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People's News Service, February 25, 1971

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Title:
People's News Service, February 25, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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Language:
English

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serial ( sobekcm )

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Copyright [name of copyright holder or Creator or Publisher as appropriate]. Permission granted to University of Colorado Denver to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.

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Full Text
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It has 'been rumored that at this time last year the Berkeley, Cslifomia an&rchjLsts had a nev systam develaped for shattering the econemy, and adding & touoh of 'beauty to the Almighty Dollar. I sm not sure hew w&U it varked, tut it goes like this: Vhenever you getfyoor gruhby little hands on some money, mske sure you hare m an indelihle pen. Then you Juet heautifyi slogans, juat plain art, or vh&tever your Iitt3.e heart desires.) Vhen you do this, only do it on one side of the hili, so when you pey for scwething you can give it to the person ale&n side up so they vili he sure to take It.
The effeet this could have on the mor.ey-ifiaki.eg departmants could he devastating. The pigs vonH want defsoed currency flo&ting arcund, especially vhen it is derog&tory to the system, so they take all o1 this money out of cirou-latioa, thus having te replaae it. If 100 Denverites fuek-e& up $10 a week per person, in a year that vould he $52;000 a year that our fine oity vould haee to replace Xf every-one got their frlends to do it, there is no tellxng vhat eould happen. See you at the hank.
P. S. A jflk hraas washer vith a plece of scoteh-tape on ons side vili work as a dime in-maohinea.


VIETNAM:
THE NEXT HIROSHIMA
Since the 1950's numerous military papers have outlined. speeific circumstances under which nuclear weapons would be used in areas like Vietnam. As of 1S68 there are 5» 500 nuclear weapons in Southeast Asia most of which are on the Korean and Thailand mainland; adi easily accessible.
Riehard Nixon on March 17, 1955» before the Sxecutive Club of Chicago said, "Tactical nuclear weapons are now conventional and vili be used against the military targets of any aggressive force”» The majority of the American. peo~ ple believe tbat the South Vietnamese are victims of aggressive terrorist forces froa Sorth Vietnam backed up by Hussia, China and any other barbarie animals their^mis-informed minds can conjure up.
Ron Young, director of Youth Work of the Pellowship of Reconciliation, vlsited Sorth Vietnam over this past Cinrist-mas to obtain n&mes of POWs, Back in this country he vas told by a voman in Seattle who is an administrator of Canadian Relief Prograas in Vietnam that ali uersonnel in the northern provinces of South Vietnam vorking at CRP medical outposts vere recently given crash training programs on the treataent of radiationpoisoning,
«***■*» ******
had on occasi on thought of using tactical rraclccr. weapons in Indochina. John Poster Dulles and Admiral Radford proposed to the Prench the use of such veaponry to save the garrison at Dieribienphu. In the summer of 1?66 Pres-ident Johnson made a reque3* for volunteers from Thailand air-bases for a "special misslon”. Pour pilots each with over




100 missions over Horth Vietnam vere chosen» At first the pilots had no idea as to what their mission was all about.
Later they were briefed that it was to drop A-bombs oyer selected targets in Horth Vietnam. Suddenly it Was called off. No reason was given. Later on it became ciear.
Otrategie nuclear weapons would nofc be used against the Oemocratie Republic of Vietnam because it is a aeafcer of the "socialist camp” and the risk of starting a var with the ooviet Union must be avoided. In 1968 however, Johnson had not ruled out the possiblities of creating a nuclear contaminated barrier along the DMZ and along the Ho Chi Minh trail cutting through South Vietnam. He also considered the use of tactical nudear weapons to save the troops at Khe 3anh. leports that the Vhite House was looking for congressional isaction to such a move elieited a strong public reaction and the idea was dropped.
Hixon is ccmmitted to a military vlctory but it seems beyond his grasp. It appears that his only alternative to tota’ vith-drawal and defeat may be to massively esoalate the var vithin the coming months. But this too has it’ s probi eras, The U.S. has 'been boatbing the shit out of Laos since I96.I and resistance to the lmperialists is as great as ever» His options for escalation are limited. He can attempt a lafger invasion than is already oaeuring in Cambodia and Laos in hopes of stifling revolution and cutting off the Ho trail. But this will prove suicidal in the end as the Pathet Lao and the Horth Vietnamese are well-fortifed and that 100-mile-wide terrain is the asost difficult in Indochina for a mechanized army to manuever. He could invade Horth Vietnam (several unverified reports from Japanese corres-pondent» eontenfi th*t, there are already U.S. troops in the soufchwestern partion of Horth Vietnam) with U.S.-Saigon troops.
If this happena Hixon will have to follow it up with massive bomblng of Hanoi and Haiphong. Past experience however has shown this to be fruitless. There is another thing Hixon can do and that would be to use tactical nuelear weapons against the North and the Ho Chi Minh trail.


An important question to be asked is vhy have oonventieaal weapona failed. Virtually everything in the Pentagon’s arsen&l has baen tried and failed. The asassaere of the rural popula-tion and their forced evacuation is not an accident. It is the American strategy. The Viet Cong are a poverful revolutionary foree vhich earrnot be cut off from the people so long as the people exist. The strategy is to apply enougb warsnakiag pover on a massive seale against the Viet Cong constitueney-the people- ia hopes of forcing migration to the' refugee campa and the slums around Saigon where they ean be controlled assuming of eourse that the VC are a rural based group, This is called urbanization. The idea that such densely populated and oppressive areas would become perfect ground for the urban guerilla has probably erossed Nixon's mind. But it is a risk he is willing to take believing that the VC are a rural group.
An examination of the Tet offensive would prove different.
Any colonizing power beiieves in it's own faltering strength even after the veeds have sprouted from it’s grave.
The administration recognizes that so long as an organized social life exists in Vietnam the KLP will be a dominant fores. The U.S» vili have to obliterate the social fabric of those people and will in an attempt to keep you and me "free". This plan of aetion is characteristic of any war fought against a whcle people or at- least a large segment of it 5 that it's primary■aira is not the eonquest of territory but the destruction of the.vili of the irsurgents. Wben it teeomes ciear that it'is impossible to crnsh such revolutionary fervor to one’s cause then the destruetion of the insurgents beccrmes the primary aim. What ve have dene in Vietnam on the ground and In the air has so far failed to vin the var. What we are doing in the air over Laos and Cambodia and vhat the ARVN troops are doing on the ground vili not end the war either...in the short run. If however ve vere to continually year in and year out destroy the land and the people then eventually we would win the war. But Nixon wants to get re-elected in '72.by fulfilling his promi3es to the publie by windlng down the war. Also the U.S. high command is fearfui of the demoralizlng effeets of this war has had on their own troops particularly since soldiers are refusing to be owned. Their officere are increasingly


becoraing victims of a war vithin a warj victims of fragging and aecidental bombings. However the administration is bent on leaving Vietnam and ali of Indoehina with a medal attached to it's breast pocket announcing a total railitary vietory. They also want to leave sufficient toops in Indo-china to insure that no one vili shoot the pig card cheaters in the back with one hand in the till. Vietnamization is vinding dovn the ground war, widaning the air war and ehanging the color of the casulties.
As I stated before the U.S. has very few options. One wouldbe the use of tactical nuclear weapons which is an action the administration by the logic of it's position is being moved to. The second is unconditional disengagement. Nixon has definately not ruled out the possibilty of using nuclear weapons. The last option: we might provoke China into a war in which the people of this country would unite behind the administration thus removing from history the failure of Vietnam. If China enters the war the U.S,, is left with two choices. One would he immediate political settlement leading to complete American Vithdrawal frcm Indo-china...hlghly unlikely. The other would be to attempt to stop Chinese intervention with either the massive use of conventional weapons or limited use of nuclear weapons. Some, it is hard to teli how many favor this as the perfect time to get China. The Chimese have stated their support for the United Front of Indochinese Peoples. If the Chinese say to the U.S. go no further and the U.S. continues to fuck around with Indoehina then the majtur war will have already begun.
As the war approaches' a crisis point Nixon must escalate to total genocide and the threat or use of nuclear weapons or baek down and accept U.S. defeat. Nixon is avare that the esupire is at stake in Vietnam.He has said that he will not be the first U.S. president to ever lose a war. It is possible he will totally destroy Vietnam and engage us in WWIII in an attempt to save his temples of Home from erurnb-ling down the hili...a last diteh effort to affirm the U.S. world-wide role , that of policeman... vhat he believes the


vay to vorld peace. It is up to us here at home to make sure Nixcn is the first American president to lose a v&r, a war at hw and abroad, keeping in mind that that mother-fucker vili not f alter in destroying the world in an atteapt to -save it,
-Scott Keating


DOPE SMOKtKG KIKTS #1;
WHEN SMOKING YOUR CAR, UPOK ENCCTOPERING THE EVER tfROUBEESOME RQA.CK, POT IT IN THE LIGBTHR AND SMOKE YOUR TROUBLES AWAY,
IO


And the second colusan is coarposed p? youth, running as with vinged feetj ainging as if tfceir throats vere struhg vith sllver strlnga, and cllniblng tcward the mountaintop as though drawn by some lrresistsible, aiagic force.
"SSms is tnankind divided into tvo long columna, one compos ed of the aged and bent, who support themselves on crooked staves aasl as they valk themselves on the p*th of life, they pant as it they were clitabing toward a mountaintop while they are actu&lly descending into the abyss.
In which of these two processions do you belong, roy brethren?
Ask yourself this question, when you sure a&one in the silence of the night.
Judge for yourselves whether you belong with the slaves of yesterday or the free men of tomorrow."
//
-KahJil Gibran


jgv?
Most of us knov this system is fucked un. The ouestion is hov cari we, as individuals do spmething to change it.
People are understandably frustrated as to knoving an effect-ive course of action. One.of the hest way? to vork toward a Revolution is to build a Revolutionary community in Dehver and it is something we car. all be part of, as a community is rire than just people with a similar Life style living in a gi ven area. Take a look at suburbia, i^hau is not the life style we are talking absut. Contesaporary Asnericans are isolated from each other by capitalistic urban society to the point they vili walk around a man being hurt in a gutter, now warrting to get involved. A real comrmmity is hard to define in wcrds, its a shared state of mind, a kind of communal feeling that exlsts briefly when people get together vith a common purpose in mind. If you' ve ever been in Berkely, you know what I mean.
We intend to discuss various ideas and proposals in this and coming issues, that hopefully vili get people involved in vhatever type of community effort that they ean relate to beet, Denver ie beginning to ccce together as never before, vith a variety of counter-institutions and Services that need your continued support. The poteatial is here ( remetat)er Woodstcck West) and summer is coming and it is up to us to make Denver happen.
1 know all of us could dig havlng free concerts, say in Vszshor Cheeseman parks. There no doubt would be mSBiy bullabit legal hassles withi the authorities, but if we are deteyssined enought I knpw it ean be done. There are Hfcnds vho will play for free or donations (we might even find 5*1 -Mgh anapgy revolutionary group like the MC 5 used to be).
/>


It’s too bad ve couldn-t have a real Woodstock every veek«
I meari the type of tribal gathering vhere we could really be ourselves, smcke dope openly, skinny dip? and be comoletely free of p&ranoia and inhibi*tions, but being in a city nark vould impose certain limitations*on our behavior. No ourpose vould be served by freaking out straight people (vho have a much right to use the park as we) and thusly giving the pigs an excuse to come dova pn us. At least until things get rolling neocle should avoid dealing and above ali clean up after themselves, volunteers could ipsure that all is left in good shape and deal with any unforeseen trouble.
We could also think about creating a genuine peoples park in Benver, There are a number of vacant and unkempt lots in the Capitol Hili area, I’m not saying that ve should just liberate them, as I doubt that ve are ready for that, Perhaps the ovners could be per suade d to let us use the land in exchange for cleaning it up. Especially if it is an eyesore the surrounding residents could really relate to seeing the hippies vorking to create something of use to all.
People of all age groups ift the area of People1 s Park Annex in Berkely, for in st ance, really appreciate haveing the park and help to keep it up, Any one intereated in these ideas contact P.N.S, and ve vili try and get things goihg.
PCWSH TO TEE PEOPLES PARKS!


Throughtout the pa?t fev years- in the Denver area there ha? been a great increase in the nuraber of craft nnen ani artiits. It seems that ali over the country the art of the craft is comirig back. This i s an encouraging rign for our socjety and ve should gear up to it and meet it.
In the Denver Area there has been scme rnovernent tovaris cultivation the crafts, but not enough. There has been a rarh of sma.ll shops, boutiques and the like epringing up everyvhere. but no one coneentration of activiti.es to serve both craftsinen and the public, Hence Denver Potter’ s and Craftsmen vas formed. A group of five or six people ihterested in ceramics eaw the need for a eomraon studio and facilities for craft^nien, esp. uotters. After about eight months of hard vork and organi/ing the studio has becorae a reality. Its main function is to uro vi de ebimaon space and equipment to those vishing xo further the rottery craft. It vorks as. a guil d or eo-operative vith everyone taking equal part in the vork as veli as the craft. Eut it also perves nsany other functionr. Ropefully;the gulld vili1 be the focal point of the conmmity for other craft development also.
i


The tnembers pl-at^en to the public. There are aleo plane for seminare at the guild and vorkshope for different dicinlines nlus many dufferent art shows and sales.- All of t-hese thing? vili take a lot of work and crenaration which vili also involve th the community. When possibjle^ esneeial ly rduring the surmner. high school and junior high studente can he hired to help out with displaye and vorkshops or in gener&l to help vith mixingclay, preparing it, mixing glaees or just helning out vith babyeitting for guild members* offepring...,.while being exposed to severa! crafts and perhape partaking in them. The guild will also serve as a tool to infor the public of ite arte, Eead Start students have been invited over the the guild to observe the craftsmen at vork and perhaps get into it themselves. and any other group or class is certainly invited to do the same. And finally, the guild pians on running a shop in front of the studio so that there will be public access to all these crafts. For further info call: Denver Pctter's and Craftsmen at 8P5-9T03
On Saturday, March 6th, there vili be a conference on student organi?ing and high school students rights.
The conference vili run from 10:00 A.M. to k*00 P.M. at the First Unitarian Church located at 1^-th and Lafeyette. The conference vili focus on the needs of high sehool student, techniques of^organi?ing in high sehools and the use of lawyers, teaehers, and pacent group s in chang-ing the sehools. Students; teachers and parents are velcome.


Saturday 11:00 am
Feb, 27
8:00 pm
8:30 pffl 10:10 pm
Indochina Teach- In & Workshop -' see baek cover.
International. Folk Dane er 3 & >fusic CMC B&llroom, donations.•.everyone gets to join in the dances.
Roaalie Sorrels at Denver Folklore Center, favorita singer of vestern influence*$2#00. Channel 6 - "Viva Mexico" Deals with the cultura! riches of this country*
3:00 P® Sim^ay * p®
Feb* ™ 8:00 P®
10-11:3° P®
Free Symphcny at the Dovntown Tlieatre Jazz on KCFR ~ 90.1 FM Pin at Denver Free U* - mixed style, original songs, genera! folk. 50^ donation. Channel 6 - Fanfare
Mareh 1
10*11 -g. 8 P» " 7- 8 P® ~
g. 9 p® *
8:00 p® *
KCFR, Women? s Liberation Movement in America, .Black Focus - KCFR
Channel 6, Fnvironinental Hot Line - Air Follution in Colorado
Channel 2 - ”Nev Direction in Music" series* Electronic Musio*
"Soviet-American Relations in a Changing World" DU Auditorium, General Clasaroom B3.dg* For tickets, vrite Lecture Tickets, Social Science Foun&aion, D.U* 80210,
Mareh 4 7.30-
8:00 P®
8- 9 P®
Symposium oii Cuban Affairs, Colorado College Colorado Springs*
Channel 6, Country & Western Music*
KCFR, Women»3 Liberation


Friday March 5
*i*“~~**‘*,^“ Symposium on Cuban Affairs , contlnued*
5- 8 pm - XCFR, Classica] auslc'8 influence on rock.
Saturday Symposium on Cuban Affairs, contlnued.
March 6 8:30 pm Mike Williams at the-Fplkl ore C en ter, Western
flavored crigina]. fplksongs. $1,50*
Corning Bicyclea Kowl Ralliee, Marcii &. April l8th.
Soon .• 1:.00 pm at the parks*
James Taylor at the'Downtown Arena, March 18, 7:30 pm ‘
3ma.ll Paces-Savoy Brovn & The “Grease Band, Sunday, March lUbh/ 7:00 pm. Colis eum*
Denver Free Universifcy is now preparing its catalog of courses/for the Spr.ing.Quarters which starts in April. Do you have a skili or special knowledge or interest you would like to share with others? Anyone who w&nts to lead a course should call in person or by phone as soon as possible. Last quarter we had 114-courses and 1120 students; and we can always use more teachers, because there*s no shortage of students, There is special demand for courses in music. (especially guifcar), the arts and crafts, but alraost any sub-ject will find people interested. Anyone who wants to lead a course or would like more Information should call 825-1297 or come to the BFU building on 18th and Shertnan and talk to the Class Coordinator, Doug Wolf.


Hov do I get my damage deposit backf Believe it or not ite very simple, you don*t. need a lavyer, it costs only severi bucks or its free if your income is exceeded by your basic mohthly income for food, rent, ctothes, medical care ect. or if you are on vel fare (or badfare if you are actually trying to survive on it).
What you do is go dovn to 1100 Bannock St. vhieh is the ad&rese of the civil division of the city and county court, valk up to the clerk behlnd the long coun-terand ask for a suramons and a cornuiaint form, if you vant to sue vithout r-aying there is a form you vili ha ve to fili out vhieh is a petition to, file vithout payment, You vili need the narae of the ovner and his a&dress in order to fili out the compl&int form, you ean get this by calling the Assessment BiVision at P9T-PPH and asking them vho ovns the building you live in.
You fili out these fornis in plain english (no legal-ese repuired) and theii return the forms to the clerk for filing. A good thing to do is to ask for the legal aid attorney and have him help you by checking the formio see that its properly filled out, if you gocf on the form the court vi11 consider it.defective and you vili have to do it ali over agairu If you use the petition to file vithout paymsnt the judge vili have to decide vhether or not you meet the requirements so its b et ter to scrape up the seven bucks if you can do it.
After you have filed these papers the sherlff vili serve the summons on the landlord, at thls point the landlord has not less than.five days nor more than- seven days to file an snsver,V the due date vhieh is the last day on vhieh the landlord can file an ansver, vili be on the summons.* If the landlord doesn*t file an


ansver |J§ 'icses py default and you can get your bread back, if he does file an ansver a court date vili, be set | usually within fi ve days of the return date but. this depende on. the court| case load). At this ooint you go to court and argue before the judge, It*s a good idea to use legal aid unless you can afford a law-yer but you donft need to if you ’• use some of the follov-ing tactics. Get a counle. of people (rxot a relative or a roomate) who are deper;&abie and have them look over the apaftment or house so they can testify as to its condition, take some pictures, if you can get a hold of the previous tenant or someone vho saw the apartmeht when you first moved in bring them into court or get svorn affadavits from them’, all you need for this is a notary public.
that you knov about this» ifvyour landlord pulls this glmmick on you teli him you are going to sue him and throw the tenants union name around as your I source and as the organi*ation that will come dovn all ' over him for his piggish behavlor. After that you may I get your money back vithout having to go through the legal routine, ve had one case that vorked out this vay this week. Another thing to try is to get a hold of the cwner If jjjt I the maneger who is pulling this rou-tine, because it often happens that the maneger is poc- I keting the money vithout the landlords knovledge or perraisslon,
If you have a problem like this and you vant scme helo, call the tenants union at 8p5~?3?Q; ve* re ooen Monday thru friday f*rom six to ten vm, or drou by and rat> about any ideas and feelings you have about housing. The T.U, is goinging to br on KRMAS’ Open Ooinion shov on March 16 and we would like to be able to air your idea? and gripgs so choogle on over to 1^60 Pennsylvania St. room 8 some evening and teli us about it. The land belongs to the -oeoole.
Capito1 Hili Tenants* Union


Saturday, FeBruary PJth 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
University 6f Denver General Classroom Buildlng
AGENDA:
Mornlng: Hlstory and analysis of U. S, involvenient in Indochina Afternoon: Workshops to plan Spring Aetion
Evening: Diseussion on the Best way to Bring the P.O.W.s nome
Ve ean't Be effective uniess ve understand We can't Be 'effective unies s. ve nlan Ve can't Be effective uniess ve organi?e
Lunch and Dinner availaBle for 50$ a meal


Full Text

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.• system developc('l_ for shatter ir:g the eeoncmy, and adding a touch _.,:r beauty to the AJ.mighty fu.lJ.e..r. I run :oot aure hw well ::. t worken some money, make sure y(]>.J. have a a;: an indeHble pen. Then you. Just beautify' . n , \ ' h-LJ slogans, ju.s t plai.n s.rt, or you:t' J..1.ttJ.e heart desires. ) Wb en do this 1 only d . o it on s:i.de of" thf• uill, so \ft ;En you pcy :for you can give it tc the :person >lle&n side up so they will he ame to ta.ke it. " 'I'be eUec:t this could have on the money-rll8k:l.ng J.eJ,
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VIETNAM: 'THE NEXT HIROSHIMA Since the 19501 s nu.lnerous military papers have outlined specific circumstances ur.der vhich nuclee.r would be u ;;ed. in areal5 like Vietnam. As of 1968 there 5,500 weapons in Southeast A.sia most of .wh:!.ch are on the Korean and Thailand ma.i.uland; all easily accessible. Richard N:f. xon on March 17, 195 5, before the Execu tive Club o f C h icago said, "'factica.J nuclear w eayl ons are now eonventional and wlll be used against the rtras. told by a woman ln Seattle who is_ an administrator o f Car1a1.ia.TJ. Relief Programs 5.n V:!.etnam that a E lJHso ;mel in the northern provinces of' S o uth working at t.RF m edical outposts :er e recently given crash training progrruns on the trea.i;iaent of racliation •• • •• r r r 1 , r " ' , 'r.'=. had on t hought o:f using t!:'.ctical " n " -:?3.pOn s in Indochina, John Foster Dulles and Admiral Radford proposed to the French t}-.e use of such weaponry to sav-e the garrison at Dienbienr.:-,u. In the stunmer _of 1966 President Johnson made a request for volunteers. from Thailand airbases for a "special mission" . Four pilots each with over

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.lOO missions over North Vietnam WP.l'e chosen. At first the pilots had no idea as t c what mission vm.s all about. Later they were briefed that it was t o drop A-bombs oyer selected targets in Uorti1 Vietnam. Suddenl y it was called <:i''f. No reason was giveno Later on it became clear. Jtrategic nuclear weapons would not be used against the ncmocratic RepubU.c of' Vietnam bec e.us e it is a member of the socialist ca!Dp ' ' and the risk of starting fl. war the Unicn must be avoided. I n 1968 hm-rever, Johnson ':ad . . ut ruled out the possiblit1es of creating a nuclear :.vntam.inated barrier a long the m1Z and along the Ho C1:.i Ainh t 1ail cutting through South Vietnam. He also considerE'd the 'JS e of tactiea.l nuclear weapons to save the troops at Ki.l _<:'.action to such a move elicite d . 3. strong public reactton and ' "}::e idea was dropped. < --l!-*H**-*!Ht*lHH!*l( K M M * * **-.-** ' : .i.xon is cOJllmitted to a militar y Yictory rut it seems be:;ond_ 1'i.s g-.L'a&l; • It <'tlJpears that his only altern ative t o 'dthahtf>rn portion o f North Vietnam) with U.S. Saigon troops. If this nappens Nixon vill hAve to follow it up with mass:tve bombing o 'f Hanoi and Haiphong. Past experience however bas show n this to be fruitless. 'l'here :l.s a.'lother thing Nixon can d . o and that would be to use tactical nuclear •reapon s against the North the Ho Chi !fd.nh trs.il.

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lm :t.mportant question to be asked is why have conventional Wea:pons failed. VLtua.lly everything in the Pentagon' 8 arsenal han been tried a...'1d failed. The massacre o f the rural :populat,:lon enrl their forced evacuation is not en accident. It -is the Amer:t.ean strategy. The Viet Cong e.re a powerful reyolutionary 'mc:e \ihich cannot be cut. off' from the people so long as the people exist. 'I'he strategy is to apply enough warmaking powe:" on a massive scale against the Viet Cong constituency-the people-in hopes of forcing migration to the' refugee camps and the slUllls around Saigon where they can be controJ.led assUl!l i n g o.f COlli'S":: that the VC are a rural based group. T'n:ls is calletJ. urba.n:lzation. 'I'he ::!.d.ea that such densely populated and areas ' ''ould become perfect ground for the urban g u erilla has p:t•obably crossed N1.xo:J1 s mind.. But it is a risk he :!.s willing to take believing that the VC are a rural group. An examination of the Tet offensive would prove different. Any colon:l.zing :power believes in it 1 s own faltering strength even after the weeds have sprouted :from i t 1 s grave. 'l'l 1e administration recognizes that so long as an organi.ze d soc.ial life ex:tsts in Vietnam the Nl.Ji' >dll be a domina.'l.t force. The u.s. 1..-:'tll have to obliterate the social falric of those people and. w-111 in an attempt to keep you and me '':free''. TbJs plan of action is characteristic of My war fo-ught.agahot ::. whole peo:pJ.e or at least a large segment of :!. t,; that :!.t 1 .ry 3.llll. \Ihat we have done in Vj.etnam on the ground and. i n the air has s o far :fa.lled to -..i. n tbe war. lvhat .,e are doing in the air over Laos and . Cambodia and what the AH'lN troo:t) S are doing on t h e ground w:l.11 not enu the war eit1,er ••• in t h e short nm. If !."o"n•ever we were to continually in a;:1d yero-out destro:;' the land and the people then eventua11y 'lle would w:tn the war. Bu t N:L:xon ,,,ants to get re--elected in 172 by fv.lfilling bis promises to the public by vrind:tng down the .nso the U.S. higb cO::.\Jlland is fearful of the d.emorall:dng effects of this -wa r has had on their GWll . troops particularly since soldiers are refusing to be -owned. The:l. r off:i.ceri are :J.ncreasingly 7

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becoming victims of a. war withi n a war; vi;:tims of .fragging and accid-ental bombings. Howe v e r the a.d!liinlstra.tion is bent on leaving Vietnam and all o f I ndochina wtth a medal attached t o it' a breast pocket anno uncing a total military victory. ' l"ney also want to leave sufficien t toops in Indoc hina to i . nsure that no one 'ld.ll shoot the pig card cheaters in the b a c k with one hand i n the till. Vietnamization is winding clo\oln the ground war, widening the air war and chang i n g ::;h e color of' the c asulties. -t.'-***-** !Ill lE l! li!IIC I! II II II II A s I s t ated before the U.S • . has very few options. One woul d be '"' h e use of tactical nuclear weapo n s whtch is an action tbe administration b y the logic of H ' s position is bein g ruo ve d to. The second i s unconditioneJ. dis e ngagement. Nixon h&s defina.tely not r u l e d ou t the possibilty of using n u c lear •ri!apons. The last cption : we might. provoke China int o a \iar J.n which the people of this coun t r y would unite behind 't< t e administration thus removing from history t h e failure of.' Yietnam. If Chi n a enters the war the u.s. is lef't with t w o choices. One would b e immediate settlement leading t o compl e t e A meric an Wit hdrawal from Indochina ••• :1i ghly unlikely. The other woul d b e t o attempt to sto: p Ch:l.nese intervention with either the massiv e use of c on v en t 1onal weapons or limited use of nuclear weapons. Some, it is hard to tell how many favor this ali the perfect time to get Ch:!.na. The Chimese have stated their support for the United Fron t of Indochinese Peoples. If the Chinese say to the u.s . g o no further and t h e U.So continues to fuck around w:tth Indochina ther. the ma,f{&' war uill h ave already begtw. A s the war approaches a e r i sis point Ni xon must escalate to total genocide and the threat o r use of nuclear weapons or back down and accept u.s. d efeat. Nix o n is that the e m p i r e is at stake in Vietnam.He has said that he will not b e the flrst UaS. preside nt. t o eYer lose a wa.i'. It is poss.1ble he will totally des t roy Vietnam and engage us in \MII in an attempt. to save his temples of Rome from crumb ling down the hlll ••• a l ast. • Utch effort t o e.ff:i:rm the u.s. world-wide role, that o f policeman ••• what he believes the 8

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-way to world :peace. It is llp to us here at home to make sure Nixon is the first American president to lose a war, a war e.t home and abroad, keeping in mind that thto . t motherrucker will not falter in destroying the world in an a.tterovt to save it. -Scott Keating

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-'----------.. --p:'> ==-=.. _==-::::::.::::::: ==. 1 ... l..-• wfQO't\''1 3(:0 \-\J. t•Wi?. E I AWl I I . o a 1 1 "ro . . \'1 }\":> 0\'. \ ji " \Nt..u... '"tQ . 1 11\'E \).\). Ci'.'!\\\l\.ls.. SMOKING Ji.INTS #l: W H'EN Si'401GNG YO"'UR C.-'\.R, UPON ENCOUl'iTUUNG T'HB EV:ill 'l'ROUBLESOl>!F ROACH, PU'I' IT IN 'l'HE LIG H'J'ffi Al'ID SMOKE YOUR TROUJ3L:E: s AWAY. /0

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Thus is mankind di"Vi.ded into two long columna, one composed of the aged and bent, who support themselves on crooked. staves all4 a.s they we.llt themselves 0n the of life, they pant . "lS if they vere cl:!.Jnbing toward a mountaintop while "tney are actuallydescending into the , abyss. And the second co lumn is CO'i!lposed. pf youth, running l.lo with winged feet, siriging as if their throats were st:ru .. "
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Most of u s know this no'.; the life styl.e VI ;;u e ti..lking Contemporary Americans are isolated frt'm es.c:h other by capitalistic urban to the tJOint they 'lli"ll walk around a "!ll'il:n being hurt. in a gutter .. now '.lmntfng ';o e;et involved. A real community is ha.rd to det'ine i n -w-ords, ltF a shared state of mind, a kind. o f coilllllunal feeling t.b:a',;. exists briefly when people get together -.rith a common pur-yose in mind. If you've ever been in Berltely, you know vb.t:>t I mean. We intend to discuss va:rious ideas and proposals in this and coming issues, that hopefully will get people :!.nvolved in whatever type of community effort that they ca.!1 relate to best, Dtnwe:r ir:: "beginning to come together as never "'.:Jefore, with a variety of and l:ervices that need your continued support. The votential is here ( remember Woodstock West) aud sllliUl!er ir;; coming and it is up to us to make Denver happen. I know _sJ.l of nt> could dig hav:!.ng free eoncerts, say !::. or Cheesem&n parks. There no doubt would be many legal hassles witb, the authorities, but if we are detel"i'ttned enought I knou it can be done. There are wha will play for tree or donations (we might even find ; b:f.gh ene+u .revolutionary group like the MC 5 U!';ed to be). ,.,_,

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It's too bad we couldn't have a real Woodstock every week. I mean the t:ype o f tribal gathering where we could really be ourselves, smoke dOpe skinny dip. and be comol.etely free of varanoia and inhib:f,tions, but being in a city T'Jark would certain limitations on our behav:lor. No purpose 'o/Oul d be served by freaking out straight peoole (who have a much right to use the park as we) and thusly giving the pigs an excuse to come down us. At least until things get rolling neoole shoul. d avoid dealing and above all clea.."l up after ttemsel ves, volunteers could i_nsure that all is left in good fhape and deal with any ynforeseen trouble. '1-le could also think about creating a genuine peaples park in Denver. There are a number of vacant and unkempt lot:o in the Capitol Hill area, I'm not saying that we should just liberate them, as I doubt that we are ready f'or that. Perhap's the could be persuaded to let us use the in exchange for clea"ling it up. Especially if it is an eyesore the surrounding residents cou _ld really relate to seeing the hippies working to create something of use to all. People of all age groups in the area of People's Park Annex in Berkely, for instance, really a;pprecie.te haveing the park and help to keep it up. Any 011e interested in these ideas contact P.N.S. and we wi1l try and get things going. PO'..Tm TO THR PEOPLES PARKS!

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Potters o..nd c : ro. art in the work a s 'Hen as the craft. B u t i t aJ:=o rerves many other functionf'. RCY;'efully the e;ui' d wii 1. be tbe :foc a l point of the community for o t i1er craft development al:=o,

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. .\ ''' '#. ' ."" . . • T'ne members vlarii"on hol_ d.ing claFFes of all kinds inclurlinr; -rottery. ; batik, jewe1 ry making and other craftF can n romot.e, all_ of these being onen to the o:ublic. 'Yhere are a L "o -::-'an , -for seminar; at the guild and •rorkshODf for different d:f.cic:l_ines vlus ma.'1y dufferent art F'hOws and AJl of these t.h :tng:o vliF take a lot of work and Cl'e ')aration which win a i _:':O involve th the community. Wl1en eF ,Decial r..lul,in g the high fChOO) _ and junior h:!.gh ro+udentF can be 1Jire1 to hel D out with disniayc and 'Is or in to h eJn with mixing clay, prerarine j_t , m ixing gl.a7es or just helning out with babydtting i'or gd L d members' offcDring .•••. ..rhile teing exposed to r evera.J. crafts and 1)erllal) f nartaking in them. The guild will also serve as a tool to infor the nub lie of it:: aJ_.t s , Head Start students have 1 )een tnvi ted over the the guil.ii. t o t h e a t vork and nerhaps get into i t themselves a."ld any o-ther group o r class is certainly invited to do the same . A.:.<1d fhlally, t h e guild pla,"ls on running a shop in front of the studio r;o that there will be public access to all these crafts. :F'or further info call: Denver Potter• s and Craftsme n at 8?5-9703 O.a Saturday, March 6t.b, 'there will be a conference on student organizing and high r:chool students rights. 'l'he conference will run from 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the First Unitarian Church located at lhth a11d The COil,ference '
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Saturday 11: 0 0 am Iri.d.oehina 'l'e a . c h In & Worksho p see cove r . Feb. 27 Scm day ?eb. ?.8 8:00 -pm 8 :30 :pm lO:J.O pm I nt""rnationl:'..J. !<'elk Dancers & Husic Ballroo m , dcnations •• • everyone gets to join in the dances . Ro1 . 1alie Sorr<1la at Denver F olliJ.ore Center, favorite singer of western inf'luence.$2.00. Cha nnel 6 "Viva f.1ex.ieo" Deals with the C tlJtura.l of this c o untry. . 3:00 pm Free Symphcr. y a.t the DoYntot.m T heatre 7 ll p m Jazz on Kern 90.1 FM 8:00 p m Pin at Denver Free U. mixed st:,rJ.e, original sonr:;s, general. folk. 50 donati on. 1 0-H: 3 0 :pm Chann e l 6 -Panfa.re ' I t. I r t ! I t l f ' ! f 1 l1onday 1 lO:U am ... KCF'H. , Women',; IAberation M:o vemen' . J.n 68 p m d Black J:."ocus .. XCFR A meri.e a , I Thnrsda.y March 4 78 pm -Channel 6, Environmental Rot L:i.ne • . Air P ollution i n Colorado 89 pm • C hannel 2 -"Ne\J Direction ir; series. 8:00 pm 7 : 30"E:lect.ronic Mus :i.e. ''Soviet-American Relations in a C h
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March 5 Satu.rd<:1.y liarch 6 Com inc; Soon d. f. u. 58 DP1 -Symp o c;lum on Cuban Affs.i.:rs , continued. KCFR,. C l assicaJ mu:;i .. ; ',; influence on rock. Sympo sium on Cu.ban fdfairs, c ontinued. 8: 30 Mike William s a.t the Folklore Center, WP.s ternflavored original folksongs , $ 1. 50. BicycJ.e:-; H'lllft';s, & A pril 18th. 1 :00 pu P.t tiH' rarks. t.T.:une s •ra:;rJ o r t. Arena, i'i1!3Xch 18 _. 7 : ]0 p;: :F'IS.C3 -.C)H,':Cy 3:. r.rJ'le Gr e a.3e Banct) 0LlndB:y_. .. 7 :0C r m .. -,J • .... .. -• .-:.. '"' .. ;)I :-. Denver Free University is now preparing its catalog of courses;for the Spring QuartBr, x qhich starts in April. D " you have a skill o r s pecial N' interest you w ould 1 ik
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.. _____ ''Manta don't return no deposits 'round '' here. How d.o I get my dama g e depodt b ack?' Believe it or not 1 t f very simpl e , yCJt.; don't. need a J awyer, 1 t COf t F only seven bucks or its :free if you r income is exceeded by your bade m onthly income for food, rent, clothes, medical care ect. or i f y ou are o n welfare (o':" badfare if y ou &r<: actuaU:; tryixg to ;ourvive on it). W'na.t y ou d o 12 g o down t o Bannor.k St. vihich if; the add.re s E of the civil div:iPion of the cit.y and county court, ll" to the clerk behind the l ong coun terand ask for '3. "Ul!llil0r. e .•l.nd a com1) l a .int form , if y ou ,,..an-: to 2u0 withoC<-':-r , e.ying t here i:; a form you "rill have t o fiH ou " o which ir' a petition to. fEe > rithout uayment. You YlilJ need the name of the and his address in order t o :tJ.:i.l out tl!e c o mplaint foTI!'_, y ou c a n get thif l:-y calling the Assessment Divisio n at ?97 -??J.l a.nd asking them who O',rns the building you live in. Y o u fill out these forms i n 1l1a i n (no legal ese required) a..'1d then return the form s t o the clerk for filing. A good thing -to do iE t o a < k for ne l egaJ_ a . i d attorney and have him hel1J you by the form. to see that it>; properJ. y filled out ., if you goof on tbe fo!"!!l the court vri U c onroider H defective and y ou will have to d o :i.t over again. If you use the petition to file without payment the judge will l 1ave t o decide whether or not you meet the requirements so better t O scrs.pe tlO the seven buck;= i f you can dO i t . After you have filed. these ;:-a,)en t :'le sheriff wEl serve the summons o n the landlord. at tr!is no1nt the landlord h af' not less than five nor more than !"eV en to file an anfwer, the due dat e Yhich is the laft da;J' o n which la.'1dj.ord -::an fiJ e 8.!1 anPwer, ;.ri .l 3 . be on the summons.• I f the lar;dlord doeF n ' t fil e art

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.1,, set ( wcually within .five dayf; of the ret.1rn date but. thic de!'E'ngo who is pulling thiB routine .• becauee it often ba-ppe'1E that the maneger is pocketing the money 'ld.thotot the landlords knowledge or -permission. If you bave a problem :Like tLi.s and you want !"Cme hel-::J, call the temm.tf' union at we're O;Jen Monday thru friday from dx to ten ''r". or dron by and rau about any ideaE and fee2.ingc yon have about houdng. The T. U. is goinging to br on KHM.b..S' ()pen Ouinion sl';ow on March 16 and we would. J ike to be able to v.ir yo•lr and griDe.s FO choogle on over 'i.O 11i6o Pennt:yJ.vania St. room i+ some evening and tell us about it. The land belongr to the Capitol Hill :renants • Union

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Saturda.y , February ?7th UniverEity of Denver 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. General ClasEroom Building AGF.o1"'DA: History and analysis of U.S. invoivement in Indochina Afternoon: Horkehops to plan Spring Action Evening: Discusd.on on the best way to bring the P. 0.1;1. E home v!e can • t be e:ffecti ve E we understand We can't be effective we plan We can't be effective unless we organ17e Lunch and Dinner for 50 a meal