in Hiroshima" 1970.


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. as revolutionaries we have worked for spring* this morning told me it’s coming we will win
Mass.Marvel


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I I ......... t.allle of contents red barn boycott •••••• 3 safeway boycott ••••••• 4 life culture • •••• , •••• 6 free strawberry fielo$ •••• 10 tell bell tel •••••••• 14 bicycles., •• rip book review •• , ••• 16 calendar •. (I •••• o. " ••• 18 poem •••••• I'm supposed to write a collective statement •••• speaking for us all. But this time something different. We1re a collective; but we don't all live together, except in our hopes and beliefs. We are frOll'J Capitol HUl. Our purpose is t.o serve and act in the interests of people >Tho are trying to develop alternatives to the robotic, enslaving structures of this society. This paper is a kind of mirror to our pers0nalities -we make these pages as truthful as possible, we make them as creative as we can within a limited framework of facilities. Now, a subtle pitch for This newspaper is free. We dig donations. B:r donations, we don.'t necessarily mean money. If you don't have any spare change we would enjoy your. contributing your talents w-riting, artistry, photography, printing presses and a "nose for news". If you happen to have twenty reams of paper sitting around I'm sure we to pick them up. We need your support. If you have any ideas abput, or want to help \-rith distribution let us know. We've kept ahead so far but Hs getting tight. We thank the people who have called in over the past week with information, assistance and. to those who came an.d saw the film "Salt of the F.arth" • It sounds like the babies playing on the floor are gurgling right on1 Mass Marvel, People's News Service 333-7875

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boycott red barnl The ha.rrassment of long-hairs has been going on for e. long time. A t the Red Ba.rn the uniformed D enver pigs always have harrassed the freaks especially as its across the street f.rOll.i Hauunoth Gardens. Also the undercover Narks hung around there quite often. Now it seems that the 1r..anagers are turning into pigs. If you buy a or a cup of coffee and if you have long .l:a.i r you have fi. .ve mJ.nutes to get out. Because o f this there v a s picketing a.nd. a boycott launched against the place headed by St. Andre ws. Now the picketing has stopped, but the boycott contl.nues, and the struggle now must be taken up by the community. The refusal to eat Red Barn manure will be done by v.s. This is a :move against the repression that has been coming down on the long-bair commun:!.ty in Denver on East Colfax especia1ly, a n d no w the accelerated repression at Red Barn. As l.s an. example of what can be done about this situation, a group of people are setting up a cooperative . natural foods restaurant at 18th and Clarkson. If anyone kn.ows of a lh:ensed electri.cla.n (cheap or free) or of any kitchen equlpment or furniture, let us know and. we'll get you :i.n touch with the :right r>eople. Steve 3

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. I ay. (Note: The following introduction is a quote taken from "El Halcriado" by Sister Ursula, a social worker in Tulare C ounty north of Delano.) "Have you seen the places in which they live? There are county regulations against such housing, but the laws are not enforced, Nobody comes to see; nobody cares. The hi.gbiay s are beautified and the people live in roach-infested stums. "Host of u s are drmming tn materialism, although we preach love, We close our doors and eyes to the poor. "The poverty programs are little more than l i p service to thei r needs, so little real help filters dmvn through the bureaucracy to them. El Rancho, 1-1here I've worked, is like Biafr a . You see children with tummies S \volen 1-1it h hunger there. In the it's beans and tortillas, beans and tortillas. No meat. No milk, "Peopl e just don't care, though. They don't care." For so many years the sufferings of migrant workers have been silenced by those who feel that the >vorko.rs can be counted as less than human. Fallacies propa g ated by ignoranc e have helped to perpetuate the conditions of the 1-:orkers; defined them as lazy, dirty, happy gypsies ''ho cannot speak a word of English. For many years none of the grm,;ers even considered including the "braceros" in union contracts. these workers are uniting in anon-violent struggle to represent themselves , protect their rights and dreams for brotherhood and dignity for a l l Americans. Right now they are striking against growers in Salinas and Santa Haria, California, attempting to gain recognition of the union which they have chosen to support them. The have refused to sign contract Hith thP. United "'arm Workers Organizing Committee and got an injunction from local courts to hold Ces.ar Chavez in jail until he called the boycott off.

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Yet, the farm vlol-k ers' power lies in consume r support of the i r union which means publicizing and el:lucating people to the facts; informing them about the various relationships bett;een corporations, and some of those affilliatl.ons mean in terms of United Farm Horkers' rights. A major issue affectin g-tne boycott right now centers around a major non-union Bud .<\ ... "ltle, Inc. Bud Antle is an affiliate of Chem-J.ca1 which provides the p2s:f:icides use d in the Antle fields, the \,>rapping used on the Antle lettuce, and 17,000 acres of lan d used by the Antle corpora tion. Since Bud Antle, Inc, is a very large grower, much of the boycott is concentrated there . At this point, the Defense Department is trying to break the Bud Antle lettuce strike, Department o f Defense direct lettuce purchases increased last quarter f rom under 10% t o 30% of their total purchases and are still increasing, In addition, the Defense Department is paying more for i.t. Last month, other wrapped i.ceburg lettuce sold for 7.5 per pound while the government bought Antle lettuce per pound. Statements by government agencies using Antle lettuce say that they w ish to remain neutral tm-Jard the dispute, Paying fer non-uni.on lettuce at more than the prevailing market prices is not an e xp ression of neutrality. The UF\.JOC contract i s t rying to b<:> fair t o workers. It provides a salary of $2.10 a n hour, grievance procedures , provisions for medical insurance, and pesticide control. Migrant workers lead very hard lives -families must survive on around $2,340 per year. T hey are treated as s0co n d class citizens or simply ignored b y mos t of thq American people. They a r e strugglin g for their dignity, tb-o.ir h ealth, in many senses their lives. B\.. d lmtle, Inc. is striving for grea ter profit. The goverr: . t should not remain neutral, but support the workers in gaining the rights guaranteed by the Constitution of the United States against the m onopoly o f power ioihlch has been denying those r ights for so l ong, The \\forke s are in need of support righ t now. They are boycotting Safev1ay for carrying non-union lettuce and need peopl e are ' ,_lling to give time be tween 10 and 4 each day. The UF'\WC >vou::./ like some people 1i ving in the area of the Colfax and Pearl Safeway to t<.' :e pver ':he boycott so that tr;ey can move their people So much needs to be done and there are so fe-r.v people to do :..t, that any help is For information call 222-4371, Ch ester. Ruiz,

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j , , ;,

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l t . ( Our community i s not a n old community. It i . s nnt, . ho1vever, a new corr.muni ty, for its culture can be traced to the early beats in Greemvich Village, a n d i t s ideas can b-e fou n d a s far back as man fel t the need to exprP.ss himself. Our culture, and our peoples, needs a r e not .separate, i n fact t hey are so interwoven that neither 'see m to get along without the other; Ours is a culture inten70ven with the lives of its people, it is Life Culture. It seems to me, f rom looki.ng back, that the hip communi t y has been established for definite reasons. The first .reason, from my vie"' poi.nt, is the breaking dovn, o r overc:oming of the barriers that stop a person' s self expression. These barriers are often enough found within us, and self realization has been a pursuit of almost all, but i t should be that man and woman are not separate from their environment, just as culture s hould not be separate from the people. l-ie must remember that the search for f inding oneself within, is also the search for one's place with others. We a r e not alone in the problem and 1-1e cannot be alone in the solution. Secondly , and because of the f irst, the Hho have made the above realization and who then are part o f the Life Culture, come in direct contrast w1th Deat h Culture still enslaving many. People ,,,ho believe in s elf. determination , people who oppose the Deat h Culture, peopl e tvho spe.ak their heart, and peep l e who dare hope of a ne;.1 day, must stay .!9.R.ether, must each other, a n d live together. The third reason is in L ne with the others and i.s the fruit o f the Life Culture, it i s th2.. love that has been nurtured in the warmth of our awareness o f each other. It is t h i s love of brothers and si.sters that 1o1ill ........ . make our survival a reality. We shall struggle, fight, express, a n d live for love .Qf our brothers _?nd sisters. I believe that it is good to struggle a galnst an insane . ... . Death Culture, lvhose go a l '-:: t o not only shut the . flow of thought, but also to shut o f f and destroy the root • of life, the Earth. But I believe tha t it should not be . the hate for this Death Culture that move 3 ui, but instead , the love for our Culture of Life. l Sammy \.arcia 7

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Angela Davis, young black \voman, respected scholar, former UCLA professor of philosophy, a member of the Communist Party, fi.ghter against t h e oppression of her people and all people, today fights for her life from behind prison bars. At the time of her arrest, she was leading the effort to free the Soledad Brothers and other political prisoners; to eliminate the inhuma n and degrading conditions existing in the prisons of California. Angela is a victim of a racist frame-up, instigated by highest authorities of State and Federal gove,rnments. If allowed to succeed it 'Hill result not only. •n death for Angela Davis but i n a most critical loss of f t eedom for us all Ireangela STATEMENT MADE BY DAVIS AT HER ARR.Ur.NNENT ON CHARGES OF MURDER AND KIDNAPPING' HARIN . COUNTY. COURYrlOUSE. JAN. 5, 19 71 As a preface to my brief remarks, l no declare pub1ic1y before the court, before the people of this country that I am j_nnocent of all charges 1ehich have been leveled against me by the State of California. I am innocent and therefore maintain that my presence in this courtroom today is unrelated to any c.ri.minal act,

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I stand before this court as a target of a political frameup which far from pointing to my inplicates the State of California as an agent of p61i tical repression. Indeed, the state reveals its own role by introducing as evidence against me my participation in the strut=J;gles of my people, Black people, against the many injustices of this society -specifically my involvement with the Soledad Brothers Defense Committee . The American people have been led to believe that such involvement is constitutionally In order to insure that these political questions are not obscured I feel compelled to play an active role in my O\v n defense, as the Defendant, as a Bla ck woman, and as a Communist. It is my duty to assist all those directly involved in the p roceedings, as well as the of this state a nd the American people in to thoroughly co m prehend the substa ntive i ssues at stake in my case. These have to do ,,,ith my political affiliation, and my da y to day efforts to fight all the conditions Hhich . hav e economically and politically paraly:zed Black America. No one can better repres ent my political beliefs and ac ti vi ties than I. A sys tern of justi ce whi c h virtually c o ndemn s to s ilence the one pers on who stands 111ost to lose would s eem to b e self-defeating. I t is particularJ-y ,crucial to Black people to combat this contrad.iction i nherent int the judicia l system, for '"e have accumulated a wealth of historical experience which confirms our belief that the s cales of American justicecare ou t of balan ce . In order to enhance the possibility of b eing a fair trial, of rtThich a t present I am extremely doubtful, it is i mperative that I be allowed to represent m yself. I miP,ht ad d t hat my req uest is not without legal precedent. If this court denies our motion to include me as cocounsel in this case it will aligning itself with the forces of racism and reaction which threaten to push this country into the throes of fascism, and the many people who have become. increasingly disillusioned with the court system in this country \vill have a further reason to solidify their contention th't it is no longer possible to get a fair trial in A.11erica. FREE ANGELA DAVIS AND ALL POLITICAL PRISONERS CO"':l-1ITTEE meeting Tuesdays 8 pro East Side Action Center, 2 30 0 Helton 9

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11\v,z hav" often please d by the:. app children's feelinp We from 1mpos1ng our jadgements on the. c ape.b l e of expres . are sensible and Although they o f t frorn us about ';,;rha J or how and Hhen t abou t doing it, t ! distinc tly appro' selves. He h ave f H hen recognize d rights, they are recognizing the and from Parents\ I . I 1

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1startled and j S S . o: : y nen we r estra1 n ejudi.ces a n d they
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tCJ Greek," she says. "My brother's name is Constantine but he wants to be called Ray because he doezn't like his Greek name." Athena is very small, and she has pale freckles and her real teeth are just coming i.n. She smiles easily and she looks at me when she talks. There is no shyness and no cuteness about her, just honest intelligence and enthusiasm. She tells me about her family, and about the public school she use d to attend. -"it "'as full of straight people." Athena may have to go back to public school unles s she can learn some academf.c skills at Strawberry Fields, so we sit on the floor and do addition and subtraction. We do our r.vork in the midst of about twenty other children, three or four p arents, and Donna, Strawberry Fields' only fulltime teacher. Some of the children are dra\ving, some are vnestling, some are setting up a puppe t theatr-e they have made from an old refrigerator crate. Once Athena comments that the mathematics are boring, but she '"orks Hi.thout a break for over an until I have to leave. As she figur9s, rocks back and forth over her paper. H e r hair is reddishgold, thic k and curly. I don't know many children, a n d t o me she is utterly beautiful. Other children drift i n and out of the arithmeti.c lesson. Greg is a tiny boy lvi th long, floppy brol\'11 hair. He isn't interested in arithmetic, but he sl.ts on my knee and sho\vS me how h e can crack p<>anuts • .vi th his incredibly small hands. "I just squ<>eze them hard Uke this," he says, and is amazed t o find peanuts i n one shell. Athena's brother Ray come s over. He is ten, with long blond hair, and he makes a condescending remark about the problems his sister is struggling with. Ray does a few division problems which I give him, and he starts to make a multiplication table, but abandonS it 't..;ohen t\vO small boys appear 1-.rith a set of talkies. They think they can hear police broadcasts, A very small girl named Jennie sits down with us and begins to write her m.11Tibers, first-grade style, except that they all face the wrong way. I tell that they're bach:rards and she writes them aga!n, still bachrards, Fl.nally I realize she's putting me on. She laughs at me as she writes the number again --:this time "the right \vay,"

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Meanwhile, Athena has worked about thirty problems 1vhich she says are harder that 1-1hat she had in public school. She learns very quickly. She has learned to chec k subt:::action by adding it up, and she has learned to "carry the t:'wo," Nineteen years later I can still remember the fear and humiliation I felt when my third grade teacher discovered that I couldn't "carry the tlvo , " Here, among her friends, Athena learns it in five minutes, "Know why l don't want to go back to public school?" Athena asks me as she eats he.r lunch. "Because in public school everybody has to do the same thing and eat the ' same thing. Everybody has to drink milk, even if they 1vant tea instead. They're almost all stralght there. Sometimes I get frustrated and I have to say something like 'oh shit' at public school they send you to Mr. Rogers' room." \Yhen I ask Athena the difference bet1veen hippies and straights, she explains "Straights are strict but hippies are peaceful people and they don' t believe there are any bad •,;ords." Athena is going to take ger arithmetic papers home tonight to show her mother she has le.arned. Perhaps she will be able to stay at Strawberry Fields. This little school i.s part of something big. Here and there around the country people are breaking out of the prison that is Old America. They are breaking the chains of racism and sexism and capitalism and hadv7Grdism. They are making li.berated areas -free spaces ne1 people can breathe and learn and grm". The free E'pa.ces are in people's heads, in their house, i.n stoxefronts and underground papers. Fields is a free space for young children. There are more all the ti•ne, A ne,.; America is being born a.nd nothi.ng can . stop it, ' . , Stra1-1berry 'Fields needs money and a house that will pass ' the building code. It needs people who are comfortable with children and l
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' ' THE NEXT BEST THING TO BEING THEREf Berkeley rumor mongers are spreading the 1o1ord that the telephone monopoly has gone and changed the credit system, making it more complicated for would be thieves to get away with credit card frauds. Ho1o1evo.r, the word is that these immoral louts have found out the key to the sys tern. They say that the letter now comes at the end o f the number ins t ead of before it. ln addition, there are nin e different letters in use this year, keyed to the sixth number of tae credit card. The key, reportedly stolen by these jackanapes, is this. If the sixth n umber in the card is one, the letter is "Q". If it is t\vO, aA11 is the letter at the Three cor!"'esponds \.,'ith nEn, four is "Hn, five is nJ11, six and nine are "N", seven is nR", e ight is "u" and zero is " Z". For example, if tl,e card is 621 -7328-15'3, th"> sixth nurrioer is tvo, a n d the letter at the end \vould be "A". it is still the 3ame, The first s<>ven numbers are the r;hone num b e r of the card holder, the last three are to the city. The key remains same as las t San Francisco is 158, Boston is 0 01,NYC is 021, Minn. 5.. s 126, Pittsburg i s 030, Pbila. isOi+l,Chicago is 097 , & D.C. is 032. The dangerous criminals vho use phoney cards are carefu l that the first three numbers of the prefix is a real prefix :Ln the area the card purports to be f r o m , and the fourth number s<.>ould never be "9" because that indicates a pay phone. It is scandalous that if they sound sure of themselves over the phone, and make up a realistic number, they are never caught. Of they are careful to not call in traceable patterns, talk for longer than fiftee n minutes on the call, talk to anyone '"ho would turn them in the operator later calls and asks who just called them, or use anyone's full '"lame in the conversation. Tml Water pollution killed an estimated 41 million fish in US '.vatenvays in 1969 , nearly 3' times more than the year before, the Environmental P rotection .Agenc.y reports. Happy fihing.

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COHRECTION; In 'the article last week about our brother Rick;_ who had to leave town because he got caught with a roach, we mentioned a pig na.rr.ed Ramsey, who testified a_gainst him. it seems the dude's name wasn't Ramsey at all, but Ham:i.rez, ( sp.?) so apologies to any Ramsey1 s minds we may have XX M )(*X l! It IE II X X lH-'.',!if ==--------

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radical infor alion oroiecl ook revie The Free Horld Colossus: A Critique of American Foreign Policy in .. the C.;:l(i Davi.d Horowitz, $2,45 (RIP ;rice $1.96). M"st of us have lived our whole lives in the Cold h'ar, l1any .tuneri.cans are dedicated anti-c ommunists on the basis of cold '"ar his tory as they have learned it. Re-examining thi. s history :i.s almost indispensi.bl e to understanding H e are and who we can become, The Cold War began before Har II ,,,as over, and reached its full dimension s by 1950. On l{;;,:rc:h 12, 1947, Harry Truman define d the Cold War c onfrontation in a famous speech: One 1•lay of life is based upon the will of the majority, and is distinguished by flee institutions , representative government, fre. e elections, guarantees of individu.<>.l freedom of speech, and religion and freedom from political repression. The second way of life is based upon the Hill of a minority forcibly imposed upon the majo:dty. It relies upon terror and oppression, a controlled press and radio, fixed elections, and the suppression of personal freedoms ... Host: of our elders have accepted Truman's definition and they have lived their political lives according to it, Anti cormnunism, the American posi t icm in the Cold Har, >vent virtually unchallenged right up to the escalation of the Vietnam \var in 1965, the year this bo'ok \vas published. Then Vietnam forced the question: Hlilhy are '\Ve doing this? n Now vJe are working backvlards,. taking the myth apart, The search takes us baek to Diem, to Guatemala, to Korea and China, to Berlin and Greece, t o Potsdam and

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111e first pa1:t of Free \1orld Colossus covers the period of the Cold \Jar from ot' to 1948, lvhen Stalin's fears made the iron curtain a reality. Fo . r 20 years the PJ:nerL :an people have understood this as a of na.ked Soviet aggression., Horowitz makes it clear that the t ;,:igidi ty largely a defensive. response to American threats and provocations. It isn 1 t really hard to understand defer.s'i.veness on the part of a country that has just lost 20 million of its citizen s and 40% of its industry at the hands of a western invader. Read this section of 75 pages --it will turn y ou r The middl e section of the book is a series of case studies of US 2 .ctivi ties as "Leade;: of the Free \>Todd: 1950-63." Horo\•litz examines American interventions i:1 Korea, Vietnamf Guatemal.E L , Greece:$ Turk ey, Lebanon and His includes thes e comments on the Alliance for ProgrE!SS: Only by aeeing that the ptimary function of the Allianc e was to defend p rivate US vested interest s i.n Latin An.:eric a :) t is i.t possible to understand the total failure of the S tates t o honor a cardinal principle of the Alliance program; the conun:L tme n t to political freedom . (p.233 ) Th e final section surveys America's nuclear diplomac y and the use of ato::d c blackmaiL HoroHitz analyzes the evolution of the American containmen t p,.,li..c.y through the death of Stalin and the Hun garian x:ebellion up through the Cuban missile cris j.s. After 1.962, the American cold \varriors finally recognize d the Soviet U nion fer its essential conservatism, and t h e ... commun ist spotlight was refocused on new demons. Russia, grown too fat to play the archvillain, is ret:!.red to a support:tng role, The book ends as we. are asked to fight the net-t, leane:t: conunists of Indochina, for the same old reasons. David Hormd.tz is an extremely valuable Hriter, Since Free Horld Colossus he has edited three fine collections of capitalism and the Cold \Var. He has just pubJ.ished a new book, .Jllf!J-.re .;_nd A Radical Reinterpretation of Contemporary History.. He is an editor of and his articles appear there regularly, His writing is generally clear and precise, Read him': he will arm you for your 0\>111 revolut:l.on,

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LENDAB 8:00 prn -Channel 6 "Science 1970", "The Not So Silent Minorities " The new roles of Homen, youth, and radicals in the scientific wocld. 10:00 pm-Channel 6 "San Francisco Hix", "Traveling" unusual trips in 'Frisco. 7 :00 pm &9:00pm 8:00 prn 8:30 pm-8:30 pm "Cat Ballou" Lee Harvin, ronda at DU Student Union, 75 Neil Young i n concert, Haekey Audit. CU, Boulder, ticket info not avail. Channel 6 "The Grea t American Dream Hac hine " far-out collage of america. " A Flea in Her Ear" classical French bedroom farce, DU campus theatre, reser ve tickets by calling 753-251 8 . 8:30pm-Channel 6 "NET Playhouse", Arthur Miller' s "A Memor y of Two Hondays" Estelle Parsons & Jack Warden in a 10 :00 pm -portrayal of blue-collar life in the 1930's, 1st part of a 6 part series. Channel 6 "Soul!" singer-composer Leon Thomas and Vivian Reed .

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Let us know as soon as you hear o:f anything going on. Call 333-7875• sat. Sgft. 7:30 pro -8:30 pm 8:30 pm 9:30 pm-8:00 pm -8:00 pm 8:30 pm8:00 pm 8:00?prn -Gay Liberation meeting, at Denver1Free University, 18th and "A Flea in Her Ear", see Thursday Channel 6 "The Toy that r.rew Up" /125 "Judith of Betheli.a" & "The Lonedale Operator" old, old movies. Channel 6 "Flick Out" films by Di. ck Bartlett, recommended for the acidhead with a color TV. Jan Mingus talk on "Eckonkar, the ancient science of soul travel" total awareness, responsibility, and freedom, DFU 18th & Sherman, 825-1297 Gordon Lightfoot concert, Mackey audit. CU, Boulder, ticket info not available. ''A Flea in Her Ear", see Thursday Max lecture on guitar making and DFU, 18th & Sherman 50 donation asked, call 825-1297 Issac Hayes conceit, Fort Collins, CSU, $4.50, $5.50, $6.00, May D&F downtown & the record store in the Dahlia Shopping C.enter. 10:00 pm-Channel 6 "Fanfare", "Orpheus: then and now" Claudio Monteverdi's "Orfeo" dated 1607, and "Orpheus in Hiroshima" 1970.

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Chicago Eight Happy Fast Died . Among . • . -:. • the carburetors' and gin mills of amerika, says we 80t to keep a mel!IOry running. julius died among the instigators and toke shops of Arnerica as revolutionaries lve have ;.;orked for spring. this morning told me it 1 s comlng we will win Mass.Macvel