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People's News Service, February 6, 1971

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Title:
People's News Service, February 6, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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sud now Laos«*««•«*••••***•••••»•*•* 3
•»«••»•••«•*••»•**•••••••••• 4-6
Travels with Charlie.o*.••*..*•••••• 6-7
Foem^o.............. 8
Under My Thutdb • «••••••a...»a*.<»e«,. 9
PHG 8-Point Peace Plan •*••»••,««.•• 10-11 How to Bite when the
Landlord Barks , • • •..••••••••«i 14
EIP Book Heview
«Prison Letters of George Jackson.. 15-17
Calendar ..................18-19
Pat FreddjMs Cat*#••••••••••••••••••"20
Many of us are different in what we want to do for our happiness, but none of us differ in wanting to do what’8 relevant and meaningful to us. This is where we meet, this is where ve become a community, and this is why individuality does not mean to be alone.
Prom my participat ion in PNS, I have understood its goal to be one of supporting our similarities, and overcoming our fearsj and struggling for the liberation of ali, together. And we are sure there are other families and groups that have things they too want to work on, this is what we want to learn, this is us together,
The people now working with PNS have things we want to do, things we want to say, and things we want to perpetuate* Ali of our hopes lie with the community, cause we need you to survive, We want new people to work with us and we are continually searching. Sammy
PNS 333-7875
(our phone works again)


In aceordanee with Hixon’3 continuing poliey of de-escalation and wlthdraval, it appears that another 3.E Asian eountry is about to be openly invaded. In f&ct, aecordlng to Sovielj Japaneae and confirmed by some T)»S. sources (before the blackout on news frota S.E« Asia) a force of 20,000 had already crossed into Laos. The U.S. insists that the $,000 Amaricans involved will not eross the border, but act only in a supporting role (to ciear the way for Vietnamese puppet troops). There are many reas esos to doubt the truthfullnes s of that statement. U.S. troops are massed along the border and the adjacent area in Laos has been heavily bornbed. Laird has said repeatedly that there is no limit to use of American air power in S.E. Asia. He vas also painfully evasive when questioned by the press. The White Hcruse even refused to take a auestion on the subjeet. The Soviet nevspaper Izvestia claima the puppet troops are officered by Americans.
It is obvious that the military would seek to deny or "nide such action as the Congress has forbidden the use of American ground troops in Laos or Cambodia. Witness last weeks sending of GI's in civilian clcthes into Cambodla to recover damaged helicopters.
American involvement in Laos has been a fact for the last' 12 years. CIA arranged coups, subverslon of neutral governments and mdssive boabings (reducing the population in Liberat e d Zones to living in caves) are not enough it
Its hard to see what purpose this concentra-tion of’ troops would serve wlthout an lnvasion. Perhaps the outrage already generated around the world vili force this admenture to be aborted. Congress is. as aaich in the dark as we are and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee has called for hearlngs. .®ie Senate is also discussing the possibility of sending their own investigators to find out what really is happening because the administration and the military are releasing little news and even less truth about their actions. It remains to be seen if a real attenspt will be made to curb the military. If not, we ean only hope the American public will respond as they did last spring over Cambodia.
Jim D
3


A 'benefit eoncert will be given on February 5th and 6th at the INDIAN COALITION BTJILDIWG, lHh and Gaylord in Denver at J:30 p.m. There vili be a Theatro Group from Center performing, a Mariachi Band, Yvonne Sanchez, a Spaaish dancer, and varicus folk greups.
Center, Colorado. It is very important, that; many people snpport the ooncert as the union is having a very difficult time now, during the winter. Work has come to a standsbill at the union office in Center because of the extreme temperatures that dropped as far as 1+0 degrees below zero last month. Water pipes throughout the community vere bursting a fev weeks ago due to the cold. Ali help is greatly needed, especially your support of the concert.
HUELGA 1971 - THE LETTUCE BOYCCCT CONTINUES
This past Saturday and Sun&ay outside the Safeway Store on East Ornati and Mesa Avenues in Pueblo, assembled a strong, spirited picket line of about 60 people in pro-test of Safeway's purChase of Bud Antle teamster lettuce.
The picket formed a strong Chain of both young and old people from La Raza. The people, mostly residents of Pueblo and a group that came up from the San Luis Valley, proudly waved their bright red flags of the huelga and shouted loudly, "Viva La Huelga, Viva La Raza, Viva La Revolucion." The spirit was great and many Safeway shoppers could not neglect their presence.
Safeway has failed to recognize the United Farmworkers Qrganizing Committ.ee Union and will not buy the lettuce picked by the farmworkei’s that receive the benefits under this union.
Bud Antle, Inc. owns 1+3*000 acres of agricultural land in California and Arizona and is partners with Dow Chemical Company in a styrofoam Container company. Antle ships 11,000 carlots of lettuce per year (he ships 3^5 days out of the yeari) Antle recently bought a banana plan-tation in the Dominican Republic and expects to have 10$ of the U.S. banana market in the near fature. Antei's produce includes: lettuce, celery, broccoli, artichokes, carrots, and cabbage. Ante's lable are: "Bud", "Rick", "Anco", and "Jade".


In 1968f Dow was the only outside stockholdei; in the Antle Gonrpany. We are all fairly familiar with Dow, being one of the largest U.8. corporatione and a major manufacturer not only of napalm, but also of pesti» eides, herbicides, and fumi-gants. One of the five direetors on Antle' s boar&;,
Dow is represented by C.F. Weaver, president of the Dow Chemical Financial Corporation (an inveetment arm of Dow).
As one ean easily see,
Dow and Antle are closely allied. The Dow-Antle "love affair" all began in 1961 when Dow began making Antle's lettuce wrappers.
It is very important to recognize the connection between the two coaroanies and take this under eonsideration before stepping into the closest, Safeway to purchase food.
During the last few months, Interharvest and Fresh Piet, the two largest lettuce companies in the U.S. have signet, contracta with U.F.W.O.C. Ihey acc-ount for 17$ of the natioo» s lettuce. During the winter months 99$ of Denver' s lettuce comes frons California and Ari zona. Inter-harvest ships under the following labeis: Unwrapped lettuce: Blue Chip, Pasco, Volume, Eagle Eye, King Pin,
Nunea Brothers, King City, Eagle, Ajnigo, Quality Pak, '
Queens T, Favor, GoJ.d Star, Second Lable, and Hawk Fyej wrapped lettuce: Chiquita. Fresh Fiet ships under the following labeis; all unwrapped#* Eam, Sun BXush, Prime, ani 'Siree Crown.


•\fa"
33ie only lafcel aceepted by the AFL-C1Q as representing farm vorkers is the United fara-Workers Grganizing Conanittee Union Label. whlch is charaeterized by the Black Eagle.
Doa' t be fcolei by unitati labeis which do not represent farm workers harvested lettuce. Ab of November llth,
Klag Soopera is the only chain that has thus far agreed to sell only U.F.W.O.C. lettuce.
In the nexfc few weeks, pickets will continue to for® otiiside the Safeway stores in Pueblo, as veli as Colbrado Sprlngs and Denver, If you would be interested in supportiig the picket lines against Safeway, call:
Denver - ^33-^306
Boulder - kk9-8l2B or leave message at Daily office in IMC.
&
"Charlie Manson, hippie-eult leader" says the media daily. Hcw many other "hippiea" have been in jail for months and kept their long hair and beard? President Nixon announces puhlicly during the trial that he's guilty and fefuses to retract. Two novies are being made. Middle-american housevives tremble at the sight of longhairs and their husbands arm theaselves. Charlie couldn't "defend” himself on their tersea, even if he w&nted to. The guilty verdict came dovn a year ago.
Charlie Manson, the person, spent more than 30 years of his life in Jaerica's institutionej hate-filled broken fsmily, public schools, Sunday school, juvenile hall, retorte school, foster family, jail» Over 30 years of nightmare, perversion, death.
I only spent atoout IT years being frustrated in an unbroken faaily, public school and a iiheral Sunday school. And yet vhen the time came to fuck all I could do vas


~ 7-
masturbate to a Playboy foldout. And fantasizej strlp every female you kaow, fuck (rape), titty, pussy, aveat, groan, fuck, gang-bang, animal, titty, pussy, eat it,beat it, blood, • . aha on and on and . . come» Perversion. Absolute. And this is wbere The Crime came frcm. And tkis is where the attraction to accounts of the crime come from. This is vbere Nixon, the KKK and Amerika all come from. Perverted, institutionalized masturbation fantasy.
That is Amerikan culture. That is why fuck is rape. What woman vould vant to be part of that fantasy. Anyto ow, enough to say that you, me, Charlie and The Crime are products of the soclal enviroament. And aov the mother vould devour the child.
Charlie grew his hair long, hitchiked around the country, dropped out, tuned in and turned on» Ee claii» to be a Citizen of Woodstock Hation. long hair, dope and Identification wlth Woodstock Nation does not cure Charlie or me or anyone. I am not responsible for Charlie, The Crime, or my ovn lingering rot, but 1 must take responsibility, I will take responsibility, because no one eise will. Amerika, either by reaction or iarpotence, disclaiass re spons ib ility for us, so why did they judge and condemn Charlie? I must deal vith the remnants of death-perversion in myself, ve must deal vith the remnanta of death-perversion in us, until The Crime is purged from the planet.



You doaft have to know someone to love them.,, but you have to love them to know
the point? Sir if you don' t aaind Charlie Manson shouid not bura (as he will)/ be behind bars or anything eise that the will/hate of America
*i«Tv. i V
.. v H ]
i .
st
O
a
Are you saying to me my goodaan (aithough maybe unaware) that evea though
1» Nixon said he's guilty at 5 on T»V.
2» He has long hair, 'wears beads and probably smelis bad
3* Talks wierd and thinks stranger’ they should let this twisted monster go? they they they
they have no more right to try Charlie
(and thus aLT. of us)
tban to try
Tasmanians, Hobbits
Prench, Martian, Blaeks
Brown or Venutians
Charlie is a eitizen of Woodstock
A veteran of the Street,
And he!11 get no fair trial from the Amerikreepies whether he dia it or not.
And that means no fair trials for any son or any daughter of any father vho went crazy at the sight of a daisy and shot to kill.
They ain’t shit and never could see Charlie and us will be free.

The Pied Piper
*»•


UNDER HyTHUMB
For many of our brothers and sisters, their thumbs are their transportation. Because of laek of good mass transit and because it is merely a good means of easy mobility through the City, thumbing has beeome a part of our daily lives. If you happen to ova a car, you might notice that almost ali hitchikers are long-hair youth, and it may be noticed from the other end that most of those those to stop are the same people. Hitchiking is nov so characteristic of our culture that looking at it ffom a third point of view, ve see that most of those prose-cuted for this "crime" are again the same people.
Hitcbiklng and the interaction of community people It involves is unique in bringing about an awareness of each other and unique in ita ahility to give us a chanae to continually respond to each other's needs. Every time we vateh ruahed, unresponding hordes pass our out-stretcUed thumb, we begin to periodically define who our family really is.
The prosecution of our people, for asking our brothers and sisters for a ride has developed into another method te harrass our community.' It is no longer legal to even help each other out. Many of us really need the fines ve have to pay, to bujr groceries, shelter, weed, or other things we need and want. We are definitely not going to stop thumbin and definite action to fight this infringement of our right «Viali take place, as in the following aimouncement. Further things can happen such as an unsuspected gathering of brothers and sisters excercisihg their rights» If such action interests you contact PNS, 333-7875, or specifically
® OQ


1. The U» S • Government must totally withdraw oli its troops, xnilitary personnel, war mater-ials and weapons, and dismantle all U*S. mili-tary bases in Souty Vietnam; without. posing any conditions whatsoever* If the U*S* Govern ment declares it will withdraw from South Viet nani by June 30, 197d* the People* s Liberation Armed Forces will refrain from attacfcing the vithdrawing troops; and the parties will begin negotiations at once on the question of the safety of withdrawing soldi er s and of releasing eaptured military xnen.
IN 2. The question of Vietnamese armea forces in South Vietnam shall be resolved by the Vietnamese parties among themselves*
3* The administration of Thieu,.
Ky and KMem carri es out ferocious repression. against those who st and for peace, independence, neutrality and democracy* The r est orati on of genuine peace in .South Vietnam necessitates the formation in Saigon of an administration without Thieu,
Ky and Khiem* The ProvisionaX Revoluti onary Government of South Vietnam


settlement of the South Vletnam prob-lem.
h-. The South Viet Nam people will decide themselves upon the politica! regiae of South Viet Nam through res-lly free and deiaocratic general electiona. They will set up a gevernment refleeting the entire people’s aspirations for peace, independence, neutrality, democracy and national concord.
General elections organized hy the U.S. puppet administration In Salgon at the bayonets of the U.S. occupying troops cannot he free and democratic.
5« A pravistonal eoalition government is indispensIble for the organi-zation of free and democratic electiona, and to ensure the right to self-determination of the South Viet Nam people during the period hetveen the restoration of peace and the holding of general electiona.
The provisional eoalition government will include three componente; Persone of the PRG; persone of the Salgon administration wbo really stand for peace, independence, neutrality and democracy; and peraons of various political and rellgious forces and tendencies standing for peace, independence, neutrality and democracy, includlng those who, for political reasons, have to live ahroad.
6. Viet Nam is one, the Vietnamese people are one. The reunification of Viet Nam will he achieved step hy step hy peaceful means, on the basis of dlscussions and agreements hetween the two zones, without foreign interference.
T» The parties will decide together measures aimed at ensurlng the respect and correct inplementation of the measures agreed upon.
8. A ceasefire will he inrplemented after the agreement and on signing of accords aimed at putting an end to war and restoring peace.
%1toCU)TidN N*.y
OF YtfrmXfA-


In talking aboufc radical change'we must realize that a simple change of political-economic form is not in itself going to insure a successful new order* I believe coxnmon ownership of land, resources and the means of productiori are basic for liberation of mankind, but revolutions are made by people who are subject to human failings* Bureaucracy, ego tripping (already a danger here), pressure frora opposition, etc, oftexi cause the creation of a new ruling class* Example, the Soviet Union* Kany socialist countries are fighting this trend as in the cultural revolution in China* Mao said politics and culture are inseperable* The need then is for a struggle that will involve & cultural change, but what does this consist of?
We speak of our counter-cuiture* This includes, to the alienated youth* a wfaola aasar sot of t*aluss, lirestyle differances ia dress and nusic, use of drugs, hairlength, etc. The question is what elemants of the counter-culture are essential to achieving and maintaining a new world order* Consider that such a new society will consist of ali age groups with many raeial and social differenc.es*
We cannct demand conformity to ali aspects of our beliefs* In fact, this very refusal to conform to old establishcd patterns, the willingness to afccept new ideas is one of our greatesc strengths. We are opposing the inechaaization and programming of mankind into ariy one mold* We are tuming for inspiration to many other cultural pattems. Primitive people, we realize, often had mueh that has been losfc to civilized man. Consider that the Indian, for instance, iived in haraony with nature rather than attempting to conquer it* One answer to our question then, is tc take the best frora ali varieties of human experience and apply it to present society* This explains the value then, of long hair and the hip style of dress, whieh is, in demenstrating and encouraging the right to individual diversity of appearance. I iike to see people looking ju9t: as freaky as ccnceivable, tum the whole world into a circus if pcssible.


One important. deve Ippment also is the.new ways people are finding e-f relating to each other» We are breaking out of olds s tale pat teras. such as the rigxd nuclear family* Coaanunsl liviag* IdeaXly, can end xsolation, extsnd personal contac-t and understandirig while eonserving material goods (appliancest ears* etc,) by sharing use and maintenance; (In nitty~gritty that means that its cb.eaper), 'Ibis doesn*t desttoy personal priyacy if desired*
We are becoming more tolerant of difference in sexual. behavior (if it feels good9 do itS as iong as no cne is hsrmed or imposed on)« We are no longer ashamed of cur omi bodias or of common language of description (you know* ’‘fuck” and ali that stuff)* We are laarning that happlness does not come from amassing material wealth but f rom personal fui£iliment* fuck madispn avenue, the latost stock market quotations and a mortgaged house in suburbia!
The proper use of psyckedelic drugs (literally mind . expanding) can bring whole new leve Is of awarenesa-* They can help us to cut through the lies and bullshit with which we have been programmed. The Indi an s used tbeia fer rellgious purposes, probably the best approach for real insxght,
The final elemant I?11 consider is our music® The best of which dea Is with i.s sues and aspirations put into original dynami c musical forrn* A union of politics and art which reaehes the youth as no other form o£ expressiori can®
So if politica! victory seems remote need not be disheartened.» for we are ti
future! Let the young
in age and in spirlt continue to build the counter-institutions and sccial conseiousness that will make


e Bkws
If you get hassled by your house and/or the peram who owns it, the place to go is the folk at the Capltol Hili Tenants Union. Their office is lh60 Pennsylvania Street, Room i. Phone is 825-2329» Best time to see the® is between six and ten any weekday evening»
The Capltol Hili Tenants Union can help if you get any of the following laid on you: Illegal evictions (several klnds),. Lahdlord' 3 Lien (usually used illegally by landlords), any kind of discrimination in renting an apartment or being tossed out of one (red, black, brown, single votaen, hippie, etc.) any kind of harr as sinent vhile you*re stili living at one place, violatione of the housing code (you can force your landlord to fix the place up and nat be subject to any kind of retaliation), Bid your landlord become a greedy guy when you aoved out by refusing to return your damsge deposit? You don't need a lavyer to take him to court over it. Give us a call, we'11 show you how.
Capltol Hili Tenants Union can provide PBEE LEGAL help in any or ali of these areas. Call us.
The Capitol Hili Tenants Union haadbook on tenant's rights is av&ilable at HIP, Together Books, and Jerry* s Newastand. It covers ali types of housing prdbleas and how to solve thea. Copies are also available at the office.
Capitol Hili Tenants Union is a collective, btrt they have an open meetlng every Wednesday night: at at their office. Ali veleooie.
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i
Soledad Brothers The Prison Letters ot George Jackaon. $1.50 (RIP priee $1.20).
On January 13, 1970, at Callfornia?s Soledad Prison, a fight broke out between black and white izm&tes is an exercise yard. A guard staa&ing os a wall, completely out of daager, killed three ot the blasks vith a high-povered rifle. He vas exonerated tvo days later. The folloving day s white guard was tbrown over a third-story railing to his death. Three black coavicts vere indieted for the murder of the guard. The three are knovn to the prison authorities as "militante and troublemakers." To their supporters in the movement they are the Soledad Brothers. Their nazaes are John Clucbette, Fleeta Drungo, and George Jackson.
On August 7, 1970, the newapapers carried the sensa* tional story of a "abootout" hetween black pris oners and pelice, in vhich tvo of the prisoners, a Marin County judge. and a 17-year-old black ssaa vere killed. Biis episode began when the young man stood up ia the court-room and announced, "ALI right, gentlemen, Ifa taking over ncv," as he passed out guns to three prisoners. The State of Callfornia charges that those guns vere bought by Angele Davis, and she has been imprisoned and charged vith surder on the basis of that allegation.


As the groiip of blacks and ifaeir hostages left the room, the young man shouted to the spectators, "Free the Soledad Brothers .by 12:301" Half an hour later he vas dead. He was George Jackson's younger hrother, Jonathan.
Soledad Brother is a collection of letters written George Jackson hetween l$6k and 1970. The last letter is dated Angust, 9, 1970, two days after his brother’s death» The letters are addressed to his parents, to his sisters and his brother, to F&y Stender his lawyer, to friends, and, in the last few months, to Angela Davis.
The collection begins with an introdnction by Jean Genet, and an autobiographical sketch written especially for this booko Many of the details of George's youth will sound f assiliar to a person who has read The Antobiography of Malcolm X or Claude Brown * s MancMld in the Fromised. Land. They describe a guerilla resistaace in the streets and the schools against the poverty and racism which are the birthright of blaek Americans«
In 1957, at the age of 15, George Jackson spent his first 7 saonths in prison. After another short streteh, he was arrested and persuaded to plead guilty to robbing a filling station of $70.00,
That was in I96O. I was eighteen years old, I've been here ever since. I met Marx, Lenia, Trctsky, Engels, and Mao when I entered prison and they redeemed me. For the first four years I studied nothing but economics and military ideas. I met blaek guerilias, George "Big Jake" Lewis, and James Carr, W.L. Nolen, Bili Christmas, Torry Gibson, and many, aany others < We attempted to transforas the blaek crfminal mentality into a blaek revolutionary mentality. As a resuit, each of us has been sub ject-ed to years of the most vicious reactionary violence by the state. (Note: Nolen was killed by the sharpshooter at Soledad, Christmas died. beside Jonathan Jackson in Marin County.}


Meeting George Jackson In these letters If a fantastic experience. Hia letters to his f&ther are a running debate, sometimes loving and sometimes bitter, between two generatione of blaok tnen. There are tender love ltters addressed to a woman known oniy as "E". There are letters to Ms mother, pleading with her and praising her, asking for a portable typewriter, diseussing nutritie® and ecdnomics. To his brother he write encouragement and guidance. In a letter to Angela he writesi
I want you to believe in me. I love you like a man, like a brother, and like a father. Every time I've opened my mouth, assumed my battle stance, I was trying in effect to say I love you, African—
African woman. My protest has been a small one, something much more effective is hidden in my mind — believe in me, Angela.
Anyone who has ever spent a day or more in jsdLl kaows the fear and the hopelessnes3 of it. The prison Controls the prisoner - it can beat him, humiliate him, reward him or ignore him. At the outset, the prison takes his hody and begins the struggle for his mind.
Through what must be a constant battle, George Jackson keeps hfe mind free. In his letters we see him grov from the cold bitterness of 196^ through thought and reading and struggle. The later letters are informed, thoughtful, and often brilllant. His example should instruet us ali.
George Jackson is winning the battle for his spirit. When the people control the prisons, they vd.ll set his body free.


Sun»
Feb.7
Mon.
Feb.8
Tues.
Feb.o
Wed.
Feb.10

r- *-/â– >" "â– / n
8:00 pm - Jan & Johanna singing folk at DFJ 50^ 8:00 pm •• Zephyr Concert
6:00 pm
9:00 pm
Channel 6, "Whafs New" "Stand Up for Counting" Three-part drama dealirtg with the pre,judices encountered by a young black boy»
Channel 6, "Prison" Thia docuaentary takes an unflinching look at our penal system, its effecta on the inmat.es. and its reflections of a total society»
6:00 pm - Channel 6, "Whafs New" "Stand Up
for Counting”, p&rt 2. See Mon. 6:00 pm» 10:00 pm » Channel 6, "Saa Prancisco Mlx”,
"Fighting" - films of fcarate, RQTC training and Chicanos and .American Indlans fighting for their rights.
6:00 pm - Channel 6,"Whafs New” "Stand Up fei' i .;t>, part 3* See Mon»
8:30 pm - Cie .. t , "The Great American Dream Msd.... Far out collage of America»


Thurs. Feto. 11
Fri. Feto.12
8:00 pm - Ctoaniber Music Concert, general clasa-room toullding, 20l0 3. Race St. Open to putollc - free.
8:30 pm - "The Lost Sweet Days of Isaac". First
presentation of experimental program in theater-DU Theater Annex #2 adjacent to the little theater at E. Evans and 3. University. Tickets $1.25»
10:00 pm - Channel 6, "Soul" Jazz musician Jimmy Owens and gospel singer Eather Williams.
9:30 pm - Channel 6, "Flick Out» "Time Is". This playful film depicts the fantasy and reality of that inexplicatole force that governs everything 1 time.
Sat.
Feto.l'
8:30 pm
9:00 to 1:00 am
Doug McKee in concert, folk in a country-influenced style and some toluegrass. Denver Folklore Center Concert Hali.$1.50. Benefit dance for iatin American Develop-ment Society of Canon City Prison. Annunciation Church, 35th & Lafayette, sponsored by West Side Aetion Center. Tickets $5*00 per couple.
Sun. Feto.11
8:00 pm - Bili Rose Makesa jug toand and singing at Denver Free University.
-


'^AOTOOTCHMENT m The Denver anti-hitchiking iav is being challenged on Constitutional grounds by A.C.L.U. attorney Walter C« Brauer in behalf of Ron Schiess. Sehiess was arrested by the Denver Poliee on Oct. 1, 1970 and.he contacted attorney Brauer who agreed to take the case without any fee. Brauer has prepared a brief whieh eontends that the anti-hitchiking ordinance violates constitutional guarantees for six different reasons» Among the reasons are that the ordinance alJLows selective enforcernent and that the ordinance is a deprivation of freedom of movement.
The initial trial is to be held. on Pebruary 9*
Pollowing this trial appeals are to be made to the Court of Appeals and if necessary to the Colorado and U.S. Supreme Courts. Both lawyer and client hope the ordinance wlil be |overruled and that this will lead to an end to all such ■similar legislation»
... Hl. Mf'
HAMIMS» FU* ?UCWN<3* ANP
ToWt FIMO /W CffM SHCT /WWKtSE» HE MsJST i KV£ SEEN AftOC® C*. >'jt


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contents; and now Laos ....... • IJ, o. (II.-•••••• c.... 3 Huelgal 4-6 Travels With Charlie •••••••••••••••• 6-7 8 Under My Thumb 9 PRG 8-Point Peace Plan • , •••••••• , • • 10 How to Bite when the LancU...ord Ba't'ks ••. • 111o. •• •• .., ...... \1. •• 14 RIP Book Review .Prison Letters of George Jaclmon •• 15-17 Calendar 18-19 Fat Freddy1s Cat ••• Many of us are dif'f'erent in what we want to do for our happiness, but none of us differ in Ianting to do what's relevant and meaningful to us. This is where we meet, this is where ;.;e become a community, and this is why individuality does not mean to be alone. F-L"om m;y participation in PNS, I have understood its goal to be one of supporting our similarities, and overcoming our fea.rs, and struggling for the liberat:i.on of all, together. And we are sure there are other families and groups that ha'"le things they too want to work on, this is 't.'hat we ''ant to learn, this is us together. The people now t.'Orking w:J.;:.h FNS have things we want to do, things we want to say_. and things we want to perpetuate. All of our hopes lie with the commtmity, cause we need you to surviYe. We want new people to work with us and we are continually searching. Sammy PNS 333-7875 (our phone again)

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In aecordance: with Nixon's continuing policy of de-escalation and withdrmral, it appears that another S.E. Asian country is c.bout to be openly invaded. In fact, rl according to Soviet, Japanese and conflrmed by some U.S. , •• 11 sources (before the blackout on news fr0111 S.E • . Asia) a 1 :force of 20) 000 had already eros sed into Lao a> T"ne u.s. I i . :tnsist.s that the 9;000 Americans involved will not cross El . the border' but act only in a supporting role (to clear the vla.y for Vietnamese puppet troops). T'ner e are many (! reasons to doubt the truthfullness of that statement. U.S. t:coops are massed along the border and the adjacent area in :Laos has been heavily bombed. La].rd. has said repeatedly that there is no limit to use of .Americ3.rt air powe r :!.n S.E. Asia.. He waa also painfully evasive quEstioned by the press.. 'l'l1e Y.'h:tte House even refused to take a question on . the subject. The Soviet n:wspaper claims the /" " ; , \ puppet troops a1e officered. by Amen cans. \ \ It is obvious that the military ''ould seek to f,eny l_). or hide such action as the CongJ:ess has forbidden the use 7" of American grounrl troops in Laos or Cambodia.. last \\ weeks sen,i:J .ng of GI' s in civil:i.an cJ.othes into Cambodia t o \ } recover damaged helicouters. J Jt.merican in Laoa has been a fact fm: the \'>} , last 12 years. CIA arranged coups, subversion of neut>: al. '/ governments and massive bombings (reuucing the population in Zones to Uv:Lng in caves) are not enough it Its bard to set? what purpose this coEc:entre.tion o f troops wou.ld. serve wi.thou . t an invasion, Perhaps the out2age alxeady gen -erated around the wJrld •'ill force tl'iiE admen+.ure to be aborted. Congress is. as ll'UCh in the dark , . .. e.s ve are and the Senate Foreign He.lations Comm:ittee has '11\ for hearings. The Senate is also the ) possibility of sending their ow'll. investigators to f:tnd. what really is happening because the adm.inistre.tton and. milital'y are releasing little news and. even less truth about their actions. It remains to be seen if a real attempt will be made to curb the military. If not, we can only hope the American public 'rill respond as they did last spring over Cambodia. J'im D.

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A l:ene:f'it concert will be gj_ven on February 5th a.nd. 6th a.t the Ilfl.)IA1'1' COALITION BUILDmG, 14th and Gaylord :i.n Denver a.t 7:30 p. m . There w-111 be a 'f'neatro Group from Center performing, a }!l • .a.riachi Band., Yvonne Sanchez, a Spa.'1ish dancer, 8.lid Ya.rious fo.l.k grcups . Center, I t ie very :i. mportant that ma.'ly people support t h e concert as the union is having a very difficult time now 1 during the winter. Work has come to a stand.sti.U at the union office in Cen ter oecause of t h e extreme tempe ratures that dropped as .far as 1+0 d.egrees below zero last month. Water :pipes throughout the con , mu..nity 1-:ere bu:>:stlng a fev weeks a.go due to the eold. All help is greatly needed, especially your support of the concert. HUEL-GA 19'{1. 'i''.dE LF..:.P.'J.'UCE BOYCO'l• r CON'l'Th1JE3 This past Saturday and Sunday outside the Safev1ay Store on East Orman and Hesa Avenues in Pueblo, assembled: a strong, spirited picket line of about 60 people in pro test o:f Safeway's :purchase of Bud Antle team.ster lettuce. The picket formed a ;;t.rong chain of both young and old people f rom La Raza. The people, rJostly residents of Fueblo and a group that came up from the Sa11 Luis Valley, proucLly waved . their bright red flags o f' the huelga a:;d shouted loudly, "Viva La Huelga, Viva La Raza, Viva La Revolucion." The spirit great and ma.ny Safevay shoppers could not neglect their :presence. Sa.feway has failed to recognize the United Farmworkers o-.cganizing Cow.m.ittee Union a.n
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In 1968, Dow was the only outside stockholder, in the Antle Company. We are all fairly familiar with Dm I, 'being one of the largest u.s. corporations and a major manufacturer not o:nl;;r of napalm, but also of :pesticides, herbicides, and. fumigants. One of the five directors on Antle 1 s board,, Dow is represented by C.F , Hea'"fr"'er J :pre5iJ.ent of t h t : Dew Chew.ical Financial ( I!Ll tment arm of DO'.Y) • .As : me can easily see , Dow co..nd A11tle are eloseJ.y allied. The Dow-Antle "love uffa.irn tul began i n 1961 when Dew began making Antl,-:!1 s lettuce wrappers. IG is very important to recognize the connection between the t\•o companies and this u.n.der considera.t:ton stel:l.):l:i.n.g i nto the clrJ8est Sa.fe i n the U.S. have signed. contracts with U.l<'.W.O.C. T'.aey account for 17% of the n ation1 s lettuce a During the w:!.nter months 99'1of' :Cenve r ' s lettuce coms from California and. A:t'tzona.. harvest ships under the fo.Uowlng labels: Unwrapped lettuce : Blue Chip, Pasco; Volume, Eagle :Eye, King Pin, rhL.'1es B rothers, K:!.ng City, f'_,a.gle, Amigo, Qual:i.ty Pak, Queens r, Ji' c.vor 1 GoJ .. cl Star, Second. Lable, and Hawk Eye; . .. e.pped lettuce: Chi qui tal,) Fresh Pict shlpa under the fcol.lowin.g l abels: all UIF,Jrapped .. Ham, Sun Blush, Prime, rud rl!hr.ee C:rown * f.

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"(, Jy 'l 'he on J. y label accepted by the J.lJi'L.-CIO as representing f e:r:u >Wrkers i s the United Ji'arm-\iorkers Organizing Committee Uni. o n Label, is characterize<.". by the Black Eagle. Don ' t be fooled. by u,.'1ion labels which do not represent f'a.r m workers ha. r vested lettuce. .Af> of !i ovember lith, K.tc.g Soopers ls t ,he only cha:.tn that ha.s thus far agreed to sell on...l.y U.F.w.o.c. lettuce. Jn the next few weeks, pickets wilJ .. continue to form outside the Sa:fe•na.y stores in Pueblo; a.s well as Col ora.do Springs and. Denver . If you uould be interested in the picket lines against Sa:feway, call: Denver Boulder 449-8128 or leave message at Daily of-fice in UMC. H ttCb.aJ:"li c Manson, hippie-cu.lt leader" says the media daily. RO"..-many other "hippies" have been i n jail for months and kept their long hair and beard ? Presid en t Nixon announces publicly during the that he1 s guilty and refuses to retract. Two movies are being made. e,merican housewives tremble at the sight of longhairs and their husbs.nds arm themselves. Charlie couldn't "defend" hill'l3el! on their terms, even i:f he wanted to. T'ne guilty verdict came do vn a year ago . Charlie Mans on,. the person, spent more than 30 yeo;rs of his l:t:f.e in America' e iMt:ltutions; hate-filled broken i'a..>hen the time came to fuck a .ll I could do -was

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r . 7 masturbate to a Playboy foldout. And f a.ntas .ize; stri:P every you know, fuck {rape), titty , pussy, sweat, groan, f'uclc, gangbang,
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li \iij) ,FH";a, -;;_!.,."':' .. I . ' You don!t have t o s omeone to love but you have to love them to know the po:tnt 'l Sir if you don't lllind Cha.rl:f . e Manson should not burn (as he v.i.ll}/ be behind bars or anything else tha t the will/hate of America /Ire you saying to me rr..v goodman (although mayb e unaware} that wven though 1 . Nixon sa.:f.d he';; guilty at 5 on 'I'.V. 21J He has long wears beads and smells bad 3. Ta-lks 1derd . EC.:td. thinks stranger they should let thi.;; t• ... 'isted monster go'l they they they they have no more right to try L.'ha.rlie ( ancl thus an of us) -than to try Tasmanians, Robbi ts :t"'rench, Martian, :Slacks Brown or Venut,ians Charlie is a citizen of Woodstock A veteran of the street, And he' 11 get no fair trial from the Amel':tkreepies whether he did it or not • . And that mean. s no :fair .trials for any son or V..Y!.Y daughter of any father who wen t crazy at the sight of. a daisy and shot to kill. They ain't shit and never could see Charlie and us will be :f'ree. !be Pied Piper

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For m9.ny of om. brothers and sisters, their thumb s are their transportation. Becau s e of lack of good. mass transit and because it is merely a good means of easy mobility thro-ugh the city, thu.mbing has 1>ecome a part of our daily lives. If you happen to own a car, you might notice that a..lmost hltchikers are long-hair youth, a...1.d it :may be noti c ed . from the other end that most of those those t o s top are the sa..11e people. lU.tchik:!.ng is now so characteristic of our culture tha t looking at it f'i'om a. thinl point of v i ew, we see that most of those pro se cuted for this " c rime" are again the same people. Hi-tcb ik:!.n.g and the interaction of comwurd.ty people :tt involves is unique in br: l nglng about a n awareness of each other a.11d unique in i t;s ability t o give us a c hance to conttnuaJJ_y respond to each otber1 s need.ll. E"rer y time we watch ruahed., unresiKm ...... --l . .

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l. The U.S. Government must t o taJ.ly wi tbdra.:>' a J..l its troo:fls, rnili tary personnel, 'WaJ.' roe.ter ials and weapons, and dismantle all U.S. military bases in Souty Vietnam; without.posing a:ny conditions whatsoever. If the U, S, Government declares it will w-1thdraw from South Vietnam by June 30, 1971, the People's Liberation Pxmed Force s will refrain attacking the 'nthd.rawing troops; and. the parties will negot:La.tions at once on the questhm of' the safety of' withdra\.ring soldiers of reJ.easing captured military men. The of Vietnamese a,rrned f'orces in South Vietnam sha.l.:L h e resolved. by the V:ietr:8.lllese parties among themselves. 3 The a.dmin:i.otration of 'l'hieu, K y &"ld. Khi.em cm:ries out :ferocious repres.o.ion .. against those 11ho stand fer.;: :f>0 a c e ' in.cJ.ependence .' neutrality und C'.c>r.;ocracy. 'l'.he restorat.ion of :!. n Vietnam :formation o:t' a n ad.mi..nistJ'at:l.on 1fi tho11t Thieu, Ky and K11iem. 'rhe Provisional R<:volu-Govertll!le.t of South Viet.naJJJ

PAGE 11

eettlement of the South V:.tetnam. prob1ern. 4. T'ne Sa>.1t h V:i.et Na.ru people wi.J.l decid.e themselve:i upon the political regime of South Viet Na.m t h r ough really free anone or the Saigo n a d ministration 'Hho really stand for peace, independence, neutrality and democracy; and :persons of various political and religious forces and. tendencies standing for peace, independence, neutrality and dem oGracy, includ:f.ng those who, for political reasons, have to live abroad. 6. Viet Na.m i6 one, the Vietnamese peor)le are on e . The reunificat:ton of Viet Nam r,J:111 be achieved step by step by peaceful means, on the basis of o..iscussions and agreements between the two zones, withcrut foreign interference. 7. The parties will decide together mea sures airn ed. a t ensuring the respect and correct inplementation of' the me,9.sures agreed upon. 8. A cea.s eJ?ire will be imple;nented af'ter the agreeme nt. a."'ld on signing of accords aimed at putting t'l.n end to war and restoring peace. cr V\f!.iNI\,....-

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'Ln talking about radical change we raust realize that a si.mple change of political-economic form is not in itself going to insure a successful new order, I believe common mvnership of land, resources and the means of production are basic for liberation of mankind, but revolutions are :nade by people who are subject to human failings. Buteaucracy • ego tripping (already a canger here), pressure from opposition, etc, often cause the creation of a nevr ,l:uling class, Example, the Soviet Union. :!a.ny socialist countries are fighting this trend a s in the . cultural revolution in China. Mao said politics and culture are inseperable. The need then is for a . struggle lhat \vill involve n cultural but \vha t does t:hie consist: of? 1-.'e spe<:.k of our countel -culture., This includes, to the aliEn .s.ted youtht a who1a 8-:!!:. cf lire;::. t.yle diferances ia dJ:ess and m•sL:, of dr\.>g s , hail: length, etc, TbE: q•.\<:,stion is 1hat of the count;;.r-c:t:lture a :ce essen t:La 1. t . o achieving and main tainin.g ;,, \vvt ld order, Consider that such a new society will consist of all age gr.:;,ups tVi th many ra:::l..•.1.2. ar:d soci.<•,l diff:erences, we cannot d eman d couformi ty to ;,tll &spec ts o f uur beliefs. In act9 this very refusal to conform to old t.!Stt>blishcd patten:.s, the willingness to lH!(,l i.s one of our greates;:: strengths, ae oppc.sing the and of mankind into any rnol d , we are tun1ing for inspir.at:i.on to many ot;her cultural patterns, Primitive people, \{e realize) often h<.:d n:.uch the!t has been lost to civilized man. Consi.dE,r that the for i ns\:ance, lived in ha:t"!:lony w.Lth nature rathe-r than attempting to conquer it, One ans'''e r to our qu .estior:. the.n$ i.s tc take the best LrorJ. all v arieties of h.:.man expedenee .r.nd apply it. to present society. <;;his the value then, of long hair and the hip style of dress, is t i n demons trati.ng and
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One i:npor::a!."'.t al:lo is the new ways ;>eople :.
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u -you get hassled by your house :md/or the person who owns it, the place to go is the folk a.t the Cap itol Rill Tenants Union. Their cff'ice is 1460 Pennsylvania Street, Room 4. Phone is 825 Best time to see them is between six and ten weekday evening. T'ne _ Capitol HilJ. Tenants Union can help if you get any of the laid on you : Il1ega1 eYict1ons {several kinds), LaildJ.ord1 s Lien ( usu.ally used illegally by landlords) 1 any kind of discrimination in renting an or being tossed out of on e (red , black, brown, single women, hippie, etc.) any kind of harrassment While you're still liv:!.ng at one place, Yiola.tio n s of t;he housing cod . e (you. can force your la. ndlor d to fix the plac e up a.nd not be subJect to any kin d of :retaliat:i.on) Did your landlord become a greedy g u.y when y o u moved out by l'e:f'using to return your <'l. amage de;Posit7 You don't need a lawyer to take him to court oy e r i t . Give us a call, we7ll show you how. Capitol Hill. 'I 'ena.nts Union can provi.d . e F'REE LEGAL help in any or all of these areas. Cal..l u&. The Capitol Hill Tena.n t.e Union handbook on tenant's rights is available at RIP, T ogether Booke, and J e r ry's Newsstand. It covers all types of. housing problema and how t o them. Copies are also a v ailable a.t the office. Capitol Hill Tenants Union is a. co:l:lect.ive, but they have an open meeting every Wednesday night''-at at their office. All L ' -rJL---1-_ 0 . i, . o '4 t:t t.t\A .:1 --. _ ;.; L •. ............ l1_:;.t \ \ _ J;Or.; i)ioore &hcd. qttCorof'l;l cit _ .. Cr<.1s\er' _ 14. _ < ;r,i\ r R_! D I t \

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Soledad Brother: Ge"Orge Jac'kso:u. no The Prison Letters cf $1.50 {RIP price $1.20). • II On January 13, 1970, at Ca.lifornia.1s Soledad Prison, a fight broke out between black Md white in an exercise yard. A e,•uard etanding on a. •ua.ll, com:pletely out of o.s.n.ger, killed tr...ree of the bl3.cks with a hig.'lpowered rifle. Re waa exonerated two days later. ibe follmrl.ng day a llhite guard was thrown over a thirdstory railing to r.J.s death. Three black convicts were indicted for the n;urder of the suard. 'l'he three are known to the prison authorities a.s ":militants and troublemake!s." '!'o their supporters in the movement they are the Soledad. B:rothers. Their names r.re John Cluchette, :t:•leeta Dru.mgo, and George Jackson. On 1\ugust 7, 19'{0, t.he newspapers carried the sensa .. t::!.onsl story of a "shootout" between bJ.ack .prisoners and. police, in which two of the prisoner.s 1 a MaXin County judge; and a 17-yea.r-old 'black man were killed. 'l'his episode began whe.u the young man. stood up in the court room and announced, "J.J.l right, gentlemen, I'm taking over nor.<, 11 as he passed out guns to three prisoners. The State of Ca.litorr..:ta. charges that those guns were bought by .4.ngele Davis, and she has been impr:tsoned and charged w-:!.th m:.rJ.er on the basis of that a.llegation. ,;.,

PAGE 16

As the group Of' bia.cks aDd their host.a.ges left the room, the young man shouted to the spectators, "Free the ; Soledad Brothers ))y 12: 30V' Half' an hour later be was dead. He . wa.a George Jackson 1 s younger brother 1 Jonathan. Soledad Brother is a. collection of letters >tritten between 1961+ and 1970. 'rhe last let.ter is o .ated August, 91 1970, two days after his brother's del,\th. The letters are addressed to his parents, to hts sisters and his brother 1 to Fay Stender his 1a.wyer 1 to :f'".dends , and, in the last fevr months, to Angela. Davis. The collection begins with an introduction by Jean Genet, and an autobiographical sketch >rri tten espedally for this book. Ma.ny of.' the details of' George's youth will sound familial to a pel' s on who has read of Malcolm X or Claude Bro•..ru1 s l.Janch:i.ld in the Promised. Land. They describe a guerilla-:;;esrsta'lce in the streets a:ruf"the schools against the poverty e.l1d r ac:i.s:n which e.r e the birthright of black Americar...s. In 1957, at the age of 15, ceorge Jackson spent his first 7 months in prison. Af'ter another short stretch, he was arrested and persuaderl t o plead guilty to robbing a filling station of $'{0.00. That was in 1960. I was eighteen yea:rs ole-. I1Ye been here ever since. I J;Jet Ma:;:-x , Lenin, Trotsky, Engels, a.nd Mao when I entered pdson and they redeemed rue. For the first fot u .1 years I studied nothing but econotnics and mill.tmy ideas. I met black guerillas, C-orge "Big Jake" Lewis, and James Carr, W .L. Nolen, BiD-Christmas, Torry Gibson, and many , ntA....ny o thers. l-Ie attempted to transform theblack cr_iminal mentality j_nto a black revo1utionary mentality. P.,s a result, each of us has been subjected t o years of the mos t vicj_ous reactionary violence by the state. Nolen was killed by the sharpshooter a t Soledad, Christmas died b esid. e Jonathan Jackson. i n Marin County.)

PAGE 17

Meeting George Jackson in these letters :t:t' a fantastic experience. His .letters to h:is fathe r are a rm-ming debate, sometimes l oving and some times bitter, behnOmics. 'I'o his brother he write and gu:Ld.anc e . In a letter to Angela he I want yo u to believe in meo I love you like a man, like a brother, and like a father. Eve r y tj_me I've opened m,y mouth, assumed my battle stance, I was trying in e:ffec t to say I love you, Afrj_ca.n-African woman. My protest h a s been a small one, s omet hing much u .iore effective is h:l.C.den in my mind -believe in me . • Angela, Anyone who has e ver spent . a day or more in ja.il. lmo;; s the fear and hopelessness of it. ' l'he prison c0ntrols the r;risoner -i t can beat him, humiliate him, reward him or-ignore him. At the outse t , the }?J.' ison ta.ltes his body and begins the struggle for his mind. Through >rhat must be a constant battle, George Jac kson keeps hi=; mind free. In his letters vre see him g rO'!tJ from the cold bitterness o f 1964 th:::-ough thought and reading a:ad struggle-. The later letters are informed, thoughti'u.l; and often brilUant, His example should in-struct us allo George Jackson is winning the battle for his spirit. v/hen the people control the prisons, they will set his body free. ... . ' ' j ; l

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Sun. Feb.7 M on. l<'eb.8 Tues. Feb.9 Wed. Feb.lO I < 8:00 pm Jan & Joharma singi.ng folk a t DFU 50 8: oo pm Zephyr Concert 6:00 :prn Channel 6, Nevi'' "Stand Up for Count:! .ng" Three-part d.rarua dealing with the prejudices encountered by a voung black boy. 9:00 pm Cbru-.;:el 6 , "P.rlson" Thi.s tioeumentary takes an unf'li.nching look at our p e:d Up for Counting", part 2. See Mon. 6:00pm. 10:00 pm Channel 6, "San Francisco M:lx" .• 11 Fighting" films of karate , ROl'C training and C11icanos and ll.merican Ind.ians fighting for the i r rights. 6:00 pru Cha.rnel 6, "h'hat ' s NeW'' •stand Up t • .'. part 3 See 8:30 p m -C t . : :. , ''The Great J\merican Dream • Far out collage of America.

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l 'I'hurs. 8:00 pm -Chamber Music C oncert, general class-l<'eb.ll room building, 2040 S. Race St. Open to public free. Fri. Feb.l2 Sat. Feb.l3 Sun. Feb.l4 8:30pm"The Lost Sweet Days of Isaac". First presento.tion of experimental program in theater-DU Theater Annex #2 adjacent to the little theater at E. Evans and s. University. Tickets $1.25. 10:00 pm Channel 6, "Soul" Jazz musician Jimmy O".rens . and gospel singer F.sther Williams. 9:30 pm Channel 6, "Flick Out" "Time Is". This playful film depicts the fantasy and reality of that inexplicable force that governs everything -time. 8:30 pm Doug McKee :l.n concert, folk in a countryinfluenced style and some bluegrass. Denver Folklore Center Concert Hall.$1.50. 9:00 to 1:00 am Benefit dance for Latin Develop ment Society of Canon City Prison. Annunciation Church, 35th & Lafayette, sponsored by \1est Side Action Center. Tickets $5.00 per couple. 8:00 pm -Bill Rose Makes a jug band and singing at Denver Free University. 50 l E f1 [] fl -19-.,.

PAGE 20

.... .•. • .arA.1'i?IOUNCTh!ENT 'tf Th e Denver 3,tlt:i.-hitchiking law is being challenged on Constitutional grounds by A.C .L.H. attorney 'ila.lter c. Erauer in of Ron Schiess. Schiess was arrested by the Denver Police on \)ct. J., 19r(O &"ld. he cor.tacteo. attorney Brauer who ag.ret:d to take the case without any fee. Brauer has a brief which contends that the anti-hitchiking violates constitutional guarantees f o r six Qtffer.ent reasons. Among the reasons are that the ordinance aJ.lm;s :Jelectiv-e enforcement and that the ordinance is a of fl•eedom of movement. The inH:i.al trial is to be held on February 9 l''ul1owing this trial appeals are r.o be ma.<'i. e to the Court of lq,rpea.la a.nd i.f necessary to the Color:;.rl0 and U, S. Supreme Co11rte. Both law-.fer and client hope the ordinance will be , ove"l:'"ruled a.nd. that this will lea(l to an end to all such sim:tlar legislation. -ao-