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People's News Service, April 14, 1971

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People's News Service, April 14, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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chtu defeated l8>OS ••••»•

• ••••• «
tele-talk.......<
yes sir, no sir,
3
.5 elephants &
,7 snosquitoes............17
i rip review............19
calendar..............22
1 p06IB«
(insert: leaflet on april 17th & dewey canyon III)
Perhaps the most significant eveni of the past week vas the northward migration of the birds into the Denver area. Their song, a welcoroe relief frotn the stillness and silence of a long winter, is a constant reoinder that spring has arrived. With spring, the renewal of life nsust he reflected in the resurrection of the spirit of the people. That spirit is our most precious possession as well as 1 potent weapon against the oppression inherent in our capitalist system.
The vitality of that spirit is in our hands. We have a double responsibility. First we nsust becctsse avare of those attitudes in us that wreck that spirit, the many ways we rip off each other and ourselves, attitudes that have been instilled through decades of life in a profit (not people) oriented society. Such attitudes are reflected in our actions, as our abysmal participation (11 people) in Friday's CHTU benefit testifies. We nsust work together to rld our-se&xes of such negative attitudes. Seeondly, through ponstructive action we must build and properly direct that energy, that spirit. Hiat's what our sisters and brothers on the Venceremos Brlgade are doing in conjunction with the Cuban people. The spirit of the people (even the Harris poli says so) wants the United States out of Indochina. Tnis spring we can renev that spirit by actively participating in the anti-war offensive. The spirit of the people vili be in Washington and San Franciseo on April 24th, it will be with the Vietnam Veterans in Washington April 19-24, it wfll be in Washington again during the first week in May.
Hiat satae spirit will be expressed in Denver on April 17th, this Saturday. Come join us. Together we will resurpect the spirit of the people. “ftick


Gn Friday, April 9th, the Capitol Hili Tenants Union suffered its first defe&t*
Were we stopped by a large realty company? No,
Were ve stopped by any part of the City, state, or federal power structure? No*
Were ve tr&shed by right wingers armed with rifles and clubs? No*
FBI or CIA? No*
We were smashed by the ,fPeople,f • We threw a benefit on Prid&y for a buck donation or wh at e ver, and eleven, count them, . t eleven brothers and sisters came out to support us*
In case you didn! fc knov, the T*U* is ten hassled people, very little bread, and a smail office* Tiiis small force has han&lsd ctfer seven hun&red landlor&~tenant disputes involving over a thousand people in the past eight months.
There have also been various other things which we don’ t fcel up to enumerating 1 cause our gat aches too much*
3


We expect, and usually do, catch just about every conceivable Jclnd of shit the man and his puppets have available. But when ycmr own people, correction, what we thought were our own people, cut your fucking throat with the blade of indifferenee, that pretty well tears it. To say that ve're in pretty bad shape because of the overwtoelming "soli&arity" of the so-called people is to state the case mildly.
So what do we do now? Well. ve're not going to fold up. Why?
Because we talked to a seventy yesr old vcman who had bad hassles and nowhere to tura exeept us.
Because Chicano, Indian, and Black people are ripped off every day. They have no protection, no "white-skin" privi,lege.
We know frcm experience that these people support those who fight for and with them for integrity and soul.
We also know froas experience that the so-called "hip conanunity" is just so uruch bullshit. So take your white middle class myth media projection and go rap revolution to your laadlord when he evicts you. Teli hira his “lieavy trip" is bumsing you out. Sihg him a song that rotten housing, harassment, etc. aren't quite your bag.
For a long time we weren't quite sure if there vas a "Woodstock Ration". How we know. There ain't no such animal.
But, we’re beginning to understand that there is such a thing as ac underground, a "Woodchuck" nation - a lot of people with their heads stuck in the sand.
BBS*---«S
4
Denver, Colo» (LHS)—State Legislators generally receive num-erous letters from their constituents» Colorado state repreaenta» tive Eria Sehmi&t of Bcrulder, hovever, va3 a "little surprised at the tone" of a letter he reeently received, says United Press International. The letter read in paxt, "I hate pollution and please 3top it or I'll pusach your nose." It was signed "Caria".


(
The people's wiretapplag Service recently overheard a conver» satlon betveen Nixon and Lalrd. "Veli you’ve certainly done it this time Qllie." Irt one gigantic blunder comparable to something out of s Laurei and Eardy saovie, the master strategists of the Pen-tagon ha ve completeiy blovn the «hole myth of Vietnamisation.
Usis vas the plan l&id out by the murderous buffoons who run this gcnocidal var: Invade Laos, cut the Eo Chi Midi trail and prove to the vorld how veli the South VietHamese (puppat S&igon biceps) ean handle a major operation.
The 0*51,5? thlng they succeeded in provisrtg is that when the liberati os forses have a chanae to fight on evea half vay equal teras they will alvays vis. For the first time the people*s araty vas able to fight somethiag approaching conventiohal var, using taaks, artil-iery, and aati-aircraft guas of their ova. The puppet troops vere not faelng ragged peasant guerillas but a fully equlpped military g -*orce»


Obviously I a® not qualified to giye a detailed account of the whole fiaeco, but in spite of news blackouts, an atteapt to hide full Aserican involverent atxed with the usual falsified kill reports and outright lies 3 the truth is stili dbvioua. Even if you read the straight press, these accounts teli of a complete defeat of Saigon troops. The puppets never even reached their objective of Tchepone (the crossroad of the main Ho Chi Minh trail and highway 9 cojsing fron South VietNa»), Instead they were isolated and besieged in their five bases and eventually had to be evacuated by rescue pianes and helicopters.
The U.S, lost at leaat 300 helicopter, falling to soae of the iisost accurate and heavieat anti-aircraft fire ever encountered. The American bases at Khe Sanh and elsewhere on the Laotian border are also Corning under heavy attack and aay likewiae become traps for U.S.-Saigon troops.
Watch now as the Pentagon telis of the ssooth running Vietnaaiz-ation prograsu How wlll they defend their cruwbling puppet regiae alone, wfaen they caanot-even dd so with «assive air support and trans-portation. Let thea explaia to the American peopie why U.S, aray helicopters in Laos (ksxowiag that dovned pilots aust defend thea-salves on the graund) do not violate the congresaional law forbiding ground troops of the U.S. in Laos or Caabodia. Let thea pretend the 50,000 Pathet Lao forces fighting in their own country don!t exist. Surely now Aaerlcans of ali political tendencies will realize that the only options left to the Nixon regiae are either the utter destructlon of the entire Indochinese peopie and their whole country ( by unliaited airpower (unthinkatole by any Standard of huaanity) or to totally withdraw ali U.S. forces from Indochina in accordance with the Peopie*s Peace Treaty. It is up to us to insure that this w&r does end iasediately by any aeaas necessary.
For further background on laos and the widening war in Indochina read Laos, War and Revolution, Wilfred Burchett*s coverage in tha Guardian and nuaterous other publications availatole at RIP.
Jia D.


WeWMULUlM?
Eigbt nem, sevea of u.s enroute to Cuba, coast over the buddiag flelda of Xansas, Tomorrow ve fly to Cuba from Kaasas City via Mesico City» Orice ia Cuba we‘ll do our damndest to help the Cuban People reach this year’3 sugar quota of 7 million tons.
Lite the Greak giddess Janus wa.too look to the North and South. Our eyes are crossed far&vhile. Ve vili vork in Cuba so we caa vork harder at revolution ia North America. Vhile ve raachette sugar cane ve remeaiber Cerky Gonzales as he stocd before the raclst esurts of the land in LcsAngeles, Ve do iiot forget 'Angela Bavis who zealously fights for freede® for all of us.
Ve watch vith fear as the U.S. considers again nuciear veapons.
In the U.S* to creatively counter this fear is the iaportanee of the anti-uar spring offensive.
Aa ve leave the feeling is one of celebration. Ve vili celebrate in Cuba the reblrth of humanity and eor;eciousndas of the Cuban New People. Ve also celebrate vith our Indcchinese sisters and brothers their reeent viotory. In Laoa the U.S. suffered the gr eat est defeat sinee Tet.
Venceremos extends it!s solidarity to the struggle as it uhwinds here in the United States» Continue to earry to love of liberation within your hearts and on your shoulders. Venceremosl La Brigada Vencereoos de Colorado 1971
7


Laat fflonth the Denver Creative Tax Fund began monthly demonstrat ious at the Main offlces of Mountalh Bell, 931 lUth Street. Demonstrations vili be held the thlrd Monday of each month.
Whyi The people In the Creative Tax Furid are refusing to pay the federaJL phone tax enacted in 19<56 specifically to help meet the cost of the VietNaa war. At each demonstration the refused taxes vili be turned over to a representative of an organization whieh Is an alternative to death and destruction. La3t month they gave to the Organization for Solidarity and Freedom vhich operates a free breakfast progrant. The Creative Tax Fund has been together for several months-—but there are many tax refusers in the area. We invite you whether you 'Have been refusing to pay taxes or not to beg:
For
Mountain Bell gained in revenue and earnings in the quarter, and . the year ending Febuary 28, 1971 according to President Robert Tim-othy in a short article in the 3-19-71 edition of the Denver Post., Yet a request to a Denver U.S. District Court for a rate increase was heard by District Judge Chilson on March 25, 1971. The phone comapany claimed that the Public Utilities Coamission vili be irrepar ab ly damaging it by not granting the increase,..sub«Ject to revlew of course.
Mountain Bell seeks to increase it's revenues $82,000 daily.
Het income for the qusrter vas up to $26,998,000 or 55^ a share from 52^ a share in the like period a year ago. For the 12 months, net income went to $100,2^7,600 or $2.03 a share compared to $2.00 for the previous year.
The PUC granted Mountain Bell a Standard increase though some subsribers vili feel a 1'+^ increase, The PUC approved a $11,2 miIlion rate increase on March 25, 1971. Tite nev rates vili -.become effective on 'Aprilj g, 1971. Increased charges on long _ dist ance calls made within the state became effective on March 26


thankyou
'Safurdoy mornkig about 1s30 (Mardi^Mmcameruvsi^ in and (d^\«wv ma^wow, Scott jwst got the fu«k beet *out af Mm mon, hejust 90* the fuck baatout of Mbit'*'
9


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«UNCNME.**
queat» - Who are John and Scott?
Jack - They live in the house behind ours» I said who dld it,
where dld it happen, teli me about it.” He said, "The police did it down on Colfax, I got to get rny shoes.'' "Walt a minute, I'm coming with.” When John went back to get his shoes I screamed upstairs and told Doc vhat happened.
Doc - I was in bed.
Jack - He said wait & second I want to come with. ,!Let me get my clothes on.” "OK, I’li be waiting out in back." So John was ali ready and he wanted to split. I told him wait a second,
Doc wants to come with. So ve vaited but John vas just in too big a hurry to get back there. So I walked up to the corner of Colfax and Emerson and I stood and watched where John vent and waited for Doc. Doc came out and I motioned and he came up there. John came back, he di(ln’t find Scott anyvhere. Scott was just gone. Meanwhiie Doc had gone inside of Red Barn and bought a bag of fish and chips. There was a squad car sitting out in the parking lot there. Thafs about when ali the hassle started.
We went up and Doc asked, "I'd like to get soae Information about a frlend of mine that you arrested about 10, 15 minutes ago. We were being really polite, calling them sir and everything.
He just started throwing out cracks like punk, ail kinds of shit like that.
Doc - He told me he didn*t like longhairs in the Red Barn, they cause trouble around there.
Jack - Finally the cat Jutnped out of the car and unsnapped his pistol and put his hand on it and started to draw it.
Doc - So then I asked hia for his badge number and he said he didn't have one. I told him, "well you just got out of a police car and pulled a gun on me and I'm a Citizen of the state of Colorado and 1 pay taxes here and I want to know why you pulled a gun cm me. I didn't do anything wrong.” He told me to shut the fuck up and he drove away.


• quest. - Po you remewber what his nase «as?
Jack - His nasse vas Cortiz, his badge # was 692. We asked him what district he vas frora. He said he didn't have a district. We asked hia if he eould eall his field sergeant cut» He wculdn' t do it. Sald his radio wasn'i working properly. Flrally he jiist got fed up and ieft. By then another squad car had pulled up.
Doc - I waved him down on Colfax.
Jack - We wanted them to eall the field sergeant, they,,woulds!t
do it either. 3o we took down their badge mtmbers. Einally they just drove off and qnother squad car casse.
poc - The guy said he was a sergeant in the district and I told hia what had happened and I*d like to file a complaint. He said if I wanted toflLle a complaint I’d have to file it through internal affairs. I asked him if I eould have his badge #. He showed me his badge and said, "I hope you can read." Ee had his haud setting oa it so X couldn’t see ito So thftn I said, 11 can I have your badge $ please?" He finally gave it to me and I asked him what his partner's badge # vas cause I wss.goiug to file a eomplaiat through Internal. affairs about the vhole thing. He said, ”If you don't shut up 1*11 kick your fucking ass, right here in the parking lot.!! They all started to dr^re away and we started to walk away.
We crossed Colfax and wsre wsi.id.ng down Emerson and they shined their spotlight on us and asked us all for ID*s» I said I didn’t have any on me. jactk - I showed them my ID.
Boo ~ Little John had his ID oufc and the police officer said,
"What*3 your name?" in a re&inasty tone. He said " John". -iSDcn*t you have a last name?"' "Well X guess my mother gave me one when I was born." "Get in the car." John asked, ■*What a&l doing wrong, what am I under arrest for?" "You*re not undet a arrest yet. Just get in the car, thafs an order. You’re under arrest for dnink and anything eis e I em think of bn the way i to the station." He told the rest of us, "GK you can go nov.11 We started walking down the Street. When we sat in front of the faouse we started to erosa the Street, one of the cop ears, with no lights on, stomped'it all the way to;the floor, got rubber out of it, He was doing about 50, and almost Mt us.
We came in the house, called the police, Internal Affairs, down-town. The first time I got it, they hung up on me and told me V to eall back Monday morning at 8:00. The second time I got the n


same guy who hung up an me. Third time’'they. gave me a lieutenant, a dist. h lieutenant. He said ”1*11 dispatch a eruiaer to the house." I said,- "If a eruis er carnea to the house Pii put my fucking ax right through the cop*s bead, What do you think I am, cr&zy? A police officer just tried to kill me out here on the Street, and expect me to let one in nsy house?" He said,
"GK, wetll just have hira meet you some place." So I said I' d meet them in front of the Folklore center. So we rah dovn the
allevs and they were just cruising up and down the Street trying to find us. We hid in the mortuary parking lot, rasa threugh a friend’ s apartment tc get to the alley. We decided to bide in the carwash aerosa from the folklore center in case they were looking for us. If it was cool we figured the cop would pull up in front of the folklore center. The cop came dovn 17th and saw us and pulled in» As soon as he pulled in 3 other police cara pulled up. One of them had k mea in it, one had 3 and one had 2« Tvra of them didn*t have isniforms on. They had skt parkas on.
Ybo sf\y Aceo\5Be.Tc>my touser
i & tcuce oftsCfeR, 30ST -meb -to sacBT txtferr (V\t io t£T<5K«r W hoose?? oohat boyov -think. t AfycK&y??? m you whai, '
uieutewant, t'ul vum fa thb FOUlu^lffl ij n
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They got out, threv us ug against the car and said to me, "You llke to make compl&isrts against police officers huh, we’11 teach you." They kept telling us, "spread those lega" as they kicked. our feet apart really hard. They searched me and then Jack and they found a walnut pick on Jack which he uses to carve' wood.
The police officer took it ana gave it to the police officer who
had my handa against the
He tore
whole pocket of my
12
eoat out and asked me what are you carrying this concealed weapon for? So they aivested me for suspiciosa of carrying a coneeaied we&pon and drunk. They twisted the chains on the handeuffs and made them really tight and almost hroke cur arma off at the ehoulders when they put us in the car and hit us in the bacfewith lead filled gloves. Every one of them had lead filled gloves. , They were ali laughing and;saying they»d- take care of us. They took us to Dlstrict k at 3^th and Colorado.


A LIMITED INCURSION INTO THE COUNTRY OF CONGRESS
* ' ! itiflthe nea. who had enlisted in the summer
were golng horne Dt ean^e therwsur was hard and their enlistaerjis vere over,
^oa gatoe.-WOtfe,,. t^ie times tha-tj try roen1 s sonis. ®ie snaaer soldier


vomas."
Vietnam Veterans in 197 i, like the winter soldier of 1776, recogniae that Ar.erica is in grave danger and that this danger is from wlthia. We understand oaly too weil that vrhat threatens America this time is not the Redcoats.
Bather, it is the crimes that America is carrying aut against her peopie at home and her brothers and sisters atoroad. It ie the separatiori of those country raen who deplore these acts from those who refuse to examine what is being done in our nase, that threatens to destroy our country.
Vietnam Veterans Against the War, the wlnter soldiers of today, will not give up the struggle. We will fight on, continuing the effort to bring an immediate end to the war in Xndochina, a revamping of veterans benefits and hospital care, and a restructuring of priorities that will make this nation what our forefathers intended it to be.
Operatiori Dewey Canyon I took place illegally in Laos in 1069. Operation Dewey Canyon II is taking place illegally in Laos today. Operation Dewey Canyon III will tafce place, one way or another, in Washington D.C. April l8th thru the 23?d. It will consist of a massing of over 5,000 Vietnam veterans, other vets, relatives of POW'3 and KIA’s, and active duty G.I.!s We will place our demands before Gongress, the Supreme Court, the Executive, and the Veterans Administration. We will be heardi
The Presidsnt watched football 0« T.V. during the Iasi peace march.
And America aecepted his indifference to studenta and "peaceniks". We know he will notice Vietnam veterans when they . urround the Capitol. They are the men who fought, men the Presidsnt praised and decorated. He’11 have to notice; it wottid be disasterous to do otherwise.
We will, therefore, have I large number of Vietnam vets in Washington from April l8th to the 23rd. We know that these men can make a unique impact oh the Administration» However, for the success of this operation, we need commitaents for fced, transportatios, and housing for the fassilies of deeeased veterans. If everyone would provide some finaacial support, we would have a stroag beginning, a begirming that would capture and hold the attentlon of the entire|American Peopie.
Vietnam Veterans Against the War Denver Office, 1^56 Fena, 255-IOO6


THE WAR
It skulks between lovers at the dinner tabk; it is in the soup. No one speaks of it any more-what is there to speak of anv more?-it has settled on the land; the unspoken news, the not news, the news no one hears on the radio any more, it has been with us as long as life, longer than seasons, longer than the wind.
The weight-the body adfusts, the frame bends-
has settled on the eye, it is behind
the giasses, it is on the retina,
it is before everything, it is no longer seen,
we do not live it\ it lives us.
-toddgitlin
AN AJ5TI-WAR RALLY
CITY FAEX BANDSHELL
APRXL 1?
1:00 m


IriTH SPRING, THE RENEWAL |F LIFE MUST EE REFLECTED | END THE WAR


quest. -Tfeafs District 2
Doc - They toid us it vas District %•* They took me into this investigation room, they'ire coffee room I guess. There were coffee cups, a sink and a coke machine. I was sitting in there arid he was filling out the report. There were about 10 police officere in there' and they told me I was a faggot and they toid me it must he the new faggot thing to wear leather-pants and if I had a brain in my head STd join the poliee forde. Every time I said sometbing they'd smash my head ag&inst the coke machine» One said every time ne sees me on the Street he’s going to arrest me for drunk. Another said if he saw me in an alley at night he * 4 shoot me as a burglary suspect. 5he other one said if he sees me he*s going to kick ny ass on the Street, Just really harrassing me super-fead.
jaek « A eouple of them said if they ever saw me they’ d juat shoot me and kill me.
Doe - I asked to speak to the lieutenaat. He said that he woald . fili out a for® through IhteraaD Affairs. Then they put me back in the holding tank with Jack. quest. -Wiat happeaed to you, Jack?
Jac,» - I was ia another room and tuere were a lot of police making cracks to me and about me. A couple of them pushed me around a bit. They hit me across the back with a Steel pipe with a Chain on the end. The same one that hit me with the lead gloye. They asked me where 1 was from and I said Chicago. One of them'said,
"Do you think theress bad eops like this in Chicago?" Then they threv me back in the tank.
Doe - They difin* t even take his pocketknife away and they had me with a concealed weapon, After they were done talking td me they read me my rights.


Jack » Thev never told me tay rights• I requeoted blood and breath analyzer tests about 8 times and they denied them.
Doc - Me too« They took us down to City J&il. There vere llA-people in the tank I vas in» We bad to etand up until 5i30 tbis morning vhen they started kicking people out.
Jack - The cells have 8 bunks in them and they keep the® filled vith about 30 “ ^0 people®
Doc - ' They kept Scott in the tank vith no John or water» They
wouldn’t give hira sny water for about 8 hours« Be piased out the bars cauae he dida’i want to piss where he was in® Tfoen they told him they wouldn® t give hi® any water cauae he piased out the bars.
quest. - Md you notice any brutality towards the other priscnersS Jack «• There was one guy they kicked the hell out of® His face was ali out up, it was just bloody. He was in the holding cell f with us at District 2» There was a guy in City Jail that they tried to wake up and he wouldn’t wake up so they' started yelling his nsaae really iotid and kicking his stomach and sides reaily hard.
quest. ~ How much did it eosi you to get out i
Doc - My bond vas $51® 50, the $1.50 was the fee for getting booked. Jack » I got a P.R. bond eause it was my first rap for drunk.
Doc « Scott and John are stili down there. Allday sinee we!ve been out there have baen pigs parked in front cf our house and drivlng up and down the Street» quest* “ Why do you think they’re doing this?
Doc - I think its cause X asked for their badge nyxsbers. I don’ t think they llke that® I don't think they like you to act like you know vhafc your rights are. They w&nt you to'say "yes sir no sir" to everything they teli you. When they slam you against a coke machine you’re supposed to say thank you. They vere into a big trip of showlng off to each other.
The arrest slips vere signed by|
P* Gentry - JOJk M.T. Buekley - 69.Hl or 6T111 â–  H.W. Duiker ~ 6868
fg S.J. Baskin - 6?48


The attack on the Mayfield faasily (laat week' s PNS) is nothing new to Benver's or America*s blaek and brovn consrainities. AII of America*s oppressed and poor kaow that ”a pig is a pig" from generatione of experience. But ea this veek*s PHS interview with some young wbite victims shovs, most whitfc people are struck with disbelief when faced with pig hrutality and are unprepared to deal with the situation realistically. Those who attempt to explaln the prdblem as a hation-wide conspiracy to get blacks, browns, and now hippies are often accused of being paranoid. It is now paranoia when this explanation is used for attacks on organizabions and big naases in the movement, attacks whieh include the cooperation of the courts and other branches of goverament. But to believe tha^ every pig harrassment of Individuals was ordered in Washington ia noi realistic. Erosa the point of viev o_ Washington, it is Just unnecessary. That’s what Attorney General Mitchell meant when he said martial law will never he necessary in America because vigilante groups will do the job instead.
Most policemen (and vigilantes) are into a power trip. Some of the most brutal police are black or "Mexican". Ibis is because those who are least secure in their power need continuing proof of their superiority. This is one way racism is viciously used to set people agalnst each other and against their real interests. Police naturally identify with the pig powers in this country whose interests they are paid to proteet. When these powers are challenged, the cop feels threatened and feels an increased need to demonstrate to others and himself his power and invincibility.
Domestically, even though there is less of the media-oriented, macho type activities, a much more powerful and stable oppositlon io the powers symboli zed by Hixon's administration is developing. The white "mavement". of studente and youth in aany areas has ibecoae more serious and realistic, working tobroaden the base of demonstrations and developing a material as well as cultural alternat i ve by establishirg cooperative community institutions» Most white policemen, because of


'fthff-f v functioa, fieel threatened by even pseudo-hipples,
'the muriber oFwiiich iacreased daily, aided by the e caseerciall zation of the *hip culture"• Svea thcugh the Panthera seea finished, there are aany bl®ak organi sations that- sssay cmaider to be as strong or stronger that the Faafckers. Sbe Hepsblis ©? Sfev Africa is very strong ia the south and In any case, whether directly or&ered fana Washington, or iust caused by a general deterioration of the "establishment", aessse hesvy represslon like mt of us can*t imagine may come dovn this year.
(And soste of us can't evan handle wb&t*s happening now). PIS is publishing stories of busts in Denver so people can become familiar • vitii the tactics of Benirer pigs and leam frem the experiences and aiatakes of others. We hope that the conhinaticn of repression and « realistlc dlscussion of the protolem vili lead to a eo-ordinated response that vili be repidly develcped and implemented. So tf any of you or yoar friends has had an experience from vhich others can 15 leam call People* s ffews Service and let the people know.. »333-78?5»


I recently had an opportunity to go with a group to Paris to talk with ali parties involved in the Paris Peace Talks» We saw Xuan Thuy, chief negotiator for North Vietnam; fedaae Binh of the Provisional Revolutionary Government; Pham Dang Laia negotiator for the Saigon regiae; and members of the American negotiating team» We also talked with non-aligned Vietnaaese Buddhists and Catholic groups, with Laotians, Caaibodians and French experts in Indochina»
Rather than go into a long politieal analysis of the different viewpoints, I would like to briefly describe some of the "vibrations" 1 felt from the different groups. Ali the groups, with the excep-tion of the Saigon negotiators and the Americana related their stories with maay anecdotes and humorous incidente» Perhaps if I relate some of these incidents the vibrations will becoae evident.
One member of the PRG delegation said, " The Americans are like elephants and the Vietnamese like mosquitos» The elephants cannot drive the mosquitos from the swamp but sornetimes the mos-quitos can drive the elephants away."
When asked whether the resistance forces would attesspt to masacre the last withdrawing American trrops, a former member of-Cambodia’s Prinee Slhancruk' s cabinet said, "We will not stop you from leaving, we will roll out the red carpet for your departure.
We will even by the carpet ourselves."
In this saffie vein Xuan Thuy of North Vietnam said, MIf you are having problema getting enough boats to withdraw your forces we will get you the beata» We will buy. the boats’ or borrow them for you." ckVfH*#


TMch Rhat Hanh, a non-aligned paci fiat Bvtddhist told «a,
”You caaae to save/*us f.ro® coffl&uni-sra, ve ask.-pnly to be .saved from your a'alvation<.!S
In ansvsr to questione about prisoners of war, safety of witli-drawing trcops, cease-fire, electione ve vere told that these vere secondary .isauea to the,?primry ia sue., of sefcting e date for American vith&rawal» In Vietnasese vords to talk abcui theae things before Settling tlie questicn of American vithdrawal vas to put the' Mplow before the "buffalo”»
m contraet to these faumorous anecdotes the Saigon goverxment came on with a very heavy anti-ccnsiauniat politice! line and some propaganda files» No humor at ali» The American teara also came acfoss sterile and cold» The Only humor vas vMbr somsone asked if Viae Fresident Ky didn’t really come froa the north» , The American negotiator sald, nYee, and I understand he vahts to go hack north, although probably aot under circurastanees you vould approve»!f:
I think ve cim leam sosething from the humor, anecdotes and casual style cf th® North Vietnaraese, the PRG and the Cambodians an® iisotiaas» They have fcept their humor and vitality in.spite of years.of serious struggle» We in the asovement here need also keep our sen3e of humor and vit&lity» or wewi.ll end up as sterile, lifeless, and humorless as the American and Saigbn governments and their negotiatore &t the Paris Feace T&lks»
Duane Gall Denver Director,
Clergy and Layreen Coa* ‘eerftad About Vietnam
^ % • * - «
As; part'of tlie new sdhefele, Mourrtair vili levy. a? 15i bharge per month on nonpublished tei.epb^he Service. Jroa the comanv^s newr&te schedule, the heavily populated Denver metropolit.an area vhere telephone tCage is highest wi.ll he the area with;the Mghes pereehtage rate increase.
18


THE 8ARTH BSLONGS TO THS PEOPLE: ECOLOGY A392) POWER* 750 A ye&r ago this spring we were all upset about pollutiori and overpopulation* Liberal poiiticians wrung their hands at the destruction of the envlronment and ealled for a national movement for ecological responsibility* Copying the nation-wide Vietnam teach-ins of 19&5# there was a aat-ional Earth Bay on Aoril 22- 1970* In Denver, 6G00 eamest enviromaentalists, raostly yoxmg people* gathered at Curri-gan Hali to listen to Gaylord Nelson, John Love, Mark Ho~ gan, and dozens of other public figures pledge their Xoyal-ty to the earth. The 6000 went horne that day determined to work within the system to protect the envlronment* They would insist on retumable bottles and bio-degradable soapi they would ride bicyoles| they would write their congress-raen*
The anniversary of Earth Bay approaches — what changes does it bring? The South PXaiie is filthier th&n e ver* Abortiens are stili hard to gei* The mountains are dimly vi-sible through a darkening curta in of greasy staoke* The an-nirersary observance of Earth Bay itself telis the tale: there will be an ”open house” at the CU Benver Center from 10 to 3 pm on Saturday, April 1?« Perhaps 200 people will attend* There will be a bike rally for those whose bicyoles haven* t yet been ripped off«
Ecology has been a liberal cause, and like most liberal causes there are no villains except all of us* To liberale f pollution is caused by ”hu&an nature” 9 so we must change


cur hearts. THE EARTH BEL0HG3 TO THE'PEOPLE is about eco-logy, but it waa wxitteb not by liberals bui by four radi-cals associated with Peopl.e's Press in SanPranciseo, The authore believe, as Karl Marx did, the the "natare" of human beings is shaped by the oonditions under which those human beings live.
For example, the liberal seea that much air pollution is produce! by private automoMles, and concludes that the people are at fault because they insist on driving their own cars. The liberal carefully avolas the faci that seven of the ten largest:corporations in America either make automobiles of automobile producis, and that these huge compariles and sany others spend hun&reds of tnillions of doliare on advertiaipg to convince people that they can achieve virlllty, sex appeal, freedom, individuality, and self-ex-preasion in a.J&istang or a Dodge Charger. These ssrae corporations ..spend millions more electing politicians vho pro-isise to support the highway industry and subsidize the oil oompanias. This advertizing, this lobbying, and the distri-butioa of wealth and power that go with the® — these are' the oonditions Karx refers to. People drive cars because they have no choice? there are no subways, bicycles are ia-practical and passenger traihs intolerable, and because they are emotionally defenseless against the barr&ge of propaganda put out by Chrysler, Gul£s General Tire and the others.
•HIS EARTE BSLOSGS TO THE PEOPLE attacks the "human nature" theory of pollution head-on. The liberale like Paul Ehrlich have told us that millions starve in countries like India and Brasil because there are teo many people, but the populatiorx density of Holland is twice that of India, and the Dutch don*t starve. Holland is a highly industrialized country, and the tentaoles of the Dutch economy reach into the Kiddle East» Indonesia, Africa and Latin America. India is an under-developed country. Its xaethods of manufacturing and agriculture are primitive and inefficient. A small


Indian elite Controls most of India*s land and wealth, and much of India"s economy is dominated by American and Bri-tish corporatioris, Indian families ha ve, neither the means nor the inclination to control their birth rate — in a poor oountry lika India, more children simply mean more family labor power,
Another eomoerison casts more light on the problem.
The populatio» density of China is five times that of Bra- .. sil, yet the rate of starvation and malnutrition is rmich higher in Brazil than in China. The reasons are simplet in Braz.il the best farm land is controlled by huge coffee plantations owned by the Brazilian elite. People can*t eat coffee, but the American taste for coffee enriches American businessmen and the Brazilian upper class» In China, agri-culture is organized collectively to grow enough food for ali the people as efficiently as possible. In Brazil agricultore serves profit, in China it serves the people.
The pamphlat demonstrat? i how, in America, govemment and busineas collaborate to confuse the people profits. ©iere is a discussion of the important connections between the American economy and the near-total destruction of Vietnam as an eco-system. The example of Vietnam suggesta a very un—liberal solutioni "The Yietnamese have a head stari on us in solving their pollution problem. They know very well what causes it. They are attacJcing the problem at its source,"
THE EABTH EEL0NG5 TO THE PEOPLE is a powerful piece of Information. It is written simply, it is reasonable, it is interestingly illustrated. It even has a moralt "There will be pollution and hunger as long as the land and resources of a nation are run for the profit of a few, and at the expense of the many."
the RIP Collective


8:30 pm - Chanrsel 6, Great American Bream Machine
P
THUI3S.
8:00 pm - Ario Guthrie at Deriver Auditorium Arena 8:00 pm - Rod Serling at D.U.
10:00 pm - Channel 6, Soul, singers If ove lia Nelson & Joe Simon BAT
10:00 am to 3:00 pas - Eartb Open House at C.U. Denver Center
SUN.
1:30 p® - Bicycles Row Rally,,Civic Center, meet at closest high school between 12:30 an$ 1:00 10:00 pa - Channel 6, Fanfare
MON.
7:30 pa - CCultural Arts Program, free at Tetaple Buell Collegc Huston Fine Arts Center. Jazz Omen, Herman Ayers & Afrlcan Drum Bnsemble, Wills Coammity Singers, Mei Briscombe Iheatre, John Patton, Jazz organist.
7:30 p® - Grand Punfe, Coliaeum
9:00 pm - Channel 6, Beaiitlea, nSoldiers Who Seareh and Disseat" highlights of testiraony agalnst tfee war organized by Vietnam veta.


TUSES.
9:00 pm - Channel 6, Open Topic, diiscussion, of newly revised Colorado Crlminal Code
WEO.
B: 30 pm i Channti 6, Trial, "The City & County of Denver vs
Lauren R. Watson"
TKU3S.
6:30 pm | Channel 6, Sarth Day Hctllne
SAT.
9:00 am - Red Rocks Clean Up
SUN. '
7:00 pm | Channel 6, Advocate?"If you oppoae the war, should you answer the call for mass civil" .
8:00 pm - Miles Davi3, Denver Auditorium Theatre disobedier I 10:00 pm - Channel“'Fr'Far,fare, Ario Guthrie
| MOVI.
9:00 pm I Channel 6, Black Journal
TUES.
7:00 pm | Channel 6, Flrlrsg Line, Buckley vs, ACLU 10:00 pm i Channel 6, San Francis co Mlx, »Fearing'1
NAVE FUftJ FOL.KS!


if it is until, death do us part then-
may i die soon.*«
even if % ray own han&«
so that i might experience
fche smallest sensation of life.
for it is,
in these times that the only thing
held sacred is a golden la4mb of paranola*
Ima?'


Full Text

PAGE 1

II erv1 \lol. 2 Issue 9 April 14,1971 . Denver, Colo. fm! w a The Earth Belongs To The People pagel9 '. ,;{ '; ... ....... ----.......... -! • . , ,. '

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cbtu defeated •••••••••• 3 laos•••••••••••••••••• venceremos •••••••••••• • 7 tele-talk ••• • • • No••••• elephants & mosquitoes •••••••••••• l7 rip review •••••••••••• l9 yes sir, no sir, calendur •••••••••••••• 22 thani you sir••••o•••• poem •• o•••••••••••••• (insert: leaflet on april 17th & dewey canyon III} Perhaps the most significant event of the past week was the northward migration of the bhds into the Denver area. Their song, a welcome relief from the stillness and silence of a long winter, is a constant reminder that spring has arrived. With spring, the renewal of life must be reflected in the resurrection of the spirit of the people. That spirit is our most precious possession as well as a potent weapon a.ga:lnst the oppression :!. nl1erent in our capitalist system. The vitality of that spirit is in our hands. \ie have a. double responsibility. First we must become sMare of those attitudes in us that wreck that spirit, the many ways we rip off each other and attitudes that have been instilled through decades of life in a profit (not people) oriented societyo Such attitudes are reflected in our actions, as our abysmal participation ( ll people) in Friday's CHTU benefit testifies. We must work to rid our sel'tes of such negative attHudes. Secondly, through we must build and properly direct that energy, that spi:r.it. That's what our si:::ters and brothers on the Venceremoa Brigade are doin. g in conjunction with the Cuban people. The spirit of the people {even the Harris poll says so) wants the United States out o f Indochina. This spring we can r.encv that spiri t by actively participating in the anti-war offensive. The spirit of the people will be in Washington and San Francisco on April 24-th, it will with the Vietnam Veterans in Washington April 19-24, it V!ll be in Washington again during the first week in May. That ss.r.oo spirit Will be expressed in Denver on A:pril 17th, this Satu.rd.e.y. Come join ue. Together we will resurrect 2 the spirit of the people. -Rick

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Isn't On l''ri.d.ay, Aprll 9th, the Capitol Hill Tenants Union suffered its first defeat. '.-lere we stopped. by a large realty company? No. Wt?.re \te s tcp:ped by any part of the city, state, or federal No. W e t r-ashed by right winge r s s . nned. wi-th rifles a.nd clubs? No. FBI or CIA? No. We vere smashed by the "People". vie tl:rrew a benef'it on FridJly for a buck donation or >.1w.tever, and. E.:leven, count them, eleven a.nd sisters clll!le out to support us. In ca.se yo u di
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We expect, and usually do,. catch .iust about. every conceivable: kind of :.hit the ma."l and his puppets have available. But when own people, correction, what we were our own people, cut your fucking throat with the blade of indifference, that pretty well tears it. To say that we're in pretty bad shape because of the overwhelming "solid.arityn of the so-called people is to state the case mildly. So what do we do now? Well we're not going to fold up. Why? Because we talked to a seventy year old woman who had bad hassles and nowhere to turn except Because Chicano, Indian, and Black people are ripped off every dB.y. They have no protecti.on, no "white-sldn" privilege. We from experience that these people support those who fight for and with them for integrity a."ld soul. We also know from e xperience that the so-called "hip is just so much bullshit. So take your white middle class myth media projection and go rap revolution to your landlord when he evicts you. Tell him his "J'i.eavy trip" is bull':l.Cing you out. Sing him a song that rotten housing, hara.-;sment, etc. aren't quite your bag. For a long time we weren't quite sure if there , ,.as a. "Woodstock Nation". .!'low we . know. There ain't no such animal. But, we're beginning tc understand that there is such a thing as an underground, a "Hoocichuck" nation a. lot of people vlth their heads stuck in the sa11d. 6' .. = Derrver 1 Colo. (I.Jf.3 )--Sta t e Legislators generally t•eceive num erous letters :from t.h e i.:r constituents. Colorado st<, t e representa tive lL'dc Schmid.t of B oulcler, however, was a "little S\.J.rprised. at the tone11 of a letter he recently rece:l'.ved, says Un:!. ted Press International.. The lettel read in part, I! I hate pollution and 4 please stop it or I' 11 pUllch your nose." It was signed. "Carla".

PAGE 5

: i I ' I i I I I I l l ! 1 i I I I I I I [ I l i I I I i ; i i i I I ( ! I J i I I f ! ' i:s . Y j P:/. :\-;:E-i\ (); 1\ ,.' The wiretapping sr:rvice ove!."herud ,_:.. ccnvcr ... sr-.tt:tcn N1 ;{<..,!D . i:t • .r.ri . La. i.rd . $ !I you! ve \7 o_one it thls t:i.lt\e O:U..h:. '' In dt>l.' '"Olll f-ctr'&}):\ : e SO!!>ething cut of a arl t i 1 tht? rnn.,..-ster strategists of the Pentagon ha.r2 b1o'f-'"/l n'iyt'h . . :)f ;_)J..B..n .L..-:-J..id. ou G by the Who rtln this .. Ho Ch1 Ni.nh traJ.J and prove t o the V.'or.ld . ;..;,_:;} S&.ig ;)n. tx.Qc:ps) aan hand.Je a m.nd. a n.t 1.e .ircra.t't guns of thd.r O>-r>l. Tn.e pup1.;et troopt'> w ere Mt faci.11g ragp; ed. p<:?"l.S>J.nt guer11la. a but fully equipped military S

PAGE 6

Obviously I am not qualified to give a detailed account of the whole f:!.a ..... co, but in spite of news blackouts, an attempt to hide fuJ.l American invoJ.-ement mixed with the' usual 'falsified kill reports .and outri&lrt lies, the truth is still obvious. t'ven if you read the straight press1 these accounts tell of a complete defeat of Saigon troops. ?ne puppets never even reached their objective of Tchepone (the crossroad o:t' the main Ho Chi Hinh trail and highway 9 co111ing from South VietNa.a). Instead they were isolated and besieged in their five bases and eventually had to be evacuated by. rescue pl&."les a.nd helicopters. . The U.S. lost at least 300 helicopter) rallin! to some of the most accurate & .nd heaviest anti-aircraft fire ever encountered. The ba.ses at Khe Sa.nh and. elsewhere o n the Laotia."l border are also coll.\lng und.er heaV"'.f attack and may likewise become traps for U.S.Saigon troops. 11iatch now aa the Pentagon tells or the SOoth ru.tming Vh:tnam.ization progra.ro. Row will they defend the-ir crumbling puppet regilllle alone, wheJ;l they C!Ulllot . even do so with JJ,ir support a.nd transportation. .Let them explain to the Al!lericfm pt?op.le why u.s. aray helicopters in (kr1owing that downed pilots must defend themselves on the ground) do not violate the congressional law .t'orbiding ground troops r;i' the U . s. Jn Laos or Cat'ilioclil.'.o Let the:m pret.md the 50,000 Pa:thet Le.o forces i!.ghting in thei::: own country don' t e x:tst o Surely noH of a..Ll poli tic8.l tendencies will rea...Uze that tile only options left to the Nixon regille are either the utter destructio!l c,f the entire L"ldochinese people a.nd the:i.r whole country b y unl1llited airpower (unthinkable by any standard ot huiM.:nity) or to tota..lly withd:rv.w all u.s. forces fro!!:. !nclochtna in accordance with the Peace 'l'reaty. I t is up to us to insure tha t this war does end by any mean s necessary. For f\u-ther background en Laos a.nd. the wld.eni:ag war in Indochi.na read Laos, Re'lfolut:!.on, \-filfred Burchett 1 s coverage in the Guardian and numerous other J )Ublica.tions available at RIP. Jim D , 6

PAGE 7

Right now 1 seven of u . s e:.-troute to C."lb;_;., over buddiug fields of Kar!.sa:;;? Tomor:rcm \ot e fly to C'J.l.-:>3.. K .::u1sa.s City vi.Q. G.tty... Once in C.\lba we-t 1.1 de our dmxmdest to help the Cuban Pe>.lp1e reach this s s ugar q1wtA. o f 7 mtl. U on tons . Like t1H?! GrE.:t'!k Ja.:.t11l ! l we look to the North An:i S011th. OuT are :t'Gr a\:fuile,. j_n sc v1e can );OX'}<. ha.i:",ie . c in North 1-rhi1.e Y t e machet:te !Juga.r cane ue Cci ky Gonze.:leB a.s he stoccl bef'Dre the ru.c:tst of "!',.h0 Jar;.<;. -tn I .. V7e do not rorget. Dav:lr-3 ;rho fJ.ghtG 1"'0:.." f\ ... ::(:-:r.3.crr :fo!" all of• uHP a::: the U.s.. eon s iders nueiear "t !eapcna s In. t o t:1is fe&.i."' "i . s the of the -\s 08.\?(.: t.:.nc-; iHL one in "Li.1r.= of' of the CuJ)w .. Ne w PP t ' .c.l.e , , "tJ'r.: pJ (:t!.i. 0 1JJ.:'" siste1 ... ; .. and. 'brother'S .. Tn T>8.os +)1je U "S " t.!1e g-ret'ltest clefeat 'ret. t t i sol.id..ri.ci(.y to the as it. un, . . rlnds in U1: i E)tates;) C.:-:;r:.t:f .. to ce::cry--to l o v e o f liberation .. and o ."t youx :"'1ou1de:rs" Vencere mos! J , : l Pr:L,g:r.t!i.a. dG Colorado 1971 7

PAGE 8

Last month the Denver Creative Tax Fund began monthly demon stratioiJS at the Main offices of Mountaih Bell, 931 l4t.h Street. Demonstrations will be held. the third Monday of each month. vihy? The people in the Creative Tax Fund are refusing to pay the federal phone tax enacted in 1966 specifica1ly to help meet the cost of the VietNam war. At each demonstration the refused taxes will be turned aver to a representative of an organi.za.tion which is an alternative to death and destruction. Last month they gave to the Organization for Solidarity and Freedon; •..;hich operates a free breakfast program-. The Creative 'Eax Fund has been together for several months---but there are many tax refusers in the area. We invite you whether Y,9U $ave been refusing t o pay taxes or not to begin now by in this act of and creation. For mare information 333-1973 or 777-3256. Bell gained in revenue and earnings in the qua_-..ter. and the year endiv,g Febuary 28, 1971 according to President Robert Timothy in a short article in t h e 3-19-71 edition of the Denver Post. Yet a request to a Denver U.S. District Court f'or a rate increase was hear(l by District Judge Chilson on lcd d1arges o n long S dis+,a11Ce call:; within the state bec,_une

PAGE 9

yes sir no sir thank you sir .. • • wSaturdGy morning about 1:30 (March27) Jahn came runqitrg in and Scott just got the fuck beat 'out of him man, he iust got the "fuck beat out of' hlmt'•

PAGE 10

quest.. -Who are John and Scot t.? Jack They live in the house b ehind ours. I said ' 'who did it, where did it happen, tell me about it." He said, "'l'he police did it down on Colfax, I got to get my shoes." ''1-ia.it a minute, I'm coming with." When ,J ohn went back to get his shoes I screa med upstairs and told Doc '"hat happened. Doc I was in bed. Jack -He said wait a second I want to come with. " Let me get my clothes "OK, I'll be waiting out in back." So John was all ready and he wan ted to split. I told him \•'ait a see:ond, Doc wants to come with. So we waited but John was just in too big a hurry to get back there. So I walked up to the corner of Col:fa.x: and 'EmersoQ and . I stood and watched where John went and .,aited for D.:>c. Doc came out and I motioned and he cam e up there. John came back, he didn" t find Scott anywher e . Scott vas ju!)t goneo Meanwhile Doc had gone inside of Red Barn e.."ld bought a bag of fish and chi p:>. T'nere was a squad car sitt:!.ng out in the parking lot there. That's about vhen all the hassle started. We went up and Doc a.sked1 "I'd like to get some information about a friend of ::nine that you arrested about 10, 15 minutes ago. We were being really polite, calling them sir and everything. He just started thr owi .ng out cracks like punk1 all r-inds of shit like that. Doc -He told me he didn! t like longhairs in tite Red Barn, they cause. trouble around there. Jack Finally the cat ju.rnped. cut of the car a."ld unsnapped his pistol and put his ha.nd on it and started to draw it. Doc So then I asked him his badge number and l:e said he didn't have one. I told him, "vell you just got out of a police. car and ,pulled a gun on me and I1 m a citizen of the state of Colorado and I pay taxes here and I waut to kno>;; why you pulled lO a gun on me. I didn't do anything wrong." He told me to shut the fuck up and he drove away.

PAGE 11

QJJ:kst. Ilo you reme mber wha t his name w-as? ,rack His na::!te w-as Corti z, 1'1:ls # wa....se?'' Re f!.nalJ.:,; ga: < re it t.<> me a.'"l.d I asked him what his :parlne:r1 s badge # WM cause I wr;.s. goir g to file a eompla.tut throU{;;l:: 1nterna1 affairs about tile whole thing. R e sa,:!. d., "If you don't shut VI) I' 11 kick y om: ruc:king ass. r.ight here in the paJ:>king l o t , " 'f'r,f!: Y all st11.rted t.o dr4"e e,•, IB.y 'llld we started to wali c away. Wt.> cror;sed Colfax t Uld. W('re walKing dO',..n E'!!lerson and they shined their spotlight on us a'ld ask.e\1. us aD. for IJJ' s. I said I di.dn' t have any on me • .Tack I sho w e d them my ID. Little J 'ohn had hi; ; ID out and :pollee o:f'ticer sa.id. , " h'hs.t1s your name?" real nasty t one. Re saiO. "J'oh n". "Don't you have a la.<;t na1lle?" "Well J. guess m y lllother gave me one when r was born." "Ge t in the John asked, "What amc ' l doing •rrong, what am I unde!"' arrest for?" "You 1 re uot u . nd.er ::> axrest yet# J"ust gct in the car, that's an order, You1re under a.rrest for dru.nk and. lUlything else I can think of on the way , to the station.". told -the rst ofu.<>1 110K you can go nov.11 We star.ted . >-m.lk.J.ng dmm the stre-et.. \11len we sat i n front of the hou .se we to cross the st.ceet, one of the c op cars , w:!.th no lights em, s tompr,d H all the way to the fJ.oo r1 got r ubber out or 1 t, he was d oing about 50; ru1d e.1most hi't us. ile cam e in. the house, called the police, Internal Affairs, do•mtown. The first time I g<.>t it, the y hung up on me and told me . t,<.. call back Monday morning at 8:00 • . second time I got the 11

PAGE 12

12 same guy who hung up on me. Third t ime they gr.we me a. l.lcutena.nt, a. dist. 4 lie}ltenant. Re said "I'll dispa:tch a Ct"1 .. lier to the house.11 I saJ.d,-"If a cruiser comes to tl:•e llouse I'iJJ. put my fucking a.x right through the cop's heao . . 1<111'-J.t clo yv-u think I am, crazy'! A police oi'f':i.cer just tried to kUl me here on the street, and ydu expect to let one in rn .. y hauoe?'' He said, "OK, we' .. ll just have him meet you some place. " S o I ::;aid I'd mee t the m in :t'ront of the Folklore center. So we ran do.,.r. the aJ.leys and they were just cruising up -9J"ld dmm. the s treet trying to find us. We hid : ! n the mortuary parkl.ng l.ot, ran t hl"cugh a friend's apartment to get to the aLley. We decided to bide in the Ca:t"'#ash across from f'ol:.do r e center in case tr,ey were l ooking for us. If it vras cool we figured u 1 e eop ',!Ould pull up in 1'ront of the folklore center. Th e cop eame dmm 17th and saw us and pulled. in. Aa soon M he pu..JJ .. t;.;l ir; 3 or,h<,'r police cars up. One of the:P\ had 4 rocn in it, had 3 and. had 2. T\..ro of" them haveo t.:_niforms on. They had :;kt parkn .. s on. sf'..Y mmy .. . r ,, \'CtlC.t ;:::;001 10 &f.."ljl" Yol.l /!I I Mto 1Cl LET lN rt.y tiOllSt:-;;'? v..)Hf\1 f !>oYO\) "'UIIl{t;:_ \ "'i"E:ll-}'OU I.IJHi\1", ' II 1uti:UTC-NNifr, !:Ll Wd:'F:-T t-ltrl\ jq -n!t; fCJ ... \I,.L('g , / _____ !l l1 _j 'fhey got out, threw us up aga.lnst the and said to me: \!:fo u like to roa.kc compl&.i.tJ.t.s a.gainst pollee huh, we' 11 teach ym.I." '.'hey kept c;c::U.ing v.s1 "spread legs" as they kicked et:. r. .f.eet a.pa.:ct really har.d. 'l'hey sea.rched. rre and. then Jack and they fO'und a wa.l..":lut 11ick on Jack which he user; t o ,.-cod. 'l.fhe police of:fice r toolt it antl gave it to tb: pollee o:fficer ....-ho ha.d my ha.nd.s against the car-. 'He tore tl:t wr;o.le pocket of roy co?.t qut and asked me w hat are you carrying this concealed W(;HtiJOU f'or: So they me -e'or ::>Usficion of' carrying a. concealecl ....-ea.pon and . d...."'Unk. '!'hey twisted the chain:> on the handcuff's and made t hem really tight and almost broke our arms off' a.t the shoulders when they :put us in the car s . nd hlt us in the back with lead filled gloves. Every one of them had. lead filled gloves. They were all la.ughing and sayir:.g they'd take c1.u:e of use They took us to District 4 at and Colorado.

PAGE 13

III A LIMITED INCURSION INTO THE COUNTRY OF CONGRESS In tlJ. I:! ::teo.};. v.i.n"',e:c of.' 1'rT6, ;;hen the men who had enlisted in the summer werE, going hotAC "oeca.w1e i;''W \-r.)J.' ,,"'a har.d e.nd their enlistmer).tS were over, 1'om Po.ine wrote, "'2heae a.r;:; times that try men's souls. 'l'he sUllllller soldier .. .,,P..:!tii\; rpm tl:"" "

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w.:;:man. Vietnam in UkC> the winter soldier oi? lT(6, recognize that At.erica is in gre.ve rla:nger and that. this danger is f'rom within. vle understand only too well that what .4.mer:Lca this time is not the Redcoats. Rather, :tt is the crimes America. is carrying out against her people at home and her bro'thers anr.i. sister•; abroad. It is the separs.tion of those country men who deplore acts those who to what is being done in our name1 :.hat t.l:.:t'fY,t.ens to dect.roy our country. Viet;nam :-i,salnat; ths War. the winter soldiers of today 7 will not g!ve up the 1'/r: ,-J.l). fight. on, continuing the effort to bring an :!.mmcdiate eno. to the Hf.!.T-ii.'l Indochina, a. revamping or veterans be:1e:fi ts and hospital care, and a rest.n:ctur:f.ng o:f priorities that will make this nation what our fore:fathers intended it to be. Operation Dewey CanyQn I took :place illegally in Laos in 1::-'69. Operation Dewey Canyon II is taking :pJ.act' illegally :l.:n Laos today. Operation Dewey Canyon rn: wt:U place, one way or ano-ther, in Washington D.C. April 18th ti'.ru the 23rd. H. w'i 11 cons :ls t. of a. ma..<>sing of over 5, 000 Vi etne.m veterans, other vets, re1.a.tlves of: POH1a blld KIA's, al'Jii active duty G.I.'s We will place our. d.e:nands before Congrer;3, the Sup:r.<:>me Court, the Executive, and the Veterans We will be The we:tched :eootball o.-:• T.V. during the lar;t, peace march • . And Ali'1erica his 1nd:.!.:f.fc:r.euce t,o students a.'ld "peaceniks''. We know he will notice Vietnam when they urrou..otd the Ca})itol. They are the men who men the Pl'es id:"?ut pra.tsed tmcl dec orated. He' 11 have to noti:.!e; it wcmln be d.isMt0:cous to do otherwiBe. We w1::1, there:f"\.>re tave large w.unber of Vietnall.l. vets in \.fa.shingt.on f:!'om l:"f'ril lcth t.o the 23rd. We know that these men can make a unique impact on' the for the sncceas of' this operation, we need commttments. :for feed, trsr.sj')Or".:atJ.on, and housing f'o:r. the :families oi' deceased veterans. If .::ve(-yonc would proviG.e some f'inancia.l support, we _wo-uld have a stl•(mg beg!zi.nJ a beginning that \-Jould capture and hold the attention of the en.t:l.re Americrm People. Vie;nam Veterans Against the War Denver O:f:fice, ?enn. 255-3.006

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THE WAR It skulks between !OJ'ers at the dinner table; it is in !he soup. No one speaks of it any more -what is there to speak of any more?--it has sell led on tile land; the unspoken ews, the not news. the news 110 o11e hears on the radio any more, ii ha. \ ht?en with us as long as life, lol,ger than seasons. longer than the wind. The weight-the body adjusts, rhe frame bends has serried on the eye, it is behind the it is on the retina, it is before everything, it is no longer seen, we do not live it, it lives us. -todd gitlin AN ANTI-WAR RALLY CITY PARK BANDSHELL APRIL 17 l:OO PM

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. TH SPRING, THE RENEWAL F LIFE MUST BE REFLECTED THE RE6URRECTION OF HE SPIRIT OF THE PEOPLE. END THE WAR

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quest. District 2 Doc They told us it wa.s District 4. They took me into this investigation room, they're coffee room I guess. There were coffee cups, a sir.k and a coke machine. I was sitting in there and he -was filling out the report. There were about 10 police officers in there and they told me I was a faggot and they told me it must be the new faggot thing to wear leather, pants and :l.f I had a brain ::.n my head lfd join the police force. Every time I sa.id so-..,,ething they'd smash my head against the coke ma.chine. One said every time he sees me on the street he's going to arrest me for drunk. Another said if he saw me in an alley at night he'd shoot me as a burglary suspect. The other ere were a lot of police ma.'dng cracks to me and about me. A couple of them pushed me around a bit. They hit me across the back with a. steel pipe with a chain on the end. The Hame one that hit me '"'i t h the lead glove. T'ney asked me where I WM f'rom aud I said Chicago. One of them said, "Do you thir.k there 1 s bad. cops like this tn they thrE' w me back in t h e tank. Doc They clldn 1 t even take his pocketkni!'e awa y a..'ld they had me with a concealed weapon. After they w ere d om• talking they read me m y rir,hts.

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Jack Thev never told me my rights. I riF .. h no john or Yater. 'l'bey wouldn't give him any water for abO'.J.t 8 houn.;. He out. the bars cause he d.:l.dn1t to piss '\ihere he was in. Then they told him thev w.ould:n1 i ; g : i.ve him a:ny water c au.se he p i ssed out. the bars . " QUc& t . Did you not i c e any brutality t.owa.rd.o; the othe1 :prisG.ners , Jrw k -'l'here was one guy the y kicked the out of. F.is face ., as a.1l cut -..:p1 it wss jtJGT. 'bl o ody. He was in the ho1ding cell vith u:;. i:l.t District 2 . ' Fnere was a g uy in City . Ta:l.l that they tried. to wak e uv a.nd }1e wou.ldn' t up so they started yelling hiG nmnP. re
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The attack on the Mayfield family (last week's PNS) is nothing new to Denver's o r America's black and brown communities. All of America's oppressed and poor know that "a pig is a pig" from generations of experience. But this week' a PNS interview With som e young . white victims shows , most people are struck with disbelief when faced with p:f. g brutality and are unprepared to deal with the situation rea.Ustically. Those who attempt to explain the problem as a nationwide conspiracy to get blacks, browns 1 and now hippies are ciften accused of being paranoid. It is now para.'1oia when this explanation is used for attacks on organizaiions and big names in the movement, attacks which include the cooperation of the courts and other branches of goverruuent. But to believe tha:v every pig ha..rrassment of ordere d in Washington is noi realistic. From the point of view o _ Washington, it is just unnecessary. That's what Attorney General Mitchell meant when he aaid martial law will never be necessary i n . America because vigilante groups will do the job instead. Moat policemen (and vigilantes) are into a pov1er trip. Some of the most brittal police are black or "Mexican". ' This is because . those wo are least secure in their power need _continuing proof' of' t heir superiority. This is one way racism is viciously u:>ed to set people against each other and against their real interests. natura..lly identify.with the pig powers in.this_country uhose they are paid to protect. V.'hen these powers cha..lleiiged, the cop feels threatened and feels an increased need to demonstrate toothere and himself his power and invincib'lll ty. . ' Domestica..lly, even though there is less of the macho type activities, a much more powerf"ul stable opposition to . the powers aynibolized by Nixon's administration is-,developing. The -white "movement" of students and youth in many areas has more serious and realistic, working to. broaden the bSBe of demonstrations and developing a material as well as cultural alternative by establishin g institutions. l-lost white policemen, because of U

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__ ,:feei threatened by even pseudo-hippies, the. nuni>er orib!CL a14ed by the C
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SctUITDS I recently had an opportunity t o go '.i'i t h a gro up to Paris to talk with all parties involved in the Paris P eace Talks. We saw Xuan Thuy, chief negotiator for North Vietna.•n; l,!adu.me Binh of the Provisional Revolutionary Government; Pharo Dang J,am negotiator for the Saigon regime; and members of the American negotiating team. We also tal.lt.ed with non-aligned Vie tnamese Buddhists and Catholic groups 1 with Laotians, Gd.lllbodia.11s and F-rench exp 'erts in Indochina. Rather than go into a long political analysis of the different vie'lofJ?Oints, I would like to briefly describe some of the "vibrations" I felt fnora the different groups. All the groups, wit h the exception of the Saigon negotiators and. the Americans related their stories with anecdotes and humorous incidents. Perhaps if I relate some of these incidents the vibrations will b ecome evident. One member of the PRG delegation said) " The Americans are like elephants and the Vietnamese like mosquitos. The elephants cannot drive the mosquitos from the swamp but s ometimes the mos quitos can drive the elephants away." When asked whether the resistance forces wouJ.d a ttempt to masa.cre the last withdrawing Amerj.can trropsJ a former member or2 C31%lbodia' s Prince Sihanouk' s cabinet said, "We will not stop you from leaving, we will roll out the red carpet for your departure. lie >1:!.11 even by the carpet ourselves. " In this same vein Xuan Thuy of N orth Vietnam said, "if you are having problems getting enough boats to withdraw your forces w e 1rlll get yo1,1. the boats. We vd.ll buy the boats or borrow them 17 for you.'' ow-. ..

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Thich Nhat flalvs .tion. ' ' I n "!;J ) questic,r:.s about prtsoners of ;.nir, s(.d''ety of wi-thdr::r\tJing trco:ps, ccc.se-f'ire, told thai;, the-se \fe r e seccnd<.n:y isa ue : 3 to t.he issue of: il date for vd.thd.r e.lralo In Vietnar;1ese w o rd;.; to t all( about t.heae things before the question of .. i\r;;e:r:tc&l withdrawal "l>ias to put the ''plo w ';)ef'o:re the bu.ffaJ.o" In contrast tc.• these humorou .s anecdotfl's the Saigon governmen';,; came on , ; it11 a ve-ry hee.v-y anti-eo:mwmi::::t :poUUcal line an•l som,:. p ropaganda f:tlr,;.s. N'J h'. l.ll10r at c.ll. ;J:'he team also came across sterile and col{lv The 011ly hum.or asked lf Vice I Jre-si ... tent Ky didn't really carne :fr01!2 the northo ii'l1e ..A.iueric<:m neg ot:l.ator said> "Yes, and I undersbmd he wa.'lts to go back north, although probab.ly not und.e:r yet(t v.ou.ld a:p:p:cove.'; I th.ink wEi larn something frCIJi the rnJJ: lr)r 1 g.necdot;os and ca.sual stNle of th':'! Not•t.h Vietnaraf':se 1 the PRG :md the Cam1.)od:tans o rt1ey have kept tht:!i.:r. hu;'lor ancl vj:bJ.litv in ';n:H<> of years of ser:l. \Y.:!:J strue.:.gleo 'vie in tJ:0 !l:OVenK:nt t ... lso keep oru sense of htur.o:r s.nd .vite.J.lt.y. cr we >1":!.11 end . up a,a :>terilf!, lifeless, and ! nunor:i.ess as the and S::d.g. on goverP.Jllents snd. their negotiators G,t the Paris Fea.ce TfjJ_k.;;" Dttane Ga.ll "!U:rect.0r, Clergy and Laymen ConAbout Vietnr:un !\s . of' t!10 I-e'l.l ;.rlll :t 75 per montl--;_ en ?)Onp tibl:tshed Frcrj L!te ne rate scbedtil
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radical infor ation oroiect book revie TH' 6 E:ARTll BELONGS TO T.HE I'EOPLB: ECOLOGY AND PO\:iER. 75 A year this spring we were all upset about pol1 -lltion and overpopulation. Liberal W1."\J.l".g their hands at the dest:t"Uction of env1ronm!;!nt .y itself tells the there win be an "open hou.se" a t the CU Denver Cente:t.' f.rom 10 to 3 pm on Sa.tuxday, April 17. Perhaps 200 pe ople will attend. There will be a bike rally for those whose bicycles ha.-ven' t y<; t been ripped off. Ecology been a cause, and like most 1iberal causes there are no villains except all of us. To liberals, po1.h:tt.ion is caused by " hu.ttian nature", so ... ,e must change

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20 o1n hea:r:t s • YtfE I<;ARTH BEL-ONGS 'l\l PEOPI.E is abou.t eco--logy t . hu1.; it wr1tteh not by liberals but by four radicri.ls associated \;ith People's P:z:oRs in San.Francisco. The authors believ-e, as Karl l'fu.t'X the the "na;b:re11 of human beings is sh-1.ped by the conditionH under which those hw:nan beings 11 ve. }'or the liberal seea that urach air pollution is p.rodu.eed 'Jy private automobiles, an the;r i!'u'>ist on driving their own ca.rs. The literal !x.reful1y a.voio,s the fact tha.t seven of the ten largest' cor,;oraticns ln. America eithi!r rna.ke au tomobiles of au:tom obile and that these hug!'; compani.<:>s and !!l[)_ny 0thers spend hund:t:et::h of miJlions of dol lars on a ..g poli tioiatlS who pron:d..se to support the h.i.ghHay :t:ld.u.stry a,nd subsidi.ze the oil oompan:tes. 'l'his this lobbying• and the distribution c.f . put out '-,;y Chrysler, Gulf t General Tire and the others. ' l'H E Ef,Ji.TH TC '.FrlE P80PlE attacks the 11h'.lma.n na.tuJ.'e11 theor.>' of pollution T:'1e l:i .ba:mls like Paul Ehrlich hHy c•f Holland .is twice that of I.ndiat and Dutch star:ve. Holla..n.d is a. high1y 1.ndustrie>.l i zed country, and th
PAGE 25

Indian elite controls most of India's land and wealth, and much of India 1 s economy is dominated by American and :Bri tish corporations. Indian families have neither the means nor the inclination to control their birth rate --in a poor country like India, more ch.Hdren s:iJnply mean more family labor power. Another CO!J'Ipanison casts more .light on the problem. The population ty of China is fi-.re t:imes that of :Bra. zil, yet the rate of starvation and malnutrition is much higher in Brazil than in China. T'ne reasons are simple: in Brazil the best farm land. is conti:olled by huge coffee plantations owned by the Brazilian elite. People ca.'11t eat coffee, hut the American taste for coffee enx1 .ehes American businessmen r..nd the B:cazilian upper class. In China1 agriculture is orgomized collecti '.rely to gro\'7 enough .food for all the people as efficiently as possible. In BI'azil cultu.re serves profit, in China it serves the people. . The pamphlet demonstratr 1 how, in g o vernment a.'1d business collaborate to von.fnse the people aml increase profits. T'n.ere is a discussion of the important connections between the American economy and the near-total destruction of Vietnam as &"1 eco-system. 'The er..ample of Vietnam suggests a very un-liberal solution: "'f'ne . Viet:r..amese have a head start on us L'1 HCllving their pollution problem. The y know very well what causes it. They are attad..:in g the problem at its sou.rce." 'l"r:E E.!LR'l'E BRLONGS TO THE PEOPLE is a powerful piece of information. It is written simply, it is reasonable, it is interestingly :i.11ust:roted. It even iL1-s a moral: "'!'here be pollution and hunger as long as the land a.nd resom:-ces of' a nation are run for the profit of a few1 and at the ex pense of the man;r. 11 the RIP Collective I _________________ 2lllii'l:l

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WED. 8: 30 pm Channel 6 , G 1eat Aruerican Dream. Machine THURS. 8:00 pm -Arlo Guthrie a t Denver Aud.it orium A:J:ena 8:00pm Rod Serling at D,U. 10:00 pm Chanoel 6 , Soul, s ingers Novella Nelson & 1oe Si:mo n $.A.T. 1 0!00 am to 3:00 p:n Open He-use at c.u . Denver Center SUN. 1: 30 pm Bicycles f{o•.r Ra.lly, , C i vic Center, meet a t. cJosest high s chool between 1 2:30 l :,Xi 10: 00 p!ll Chann e 1 6 , I<' au fare MON. 7:30 pm -22 T:30 pm-.Pill -C OuJ.tm a l Arts Program., free at 'l'en1ple Bue l l College Ruston Fine Arts Center. !!_az!: !l!Er:; E!Pmity Singers . • Mi:l Briscombe 'I'heatre) , John Patton, jazz orga nist. -----(.'ha.nnt!>l 6, Reali tter;, "Sold.t.ers \<.J h o Search and Dissent" highlights of' testimony aga.inet the war organized b y V.ietnam ve ts.

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TUES. 9:00 pm Channel 6, Open Topic, discusslon of newly revised Colorado Criminal Code wee. '8: :30 pm -Chanm ... 6, Trial, "The City & County of. Denver vs. Lauren R. Watson" THURS. 6:30pm-Channel 6, Earth Day Hotline 'SAT. 9:00 am Red Rocks Clean Up SUN. 7:00pm-Channel 6, "If' you oppose the war, should you ansver the call for mass civ:i.J.:. 8:00 pm Miles Davis, Denver Auditorium Theatre disobedience?" 10:00 pmArlo Guthrie MON. 9:00 pm -Channel 6, Black Journal TUES. 1:00 pm Channel 6, Firing L:l.ne, Buckley vs, ACLU 10:00 pm -Channel 6; San Franc1.sco Mix, "Fearing" HAVE: FUN FOLKS! 23

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Amerika, if it is ;.:.ntil, deu.\;h d.o us part thm-may 1 die soon ••• even if h;y my mm hand.. so <::.nc:t:: i v1\.ght the sensation of life, for it ::;, ln '.:lmes that the only thing sacred is a golden of parl'l.noia. PHS 333