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People's News Service, February 14, 1971

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People's News Service, February 14, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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English

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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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VIGE ANO CRIME ON GAPITOL HILL

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Police Chief George Seaton ventured. out of his pig pen Tuesday evening to speak at a meeting called by tne Capitol Hili Congress to discuss "Crime and Capitol Hili." The meeting, attende! by about 300 Capitol Hili residents, in-cluding young parents, longhatrs and older couples, vas held at the Moore School, 9th Ave. and Corona. Al.so on the panel vere Leonari Chesler, Chief Deputy District Attorney, and Keith Watson from the Public Defender's office.
Chief Seaton began the meeting with a long reading of statistics on "crime" in the area, followed by Leonard Chesler who explained that the law protects "law-abiding eitizens" from "criminal types." He also ran down how a suspeet is usually charged with the most serious "provable" crime at the, time of arrest, but that the charge is usually changed later on to a lesser one (taaking it easier to get a conviction) after a process known as "plea bargaining," which takes place between the DA and the aceused person's lawyer. The young people in the crowd had a good laugh at this point, understanding all too veli the custora of "plea copping."
Keith Watson spoke next, poining out a few of the eontra-dictions in the law and how it was enforced. For example, a man who finds his old lady in bed with the milkman and shoots him can be senteneed from 1-8 years for involuntary manslaughter if the man dies, but may be senteneed to life if the man lives, while a freak picked up off the Street with one joint in his back pocket, harming no one, may he senteneed from 2-15 years. ^ He suggested to the people that someday they drop in to the ^th s
floor of the City & County Building, the criminal diVision, to .
observe how Mr. Chesler and his men operate. ^ e
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Seaton and Chesler frequently made reference to the nuaber of ecaplalnts received concerning "hippy pads," how deplorable it was that one person would reiit an apartraent and 30 peopie would move in. ''Of course, we're net passing judgment on anyone," say3 Seaton.
St e ve Levine asked Wats-on what the budget for the Public Defender' 3 office in Denver was for one year and Watson repli e d that it vas approximately ^-^0,000 for 6 attorneys, k secretaries and 6 paralegals. Then he asked Seaton what the budget was for his department, to which he replied,
"15 miliion dollar3 for 1166 police officers and 260 civilian employees,Unfortunately the meeting ended before Steve could complete his line of questioning, but these figures alone were quite revealing. Seaton has $15 milllon at his disposaJ. and 1166 pigs to apprehend so-ealled crirainals, while the defenders of these accused criminals have only a token amount available to them.
Judge Rubin, recently unaeated Judge fresa the Juvenile Court, has ehallergedthe entire proceas of jury selection for juvenile- cases, saying that a "jury of one's peers" does not meaa 50-60 year old peopie passing judgment on juveniles.
When asked ab aut this issue, Chesler responded, "Well, a jury of one’s peers has its limits. I'm sure that a man facing a burglary charge would like having a jury made up of inmates from the County Jail, and that they would probably be very sympathetic, but of course that is unrealistie," It is law-abiding citizen3 that should pass judgment on the rest, according to the DA. The right of having a jury of one's peers has become a mockery in this society, where the haves pass judgment on the have-nots for resisting their oppression, for taking what they need. The accused criminal's peers, as a matter of fact, could be found in the County Jail, and they would indeed by sympathetic, because they've been up against the same brick wall. Where do jury lists come from‘f From the City Directory. Who ia in the City Directory? Peopie who have lived in eme place for a period of time, which obviously discriminate3 a^aisast the poor, the transient,, the Street peopie.



Seaton stated tbat 50$ of the serious crimes (rape, robbery, murder, assault) in the city were committed by juveniles (An officia! from the Juvenile Court was asked to comment on this incredlble statistic, and his only comment was “Bullshitl”)
Seaton also e3.aimed that the crime rate in the Capitol Hili area had soared with the arrival of t!hippy types” to the area in the last year or two. He estimated the nuxriber of longhairs in the city to be 2-3,000* He said that in 1968, over ^00 runaway girls were picked up in the city, many of them found to be living in "deplorable living con&itions, often carrying YD, pregnant, etc.,! He frequently remlnded the audience that he wasn*t passing judgment on anyone, that He was only giving the facta, that he has nothing against longhairs. Kight.
The Capitol Hili Congress passed out a leaflet at the door with a few st&tietlcs on the crime rate in Capitol Hili. These statistics, obtaihed frora the recorda of the District 3 substat ion of the Police Department itself, read as follows:
1) Major crimes only inereased 8$ in the area between January, 1970 to J&nuary, 1971 ♦
2) Of a total of 391 n&rcotic charges, 23^ were released for lack of evidence.
3) 63°7$ of ali narcoiic charges are for the use or possession of m&ri^u&na.
k) 76.5$ °f those «rrected for marijuana are over 18.
5) 96*5$ of these arresfced for heroin were over 18.
A rnember of the auculonc"? &*.ked Herr Chesler why such a large number of per sons arrws*e& and charged with narcotics offenses in the area were released for lack of e vi dene e, suggesting that perhaps the Police Department was overzealous in ita efforte to arrest people without having probable cause. Chesler leaped out of his chair saying, ■•Are you accusing us..., blah, blah, blah «.♦” uslng bis usu&l tactic of evading questions and diverting attention tropa the real issues. He tried to explsin it by saying that if 25 people were in a «communal pad/f just having "finished a pot party,” and a raid were conducted, ali 25 would be arrested, and if only two were found to be in posse3sion, the rest would naturally be released.
5


When asked why 63*7$ of ali narcotic charges were for mari juana, Seaton answered that- imlike many people, he con-sidered marijuanaa narcotic drug, that in most cases of addicti on to hard drugs, the users began with marijuana. We recalled some other recent statistics provided hy a chief customs officer who reported that the amount of smack seised hy customs offlcials last year had dropped 85$, cocaine and opium seizures dropped 25$ and confiscations of marijuana and ha^iiish had increased 600$. Seaton himself said that the vast majority of heroin, cocaine and opium in this country vas iraported, so it could not he that the amount coming in is less, only the amount heing seized.
‘ We are saying that the drqp in hard drug seizures and the huge increase in marijuana seizures is a deliberate attempt to cut down on the availahility of grass, a harmless drug, driving people to the use of hard drugs* Use of smack, speed and other hard drugs has hecome a tremendous problem in minority and longhair communities. These drugs are disabling and killing our people, who would ordinarily he among the most volatile sectors of the soelety, those who find life in Amerika the hardest to stomach. 'The pigs are more than happy to see our people strung out on dope, unahle to combat their oppression.
It is ohvious to those of us who live in Capitol Hili that Seaton’s Mcrime rate'1 statistics are a shuck, that the increase in arrests in our eommunity has little to do with an actual increase in crime, hut shows instead an increase in police haras sment of so-called 5,hippy types" who are moving in increasing numbers to the Capitol Hili area. The majority of cases handled hy the Public Defender’ s office are drug cases, not murder, rape, assault, burglary, etc. This ciearly shows that the emphasis of Seaton’s campaign against crime in


Ali over the courrtry people are getting the me3sage of life culture aeross to others by wall arc.
tione of iliis is eviderft in Deriver also, li’s very hard to walk 3 blocks in Capitol Hili and not see sign3 of hip culture on the old snd neglected huildii.gs juany of oar people are foread to live in.
I lemeriber last spririg a !'?ree Bcbby" sign adorned a high rise apertarent on Corona Street. It vas a couple of montiiS 'oefore the landlord re-moved it, I also reweraber last suminer sciae swall boys painted the word "fuci:” on cur apart-ment. Hic old hag of a landlady threafcened to have us evicted if we didn*t remove it.
I bring these up beoause by these exarrroles I know that death culture is very mucb affected by wall. art, Right now ve aren’t in the position to bring these ugly cities dcwn and rebuild new beautiful ones, but we can let our feelings be left
^Ehoojgfr the cities ecre ugly there are beuutiful fhitigs in them* *She trees, grass, roctaa, any living, growing thiug is our natural br ofther« *Io leface them is to attacta, ourselves so please release your artistic talents on syiribols of oor . oppressioxw
on every parking lot, high rise and bank that is built in Denver Not even the pigs are going to be impressed vith a brand new concrete and steel bank if v,TVst
with Death Cultnr e5’ is vritten
on the side of the wall in 3 foot orange day-glo letters♦
Dsychedelic paint In j favor ite. color s is availshl at yaocr local tardare and storea•


A JOINT TREATY QF PEACE
BETWEEN THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, SOUTH VIET NAM, AND NORTH VIET NAM
Be It known that the American and Viet Namese people are not enemies. The war is carried out in the names of the people of the United States and South Viet Nam but without our consent. It destroys the land and people of Viet Nam. It drains America of its resources, its youth and its honor.
We hereby agree to end the war on the followmg terms, so that both peoples can live under the joy of independence and can devote themselves to building a society based on human equality and respect for the earth. In rejecting the war we also reject ali forms of racism and discrimination against people based on color, class, sex, national origin and ethnic grouping which form the basis of the war policies, present and past, of the United States.
I.The Americans agree to total witbdrawal from Viet Nam, and pubiiciy to set the date by which ali U.S. military forces vvill be removed.
2. The Viet Namese pledge that a$ soon as the U.S. govsrnment pubiiciy sets a date for total witbdrawal, they will enter discussions to secure the release of al! American prlsoners, including pilots captured while bombing North Viet Nam;
3. There vvill be an immedi8te cease-fire between U.S. forces and those led by the Provisiona! Revolutionary Government of South Viet Nam;
4. They will enter discussions on the procedures to guarantee the safety of ali withdrawing troops.‘
5. The Americans pledge to end the imposition of Thieu, Ky and Khiem on the people of South Viet Nam in order to insure their right to selfdetermination, and so that ali politica! prlsoners can be released.
6. The Viet Namese pledge to form a provisiona! coalifion government to organize democratic elections. AI! parties agree to respect the resufts of the efections in which ali South Viet Namese can participate freely without the presence of any foreign troops.
7. The South Viet Namese pledge to enter discussion of procedures to guarantee the safety and politica! freedom of those South Viet Namese who have collaborated with the U.S. or wifh the U.S.-supported regime.
8. The Americans and Viet Namese agree to respect the independence, peace and neutrality of Laos and Cambodia in accord with the 1954 and 1962 Geneva eonventions, and not to interfere in the internal affairs of these two countries.
9. Upon these points of agreement, we pledge to end the war and resolve ait other questlom in the spirit of self-determination and mutual respect for the independence and politica i freedom of the people of Viet Nam and the United States.
By ratifying this agreement, we pledge to take whatever actions are appropriate to implement the terms of this Joint Treaty of Peace, and to insure its acceptance by the government of the United States.
' This version of the Peopie's Peace Treaty was negotia ted by a student delegat ion to Viat Nam and Paris, December, 1970.


formation of a broad coalition
Tae idea of the American people signing a Pecplefs Peace Treaty with the Viet-names e vas brought about vhen the U.S# rejecte! the pea.ce offer (PNS vol#2 is sue k,
Feb#6, 1971) to the Paris Peace Talks in September,
1970* As soon as the treaty*s conditions are met the Viet-namese pledge to arrange a c eas e-fire, safety of troox>s, exchange of prisoners and to supervise demecratic
elections. The first part of the PPT strategy is a xuassive -impaign against Nixon* s propaganda and to provide an opportunity to ratify it# It is for radicals a$d middle-of-the-roaders and anybody else* In a letter tp the National Coalition Against v?ar, Hacism & Repression the chief PRG representative in Paris,
Madame Nguyen Thi Binfc, wrote "At present Fresi dent Nixon is talking peace * but in fact, on his orders, the war has teen intensified, the attacks against the Indochinese eountries and the supplying of armaments, bombs, and shells have inereased, and the government has of- late threatened to indulge in nev military adventures :in North Vietnam#" High U«S# political and military advisors are talking sericusly and relatively openly about using "tactical nuclear veapons, which are already stockpiled in Fast Aslsu*
At a time vhen U#3# movement against the war has di.ssipated the Vietnamese are depending even more strongly on our continued efforts to end the war#
An important aspect of the whole trea£y is that it is supported by ali factions in Viet nam not controlled by the U03.
It v&s vritten by North Vietnamese, PRG and non-PRG South Vietnsxnese© The total of the treaty is as of yet to be determined# A wor&shop vili be held at an anti-var conference on February 27> at Deriver University to decide how this will apply to Denver# More Information will also be available# Q


On February 12, 1971, Lann Meyers anrtcjunce.d his candi&aey for mayor of Denver for the upcoming electioris in May* As. he vas introduced to the people, cheers rose fromvthe crowd calling for a "Lann slide victory." Tom Mutz, or.e of the co-chairmen of the campaign, conducted the happy days theme sorsg with a pigTs billy club painted like a flag.
Mr* Meyers began by introducing his family, friends and the other co-chairvoman of his campaign, Elly Baumann* He moved onto his opening remarks* Ee said his first public act vould be to fire Chief Seaton. He will fili the position with Mary Mutz* "Today you and 1 are living in a world society that is rapidiy heading either for a change so fantastic that we all will take on a new dimension, a new tbirth1 or for complete destructione*.it will be all or nothing*” and:
"Technologically, we no longer need to concern ouraelves with siirvival* We are potentially free to develop a new dimension of htmi&nnes3*" and:
"What is needed first is a correction of our way of thinking*
We must conceive of the abolition of poverty, misery, and alienating labor in a manner that signifles a break rather than a continuity with previous history, its negation rather than its continuation, difference rather than progress*..*
We must do away with the need to struggle to stay alive, the need to vork to be able to live, the need to compete against our brothers *and 'sisters, the need to wastefully and irresponsibly produce, the need to repress ’questionable* insiinctual drives toward happiness*"


At the end of his 3taxement he suggested the group break for refreshments\ apple pie vith American flags stuck in them and coffee ser/ed by Ius mother. He then received questione- fresa the people. Questione concerning vomen'8 liberatlon he referred to FJLly Baumann, She spoke of "free child care centers. free, safe and effective birth control and free abortions and the need to rid ourselves of all laws which teli us hov ve must live together." The reporter vho originally a-sked the question asked Mr. Meyers vhat his own personal opinion of vomen*s liberatlon vas, the mayoral candidate responded by saying, "As a man it is important for me to listen to vomen, it would be sexist for me to ansver the questioni to talk of^ a.womanjs liberaiion.
At the beginning of his talk Mr. Meyers said that he vould be fair to all questions that vere fair to him. Thus, when someone asked if he vere a hard-line law and order candidate he


moved on, asking for any more questions <> Dan Yurraan from the Capitol Hili Tenants Union brought up the question that although in Kr0 Meyers* platform he spoke of housing for blacks & browns , he didn*t mention anything about the housing situation in Capitol Kill* Lana said he was not that familiar vith the specifics of the situation* He suggested Dan stay and talk to him about it afterwards along the libes of setting up decision-making advisory boards* Someone asked about psisons - Mr.
Meyers said he would t-ear down ali penitentiary facilities and immediately close ali schools* He said people in the neighborhoods should set up their own schools. He said that when elected he vili caJJ. for a 15-year old voting age* For ehilaren vho vish to vote before that age, they vili merely have to sign a declaration that says they irttend to do so. Mr. Meyers said he expects 150,000 votes to be cast in his favor. Someone said that only a tot ai. of 120,000 votes vere tallied in the last mayoral eleeticn. Ile said, "Well I guess that means Ifm in«M His partial platform eoncerns itself vith womenTs liberation, children* s liberation, marriage, community eontrol of police, the mayorfs responsibility to Chlcanos and endorsement of the People1 s Peace Treaty. 'He is open to further suggestions from the community. Finally, his platform offers:
-...renewd immediacy and revived energy for meeting and shaking off an imposed engineering mentality, non-solutions, and catastrophic dehumanization and destruction of ourselves, each other, and our environment. •. *. community controi of the poliee and schools; it means women*s liberation, chlldrenv8 liberation, menfs liberation; it means throving off traditional and legal taboos of coming together as people and parting as people; it means defining our solidarity and kinship vith ali people on Spaceship Earth and the necessary destruction of those systems that separate us; it means an end to the racism and sexism which daily oppresses our brothers and sisters, an‘end to the growing oppression of a hcsne-grown poliee state in our city, an end to the ccrporate manipulatio» of our city government, an end to Denverfs acqviescence to American ir.vasion of Indochina and this country’s attempt at ccntrol of the third vorld— it includes the responsibility free people must assume * This concept of


Oontinue to boycott Safeway even thouph they no lorrer' bu;' Antei lettuce* Safeway is now 'buyina 1 et tu e e £-0TT! the next worse coapany... .more info later.
idrenfs Free Breakfast- Program Is stili oper-T*-eekdays at ? a.m. under, the supervi sion c£ Organiion for Solidarity and Fre-edom and ^hevs..--30th and Williams, Mt. Carmel Baptist chvrcsVu#*13onations of food and help are welcome.
Iliam D. Killet Free Cilnio* St. Andrev7* s cv=ur'ch, .Tell and Sick Baby night is Thursday.
Sirth Control is avail&ble through Planned Parent-hood Provran any night at the clinic.
Donatione needed, such as, Fedical Instruments and T&b equipment, and they need a dentist for the neo ole desoeretel.y*
Free Anreia Davis Committee needs any help you^are
willinf to ri¥e--------Call 355-^79^-----------Free
Angela Davis and Ali Politi ea 1 Prisonersl
Anttrrar Keetinv this Thureday at the lst Mentite Churoh at 9th and Deleware* Time: 1:30 p.ts.
Fven if you he.v* everythin*, a^ ■, breath, then rwt#ve fot nothi ni? at a“ *>
hu:-:- satine


BITE BACK VK® THE LAMLORP BARK3
If your laudiord vas a greedy guy the last time you moved out of an apartment, and kept the deposit for no good reason, here*s how to get it back* Sue his ass« You don?t need a lavyer.
1« Get the name of the person who ovns the buildlng. You e an do this by ealling the Assessment DiVision at 297**2211 and asking for "Real Estate”.
2* Take that name and adoress with you and go down to the County Court, Civll DiVision, at 3.100 Bannock St. It will cost you $7*00 to file a summons and complainto $f>.00 pavs a court fee and $2*00 has the Denver County Sheriff serve the eomplaint. If you caxi't afford $7*00 because you are on velfare or unemployed, bring some kind of proof with you of this and the fees vili be set aside.
3* When you get the "Summons and Complaint" form fili in the name of the ovner of record as the name of the person you have a complaint against * Und the legal aid attorney vho is always there to help you with the form. Make sure it is filled out properly.
k. When you give the form back to the elerk, the ovner of record has not less than five nor more than seven days to file an ansver. If no ansver is filed you win by default* If an ansver Is filed, a trial date vili be set.
5* The day the case is to be decided is that aay you should be able to bring either written or oral evidence that the place vas not damaged when you moved out. If a friend can be relied on to testify in your behalf, have her or him come with you to do so. Remember, mny judges believe that the burden of proof is on the t enant r&ther than the landlord - property riglits and ali that. Call the Capitol Hili Tenants Union at 825-2329 for Information and adviee on this and any other housing hassles.


Some of you may have heard rumor s, seen postera or in some way learned that tbere is an operating Food Coop in Denver • Finally, after a rugged history that began ia the has ement of Together Books last year, the Food Coop has food and is functi oning, but v?e need everybody* s support * Currently the membership is around 30 family groups but ve need to grovi That means that *?e need more interested people to «Join us, help us develop and create a good food coop in Denver which can serve the people*
Food coops have been serving people in University communi-ties such as Berkeley, Ma&ison, Fugene, Boulder and in ghetto areas, such as New York* %e idea is to be able to ob-tain good food at cheap prices - by banding together people can get the food they vant direetly from the distributors* This method allove the eommunity an alternative to the capitalistic chain supermarkets. No longer do people have to be preys of large supermarkets - and yes, I mean King Soopers. too - to buy their food* A food coop is a viable alternative to the capitalist system. It also means an economic savings to the members. The prices are eheaper, the quality better and the quantities suit your individual needs in a food coop* Also, I think it is just plain groovier to get your food with friends in a cheery, human place rather than at a sterile, plastic supermarket. One more good think about a food coop is that it is ecological. People bring their own containers for food, milk is in glass bottles,


Rlght now the uoc-ky Mountain Food. Coop is loeated at 830 l8th Street, l8th & Champa. .We have 3 clean, bright rooms,
3 refrigerators, a scale, shelves and food. Organic fruit and vegetablea and dairy producta are ordered weekly in person or by phone on Mondays or Tueedays. Grains, most of them organic, honey, nuta and other Staples are ordered monbbly on Sunday nights. Membership ia $5«00 and members niust put ia enough money initially to pay for a week's order of food. After that time food is paid for when it is picked up. Orders cari be picked up on Mon. or Tues. from 6:30-8:30 p.m. In aduition to paying the membership fee, ali members are expeeted to participate in a committee. The coop belongs to and depends upon your participation. To give you some idea of our prices and food we have:
1 gallon milk, .88: 5 lbs. organic honey, 1.00} 1 doz. eggs, .35} llb. monterrey jack cheese, .72} 1 lb. organic whole wheat flour, .08} 1 lb. organic apples, .20. We do not accept food stamps now, but will be able to very soon.
The foods we have are expanding, but we need more members to help us in orderlng more and other foods. We have lots of hopes about being able to evolve into a store, becoming an ecological recyeling center, etc. Many pe.oplc are also dissatisfied with our location and we would like to be able to have a storefronbsetup. Bat we have all worked hard to bring the food coop to its present state and we now need more people with enthusiasm to help us grow to more effsctively serve the community.
We are meetlng Sunday, Feb. Id, at 7:30 p.m. at 830 l8th St. If you cannot make that meetlng come rap with us any Mon. or Tues, from 6:30-8:30. We meet again the 2nd Sunday in March. Please come and join. us and help Denver have a good food coop. It'11 also help you.
Sandy Johansson Ji


"Gold Flower’s otory" by Jack Belden. (phamplet) kOtf.
"Gold Flower’s Story" is one chapter from Chlna Shakes the World, a book published by Belden in 1SM-9. China Shakes the World is Belden* s account of the last phase of the Chinese revolutionary war, fought by the Chinese Communists agalnst Chiang Kai-shek between 19^5 and 19^9* Belden telis his story as a reporter who travels freely about, observing the struggle and interview-ing the participants. The book has gone almost unnoticed during the intellectual freeze of the Cold War, but revolution has now begun to bloom again, even in America, and Monthly Review Press has just published a new edltion of Chlna Shakes the World.
The chapter of Belden's book reviewed here is simply an inter-view with a Chinese farm woman, who has experienced the revolutionary process in her personal life. The narrative style is her own, simple and direct. The woman who telis the sfcory, Kiahua, or Gold Flower, is 21 at the time of the interview.
At the age of fifteen she had fallen in love with a young student, but their marriage was forbidden by parents and by the society.
A few months later her parents engaged her to Chang, an 'older man she had never even seen. In despair she tried to hang herself, but was rescued by her parents, who explained to her, "You must wait for fate.'1 Gold Flower was ttnable to accept that fate, and shouted at her mother,"Do you remeaiber the day you were young? Was it suitable for- you to marry someone fifteen years older than" you?" Suddenly she raised herself like a galvanized corpse. "You want to kill mei " IT—


On her wed&ing night,. Gold Flower resisted her husband' s ad-vances until he teat her and finally raped her. These beatings became a regular part of their traditonal Chinese marriage, in which the woman's role was slave and mistress.
Gold Flower could not help Tjut accept these law» of society and outwardly she knuckled under to hei’ husband like a slave—meek, obedient, fearful. But in the innermost recesses of her heart, lier bhoughts were revolving in a different fashion. There, deep down inside her, she was engrossed in one thing onlys to pay back, insuit by insuit, blow by blow, every-thing she bad suffered at her husband*s hands» Even as she was saying goodbye to her husband at the gate, she was thifiking: I vili take my vengeance on you someday. Just wa?.to The day will come.
In August, 19^5 the Communiat 8th Route Army passed through Gold Flower's village. While they were there, they helped the village women form the Women's Association. Dark Jade, a woman from the Association, vislted Gold Flower:
''We must release ourselves from the domination of men,"
Dark Jade told Gold Flower. "But we carrnob do it individually, we must all stand together and release ourselves as a unit.'*
The best part of the story follows, as the women, strong in their new unity, discipline the mors through politica!, education and physical coercion. The vosasn fccccae the strongest revolutionary leedfers in the village and pre-ss their men into the fight against the US-backed Nationalist arrnies.
Under the- attack of the Women'3 Association, Gold Flower's husband pretends to repent of his brutality, but later adxaits to his wife:
I am interested in a society such as the one at Tientsin.
I believe women must obey the orders of men. But you see in the 8th Route areas women have beccme crazy. They don't-obey men-: But therd are*other things, too. In Tientsin, there is no plundering of the pecple. There are rich men who dress veli. But in the Lifceruted Areas all property is distributed. The rich becosse poor. I &on't believe in the new society.
'Id a.



Id Flower resolves to glve him up to the Vomeri* s association 1 to join the struggle for a new China:
But now as she lay there, even as she made no attenrpt to stop his renewed caresses, she knew exactly how she felt about him. She did not vant him, had never wanted him, nor any man like him. He was just one of those things that society, the old black society had brought on her, and now it and they were going. Good riddance. Nor was her feeling unreasonable. The only thing she and her husband had in common was. that old trndition had forced them together. The traditions removed, the had absolutely no means of contact. Their condition was not isolated.
It was national.
Gold Flower lay there beside her husband, and over and over again she said to herself: "He belongs to the rich.
I belong to the poor. He is old and I am young. We
are enemies." And though her husband tried again to make love to her, she only lay there, cold to his touch, but buming with anger and hatred.




Full Text

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' ' I ' l • ,. ,. • • ) • ' • I \ • • ' • .._ . ' -'. :t..:} .. i\"" • ."' ' '!1' 12••. A, ,"'•' .:: lr"l <.!r•\<' ..... 'I .• V . '{'..._,...,. ..J--\' ,., •r.) . ' ' ,.. ' _.. ,_ '\ i I . \ '. I ; I AvicE AND CRIME oN cAPITOL HILL I , t,"} 1 -"'-.. .. :; II ;_)f[f., J ,.,b (;'J v % Police Chief George Seaton ventured out of his pig pen X Tu esday evening to speak at a meeting called by t h e Capitol i" Hill Con g1•es!i to discuss " Crim e and Capitol Hill." The :_;:. meeting, atten ded by about 300 Capitol Hill residents, ineluding young parents, longhairs and older couples, was held "1 at the Moore S<:!hool, 9th Ave. and Corona. AJ..so on the panel were Leonard Chesler, C hief Deputy District Attorney, a..11d Keith \ Iatson from the Publ:l .c Defender's office. \) Chief Seaton began the meeting with a long reading of statistics on "crime" in the a.rea, folL.lwed by Leonard Chesler 1-1ho explained that the law protects "J.aw-abidi.ng citizens" c from "criminal types •" He also ran d.mm how a suspect is '::J • u s uaJ. l y cha.reed 'Nit h the mos t serious ''provable" crime at -;;\ the. time of arrest, but the charge is usually cnanged later 0{. on to a lesser one ( making it easier to get a conviction) ...(:) after a process known a s "plea bargaini.ng," which takes place between the DA and the accused person's lawyer. The young -r:--:peop.le in the crowd had a good laugh at this point, understanding "j aJ.l too well the custom of "plea copping." ..,.,g Keith \{atson spoke next, poining out a few of the contra{'{) dictions 1 .. n the la'" and ho,, • i t was enforced. For exi:l.lllple , n man ;.;ho find:> his old lady in bed H:i.th the m:i.lkman and shoots --t) hi. m can be senteneed f rcm 1-8 y-cars .for involunta.ry IrJP-'lS1 a u ghter t:,? if the man dies, but. b e sentenced t o life if the :nan lives, 9-'fih5.J.e a f :cea.k picked up o f f th0 street witrh one joint in his :;I ba.ck pocket, harming no on e , may be sentenced from 2-15 years. i) He to the people that someday they drop in to the 4th ff floor of the City & County Building , the criminal division, to t observe ho>r M r . Chesler and his men operate. 3.. 'c,1\bbfl .. ..

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l\ ,, If: "f R "-.. * .'JA Seaton and. Che sler frequently made reference to the number of complaints received c cncern.ing "hippy pad.e," how deplorable it was tha t one p e r 8o n wou l d reht an apartment and 30 peo-ple would move in. ncrt course, we're r..ct pa.ss1.ng judgm ent on anyone, " s ays Seaton. Steve Levine asked \1a tson wha t the budget for the Public Defende r1 s offic e in Denve r was for one year: and W atson re 'Plied tha t it was appr o ximately $450,000 for 6 attor neys , 4 secretar:l.es and 6 paralegals. 'l'hen he a sked, Seato n ,,hat the budget> '-ras for his department, to which he replied., "15 million dollars for 1166 polic e office r s and 260 civilian empl oyees, • ••• 11 Unf o rtunately the meeting ended before Steve could com:t:Jle t e his line of questioning , but t .hese fJ.gures alone wer e quite revealing . Se aton has $15. m : Hlion a t his d.iH posa.l and ll66 pigs t o a p prehend so-called. crimi nals, while the def N l:i e r s of these accused criminals hav e only a token amount t Wl-dlable t o them. ,Judg e Rubin, recently unseated Judge :fr.:-..m the Juvenile Court, h a s challeqge d the entire :process o f ju:ry s election for J:nenile cases, saying that a "jury of onet s peers " does not meun 5 0 6 0 y eru : o l d :people passing judgmen t on juveniles. W'nen askl':d. a.bout this issue, Chesler responded, "Well, a jury o f e>n e ' a peers. has its limits • I 1m sure that a man facing a . burglary charge would like having a jury m ade up of inmates f'ro:n the County Jail, and t h a t they would probably be very syrn:pathct:tc , but of' course that is unrealistic •" It is law a b iding citizens that should pass j udgmen t on the rest, according to the DA. Th e right of having a jury o f one's peers has b e come a m o ckery in t his society, where the h aves p a s s ju.Jemen t on the have-nots :f'or resisting their oppression, for t<.k1ng what they nee d o The accused criminal.1 s p eers, as a matter o f fact, c ould be found in the Count y Jail, and they would indeed by s3upathetic, because they've b een up agains t the same brick wall. Where do j u x y lists com e from? From the City D irP.ctory. w'ho is in t h e City Di rector:y? People who have i n one for a o f time, which o bviously discriminates tlle poor, t h e tranS.iept,. the stree t people . _

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Seaton stated that 50'fo of the serious crimes { ra.pe, robbery1 murder, asss.ult) in the city were committed by juveniles. (An of'idaJ . from tl:.e Juvenile Court was asked to comment on this incredible statistic: , and. his only comment was ":BullshiU") Seaton also clai.mcd that the c:cime l'ate in the Capitol Hill area had sO':l:rei,i:ctated the number of longhairs in the dty to be 2-3,000, He said. that in 1968, over rl..t."lavay girls were picked u p ln the city, many of them .found to b e living in li,.rin g cono.itions, often carr:;-i.ng VD, pregnant 1 etc." Tie frequently remi9-ded the that he p &.i!sing j'uct;men1 ; , m anyone1 that he was only giving the facts, tho::_, h<" La:cc. r;.:,th i.<•.S s.gr-dnst longhairs. Right. The Capitol B:Ul Congress passed out a leaflet at the door wHL a few statif:Ucs on +.h"" -:::ri.roe rate in Capitol Hill. These stat:i.sttcs, obt of' a11 charges are for the use or possf.?e;;;ion of 4) 76.5 % of for marijuana are over 18. 5) 96o ;'f, C.'1: ,,, .:;rr,: >>'. fr,Z' heroin were over 18. A meu'iuer of the '' -<:d}::"'' , k ':"" ' Herr Chesler why such a large nUlL.ber o f persons a:r:: <;!':. a . od . charged with narcotics offen.sf:i3 tn the ru::'"" reo:•. ' :. s cd. for lack of evidence, tha1 ; pr>::.',<;. p s tbe Fol:I.ce ::_:-,::pR.rtment was overzeaJ.ous in ita eff orts to arn!st people •ritho . 1t having probable cause. Chesler lea.:ped aut o f his chair s<>.y:L;;:;,. "Are you accusing us ••• , blal:, blt<.h, •• • " .. llL ; -usual tactic of evading questions and d.iv, ; .:"t:t•!g attention fl•oy'1 the real. issues. He tried to ex:p1s.J.;.< it by saying that i:r 2 5 people were in a H c oum.uus.l rail .• u jus t having "i'iniflhed. a, p:>t party," and a ra:!.d were conducted. , all 25 \Wuld be arrested, and if only two liere round to be in possession, the rest would naturally be . released .• 5--

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When asked why of ali narcotic charges were for marijuana, Seaton answered that unlike many people, he con sidered rnarijuanaa narcotic d1:'u.g, that in most cases of addiction to hard drugs, the users begLm >rith marijuana. W e recalled some other recent stat:!.stic: s provided by a chief customs officer who reported that the amount of smack seized by customs officials last year had. d.ropped 85%, cocaine and opium seizures dro:pp e d 25'/; and confiscations of warijuana and. hastiish had increased 600%. Seaton himself said that the vast majority of heroin, cocaine and opium :!.n this country was imported, so it could not be tbat the amount coming in is less, only the amount being seized • . lle are saying that the drop in hard drug seizures and the huge increase in marijuana sej.zu::ces is a de liberate attemp'.:. to cut down on the availability of grass, a haru1less drug, driving people to the use of rw.rd drugs. Use of srus.ck , speed and other ha.:cd drugs has become a tre mendous pro"blem :tn minor:J.ty and longhair communi .ties. drugs are ci:tsabl:tng and :Killing ou r people, who would ord:tna.rily be a .mong the most volatile sectors of the society, those •;ho find life ir: Amerika. the hardest to stom9.ch. The pigs are more than he.ppy t o see our people strung out on dope, unable to cor.;!)at theil' oppression . It is obvious to those of u s who live in Capitol Hill that Seaton's "crinie :::ate'' s tatistics are a shuck, that the increase in arrests :i.n our comraun:tty has little to do with a.11 actual increase i n crime, but shows instead an increase in police harassment of so-called "hippy types'' who .are moving in increasing numbers to the Capitol Hill area. The majority o:f cases handled by the .Public Defender's offlce are drug cases, not murder, rape, ass auJ..t, burglary, etc. This clem. ly e.hows 'tl:e.t the emphasis of Seaton's can1pa:Lgn s.gG.lnst erime in our collllllUnity :is act for the protection our citizens 1)\r\. f'or their constant J:.a.rassment. PEOPLE ' S D EFENSE COMMI'I'l'El<: __ ,

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All over the cour.t:ry lJeopl e are getting F : e message of c u1tt;t>e to o thers 'ny va:1. l a:ri: . • Sor..e ev!O. eP tt in DerJ,.oo:;cr a l so 1::. r s vs1."Y to walk 3 block s in C < '-pitol 1Li.U and ! iOt ace :;:.:i 12;ns oi' hip c::n. th0 olrJ. 321Jl :i.V2LJ ected o:L ou.r peOIJle fc:1( :-d ::,c ... ] 1 . ' / C -:n..,. I :r l.a..si:. spr:i. n g a "Free Bobby'' sign adorned a h :tgh rise ::rp&rtruent on Corona Street. It v<:;.s a co\lple of montlls b e f me the lW1d1ord removed . :t.t.. I a l s o r temeniber last :;:un.ra:er :CH'!7"' stn'iU . "boys ps.inted tbe word. "fu.ck " on cu r apart rcent. T ile old nag of a landlady tl.i.. r eatened. to hav e u s evicted i f we di.U.n1 t re.no v e i t . I bring t hesE: up bel!ause b y t h ese e xamples I k.n.Orl that death cuHure is very m u c h affected by 1 1a.l.J. a..">""t. Right now \YC aren1 t in the position to b r:i.ng thes e ugly cities d.CY•'TI and rebu i ld. new beautiful ones . • but '.fe c an let ou r feeling s be l e f t o n every park:i.ng lot , high r:l.se and bank t h a t is built in Denve:c. Not even the pigs a:ce goin g to b e im_Fressed id.th a orand ne1-1 concrete and steel bar.k if ' 'Ilov : 1 l with Dea t h Culturen is v.ritten o n t h e side of the wall in 3-foot o range d ay-gl o let,ters. Though the c1 ties are ugly there a::. e be?.uti:ful things in th.sn;. The trees, grass, rocks 1 G.ny living, growin g thing is our natural brother . To deface them is to attac k o\trselve s S'l p 1 e t:;.se release your artistic tal ents on symbols of 01.1.r opp;cssion. -_I -=T Psychedelic paint in yo11r :favorite eolors i s a v ailable at y our local hard. ware and paint 7 --

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g_._ A JOINT TREATY OF PEACE BETWEEN THE PEOPLE OF THE UNITED STATES, SOUTH VIETNAM, AND NORTH VIETNAM Be it known that the American and Viet Names" people are not enemies. The war is carried out in the r ,ame. of the people of the United States and South Viet N;un but without our consent. It destroys the land and people of VietNam. I t dr a ins America of its r esources, its youth and its honor. We hereby ag r ee to end t he wor o n the following terms , s o that both peopl es can live under the joy of independence a n d c a n devote themsel ves to building a s ociety b a s e d vn h u rnan equality and respect for the e?.rth . In rejecti ng t.he war we also rejec.t all forms of racism and d!scriminilt ion against.people based on col or . closs . sex, national origin and ethnic grouping which form the basis of the war polici e>, present and past, of tht: United States. The Americans sgree to total withdrawal from Viet Nam, and publicly to set the date by which all U.S , military forces will be removed . 2. Tl1e Viet Namese pledge that a s soon as the U.S. government publicly sets a date for total withdrawal, they wil! enter discuss ions to secure the release of all American prisoners, including pilots captured w hile North Viet Nam; 3. There will be an immediate cease f ire betwee n U.S. forces and those led by the Provisio"a'. Revo lutionary Government of South Vie t Nonr; 4. Thev v-..ri!l enter discussions on the procedures to saf e t y of an withdrawing troops: 5 . The Americans pledge to end the imposition of Thieu, Ky and Khism on the p eople of South Viet Nam in order to insure their righ t to selfdetermination, anrl so that all political priso !lers can be re!eased. 6. The Viet Namese pledge to forrn a prov i s i onal c o ali t ion gov ernment to organize democratic elections. AI! parties agr e e t o re spect the re sults of the elec tiGns in which all South VietNamese can participate freely withou t the presence of any foreig n troops. 7. The Sm.1th Viet Namese pledge to di scuss ion of proc .edur e s to guarantee the safety and pol itical freedom of those South Viet Namese who have collab orated with the U.S. or with the . U.S. supported regime. 8. The Americans and Viet Namese agree t o respect the independence, peace and neutrality of Lao s and Cambodi a i n accord w ith the 1954 and 1962 Geneva conventions, and not to interfere in the internal affairs of these two countries. 9. Upon points of agr eemer\1 , we pledge to end the war and r esolve all other questiom in the !piri t of self-determinotlon and mutual for the i ndepenc:lence an d po!iticai freedom oi the people of Viet Nam and the United States. By rot ilyi ng this agr eement, we to take whate ver actions a r e appropriate t . ) implement the terms of thi> Joint Treaty of Peace, and to insure its acceptance by the go vernment of the United Stales.

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'1':1c ide;l of' Amerlce.n :,;eoJ.le sif,r,ing a Pec:ple' s Fes:.ce -t.he Viet..ns...rnese b:r:ou gl 1 t about wlJf:n the U. B , :e jecteo the pes.CE: of'ft:;r ( PNS voJ.. 2 issue ; , , l<'eb, 6, 197:. ) to the Pe.ris Peace 'I'aJks in 8e,;;;tembcr, 1.970. As 80on as the treatr' s conditions a:,e r;;e t ti1e Viet. na.w ese pJ E'd.fe to axra.nge a cease-f'lle, of troop<;, exchange of prisoners and for n,s.t,ion of a br-oad. colli t:f.Otl to de:mccratl c 'l11Je first. part o f tbe FPT strat er. y is a ruA.ssi ve lmpai. g n o.gainsi.. Nixon t s and. to ! 'rovid. an o pp o:ctuni ty to r a Gi:t'y it. It :f.s for radicals midd.le-of'-the-roaders ancl r;..'l.jbod.y else. ln a letter t 9 the National CoP .. lition .qgalnst c :,--.r-, }:{acism & the chief PRG representativ e :i.n Ps.r is, ;:c\c:.oroe Nguyen 'l'hi Bir> .. h , wrote "At present Pl esident ::ixcn is :_,:l . .lJ>:ing peace , but ir: f3.ct, on hi a orders, the war ha.<> 'Leen intensifie d , the against the Indochinese col.tntt :Les ai"lcl tile supplying of EU'J ,,arnent.s, bombs, and sheJ.ls have iN:r.eased, nn•.i t h e government has of late threatened to indnlgP in ne'" adventures :ln North Vietnam.' ' H:l.gh U.S. pcl:ftical and n:il:i.tary advisors axe ta.lking seriously and relatively o:pe:nly abo, J t using "tactical nuclear '"'capons, which are already s to(: k1:d.1.ed. in East ;,t a time '\oi'[, e n U.S. movement against tLe war ha. s d.l.ss:lpated the Vietnamese r.tre o.epencling even more stror,gly on Ol.U ' continued f :fforts to end. the war. A n il'Jl})ortant aspect of: the whole treaty is that it j,s suppor ted all :f'act:! .ons in Vietna.1n not controlled b y the U.s. It vas yrit.ten by North Viet.nr>.mese, I\ . . G ar:d. non-PRG South Vietnamese. The toteJ. :f.g.'t'
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On Febnw.ry 12, 1971, La:nn MeyeJ.'3 <'JUlOunced his candidacy for mayor of Denver for the up-.:oming elections in M ay. As he ,,a:o introduced to the pev_ple , ci1eers r oGe from the crowd c aJ.lin g a "Larm slide victory." Tom i -lutz , o r . e of' the co-chairmen of the campaiga, conducted t L e happy d.ays theme song wlth a p:ig ' s billy club painted like a flag. ttll'. Meyers b<.gan by introducing his family, friends and the other-of his c ampa i gn, Elly Baum ann. H e moved. onto his opening Ee his first public act .wuld b e to fire Gh:tef Seaton . He vrill J:'ill the position with !<1::>.ry M utz. "'t'oc.cty you tl.nu I are J.lv:Lng in ;.;( world society tnat i s n>.pidly heading either for u ch-9-nge so f"l.nt.astic th<>.t we al1 will ta.ke on a ne•; d:i.mension, a ne" 1 b:l.rth' o r for complete t inctua l
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A t t h e eni of his he suggested the group break for refrE shments; apple pie with American fla,gs stuck in them and co:fi'ee ser•1ed. b y :;J.s mother. He then received questions from the :peo:ple. Questions women's liberation he referred t o Flly Baumo.n.n. Sh e spoke of nn-ee child care centers, free, safe 1.1.nd effective birth control and f ree abo:r.t:I . ons and the need to rid ourselves of a11 laws which tell us how we must live together." The reporter who originally asked the question asked Mr. Meyers \
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moved on, asking for any more questions o Dan Yurrnan from the Capitol Rill Tenants !Jn!on brought up tbe questlon that in Mr o Meyers 1 :pla ,tform he spo1te of housing for blacks & bro•ms, he didn't mention anything about the housing situatlon Jn ' C apitol Hillo Lar m saj.d he was not tl1at-famiHar vlit!J. the specifics of the situation. He suggested . Dan and. talk to hirn abou7; it afterwards along the libe;; of settinG u p c . ecisionmaking advisory board.s . Someone asked about -r.ir. Meyers s a,j d h e v:oulci tear down all penitentiary facilities and immediately close a..1.l schools. He said people il.'l the mdehhol'hood.s she>uld set up their own schools. He said. that when elected he vill ca)...l for a 15-year old voting age. F'o r chilciren \-lho vdsh to v ote before tha t a.ge1 they vill ruere1y have to i [;n a declaration that a a y s they :tntend t.o do so. Mr. Meyers s a:!d h e expects 150,000 votes t o be cast in his favor. Someon e said tiia.t only a total. of 1?.0, 000 votes were tallied in the last mayoral election. L e sai d . , ''\Jell I guess that means I' r.a in o" His part:;.aJ_ platf'o r D ; .::qncerns Itself with vromen1 s libe:cation, chilclren1 s liberation, marriage, comrm.mity QOntrol of JOJlct, the mayor's rcspons:lb:L:Lit;y to Cbic:anos end.orsewent o f the People's rea.ee 'He is o.i'en to further s uggestions from the c:o mrmmlty, F:i.nally, his r latform offers: " ••• rene\icl i llllTediacy and revived energy fo:c meeting and shakin g off an impo::;eci engineering ment ality, n on-solutions, and catastrophic: dehwnanization a.1d destruction o f ou rselves, each other, and. our environment ••••• community control of the police and schools; it means women.1s lihe:ration, ch:Uci :ren1s 1iberat:i.on, men 1 s liheratj on ; i t means throwing off and legal tab:>o s o:t' comin g together as J>eople and. pa,rting <.<.s peo:ple; :it mea..'l.s defining our solidarity and kinship \d.th all people on Spaceship F.arth and the n ecessary destruction of those s y stems that seya.:r.ate us; it means an end to the raclsra a.nd s ex:i sm whl<.:l ! daily o:pJJresses our brot.hers and sisters, a.n e n d to the g>:ov;:!.ng oppression of ilon , e g rown police state in our city, an end to t.h e cc ruan:i.puJ.ation of onr city g overnment , a.1 encl t o Denver1 s acql'iescence t o American h :vaslon of I'1.dochins. and this country's att.mpt at ccntrol of the ti-lird vrorlcl--it 1 nc1udes the responsibility free :peo ple roust a.sauw eo 'rllis concept of r adical social change is what I / we are of:f' e .l'ing to the 1 , jJeo:ple of Denver.'' 1:t-...

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I I I I t ' I 1 l . u )._) ... . 1 --1 i :o::tinue t0 t o;,reott SFfe• my eve::-1 they n0 lor.! e.,. A ... tte1 l ettur:e.. Safe;..rey is !:.o, : buyjnr> f: .. next 1:ors0 conosn;v ••• .. 8r: i1dre-n' s Fr-ee Breakfe.st is sti:;_l_ oper o.t inf: ... s -?..t 7 a .1n. ur1C.eY t.he su;:Jervisto:--1 of for Solidarity end ?reedon and _q\otfic:-rs •••• )Gth bnd H t . Ca.rrrtel Bapti s t ;--;n,Fr eli. DCH";"JU ons o f foorl n.nd he1-o ar-e Kelcome. -,':; '.' c-! , e1 sn0 Sick Bs by ni r;r. t 1 s • ' ! n i ,_, 2c''i:d.labl_ E< Plcmned Ps. : r e tlt-C'-'.i ' i\.:.1 ';oCl : . Proc-:rP..'' n iFJ:rt s.t the clinic:. :>:n'1s.ti.ons 8 -Llch 88, Inst.J llritt?nts ? .'f:t('i ] ( 2':<1:; e nv. i o TU1 0 , 8 .nrl t.h ey-need a der1tist -ror th•? -.j, : )eool. e r . "-'sr;<: r ,o,t e ' y . .. "' e c ' , " at1 ; , ' l'l. , _ L "' . _ 'y' 0' J_ n<. r . r I Fre0 A lVP-18 '';p,_ v i s r:'o:!lmi ttee "'" -_, , _ ffi_ l e v,--1 \ l . I \li'' ; -j J t>3' \_,.; . . All_ Political P:risone:r-sl . . .. f:P.:ti!i'> this Thursf:c).y at the :lst fj) at 9t>: "9.!.1. tr r->re a th, I • ) & ei.'"e;_ ... y t h in-:, . :.:-! . ... : !-: "..:!': ; . --. . r.: the-:1 r o t nothin::: Ft t , ----

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BITE BACK w1iEN THE LlUIDWRD BARK3 .JA l'"r.. If your landlord >ras a greedy guy the last t,:i.me yoil. moved out of an apartment, -'3..'10. kept the deposit f-or no good reason, here's ho'rr t o g<;t :l.t b ack. S'l;e hj_::-. ass. You d.o;1 ! t need. a lewys:r.. , l. Get the name of the person •rho mms t:ie building. You C:'i1.'1 do this by calling tlle Assessment Division at 297 -22ll and asking for "Hea.l Est:er is filed, a trial date \{ill be set. 5. The day the cc.se is to 'be decided is that day you should. able to bring either written or oral evidence t'bat the place was not damaged. whe n y ou moved out. If a friend can be relied on to testify in you:t behalf, have her or him come with Jo\: to do so, Remember, judges bel:i.eve that the burden. of proof is on the tena'1t rather than the land:lo:t'd property rights and all that. Call the Capitol Rill Tenants Union at 825-2329 for information and advice on this and a"ly otter hous:Lng ha.sp.Jes.

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Some of you may have heard rumors .• seen posters or in some way learned that there is an operating Food Coop in Denver. Fim11Jy, after a rugged history that began in the basement of Together Books last year, the Food Coop has food and is functioning, but vie need everybody's support. Currently the rnembo.ship is e.round. 30 fe.mily groups but r!e need i.;o gre:vt That mee.ns that vie need more interested people to join us, help us develop and create a good food coop in Denver which ca."l serve the people. Food coops have been serving people in University ties such as !>1adison, Eugene, Boulder and in ghetto G.:t'es.s, such as Ne'" York, The :idea is to be able to ob tain good food at cheap prices by bancLi.ng together people can get the food they \!2J1t d5.rectJ.y from the distributors. This method 2-l1otlS the Gorr.n;unity a.n alternative to the capitalistic chain supenn.3..rkets. No longer do people have to be preys of large SU}Iermark:ets -and yes, I mean King Soopers, too to buy the:tr food. A food coop is a viable alterna.tive t.o -(.l:Je cap:i.tulist system. It also mean.:; an econom:i.c savings to the The pd.ces e:re cheaper, the ty better ancl the quantittes suit your individual n eeds :f.n a food eoop. Also, I think :i.t is just pJ.aJ.n poovier to get your food with f'riends .in a cheery, human p1ace rather than at. a sterile, }Jlastic supermarket. One morE! good think abou. t a food coop is that it :ts ecological. People bring their ovm c-ontainers for food, m:i.lk is in glass bottles , bc.w,s are reused., etcc. . ..

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/., , • ,("! /1t ) (jj-; ;\ .... .)' \. 1 . . . ... • • /... .._; >I "J >!, l) ' Right now the Uocky Mountain Food Coop is located at 830 18th Street, 18th & Champa •. We have 3 clean, bright rooms, 3 refrigerators, a scale, shelves and food. fruit a n d vegetables and dairy products are ordered weekly in person or by phone on Mondays or Tuesdays. Grains, most of them crgan:tc, honey, nuts and other staples are ordered monthly on Sunday nights. Membership is $5 .oo and members lllUSt :put i n enough mone y initially to pay for a week's order of food. A fter that time food is paid for when it is picked up. Orders r:an be picked , _ : p on Mon. or Tues. from 6:30-8:3 0 p.m. In a ':i.i..ition to paying the membership fee, all. members are to participate in a committee. The c oop belongs to and depends upon your participation. To give you some idea of our prices and food we have: l gallon milk, .88; 5 lbs. organic honey, 1.00; 1 doz. eggs, .}5; llb. monterrey jack cheese, .72; 1 lb. organic '"hole wheat flour, .OS; 1 lb. organic apples, .20. We do not accept food stamps now, but will be able to very soon. '.rhe foods we have a.:r.e expanding, but we need more members to help us in ordering more and other foods. We have lots of' hopes about being able to evolve into a sto:re, becoming a:1 ecological recycling center, etc. Ma:.ty peoglc a>: e also dissatisfied with our loca,tion and we 1,rould like t;o be able to have a storefront setup. B.
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radical inlorftlalion uroiect book review • i Gold Flower i s StorY'' by Jack Belden. ( pha.mplet ) 40. "Gold Flower's Story" is one chapter f'rom China Shakes the a book published by Belden in 1949. China Shake s the World is Belden's account of the last phase of theChinese revolutionary war, fought by the Chinese Com111Ullists against Chiang Kai-shek between 1945 and 1949. Belden tells his story as a reporter who travels freely about, observing the struggle and interv:l.ew ing the participants. The book has gone almost unnoticed during the intellectual Zreeze of the Cold War, but revolution has now begun to bloom again, even in America , and Monthly Review Press ha. s just published a new edition of China Shakes tbe World. The chapter of Belden's book reviewed here is simply an inter vie'" with a Chinese farm woman, who has experienced the re volutionary process in her personal life. 'I'h e narrative style ls her own, simple and direct. The woman who tells the st.t:>ry, KI.nhua, or Gold Flower, is 21 at the time the :l.nterview. At the age of fifteen she had . fallen in love with a young student, but their marriage '.;as forbidden by parents and by the society. A few months later her parents engaged her to Chang, an 'older man she had never even seen. In despair she tr1ed to hang herself, but was rescued by her :parents, who explaine d to her, "You must wait for fa.te.n Gold Flower was unable to accept that fate, and :?4outed at her mother," Do you remember the day you were young? Was it suitable for-you to marry someone fifteen years older than -you?" Suddenly she raised herself like a galvanized corpse. "You want to kill mel .. " 1'1..:..

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On wedding night, Gold Flow-er resisted her husband's ad. vances unt:i.l he beat her anrl .finally raped her. These beatings became a regular part of their t:r;-aditona1 Chinese marriage, in which the woman• s role •ras slave and mistress. Gold Flower could not help but accept these la.m of society and outwardly she under to her husband like a slave--meek, obedient .• fearful. But in the innermost recesses of ter heart, her thoughts were revolving in a different fashion. '!.'here, deep down inside her, she was engrossed in one th:!.ng only: to pay back, insult by insuJ.t, blow by blow, every th:l.ng she h:-l.d su:t'fero:;d at h et' husban:i1 s hands, Even as she was saJlng goodbye to her husband at the gate, she was thinking: I will taJ'e my vengeance o n you someday. Just wa! .t. The day will come. In August, 1945 tlle Communist 8th Route Army passed through Gold s viLlage. while they were there, they helped the village women form the Women1s Asso-:::iation. Dark Jade, a woman from the Asoociation, visited Gold Flower: "We must release ourselves from th1-} domination of men;' Dark Jade told ('..old Flo1ve:c. "But we cannot; do it in d), vid.ually, we must aJ.l st?..nd together and release ourselves as a unit." 'I'he llest part of' the st-:ny :t'ollo\-ls _, as the 'WG-en, ;;trong .in their new unity, dJ.scipl:tne th"' 1W n pc•li t:i c,e.J .. e:lucation a nd. physical coercion. '!"ne vw;,:.::n l:<:<.:::,j. ' ' ' tr:e 3trongeat revolut .ionary in the village a nd Pl' , -:,;s their men into the fight against the US-backed Nationalist armies. Un(ie;: the acta;!;( of tho ::o:nr2n1s .! sociation1 Gold. .?lower• s husband pretends t o :cepcut of hiu crutc l J.j:cy, but later admits to his >dfe: I am inte1ested i.n a society such as the one at Tientsin. I believe women must o1Jey the ord.ers or men. But you see in the 8th R o ute 1il.'eas 'i!Omen ile.we beccr;;r; crazy. '.fhe y don't obey merr• But a.re' o ther things 1 too. In Tientsin, there is no pltn1d. cT :tn s of the people. There are rich men who dress wei .:;.. }l;,t :ln the L:iJ,u s.ted Areas all propB!ty ia distributed . . 'I he :dch become poor. I don't believe in the new society.

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ld. Flower resolves to give him up to aS:;ociation nd to join the struggle fer a new China: But nm.; as she lay there, even as she made no attempt to stop his renewed caresses, she knew exactly how she felt about him. She did not rant him, had never wanted him, nor any man .l:ike him. He was just one of those things that society, the old ola.ck society had brought on her, anb-llld had in co!lll'llon HaG. that olq t •..,rF_t;.qo .!lad forced them together. The traditions removed, the had absolutely no means of contact. Their condition was not isolated. It was national. Gold Flower there beside her husband, and over ru1d over -"11Sain she said to herself: "He belongs to the rich. I belong to the poor. He is old and I am young. We are enemies. " And though her husband tried again to make love to her, she only lay there, cold to his touch, but burning with anger and hatred.

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