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People's News Service, May 21, 1971

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Title:
People's News Service, May 21, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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English

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Auraria Library
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Auraria Library
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Full Text
People's News Service
VDI.2 issueio May 21.1971 Denver.Coio. 100 cneap!
PNS Foreign correspondems Report inside


Ban-
Ramparts Magazine Correspondents: Sandra Levinson, New York; John Gerassi, Paris; ning Garrett, Asia*
ABC Television Viet Nam Correspondents: Don Farmer, Jim Giggans, Howard Tuckner» Liberation News Service Correspondentss Sheila Ryan, Beirut; Schofield Coryell, Paris» People’s News Service Correspondents: Boh Bailey, Estes Park;, Jerry Nemnich, Canon City, Dedra Smith, Vancouver, Canada; R0 Butler, Jim D», Berkeley Calif*; Steve W«,
Brian Adams, Washington D»C»; The Rest of the Gang, Denver, Colo0
On April 1, 1971 ABC Evening News held a round table discussion with their corres--pondents in VietNam* The reporters spoke of the Nixon Administration's credibility gap over the invasion of Laos; the general situation in VietNam between what the government says and what it does* At the end of the discussion Don Farmer said that as a reporter he had moved beyond merely reporting what he saw and began to search for government lies* His paranoia about what was truth and fact had increased greatly since his time in VietNam made the contradictions ciearo Closing he said, ,!We’ve been lied to so many times that you begin to suspect that no one ever telis.you the truth»"
So what has this all got to do with PNS? This week the staff of our paper has been scattered around the country bringing you the truth» Like Ramparts, ABC and LNS our pepple .have written stories about what has been happening in mother country» Some have been there and back* Others are stili traveling around and reporting back to us like foreign correspondents* Why foreign correspondents?
Amerika has a keen way of alienating and isolating her citizens and thus those recognizing her oppressive and repressive conditions have bandea together to begin building a new country in the old one» So if we journey out aeross the country or even stay at home old Amerika is not our horne»
The whirlwind has begun* Our energy of liberation cannot be hamessed by the Man’ s technology»»»if we continually struggle to. free the people, ourselves, myself frorn him* We can pull through the storm victorious so that when the dust has settled a new America will stand strong in our hearts and under our feet» A day will come when we won’t be foreign correspondents; that day will arrive when we can come and go in the mother country knowing she is ours and we are proud of it»
We are taling and writing about the present and future of this country» The more of that we do the better* We will forever be making requests for responses to the words and pictures, to the ideas and history that we lay-out in each issue» We encourage people to write articles and letters to us* This is your paper also and we want to know what the community is thinking and doing» For only 18 boxtops, #3*9^ and a desire for a better world you can be a foreigh correspondent on you block» But that dismisses too lightly the importance of our struggle and what we are really ali about»
The war in VietNam is the major source of radicalization for most of us» As it creaped beyond Vietnam into Laos and Cambodia a few years ago I thought moral outrage was enough to stop it* As it washed ashore in Califoraia I thought I could smoke dope and pretend it wasn' t happening» I am working for better answers now and it has cost me quite a lot» Some of them have tested the boundaries of my humanity always asking more than I could give» But I will keep on trying* The People’s News Service likewise will continue to search and act for those Solutions whatever they are, starting with printing the truth»
In a sense that war in Indochina has made POWs out of us all in this foreign country of Amerika* PNS is working for the day when we can all go home» From Denver, Colo*
Scott Keating & PNS Collective


May 25 “ May 30
CALENDAR
ALL WEEK —
- Akbar De Priest &the Sound & 3pace».»Bad Jazz at the Boar's Head,
Monday through Saturday.
- AjlJ. kinds of together classes in art, music, literature, etc», at the Model Cities Cultural Center» FRFEl If you live in target area»
Call 892-IOI7 for more Information»
TUFSDAY, MAY 25
- TiOC pm, Capitol Hili Congress Reorganization, meeting at Moore Flementary
Schoole
- 7:^5 pm, DU Theatre, "Stop the World, I want to Get Off„ Tickets available
at DU Box Office or call 753-2578 for reservations»
- 8:00 pm, Channel 6, 16 mm "Clarksville"—technocracy invades the lives
of the ghett.o people»
- 8:30 pm, Channel 6, Hatha Yoga»
WFDNE3DAY, MAY ?6
- 6:30 pm, Channel 6, Invitation To Travel»»»reviews Czechoslavakia, Bulgaria,
Hungary, Ruraania, and Yugoslavia»
- 7s30 pm, Delaney & Bonnie/Big Brother & the Holding Company, Almond Brothers,
Crazy Eorse Productions, tickets $^»50 or hear the radio for further information»
- 7:^-5 pm, DU Theatre»»»"Stop the World»»0" See above»
THURSDAY, MAY 27
- ALL DAY , 3icycle ale, City and County of Denver conference rooms
- 7:00 pm, Channel 6, Vision of Photography, printing and Processing
- 7*^5 pm, DU Theatre, "Stop the World»00" see above
- 6:00 pm, Botanical Gardens lecture, "Tree of the World", Horticulture
Hali. f:‘»ue
-10:00 pm, Channel 6, SOULl Mango Santa Maria and Afro-Cuban musicians,
Minister Lours Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam»
FRIDAY, MAY 20
- ALL DAY, Bicycle sale, City and County of Denver conference rooms»
- 7:30 pm, Channel 6, S?r£TRUM, "Heredity; Life's Biggest Gamble"»
- 8:00 pm, The James Gang, Quicksiiver Messenger, hear the radio for
more inforrnation»
- 8:30 pia, Channel 6, the Toy Tr.at Grew Up, '* Elia Cinaers"
SATURDAY, MAY 29
- 8:00 pm. Benefit ccncert for Hip Help Center,Incredible String Band,
hear the radie for more Information»
- 8:30 pm, Folklore Center, Fred Schraeder from West Virginia, tickets $lo50» SUflDAY, iMAY 30
- 7:00 pm. Channel 6, The Advocates, "Shouid J»Fdgar Hoover be Replaced?"
- o:0C pm, DFU—Whit Porter and Jane Kuntress play material from their first
album, 'VSunappee Suite"» Peter McCabe accompanies»
- 8:30 pm, Channel 6, The World We Live In, "The Sun Watchers"


FREE
ERNESTO
Ernest Vigil, a Denver native and member of the Crusade for Justioe, started as of March 2>\, 19'fJ to serve a sentence whicn muy range frotr. 7 to > 7 e ars and a fine of £5,666., Ernesto was the first Chi cano in ti;e Southwest (Aztian) to refuse induction into the United States Armed ForceSo
Ernesto was to report i'or induction on February ?7,
1969« On that day Ernesto Vigil and a friend of his,
Gilberto Quintana went down to the Inauction Center and were passing out anti-w&r literature to celebrate Ernesto's induction- There was some actiori which end-ed up with Ernesto and Gilberto being charged with as-saulting a U.3. Marshall, The only person assaulted on that day were two Chicanos by about 15 different government officials, with such tities as Recruiting Sargent, Federal guards, and four U,3. Marshalls.
Both Ernie and Gilbert were tri.ed together in October of 19690 The case proved and «Judge Alfred. Arraj of Federal DlstLct Courts stated ''that though Vigii and Quintana had a right to leaflet and demonstrate, and that they both were «rrested illegaily, and that both have the right ot a reasonable restralnt," he then instructed. the .jury "Just to decide Lf they assaulted one U.S. MarshaJLl.'' Ihstruction was given practical.ly to hang the Brothers by a judge who thinks he's the jury» The judge did not mention the 15 other government officiale assaulting the Brothers. In other words, it's wrong to act in self-defense, In America you are supposed to just take the beating, then the time. 3o a Jury of 9 white Ang i os and 1 Uncle Tom, not people that looked IIke the Brothers on triai, but so-oal.led. ''peers'', decided the fate of the Brothers and found Ernesto Guilty and Gilberto a hung jury.
Ernesto requested a retrial and appeal to both the U.S. Court of Appeals and the Supreme Court, but was denied. The reason; because it was a political issue. The triai talked about racism and the issue was Vietnam. Something that this country does not want to talk about, they knew they could beat them in their own courts if they did not .1 ic and cheat•
They want to lock up a Brother who speaks the truth about this country's genoride at. home and abroad. Ernesto has represented the Crusade for Justice, a c.ivil and human rights organization for people and is respected as one of the top politica! youth ieaders of the Chicano Movement in this country.
Presently Ernesto is servirig a 90 day dead time observati on period here in Deriver at. the Federal Correctional Institution. The 90 day observation was on the judge's request to see if Brother Ernie is sane just because he told the Judge "What should. be on triai is the war in Vietnam, ali the generals, the President, these «ire the real criminals." At the end of these 90 days, we are calling for a FREE ERNIE BALLYat the Federal Buiiding, ?Oth and Stout. Ernie will need ali the support that we can give him, especially on that day. It will be on that day that the judge will give sentencing or probation. ERNESTO NEEDS PEOPLE POWER,
FREE ERNESTO FREE THE BROTHER FREE ALI- POLITICAL, PRIS0NER3
Send ali funda and monies for the Free Ernie Campaign to the following addressj
National Chicano Legal Defense Fund 1567 Downing Street Denver, Colorado Aztian


GIVIL DISOBEDIENCE AI THE FEDERAL CENTER
Nixon did not sign thr People's Feace Treaty. Spring Against the War did not ex-pect hiffi to0 Spring Against the War is Den-ver's version of the national People's Coaii-tion for Peace and Justiee. It is conposed of a core of 75 people and had 1000 noticable supporterso S.A.W, had 5 days of activities consisting of a rally, vigil and signing o:’ the treaty and a pianned disruption of traf-fic in an attempt to shut down the Federal Center on the outskirts of Denver.
The air on Wednesday, May 5i had been cleansed the night before by a good rain. It smelled good and fresh even though ve vere standing at the main gate of the Federal Center « People drove around, up and down, back-wards, it vas to eariy to teli. 200 people vere miiling about; reporters, agents, photo-graphers, participants, supporterso The usual set-up exeept there vere no guns or clubs in
sighto
I stood on a parkway in the middle of the z&ain road into the Federal Center. The parkway was covered with long grass growing around trees and evergreen busheso I felt like I was in the wounoains exeept for the helicopters fiying overhead, the chain link fenee, the federal marshalls and the cars„ I felt like the war was over exeept people, friends sat down in front of some Steel machines to remind me .It wasn'to I saw Sean not budge a muscie as a raan attempted to piant the GM Mark of Excellence on his forehead.
'' If the government von't stop the war then wi: vili stop r.he government", so reads a MAY-DAY luttono The answer to ending the war printed on that butlon keeps us in the frame-work that the democrats and republicans are running the war and they are the ones uiti-mately responsible for it« That legie makes it sound like the war in VietNam was the mis-take of some misled politicians rather than a ciear-cut piece in the jig-saw puzzle to world wide corporate profits. Ve can be amazed to disoover behind the bureaucratic monster of our government there stands a ruling class on the threshoia of a dream.
'fhat dream is to control the world, making it free for trade and rrofit while at the
same time roap.ing huge profits in an attempt to make it "safe”«, If we are to stop the warmakers it is not the ciowns on Capitol Hili we work on but those men and institutions which pu.li. the strings eontrolling our, in a s^nse, uuppet. government.
I do not fully understand the total logic or consequer.ces behind civil dis obedi ence. But as far as I can see they blew it in Washington D.Co What about Denver? It seemed too much like a game. You sit down and I'll pick you up» Sit over there and I won't. give you as many points» I'll give you an ace if you give me your hearts»»«gently of courseo I was pleased with the response of the federal enrployees to the leaflettingo Exeept for those few who wouldn't mind having a few crushed demonstra-tors under their belts I like the words ex-changed between workers ar.d demonstrators. I realize the importance of making a physical and moral commitnent to ending the war, but I am not sure at ali that traffic disruption is the answer nor filling up the jails»
There are always questions of how we bring people to a higher level of consciousness a-bout the role this country actually plays in the worldo As I watched my sisters and brothers dragged away I kept thinking of several things« Will it take a revolution here to end the war in VietNam? How effective an organ-izing tool is CD? Does it radicalize people or turn them off? Is enough education in-volved with each action? These questiors will always be examined* In future issues of PNS we hope people will open up a dlalogue with us and help answer some of them.
In a way it may be a cop-out to say his-tory will be the only judge of the success of our actionso In the short run we need to keep working on the best methods to stop the war. Confronted with this question-problem it must be said that in the context of the antl-war movement Spring Against the War has been and will be a strong architect of the anti-war movement in Denver by searching and acting on the answers they come up with.
PNS Staff Writer


Off the Grassy lsland
The* folioving 1-. in o:o* r *. 'f ■ i«e ■ ri»i5 itoi Imorsy of Mrs. Kathleen Couitev, '-no of the perseris arrested at the May civil disobediancc action at thr 2‘cderai Center. Mrs. Cculter acted as her own lawyer and wrote both the questions and answers printed here. Mrs. Couiter vas four.d «uilty of the vici) at ion of a GSA regulation and wili be senienced 30on, aiong with her co-defendents o
Q» Where were you bornV Ae Seneca, Wisconsln«
Q» When were you bo.\r< i
A» o ari ■> 2, 1932o
Qo How old are your children?
A. Boy 19, glrl 17, boy 14, and boy 11«
Qo What is your religion?
Ao I am a Unitarian-Universalis t, but primarily a Humanis t.
Q# What does that mean?
A# It means that I believe I am my brother1 s keeper and am responsible for the llfe, safety, and welfare of ali men on this planet, or pos-sibly in the universe, re-gardless of their philosophy or place of origln.
Q. What is your present position? Ao I am a precinct committeewo-man and have been one for 10 years in 3 different pre-cincts in ColoradOo I have also campalgned in every election campaign since 1940« Q# Why were you present at the Federal Center on May 5, 1971? Ao I had discovered that acts of Civil Disobedience were planned to petition the gov-ernment for an Immediate and total withdrawal from the war in Vietnam. I wanted to participate to demonstrate to the goverament that not only youngsters of draft 'age oppose this war, but so do the majority of American
citi/.ens in my age group and older. I also wanted to set an example for people in my age group to join the youngsters in thier coura-geous battle aganst the war0
Qo Did you go to the Federal Center to obstruet traffic?
Ao No0
Qo Did you have any prior con-tacts before May 5 with any of the co-defendents in this cas, with the exception of course of your son and daugh-ter?
Ao No«
Q. When did you first get to
. know your do-defendents?
A. When I spent time with them in a jail cello
Qo Were you given any instructione by anyone as to when or where you should sit down?
Ao Noo The general site for sitting down was voted on by the entire group, then it was the individua!'s de-cision to sit down when and where he wishedo
Qo Where were you when this al-leged violatlon first occured?
Ao I was standing on a grassy islando
Qo What did you observe?
A. Two young boys and my daugh-ter blocking a roadway en-trance to the Federal Center, committing an act a-gainst a GSA Regulation.
Q. pi« anything unusual happen?
A. Yes. I saw a car deliber-ately try to run down the boys, fdllowed irurediar.ei.y t-y anciner car.
â– c. Vfnat did the federal mar-shails do?
Ao The federal marshalls ig~ r.ored the drlvers’ aT.tcmj. lcd -lorviei de 0
-i» What was your response to this laek of action by the marshalls?
Ao I was horrifled that marahall vould not preteet the life and safety of my children or anyone elseo I decided that lf thesc youngsters were wil-ling to risk being seriously injured or even killed by protesting this war, I'd bet-ter join them so that I, at least, could never be aecus ed of letting my children light my battles aione, as parents of the draftees in Vietnam are now doingo
Q» What did you then do?
Ao I sat beslde my daugktrr in the roadway.
Q. What happened then?
A. I was informed of my uniaw-ful act and advised that I was subject to arrest.
I replled that I was avare of my unlawfui action. ITien seeing that all cars had stppped peacefully, I got back up and returned to the grassy lsland.
Qo What did you. observe?
Ao My daughter and the twc boys beside her being arrested.
I went to take her place in the roadway.
Q. What happened then?
A. I was arrested.
Q. Were you advised of any de-talls, such as your rights, by the marshalls?
A. No.
Qo Did you request the right to make a phone call before arraignment?
A. Yes.
Q. Were you allewed to make such a phone call?
A. No.


Hiis is the first in a series of articles that PNS will print on drugs of* ali types—uppers, downers, psychedelics, and hard drugs*
action:
Effect Central nervous system especially the cerebral cortex which is the site of conseiousness and "hlgher mental activity" such as memory, attention and judgement, etc® Can make people think faster, he more avare of their surroundings, more alert and re-sponsive, and talk fas ter»
use:
To treat depression of varicus kinds, to overeome attacks of sleep, to help one lose weigbt by decreasing appetite 'and increasing rate of metabolism.
dangers:
Prolonged use or abuse causes high blood pressure, cardiac seizures and arrest; possibie toxlc psychosis (heavy paranoid syndromes); psychologica! dependance, insomnia, exc.itabi.1 j ty, deluslons, increased motor activity and overall deterioration of major body organs. When given to alleviate depression may give a person enough energy to commi t sulcide®
abortive measurea:
Absorbic Acid (Vitamin C) '$~6 granis® • .«absorbs amphetamines in the blood stream or 7 tbls* of "Accent" (Monosodiura Glutamide) or 5 grams of Gutamic Acid (sold in health food Stores) to relax muxcles®
types:
A* Amphetamines
1* Desoxyn-Methaatphetamine Hydro-chloride a® 5mg-white b® lQmg-pink Co 15mg-yellow
2® Dexedrine-Dextro-Amphetamine Sul-fate
a« ^mg-orange triangular b. ii>mg-spansu le: brovn cap with orange/white inside
3* Benezdrine-Araphetamine Sulfate a» 5mg- pink triangular b« lOmg-larger pink c* 15mg-spansulrrpurple cap with pink/white inside
b® "Crystal"- Underground Methedrine a® white powder
B* Amphetamine C 'mpounds (diet pilis)
1» Dexamyl-Dexedrine/Amobarbitol a® lOmg-spansule: green cap with green/white inside b. 15mg- spansule: green cap with green/white inside 2« Desbutal-Methamphetamine Pento-barbital
a. lOmg-tab: orange/blue b® 15mg-tab: yellow/blue C» Non-Amphetamine Stimulants
1® Ritaiin-Methyphenidate Hydrochlo-ride
a® 5mg-tab: yellow b •. lOmg-tab: blue c® 20mg-tab: orange 2® Preludin
aw 15mg-tab: orange
People's News Service


Psychology Constructs the FemaJLe; The Fantasy Life of the Male Psychologist
by Naomi Welsstein 10^
Such concepts as male chauvinism, femininity, masculinity and sexlsm are now household terms which women's liberation has brought home to us« Are men superior? Are there certain behaviors and qualltles which dlstinguish men and women? Or, are we living out a social fantasy which enhances ali forros of author Itar i. anism in fam-Ilies', every social institution and government as women's liberation says? Such questions are more than interesting to ponder; lessons from Russian, Cuban and Chinese third world Revolutions point out the necessity of questioning anclent prejudices about men and women in order to carry out a lasting, true liberation of humanity*
In Psychology Constructs the Female, the author challenges the bases of therapy, indeed our cultural ideas about sex roles and behavior, concludlng cur 5 dear. are prejudifces and that we know no the human potential of human behavior, be it male or female* Excellent research studies are sited to substantiate her points«
What are the limits of human potential in men as well as women? Menta! healt.h clinicians and researchers cannot only not answer this question, warns the author, but they seem to be limitlng the discover of human potential* "*««until social expectations for men and women are equal, until we provide equal respect for both men and women, our answers to this question wlll simply reflect our prejudices*"
Why are ali our theories and research inadequate to answer the above question? For. one reason, cllnicians are uslng theory without empirical evidence* No matter the years of "clinical" evidence, the bias of the theorist is obvious* In the second reason, personality research studies "inner dynamics" or the neglect of the social context* This results in conflicting findings when the same study is repeat-ed, due to the bias of the experimenter which effects the finding*s* For a third reason, fallacious reasonlng is used in biologically based research, i.e* since maies and females differ in their sex hormones, and these bqrmones enter t.heir brain, there must be an innate difference In their "nature"* Ali one can conclude is difference in physiological state* For a fourth reason, in biologically based research, biolbgical reductionism is utilized, i*e* sex role behavior in a primate species is described and it is concluded that this is the "natural behavior for humans" • Beyond the problem of the oqperimenter' s bias in choosing a primate species and a particualr behavior, is the fact that non'humans are not humans* Such research can only Show an incomplete, but diverse sex-role behavior in primates*
In conclusioni Beware of the mental health professions* Question why it hap-pens that women show no lntellectual difference from men until about high school when th^start to become Inferior» And marvel that in light of the social expectations about women, it is not surprising that women end up where society expects then, but that some women don't get the message even after graduate school*


â–¡
©OTY (g©0J)Kl(gD[L w
A windy Monday night on May 3* I chained my bike to a collapsing pipe railing» I look around for an open door<> There's a city council meeting tonight and, as usual, only one door is open.
As is usual too, the wide marble halls are brightly lit but erapty and hollow with a sense of lifelessness* Punch the elevator button, nothing happens-wait, punch it again; stili nothing.
Oh veli, I'll just run up the steps, as usual, just as I hit the first landing, "Hey, where are you going?" confusion, "To the city council meeting.».?" "Come back down here", his badge catches the light, "NO ONE IS ALLOWED ON THE STEPS TONIGHT", a voice bounces down the hall,
"that's right, keep an eye on them"o Uniformed authority speaks, "You'11 have to use the elevators". Raggedy politico, "veli they all seem to be locked", guard, "the lighted ones work"o A quick look, hmmm, there are four elevators and only two are lit» Let's see, only one door, as usual, only two working elevators, unusual, and no one can use the steps, very unusual.
Then it all begins to make sense, there is a public hearing on the Auraria Higher Eaucational Project tonight and the hearing will draw a large number of Chicanc residents.
In the council chambers the faces are held rigidly, like a man waiting for the jury to reach a verdict in a rnurder trial» Those who are speaking for the project are running through their three minute sets, raost of the faces speaking for the project are white and talk of iraproving the quality of urban Denver and the need for "quality higher education". For the raost part they are men who own businesses or have reol estate holdings in the area» The pro speakers were led off by Eob Cameron, the director of Denver Urban Renewal Authority» Cameron was granted ten minutes to speak, hcwever, Father Garcia and a representative of the West Side Aetion Center were aiiowed only three minutes to speak, despite the fact that they are the leaders of the Auraria residents»
Father Garcia begar» to speak in an intense, emotional voice asking that his people be protected frorn the urban renewal authorities' plan to remove their homes, because the people had never had a voice in the planning, because two hur.dred families had no housing available to move to, and siraply, the people wish to cemair: a comraunity instead of being scattered»
A: this point city council president John F» Kelly interrupted to ask Father Garcia if he oouid "wind it up” ir. three minutes» Father Garcia replied by saying that Cameron had had ten minutes to .speak* Kelly snapped back that "the chair will decide" on speaking limits» A young ctilcano raised his hand and gave Father Garcia "my three minutes"» Checked, "the chair" had to allcv 'Father Garcia to continue»
Wher. Father Garcia finished by pleading with city council to appoint a comraittee to see that the people were falrly relocatea, the people broke into a heavy applause, that built in intensity untii it pourded against thr walis and the ciosed e ars of the councilmen»
There were a totai of twenty-nine speakers, twenty-tvo for the Auraria Project and seven againct«
Kelly banged the gavel after the last speuker had finished, declaring the public hearing ciosed» He then calied for council debate on the project, council bilis 16k and 165, totai silence—the people vaiVed :md the councilmen sat hunched over their desks staring at the floor. Again the gave i tanged and Kelly calied for a roll call vote,—there were nine ayes, no nays, no abs ten Mons» Cnee more, the gave.l feli announcing that council had passed bili l6U«
The r.oopie rrroaned and stood up ^o leave, their shoulders hunched, valking slowly out the door * c go horne, to wutt for the bulldoscrs»
As a reint of informat ion, part of the Capital Eill area fro® Grant to Colorado Blvd» and ?Pnd St» to Coi fax ar \ ir come areas 13+.h ic presently un&ergoing a feasability study to see if it'can be deciared an urban- renewal area---have a nice day people.
Capitol Hili Tenants Union
?eopie’s News Cervice



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I end on KDZA„.o ’ The misery of Janis. Blot-flted out by the screech of a saw blade rip-
II ping through a knotted piece of pine» Up on I the third tier, someone --JayJay I think - •
i l is singing along with the radio0 Shut the ; fuck up, I teli him. "Fuck you, Jerry," he ' I hollers back. The pleasantries of Sunday.
ooo»excepting cubes.
vacant buildings have
j â–  character/
/not sOoooo
I
| Tin-voiced authority. "Nope." I look at him; || he looks at his telephone o "Not until you get I a hiaircut and trim those side-bums." My hair is exactly two and one-quarter inches longo At its longest» And I am getting bald.
....cubes.
cubes watches iate at night tO judge my visible/
/though private/
/o o o o
||- It's true» The absolutely most traumatic thing that could happen to one of these cops if for him to catch some poor convict balling I his wife, at one of these meetings» He’d.blow it completely^ you know? And the funniest || part is that —technically -- it's not against If the rul.eso I mean, there's nothing in the I rule book that says you can’t ball your wife i
j;; . o o «masturbation fantasieso
and worse
cubes listens to the lies of liars caughtoooo
Thirty-nine-two-oh-siXo Report to the mid-| way» You called? "The captain wants to see jf you. In there." I poke my head in the office. I "C'mon in and shut the dooro" Troubleo The | flunkies are flanking God. "When* s the last | time you took a shower?" Last night. "Leave j anything in your pockets?" Huh? A pair of ■|. green convict pants emerge from behind the desk. "Are these yours." Theyf re mine.
Let’s see your arms." The flunkies inspect my. tracks. The scars are mostly legitimate. "Go wa-ft c^^side." I sit on the steps and
Pepple’s News Service
smoke a cigarette. The door opens behind me. I go back into the office. "Have you ever seen those before?" There are three ' fits' lying on the desk. One syringe, two droppers, three needleso I don't know.
"What do you mean you don*t know?" I’ve been in your penitentiary for eight years off and on. I been seeing 'fits' ali that time. How do I know whether or not I've seen thoise particular ones before? "They' re not yours?" No. "Then what were they doing in your pants pocket?" How the hell should I know? I didn* t leave them there. "That’ s where they were found." That's your prob-lem, I say, but the words never leave my mouth. Things look bad, but I think I'm clean so I shrugo "You can go." Just as I thought. A set-up. But why me and who put them up to it?
....in bold relief against illusion/
/sated trutho.oo.
enlgmatic cubes»
a pervert
a perversion
watching
listening
waiting
waitingooo.
Goodbyes are brief. "Well, see'ya 'round, man." Sure. He bends to pick up his belong-ings. When he straightens, I am gone, moving down the stairs, out of the cell house. I ai on my job, working at my typewriter when he walks out to catch his bus. Until someone reminds me, I won't think of him. He was a friendo We may be friends again. But I don' like the feeling of his being gone. And ever. less I don't like thinking of the day..««
0 o o owaiting
cubed roots/
/geometric genetics
for
the sculpting
of
my
life.
Jerry Nemnich #39206
Colorado State Penitentiary


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Anonymous
Colorado State Penitentiary
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Carefu L now,
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THERE*
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nice and easy»«0
gotta get ai.L of it, siow novo.»»
Knock. on the iicked door»..»
Son-of-a-bitcho
It's dark.oo
Shhho fJtay. cuiet. whisner,, Goddnjar, gc awny Oh what the heiio Ready»««
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In Out
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Out*
Bee-yqo-ti-fui *
Pausco
Vomit* o o Vomit * * «Vomit»


At this point, mldway in what is commonly cal.Led the ''sprlng offensi ve," it is time for a. reflecti ve analysis of what has happened so far—es-pecially the Apri i .IJth antl-war rally in Denver* Three questions need to be asked in this contexti’ first, what are the politics and tacti cs of a rally, second, what went down on the ITth, and. third, what were the differences and similari ties between the model and the real thing; the good and bad points of the April JTth rally«
A rally, in our opin.ion, is a dtsplay of strength and a revi tali zing, re-energi zing force for people* An antl-war rally, then shows the govern-ment, the perpetratore of war, the concrete opposition of the people to the contlnuing war, and aJ.so provides the people with a renewed faith in their cause and in themselves, an emotionally cathartic ex-perience so to speak, as well as a wealth of new arguments against the war, to give in-tellectual substance to their emotional reactions» As sueh an anti-war rally is only a tool, in fact only one of the tools, that serve to recommit
people to the everyday, ongo-ing organizing against the war that needs to be done, the organi zing that strives to de-prive the government of the resources, physical and intel-.leetual and emotional, it needs to wage war—i*e* its popular support and human resources, the war and counterinsurgency research conducted by the universi ties and private corporati ons, and the production of armaments and other war-rela-ted goods by industry* Ralites are no substitute for the ongolng work, but only a secondary instrument of this work, albeit an important secondary instrument»
To be an effective tool given this framework, a rally first of all must involve large masses of people and display a higb degree of mass discipline« This indtcates a strength both in numbers and in committment of individnal participants to a collective goalo It indicates strength in a positive way, a way that cannot be brushed aside either by the government or by its supporters among the people* SeconcLLy a rally must present a series of speakers'who are quite knowledgable about the
war and who can present a co-herent picture of the overall situation in a manner that ef-fectively communicates this picture to the people* The speakers must be carefully cbosen, must be given a topic to speak on ranglng from a his-torical perspective of the confli ct, through a highly emotional appeal, to an analysis of the present situation which links the war with difficulties at horne* They must be well prepared to speak on their top-icso The speakers must be prescnted in an order that both dravis the interest and a-ttention of the people and provides them with a sustained ar-gument of opposition to the war* The rally must be organ-ized around slogans that in a few catchy phrases reflect this argument but also capture the imagination of the people without compromising the argument itself* The rally there? fore must begin where the heads of the people ar at, but must proceed to raise the political awareness of those same people to a new level*
A rally then, is not a trashing operation, not is it couched in better invectives that repulse the overwhelming
People*s News Service


masses of people» It is not a debate platform» Briefly a rally Is a highly organized and discipllned display of commi ttment and strength, both physical and intellectuale It can only be strong, veli organ-ized and disciplined lf the people are famillar with and have faith in the organizers of the rally» Thls is accom-plished through the everyday efforts of the organizers0 With thls in mind we can now go on to analyze the Ap?ll 17th rally, where it raeasured up and where it was deficient» First of ali, and perhaps most important, the April 17th rally showed an increased leve 1 of organization and dis-clpllne over previous rallies» Thls vas evldent fremi the be-ginnlng when, even before the march began, John Hilson rap-ped to the people about the reasons for the march and sug-gested the dlrection that the siogans of the march should take« The siogans, especially the orlglnal ones such as "Big Business gets rich—01*s diet" and 111-2-3-^, Vietnam’s a raclal war, 5-6-7-8, nothlng to negotiatel" reflected a de-gree of political avareness hlgher than the more tradition-al anti-var eplthets» Hie march route itself was, vhether acddently or purposely, well chosen» Marching down E» Col-fax Ave» and through the down-town area maintained the spir-it of the people at fever pltch by enabllng the participants to relate to a large number of on-lookers, by the participants seelng thelr ranks swell as the march progressed, and by maklng the connectlon be-
tween business and the war evldent» Organizers dlspersed throughout the crowd who con-stantly kept the slogan-shout-lng allve also contrlbuted to the high splrited nature of the march-, as vellas help-ing to maintain a reasonable disclpllne» The march vas orderly, and stuck to the a-greed-upon route» Very few taunts and obscenitles vere hurled and no incidents of ln-dividual trashings or terror-isms vere reported» As for the rally itself, the speakers vere veli chosen to reflect the existing widespread qp-position to the war,'many women, workers, and the third vorld» The speeches vere kept short to maintain crowd interest, and a policy of a closed mlcrophone vas in ef-fect—all of whlch lndlcates an unprecedented level of organi zation»
There vere unfortunately, many negative aspects to the rally» Most important among these was that the rally did not develop from any well de-fined and effective ongoing effort on the part of the organi zers, the Colorado Peace Coalitlon» The rally stood alone» This has tradition-ally been a defect of anti-var rallies and vas no less so on the 17th« As ve see it, thls has long been the pri-mary reason for popular dls-lllusionment with mass dem-onstations, for the poor at-tendance at rallies, and the low level of Interest in the speeches» The anti-var move-ment has not been effective precisely because it coricen-trates all of its time and
energy in the staging of rallies and demonstrations, rath-er than in a constant effort to deprive the government of the necessary resources to vage war through leadlng the everyday struggle in concert with the people» Only in this vay can ve develop the trust and respect of the people» Political avareness, organization, interest, and disclpllne cannot be imposed from above; they can only be developed by working everyday with the people, by comlng to grips with where the people are at and moving from there» The people are not golng to come to us, ve must go to them»
Apart from this, the only other major defect was the speeches, vhich, with perhaps a few notable exceptions, vere uninteresting, 13J-prepared, and not logicediy presented» They did little tc raise the political avareness of the people, did not preseni a co-herent picture of the Indo-chinese situation, and, as such, vere ineffective. This is primarily due to the fact that topies vere not assigned beforehand and speakers vere not chosen for either their ability to speak well or their knowledge of the var and its background»
There is, undoubtedly, much more that could be said» We have just tried to present the major polnts as ve see them» Overall, because of the trends toward increased organization and disclpllne, we are opt.i-mistlc, though cautiously so, about the development of the organized qpposition to the government»
MASS MFDIA WORKSHOP — Free instruction is being offerred in radio production, tele-vlsion production, and film making» For Information, contact Rick Pontaza, 21^2 Weyton, 892-1017» Free films and miscelaneous media production vili b.e show every Friday evening at 7? 00. Contact Terry Gould at 892-1017 for Information.
CLOSE THE SCHOOLS — May 3,i+,&5 to commemorate the killings of the Kent State 4 and the Jackson State 6, killed in 1970» CLOSE THE SCHOOLS in Sorrov, in Solidarity, in Anger»


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I
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t

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vGlved in anti-American acti vities in ner viilage» Ultimately ehe was found Not Ghiilty but the pain and eruelties she had to endure left her permanentiy damaged anci fraii. Af-ter she vas arrested in 195? > -the first pri-son she went to tortured her for lnfo:rmation she didn't have» They pianted plr.s under her fingemails which they tapped with a sticko They appiied electrodes to her ears, fingers, nipples aria genitais until she feli unconscious for an entire af ternoon• Other times she vas made to drink a mixture of wa-ter, salt, and lime untii she passed out, then her stomach trampled upon to force out the vater» Afterwards, she would vomit* a biack ooze oi* b.i-ocd» Her cell was 35' meters iong and 1* raeters vide, with rcen and women w.ithout ciothes al.i .tiving in the same cell# They had to relieve tftemselves on the flocr and werezi’ t allowed. to take batns 0 Her hair was very long and matted v’i+.h blood, but. she iras given no bath for a whole year» She was fed riee ana decayea fiso, cr denieci food somet tmes for i.hree days0 At times she was hung froB her ce.O. and beaten with sticks unti.i she was b.:ack and blue», She said she votild jus.it wair. for the time when she would be unconsclous, to be fee of pain for awhile» Tite prisoners caiJcd the prison t:Hell on EJarth’1 o When she .l.eft, she was moved to a prison :Im a cave pa.inted r>lack which measured ?-i. meters .Jong, X-?> meters vide, and meters high. Between i5 and ?? prisoners were de-iained the:re at one time» When Dinh Thi was there, a woman had her baby and had to cut her ha.tr and sell it to pay for the deliveryt Another in.fani» suffocated to death because the ce.Ij was so crowded»
The Iasi prison she was in there were six-teen chilcLren who were very diseasedo All were between the ages of one and five, de-scribed. by her as nothing but skin and bones» Many of them died during the fifteen months she spent there» During two of the months she was left naked in her cell with her hands and feet shackled togetber and an iron bit in her mouth» The prison was surrounded by 3 layers of barfced wire,. a fleid of mines, and ten watchtowers with machine guns, with 5 battaJUions of puppet troops to watch them»
If prisoners tried to escape, they weremade to drink gas, thrown into the sea with tneir hands and feet tied, put in a bag of sand in the hot sun until they died. In 19^9 a** Ione, 630 prisoners died»
When she was finally reieased in April of 1961, she was so sick that she contin-uously vomitted bloodo She has been in and out of hospitals ever since» Her friends
in her viilage have taken care of her in a constant struggle to regain her health.
V/hen we were speaking with the women from louth Vietnam in small groups after they had toid their persona! stories, I couldn’t j.ook at Dinh Thi without feeling the pain
of being part of the system which put her through such outrageous cruelty. She was so frail but I felt frall beside her endur-ance. When she spoke of the struggle for liberation in her_country, her eyes were bright, but when she sat quietly, her eyes were. full of exhaustion, of a qui et, permanent pain, a scar of suffering that has left a dark shadow there» She fought to control her tears when she spoke of how her friends kept her alive with a smile that gave each of us a sense of the tremendous
Peqple's News Service


Inner strength she possesed*
Outstanding ln each of the vomen was a splrlt of committment to the struggle and a feeling of solidarlty betveen their Indo-chlnese countries* Their dignity, confi-dence and sisterhood served to show us where we should be trylng to go, where we would llke to go«
Un fortunat ely, it was equally ciear to every one how far we raust go0 The Women's Liberation part of the conference provided some of the most obnoxious, hostile meetlngs I»ve every had to sit througho Divisions between different factions of the women'. movement dissolved a lot of the solidarlty we had orlginally felt as women against the war* The important issues were neglect *d and replaced by smaller ones such as Non* Delegates against Delegates, Canadians a-galnst Americans, non-Trotskyists against Trotskylsts, Trotskylsts against the conference, and so on until everyone was alienat ed somewhere along the llne« At one polnt some non-delegates or Trotskylsts (it was never ciear vhich) disrupted a recep-tlon glven by the Indochinese women* Everyone apologlzed to them profusely until fin-ally they stood up and said, "Don't apologi ze to us, you should feel sorry for your-selves* We had thought you were organized, but it is ciear that we were wrong* We are sorry for you*"
The response was to plan a follow-up
conference to wcrk through some of the prob-lemso Por myself, I have lost most of my desire to struggle with the women's movement for the sake of a women's movement.* I would much rather see women work with women within groups which are already organized*
I-think it is necessary for women to struggle against their oppression, but to struggle outside of the other issues means Just that much more energy diffused* I thlnk at this point, that women working against their oppression can do it best by getting togehter with women in groups they're already involved with.
As -for working against the war, right now Nixon is building prisons to hold the patriota he is arresting in South Vietnam to secure his "Vietnamization" plan* In one pri-son Dinh Thi told us about how in 1967 there were 2 sectors and 2,000 prlsoners* Now, in that prison alone, there are 10 sectors and. 28,000 prisoners<> Nixon must be stoppedl
It is time for a solidarity of struggle, of a committement between the people in this country and the people of Indochina, the peo-ple in other countries who suffer frora U.S. Imperialism* We must end the war and prevent it from happening again. We will need the strength and endurance and spirit of the Indochinese women to maintain our oppostion ;.u the destruction of people for the sake of profit*
Dedra
day
care
center
The Lucy Stone Foundation, Inc.,a collective,of about 20 parents has o-pened a Day Care Center at 1467 Birch* There are openings for more children— ages 2-5* Bie Center is opan from 7230-5:30, Monday thru Friday. Donatione per child are $3*00 a day* For Information stop by or call 355-8910, durlng the day*


Open letter from Berkeley
Aprii 14, 1971
Marsha,
Hlghl What*s happening? Berkeley is reaily far-out, there are lots of good films and talks, fiomethlng happening almost every nighto The guy we are crashing with dld a lot of eam-palgning for the four radi.cala who were elected, and he is gonna write something about it. We are gonna go to the next "shitty counc.il" meeting and see if we can arrange to talk to Warren Widener, who got elected Mayor, and the other three radie ais who were electedo On the I2th, the 30Po office» of the National Peace Aetion Coalition were trashed» They had been in their office lens than a week» About $400 in cash was ripped off, and damages were about $10,000 in printed, stuff and office machinery. The door and file Jocks were broken, equipment was over-turned and the rooms sprayed with water» The West Coast Coordinator, Dani ei Rosenshine, called tt an "act. of Po.Li tlcal Vandalism.»" Also on the llth there was o rock festiva! in FI y si an Ff- rk ?i> l. During the festival an undercover pig tried to bust semeent for depe. Several fistflghts started. when the pig tried to make the bust, and then other people started throw-ing rock» and bottles at the pig» The !!Tac Squad” (about 200 of them) came out with riot sttcks, iriotorcycles, and other assorted pig paraphanelia, to try and ciear the crowd of 5000.
A pig who was dlrecting traffic, started to receive "Peoples Justice" from several kids with clubs. He was knocked down and a brother was about to thump on his head, when another pig shot the brother in the Jeg. The pig then shot another brother who was generously going to glve hlm a botule*over the head. Both brothers grabbed a hat, but one of them, Ronald Bar-ber, was busted later at the Unlversity of Southern California Medical Center when he tried to have his gunsbot wounds treatedo He was booked on suspicion of assault with intent to murdero But the pig who was trashed got a fractured jaw, fractured skull, twisted left ankle and knee, and multiple cuts and bruises, so I guess that’s one pig who knows who not to fuck w i th o
We have t.o go to Prisco to talk to the people at Newsreel Films about possibly getting them seni to Denver at a fairly cheap price, and we talked to the Panthers and they said that if the Lumpen are on tour they mlght be able to come to Denver for a benefit,and they vili keep in touch with us« I hope the paper is coming out OKo We may start working with the Trlbe or a paper called New Morning that has recently started in Berkeley, so maybe I can learn a little more» I'm not positive but T may stay out here until June, and ride back with John0 On Faster Sunday we went out to Wheeler' s Ranch, a i>00 acre ranch that sone rich guy ovnso Anyone can move on to the ranch for free and stay as long as they vant» Right now there are about freaks out ther living in tents or shantles that they built themselves. I may go out ther for about a month, if I don’t come back with Jim. The ranch was so far-out, you have to park your car on the road and walk in, there are no cars allowed on the ranch» And the pigs don’ t come there at alio Can you imagine a beautiful little nat ion of country-freaks witout even one pigl While we was there, they had a big pot-luck dinner, with about 1^0 freaks running around, stoned and naked» Beautiful people gave me one of the best days I've had for God knows how longo I hqpe you realize how proud ycu should be, I’ve never vritten a fuckin1 8 page letter before in my life (think about thatl)
See you soon (maybe) Love,
Rick
PNS Fuck-up On the Move
People's News Service


•inH -p+ c^or^ recent Berkeley electlon was a dream of long ago but began to mater-
® a _er, °'^r victory in November when we elected radical Ron Dellums to Congress.
.. a ? ®e**keley Coalition, in whlch I am a raember, had a meeting in December to discuss e pril City elections in Berkeley® Out of that meeting we planned and had our workshop ana nomlnating convention the last week of January® The establlshment did everything possi-ble to mess up our pians but f&iledo And example of thls was when Berkeley City Attomey Robert Anderson announced on January 2U that a new state law in the electlon code had changed the City council filing date from February il to January 26® We ai i knew why he did this0 Hovrever our convention was successfui and we nominated Rick Brown and Ilona Hancock, while the Black Caucus had endorsed D'Army Balley and Ira Simmons® So we endorsed each others candidates along with the Police Control Propositon and formed the Super Coalition S.late for clty council®
In the meantime City councilman Warren Widener, candidate for Mayor refused to endorse the Police Control Propositon but remalned for the concept of police control® We refused to offlcially endorse him but most of us voted for him anyvay®
During February and March we did much campaigning on a small budget but with rauch ded-ication includlng precient walks with a bandwagon which included a groovy rock band. We also received the endorsement of virtually ail various radical groups® As April 6 approached our chances of victory were looking good but we kept cool® Even Gov® Reagan out in his 2$ worth against us, but his influence in Berkeley Is very small.
On the night of April 6, over 2,000 of us-watched the returns and vote Processing on the stage of the Berkeley Community Theatre and were JubHiant when we had won 3 out of k council seats and had elected Warren Widener Mayor® We were disappointed in the failure of the Police Control amendment but we plan to draft up a better proposal in the future
A recount is pending but we are not worried because all groups 111 watch the recount and it will not be done in the pig station like the original count was® Vote counts are supposed to be able to be attended by the whole community, but the pig station could come nowhere near to holding any but a very few peqple (the elite of Berkeley)®
The electlon in Berkeley was a victory for all of us® Get the movement started in your
®mrnminUv If oossible sieze the establlshment through the electorial process® Good Luck® community® If possiDie sie ^ powro T0 the PEOPLE
John Combs
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Ssn FransisBO marsh- Flpril 34
As part of the PNS global network of news anajysists, two of us went to San Fransisco to ccver and participate in the rally on the ?-'+th e Kow I ra».*.st aak myself, what did I accompiish? Veii, I learned a few nev obants, rr.et some in-t.eresting peopie, got some new books and but-tons and took some nice photoa» What I lack is a sense of aucompiishraent at having effec-tively helped to end the war» Streetrarades and festivaJ.c are a grcove—but?, more about that later»
The Marsh route was the longest I haa ever seec, 7 odies frair. the bay to Goiden Gate Fark» The geoup I felt the most ut horne viti;, the ai-ti-ioperiallst contingent, sensibly chose to :is?ei!.bie at, iiair.iJt.on park ;ibcut fcalf-ws.y along» *fher« vere w.y flags flyi r.g—1'LF, ZJRVN, Pathet and ev«?n a fev Cfcim.-se in our group» It wi',i ce;-i alniy ot.? of the mest colorfui® We esanted, 'etsides the we.'. J kr.ovr ,o, (file i r:J.s in /our mesiorv baoks i.f you can dig it). ‘Vovi Po-rfl Pathet i-ao, Keed the thoughts of J.vo rarr-m Mfiol" an-i "One side rigr.t. or.e side vrong, ve’re on th« side ..>f the Viet Congl"
For mos?, o V the w&y howevsr. the narchers were c-iri. en °f pigs di>rj.ng -,hc march realiy cis sed me off»
A i.urge group surreun led thora and shout.ed to Je-*. hiro go and w«re closing .in, the marshuiis
did everything they couid to keep peopie mov-ing on and the heli with the brout.her» We left only alter he was released» During the rally, they would allow only selected speakers on stage, except for some ehicanos and Indians who grabbed the mike and said what’s all t.his marching bullshit? They vere very determined also to coliect rooney from the crcwd> holding up the rally for a half hour while their collectors repeatedly harrased the peopie for money» As I was leaving after already donating, I stopped to buy a Yippie Manifesto Poster and some buttons» A collector came up and said,"Why not give your money to us?” I said, "Fuck offl" It was a long wals back to the car, all transportation, buses ani cars, were fullo With marchers scat-tered all along Geary Blvd, some with flags stili flyingo It looked like Napoleon’s re-treat from Moscow. It was my last long march.
As to what effect the whole month long af-fair (from early April to May 5) had, here are a few of my own opinionso Marching and peace rallies have not ended the war, although they undcubtedly raised eonsciousness among large numbers of Araericans» The ruling class is itself divided on the war issue, not by a desire to end American economic domination of the non-socialist world, but only as to pri-oritieso Different interests have differing opinions as to whether the effort in Viet Nam is essential to, or a liability to the ccntinuance cf the American Empire» Some are concerned about inflation and rising anger a-mong the American public against the war--73^ say the polis» The military chiefs fear


• iL.;integrati;r :f the urrny in Viet Nam« hcwfv/j’. iiixoa !J.na the oii interests are ir rcl :.nu the in4 en sion is to hang on at ail ;osts, "Erir^in’ the trccrs hcn* noW’ wii-1 not f nd. : hc* bomt lug, we dan not v/aii until the * 7p rj/-H:tions for a c];ange>. Every GI and Vietnair:-ese ki:j f.d is a wus*ed ife., I ffel the Vets haeL and will continue ic have tr.e greal.est propaganda and Icbbying value possible, so I see nc reason for large derconstr-iticn tc. ccn-tinur Mayday was a i&ctical defeat, but I be-Hcve their strategy was soundo We e an erid the war by coni inued disruption of corporate and federal insti tuticns relating to the war ef-fort, Perhaps I should ciarify what I mean by disruption, Making previous arrar.gements vitb the authorities as to condit.ions and place of arrest cannot. heip but limit effectiveness. Maiing a morai statemnt perhaps, as in the Federal Center demonstration, but no real inter-ference with business as usual» An action should contain as nruch surprise as possible, limited only by the necessity of educating and prepari.ng those involved,
Mayday was only a beginning» Since the NPAC refused to cooperate with the Mayday action ('r even support the Peoples Peace Treaty) a great opportunity was lost by not having the actions togethero People could have marched peaceful-ly, committed civil disobedience or whatever at the same time and the disruptive effeci, vrould have been greatley magnifiedo Well, we can go it alone if necessary, but let's dc iti
Jiro E
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VietNam Veterans:
Misi effective »ti-wir iroep in Washiigtan
DFn/EY CANYON III, t-he veterari' s iimited incursion in Washington D.C0 raade it obvious that t.he Vietnam veta are going to be the most important (effective) group for stopping the war0 Like no other group can, they cut through t.he image of the peace movement held. by so nony Araericans; that of rich, lazy oollege students who smoke dope, iove free, sm.el i, and are just chicken, Another major excuse used for not listening to the peace movement is ”supporting our boys" <> Obviously this is the cutting edge possessed fcy the ver.sw The i rapaci. the vets had in D*C* will grow as the organization grows and local ehapters make it imj.ossible for America's grass rocts not to hear its owr. boys testi fy to war crines observed and committed„
APEIL ?Uth, with i to 1 millior. pe opi e in DoC. and near to that in San Prancisco was less militant and-more festive with many liberal famili.es and others obviously at their first demonstration» This is significant because it shows that opposition t.o the war is groving in a_l segrsents of the population. The impact of tho munbers vos not losi but oversha&owed by the impact of the vetSu Put it ic vhat the Vietnaaiese a*krd for. so it heJ.red their. an:*, heiped uo»
MAY DAYo. As thr- Washington P.C» rolice chicf sui.l. if the people at the May Day demonstrat ions had bern h.alf as organized a:; tho roJicc. ::.e geal of stopping traffic int.o \he city wouid hnve becn aehieved» If you've over drivon in D-C. rush hour tr.affic, you know it doesn't t.ake much to stop it»
The May Day Tribe seemed more tnt.crestcd in getting a big nvimber of people. stooping to such tactics as saying the Hoiiing dtones wouid be there, a lie, and not the way to get people *o come to an anti-war action invclving confrontations with police. During tne week before May Day a party atmosphere prevailed» Thousands of the partygoers .left before the scheduled confrontations» oome of this time could have been spent talking out t.he problems and situations to be faced, pooling the wealth of experience from across the country in discussions that wouid have broadened everyone's political awareness and heightened the effectiveness of May Days» Peoples' democracy works» The vets raade it apparent that press coverage of anti-war actione does not have to be hostile, but it definitely has to be taken into account» As it was, May Days unnecessarily reaffirmed attitudes about the peace movement which the vets had started to tear down. But, just like in the movies, the men in blue saved the day by illegally arresting more than 7,000 people, many who were not even involved in the demonstrationso
An important decision made by the veterans was, for a time, to direct their attention and the nation's attention at congress. This is an important realization for ali anti-war fore es to make» Ending the war by any means necessary means just thato It does not necessarily raean getting arrested or blocklng traffico It means being realistic and stopping the war» We have a long way to go before the forces of revolutionary social, economic, and cuitural change can seize state power. It wouid be very arrogant (racist) for us to demand that the Vietnamese people postpone their freedom and independence until we have our revolution. If we nurture and build the broad opposition to the war which exists now and direct that pressure at congress, the war mey end this year. If it does, that in itself will be a step towards our own freedom and the people will have felt their power in victory. If not we will have miiiions more people in this country who understand the corrupt nature of the government.
Steve W.
People's News oervlee


Onthisland
where each blade of grass is human hair each foot of soil is human flesh where it rains blood hails bones life must flower
Ngo Vinh Long
The first week of April I attended a con-ference for American and Canadian women calied by Indochinese women to talk about ending the war. oeven hundred delogates, white and Third World spent six days sharing tnoughts vith 6 Indochinese women, 2 frons the Lao Fatriotic Women’s Association, 2 from the Women’s Union for the Leberation of South Vietnam, and 2 from the Women’s Union for the Democratic Republic of North Vietnam. In a large plan-ary session at the beginning, these women each talked a little of the situation in their coun-tries and gave their understandings of the reason the U.So is involved in Southeast Asia. They recognize the imperiallst nature of the war, and are not fooled by Peace Talks or "Ni xon Fiction". Words such as genocide and
ecocide were often used by the Indochinese women to explain the realities of this aggrs-sive war, usually in reference to the indis-criminate attacks of hoepitals, schools, and other non-military institutions, as well as the people's fishing boats, or the poison-ing of fishing water, irrigated land, forests and people by bombs and massive Chemical war-fare. A woman doctor from North Vietnam told stories and showed pictures of monster babies deformed when pregnant women were exposed to lethal amounts of the Chemicals used to defoliate rice fields<> The kinds of problems the doctor faces because of this war are frustra-ting, because research is needed to find ways to treat babies burned with napalm (improved by Americans to burn longer) especially since most cases she treats are badly infected by
r.ne time the viet laus c&r* reaeh meniea.- fa-i it i es.
A teaeher from haos descrifced the condi-tions under which she taught, saying that because the schools were a favorite target for American bombs, the children met in smaU groups dispersed throughout the e oun t r y s i de . Whenever a house or village was destroyed, the chiidren had to stop going to classes iung enough to help rebuild it.
Chiidcare in North Vietnam has divlded many families, because in order to preter* the children, they've been scattered itito different parts of North Vietnam. The women often mentiened the great a: cen.ion given to children. They said that the children are ir ing educated with the understanding that they may 'r.ave to carry on tne struggie.
In douth Vietnam, the children are aire&dy actively involved in the struggie agairist t,::r U.S. invasion of their ccuntry. One of thv women, Dinh Thi Huong, has a daughter, ni ne-teen who is now in jaii for the fourth time.
She was arrested fer the first time when s/.«. was thirteen. ohe spent e.leven montks in jail then and endured many torturas. The r.e-cond time she was arrested, ! inerat ion arr.ei forces set her free. Her thi rd time i sus for t/r.ree months, and the fourth, for whict: she is stili imprisoned, began in
The wcman who spoke to us had suent .six. years .in prison heraelf, ascused of hefr.r in-


The Myth of the Vaginal Orgasm by Ann Kor-dt 10^
Arm talks ef woman18 need to redefine her sexuality* In the past it has been â–  ^
determined by what is sexual-l y pleasing to the man. It was our hang-up if we didn' t l
have an orgasm. Men have orgasms essentially by friction with the vagina* For the woman, the vagina is not physiolqgicaUy constructed to achteve orgasm; the clitoris I
is. It 1s a sma.il equi valent of the male penis and has no fUnction other than sex-ual p.leasure*
iieveraL references are made to Freud, his promulgation of the vaginaJ orgasm myth and declarati on of the vaginal orgasm as a sign of the mature woman. dubse-quent.ly m.yriads of women have erroneously sought psychiatric care for thelr " frigidi ty"« Others talk of actually experiencing separate and distinet vaginal orgasms (see other book review),, Others, experiencing the sociai inferiority of being a woman, are siraply afrald to establish their right to equal enjoymerrt*
Arn then goes into an interesting discussion of why men want to maintain this 1
myth and gives several interpretations* One has to do with masculinity and how it is culturally defined as being whatever is non-femaJe*
In conc.iusion, she talks of what women raust do to redefine their sexuality.
Tn essence, create new guidelines that take into account mutual sexua.l enjoyment.
»Tf a certain sexuaL position now defined as 'Standard' is not mutual.Ly conducive to orgasm, then it should no longer be defined as Standard. New technlques must he used or devised wh.lch transform our current sexuai exploitation*"
The Radical Information Project Collective
The RoIoPo Book Review in each issue of PNS is a regular Service to aquaint peop.i e with some of the better items in RoIoP<.'s stocko The Radical Information Project is a collective of 20 people working together to spread informed rad-5 cal thinking and action in Denver. RoI«.Po* s :fj.rst projeet is a bookstore/ co-Tleesbop at 17th and Clarksom Ali books are discounted at least 20$; ali other items are soid close to costo The bookstore hours are Mon.-Sato 12 noon-9 pm; Sum

mmm


''Welccme : c ‘.'r,r ?:j t._v New York -in-i 1 i'ih --Mass Marve1
Well people, finolly, here is the next, issue of PNS. Ifs been almost a month now. And right here before your eyes you see the reason why0 We bought a printing press (cheap) and it has taken this much time and the agony of many false starts, but we think it's worth it* Something else has changed too, PNS now casts 10$ (cheap) instead of just what you wanted to give» The main reason for this is so that anyone (vendors) can sell PNS on the streets and keep half of the money for themselves• Also, our donation cans in head shops were getting ripped off and new arrangements with the shops may prevent this* You will also notice some small ads* We accept only ads from places we feel serve the community and we will limit the number of ads in each issue* Our rate is $2*00 for a 2"x2' ad* We will be starting a ''Letters to the Editor” column* If ypu have anything to say we will have a P,0* Box soon, and untll then send letters to 1607 Race Sto If you are interested in vending PNS or helping in any way, call 333-7875. VENDORS CAN GET PNS AT R.I.P. (737 E.17th AVE.) AT 5$ A COPY WITH A MINIMUM OF 10 COPIES AND SELL THEM AT 10$ QUICKOl
PNS
Denver
333-7875


Full Text

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People's News service vo1.21ssue10 May 21 ,1971 Denver,Colo. 1DC cneao! PHS Foreign correspondents Reoortlnside

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PIIS Speaks Ramparts Magaz.ine Correspondents: Sa."ldra Levinson, New York; John Gerassi, Paris; Ban ning Garrett, Asia. ABC Television VietNam Correspondents: Don Farmer, Jim Giggans, Howard Tucknero Liberation News Service Correspondents; Sheila Ryan, Beirut; Schofiel.d Coryell, Paris, People's News Service Correspondents: Bob Bailey, Estes Park;, Jerry Nemnich, Canon City, Dedra Smith, Vancouver, Canada; R, Butler, Jim D,, Berkeley Calif,; Stev e Wo, Brian Adams, Washington D,C,; The Rest of the Gang, Denver, Colo, On April l, 1 971 ABC Evening News held a round table discussion with their correspondents in VietNam. The reporters spoke of the Nixon Adminl .stration• s credibility gap over the invasion of Laos; the general situation in VietNam between wha t the goverrunent says and what it does, At the end of the discussion Don Farmer sai d that as a he had moved beyond merely reporting what he saw and began t o search for gov errunc n t His paranoia about what was truth and fact had increased greatly since his time in VIetNam made the contradictions clearo Closing h e said, ':'We've been lied to so many times that you begin to suspect that no one ever tells. you the truth," So what has this all got to do with PNS? This week the staff of our paper has bf'en scattered around the country bringing you the truth, Like Ramparts, ABC and LNS our people .have written stories about what has been happening in mother country, Some have been there and back. Others are still traveling around dll d reportin g back to us like forel.gn correspondents. Why foreign correspondents? Amerika has a keen way of alienating and isolating her citizens ll.ud. thus thos<' recognizing-her oppressive and repressive conditions banded together to begin building a new country in the old one, So if we journey out across the country or stay at home old Ameri.ka is not our home , The whirlwind has begun, Our energy of liberation cannot be harnessed. by the Man's technology,, if we continually struggle to free the people, ourselves, myself frow him, We can pull t"iirough the storm victorious so that when the dust has settled a new America will stand strong in our hearts and under our feeto A day vtll come when 'n'e won't. b e foreign c .orrespondents; that day will arrive when we can come and go in tht. mot. her country knowing she is ours and we are proud of it, We are taling and writing about the present and future of this count.ry, 'I'he rror<> of that we do the better. We will forever be making for responses to the 'h'Ord..s and pictures, to the ideas and history that we in each issue, we encourage pf'O ple to write articles and letters to us. This is your paper also a.nd we WH.rrt . to know what the community is thinking and d .oing, For only 18 boxtops, #3.9il and a desire for a better world you can be a foreigh correspondent on you blocko But t hat dismisses too lightly the importance of our struggle and "hat we are really aLi. about. The war in Viet,Nwn Is the major source of radicaJ.i zation for most of us, As it creaped beyond Vietnam into Laos and Cambodia u few years ago I thought mo!'aL outrage was enough to stop it. As it washed ashore in Califor!lia l thought I could smoke dope and pretend it wasn't happening. I am working for bet;;er answers no" and it. has co3t me quite a lot, Some of them h avetested the botmdaries of my humanity always a•king . more than I could give. But I w ill keep on trying, The People's News Service will continue to search and act for those solutions whatever they are, starting with printing the truth, In a sense that war in Indochina has made POws out of us all in this foreign country of Amerika. PNS is working for the day when we can all go home, From Denver, Colo. Scott Keating & PNS Collective

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CALENDAR ;-') May 30 ALL wl"EK --Akba::: De Priest &the Sound & S paceG 0 oB
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FREE ERNESTO Ernest l , ? ) , 1.1. iJenvE=-r nat i Vf: :.t...'1< 1 of U1t not want to talk about, they knew they could beat them in thel r own courts if they c U d not li -: and cheat. They want to lock up a Brothe r \olhO speaks the truth about this country's gen<.w at. home and abroad . Ernesto has represented the Crusade for Justice, ! i and hllman rights organization for people and .i.s respected as one of t.he top pol.i tical yc.u t.h of Chicano Movement in this country. Presently Ernesto is serving a 90 day dead t.ime observat..l on peri.od .tn Denver at. the Federal Correctional InstitHtion. The 90 day observation was o n the judge's requ<'st to see if Brother Ernie is sane just because he told the . Judge ""\md 1567 Downin g Street Denver, Colorado Aztlw

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IS SPRING OVER? CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE AT THE FEDERAL CENTER Nixon did not sign i'eople1 s -e:o:..G(; Tr-:" 1-t,;'" 3:;_;r Jng t ,hc 'ti'-ir did r::ot. ex-l Ject him to., Spring Against the War is Den s version of the nation a: People's Coalit-io n Peace-ar:.:! ,_-:-u:s'l.ic,:;" : t is uf a c o:-e of 7) peop.le and tad 1000 noticable supporterso SoAa;t.'o had 5 days of activities cunsistJng of i-i ra2.2..y) vie'i: a.<'l.d s::.gning the trE:"at y and a :planned diGruption of traffic in an attempt to shut down the Federal Center on the outskirt5 of Denver., The air May 5, r .ad. been cleansed the night be.;:"'ore by a good !'ain., It sme.ll'd good and fresh even though ,:e ".Jere !::.tanding a t . :.he main gate of the Federal Centero P eO}'lle drovf; around, and J.mm, back WR.rds , i wa.:; : .. o te 2GC -pE-o-;;le •,:e:' e ahc.ut; reporters, agents, photo g::-:?.pht:?n;: ! ?X--:ept .. fer t!le he:.:..icopt.ers t ' ..!..ying vverhead, the chain link fence, the fe-deral m8.r"sf.alls and the cars • r .!'clt like the war .. r::.:; cvr::r e.x::!ept 2h _;::eople, friends .;.at. d own in of some steel machines to t'f'>L::ini me .it was n't., I ss.•; Sean ?JOt budge a _.t : :d.tet:lpted to plant the GM Mark of ExcellPnce on his forehead., "lf -:.:--1f' govt'rnmerrt ',.;on 1 t .; t-he war then .,l .. L government", so reads a !'-lAYDAY .utton o The answer to ending the war 0:1 {A:tt..•>,; kee:;:..s us in the frame work that the democrats and republicans are running t.hP v;a; and t.hey a.J. ' E ones uJ. :. 1 -!!ia'::ei:l' reS:f;Onsrr . .le for ito That logic makes it sound like the war in VietNam was the mis take of rc::..itici .S.:'lS rather :.han a clear-cut piece in the jig-saw puzz.le to world wide corporate p1•ofits o ' .-ie c:an be amazeC.. to d.is..-;over behind the bureaucratic monster of our government. there sta.'"'ld.s a ruling class on the threshol.d o f a dream., '!'hat. dream i s to control thf: v-:or1d, makiug it free for t-.rad.eand r: :---:Jfi t w-hiJ .. f : a"... 1:.he s;l.'!lf-" : . imf' rPuring hug e rrofits in an attempt to mak e i t "s:-l. f f : " o If W( :1.rc to s tOJ; the • ... arma!{er:.> i '::. L; ::o:.. tht"" clo wns o n Capi to.l Hill we work on but those men n.nd institution s which pu . L -the strings i:or:t roJ.lint, o ur, in a --,-=-nse , u uppet. governmentA I do not I'lJ.J.ly understand the total l ogic or consequences hebir.d civil disobf>dience., But as far as I can see they blew it in Wash ington DoCo • .,'ha t about Denver? It seemed too much like a gameo You sit down and I ' 11 pick you up o Sit over there and I won 1 t, give you as rr:any point.s., I'll give you an ace if you give me your hF.arts., o ogently of courseo l was pleased with t-he response of the federal employees to the leafletting., E"....;,cep t for those few who vrou1dn1 t mind having a fev1 crushed demonstrators under their belts I like the words ex changed between workers ar.d demonstrators" I realize the importance of making a physical and moral cormrri tment to ending the war, but I a.rr1 not sure at all that traffic disruption is the answer nor filling up the jailso The!'e are always questions of how we bring people to a higher level of consciousness about the rol e this country actually plays in the worldo As I watched rny sisters and brothers dngged away I kept thinking of several things o Will it take a revolution here to end the var in VietNam? How effective an organizin g tool is CD? Does it radicalize people or-turn the;m off? Is enough education i n volved v:ith each action? These questiors will always be exa.rdnedo In future issues of PNS we hope people will open up a dialogue with us and help answer some of themo In a way it may be a cop-out to say history vdll be the only judge of the success of our actions o In the short run we need to keep working o n the best methods to stop the waro Confronted with this question-problem it. must be said that in the context of the an ti-wa:::movemen t Spring Against the War has been a..'1d will b e a s trong arc hi teet of the anti--war movement in Denver by searching and acting on the answers they come up with o PNS Staff Writer

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Off the Grassy IsJGnd 607=::;... rr!-.f' f(.'_ ,i_-; ;.;) r. c : : : ( :-:, ; l " : ( r"i. : .:' c.: !''!.cs,. KathlP.cn Cuu.J.t e ; , ,r:t u.:.' the r;er::;<:"ns a._ ;.::l:, .. :-. : . . usohf:d.!.:J.n":( : lt::.i\.•Tl : tt. :.: f .::-'r:-::hT'.i.j_ :_;( ::-:.--:.fl?r , acted as h:own lu.w.ver r md. ,..,rc..tr. both ti':' qucs:i-:.• r.s :1nd :..:.r;s .. printt"::d :"'J'::> .. C r ;u.ite_.... .;a:; f.'..:a _;r.G.. of T.!'.e of a G S A regulat i o n a?'ld wi l.: bf! ::>t::n l :. ... onv .;! :..h !";t!"' co-defenden1. s o Qo Where were you born'( Ao Seneca, Wisconsina Qo When were ht.:: : , : A .. Jna, 2, 1932. Q, How old are your children? A. Boy 19, girl 17, boy 14, and boy ll. Q, What is your r eligion? A. I am a Unitarian-Universal1st, but primarily a Human ist. Q, What does that mean? A, It means that I believe I am my brother' s keeper and am responsible for the life, safety, and welfare of all men on this planet, or pos cit.il'.cns in my age group and older o I al$ o wanted to set an example for people in my age group to join th youngs1:ers in thier coura geous batt.le aga.nst the war, Q. Did you go to the Federal Center to obstruct traffic? A. No, Q.o Did you have a.n.v prior contacts before May 5 1;., I saYr -':1 car del i bera.tel y try run down ..:.--;...:.LG'..:r-:! i ::::re-ri..i.:J.!-.(:>J y 1. ar:c.T . . :•r r::i:'"., :.-rr.:wi.: . .-i::d ':'ed.t=.r 1 . LJ. ma . c -me marshal.!.5 ir.-;r,Lrr:J .. H.<_ ; . uJ. _.r.. ::: i.e o .. :J:-d .. w as your t:c r.r:i:-= lo.ck o f action by the marsha.::.ls: A., I ',-,1:'1: ; horr i.fj ed t:-:.ai.. . .;..d. n •,::;t. _!"lcctec"!. the life and. safE>t y of m y children. or anyone else. I decided that i.f these you ngstc.rs were wi l .i ing to l 'isk being seriously 1n,jured o r even killed by protesting this war, I ' d bet ter j o i n tbe;:-. sc that I, at leastJ could never be ac cused of 1.-tting my chil:i-ren fight my battles alone_ , a s parents o f dra"!'tees in Vietnam are nO'.I doing., Q. What did you then do? Ao I sat beside my daugl:t.f'!' i;; the rca<.iw a :i., "" '!/hat happened. then? Ao I was informed o.f my ful act and advised that I was subject -to arrest. I replied that r was a..,rare o f my unle.wfu.l action., ..:.'l;e:: seeing that all cars h a d stopped peacefully, I got. back up and returne.:i t o grassy island., .. :., 'n'hat did yo1;_ observe? A. My daughter and two boys beside-her being arrested.., I went to take her r:.!.ace in the roadway., ... Qo ...-nat hnppened t!':ef! ? Aa I was a:rres:. ed., Qo 'llere you adVised of anv des, s uch as your by the marshalls? A. No, Q, Did you reques-o the to make a phow=>: b e .forf> arraignment'? A. Yes, Q. Were you allo•ed to m
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action: This is the first in a series of articles that PNS will print on drugs of all types--uppers, downers, psychedelics, and hard drugs, F.ff <"ct central n<>rvous system especiall y the cerebral corte x which is the site of and " h tr;her m ental activity" such as memory, attention and judgement, etc. Car.1 make peoplA think f"a;:;ter, be more aware n f their surroundings, more alert and re spons:ive, and t:U.k raster .. use: rl'o treat depr('ssion o f various kinds, t o overcome attacks of sleep, to help one lose '""iP.ht b.v decreasing appet: i .te and increasing rat e of metabolism. , dangers: or causes h.igh b l ood pressure, cardiac seizures and arrest; 1 poss . lb.l e wx.ic psyr:iw5 : i s (heavy parano.id s yndromes); psycho.logical dependance, insomnia, 1 ex.c i t ab i I i r..y, de.l'U.s . i om; . • increased. motor activity and overall deterioration of major !I hudy o r ee.ns. '•'he n g:lven to alJ.eviate depression may give e. person enough energy to commil suit::::ide . 1 abortive measures: ! Absorbic Acid (V ! .tamin C ) 3 6 grams,. •• absorbs amphetamines in the blood i si,ream or'( lbls. of ''Accen t " (Monosodium G.lutamicle) or 5 grams of Gutamic Acid (sold in th food s't.ores) to relax muxc .les, tvoes: J-\oo .l. IJesoxyn-Methamphetam:i.ne Hydro chloride a. ) m g -wh:l t<' b • .lOmg-pi. nk c. l'jm g ye.l.low Dexed.r.ine-Dex-t.ro-Arophetamine :3ulfate a. )mg-or,mge triangular b. l )mg-spansu J.e: brown cap wj. th orange/white inside .3. Benezd.rine-Amphetamine Sulfate a. 5mgpink triangular b. lOmg-larger pink c. 15mg-spansulr:purple cap with pink/white inside 4. "Crystal" Underground Methed.rine a. white powder People's News Service B . Amphetamine C .mpounds (diet pills) .l. Dexamy.l Dexedr'lne / Amobarbitol a. lOmg-sransule: green cap wi t h green/white inside b • .l5mg -spansule: green cap with green/white inside 2. Desbutal-Methamphetamine Pento barbital a . lOmg-tab: orange/bJ.ue b. 15mg-tab: yellow/blue C. NonAmphetamine Stimulants J.. Rita.lin-Methyphenidate Hydrochloride a. 5mg-tab: yellow b • . lOmg-tab: blue c. 20mg-tab: orange 2. Preludin a • .l5mg-tab: orange

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the R.I.P. bookstore \ book review Psychology Constructs the Female; The Fantasy Life of the Male Psychologist by Naoml Weisstein 10 Such concepts as male chauv.inism, fem!n!ni.ty, masculinity and sexism a r<" now household terms which women's liberation has brought home to us. Are m<'n superior'! Are there certain behaviors and qualities whl.ch distinguish men and women'l Or, are we liv1ng out a social fantasy which entlfillces all forms of aut. hor!tar!an!.sm J.n fwnilies, every social institution and government as women• s .liberation says'l Such questions are more than Interesting to ponder; lessons from Russian, Cuban ruod Chinese third world Revolutions point out the necessity of questionJ.ng ancient prejudices about men and women in order to carry out a lasting, true liberation of humanity. In Psychology Constructs the Female, the author challenges t he bases of therapy, indeed our cultural ideas about sex roles and behavior, concludln.g n.u : J il.rH.r. are prejudices and that we know no the human potential of human behavior, be it e or female. Excellent research studies are sited to substantlate her pointc.. What are the limits of human potential in men as well as women? Menta.l health clinicians and researchers cannot only not answe r thi s question, warns the a uthor, but they seem to be lim!. t ing the discover of human pot.enttal. " .... untl.l S
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A windy Mo:1day night on May 3, I chained my bike to _ a collapsing pipe railing.. I look around for an open door.. There's a city counc i l meeting tonight and, as usual, o nly o n e door is open .. As i s usual too, the wide marble halls are brightl:,.• lit but empty and hollow wit h a sense o f lifelessness.. Punch the elevator button_. nothing happens-wait, punch it again; still nothing. Oh well, I' 11 just run up the steps, as ususl , just as I hit the first landing, " Hey, where are you going?11 confusion, " T o the city council meeting ..... ?" 11 C ome back down here1 ' , his badge catches the light, "NC ONE IS ALLC\iED ON THE STEPS TONIGHT" , a v oice bounces down the hall , "that's right, keep an eye on them'. ' .. Uniformed authority speaks, " Y ou'll have to use t h e elevators". Raggedy politico, ''well they all seem to locked11, guard, "th e lighted ones work11.. A guick look, hmmm, there are four elevators and only t"'o are lito Let 1 s see, only one door, as usual, only two working elevators, unusuA.l, and no one can use the steps, very ".nusualo Then i t all begins t o ma"k:e sense, there is a public hearing on the Auraria Higher Eciucational tonight and the hearing will draw a large number of' Chicane residents. In the counc'll chambers the .faces are held r igidly, like . a man waiting for the jury to reach a verdict j_n a :uurder t rial.. Those who are speal{ing for the project are running through their three minut e sets, most. of the .faces speaking for the project are white and talk o f improving qwt.li t y cf urban Denver and the need for "quality higher education".. For the most part they a:. e :!":en -..;ho own businesses or have real estate holdings in the areao The pro speakers were led •'1fi' by Bob Ca!'lercn, the director o f Denver Urban Renewal Authoritya Cameron was granted ten mir,ut.es t o hC',.IE>ver, .Father Garcia and a representative of the West Side Action Center ..,ere cL. 1owf:!d or..i.y t.!-..ree minu tes to speak, despite the fact that they are t h e leaders of the Aararia :-esid e nts .. .Fath e r Ga.rci.s began spea.Y. in an e moti onal voice asking that his people be protected t:Je urba n rcn(-'l<.-?..1 authorities' plan to remove t h eir homes, because the people h a d neve r had voi in the ; ::. er :lrP..:!. a n urban a ..... a nice day people .. Capitol Hill Tenants Union 1 s ! !ew::

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B D T ca.J...L me roots becausE 1 have none, o o o Cell House Seven is noicyo I sit in my cello Across the tier, a
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end on KDZA ••• • The misery of Janis. Blotted out by the screech of a saw blade ripping through a knotted piece of pine. Up o n t he third' tier, someone --JayJay I think. is singing along with the radio. Shut fuck up, I tell him. "Fuck you, J erry," he hollers back. The pleasantries of Sun day . ooooexcepting cubeso vacant buildings have character/ /not so •••• Tin-voiced a uthorityo "Nopeo'' I look at him; he looks at his telephone. " Not until you get a haircu t and trim those side-burns." My hair is exactly two and one-quarter inches long. At its longest, And I am getting bald. ooooCUbeSo watches late at night to j udge my v:J.sible/ /though private/ ; .... It's true. The absolutely most traumatic thing that could happen to one of these cops if for him t o catch some poor convic t balling his wife at one of these meetings. He'd blow it completely,. you know? And the funniest part is that --technically--it's not against the rules. I mean, there's nothing in the rule book that says y ou can't ball your wife. -"' 0 omasturbation fantasies 0 and worse cubes lis tens t o -the l ies of liars caught •••• Tbirty-nine-two-oh-six. Report to the midwayo You called? "The captain wants to see you. In there." I poke my head in the office. "C' mon in and shut the door. " Trouble. Tbe flunkies are flanking God. '1\Jhen' s the last you took a shower?" Last night. "Leave anything in your pockets?" Huh? A pair of green convict pants emerg e from behind the desko 11Are these yourso" They're mineo Let's see your arms • . " The flunkies inspect my tracks. The scars are mostly legitimate. "Go wait. I sit on the steps and People's News Service smoke a cigarette. The door opens behind me. I go back into the office, "Have yoil ever seen those before?11 There are three 'fits' lying on the desk. One syringe, two droppers, three needles, I don't know. ''What do you mean you don't know?" I've been in your penitentiary for eight years off and on. I been seeing 'fits' all that time. How do I know whether or not I've seen those particular ones before? "They're not yours?11 Noo 11Then what were they doing in your pants pocket?" How the hell should I know? I didn't leave them there. "That's wher e they were found .. 11 That 1 s your problem, I say, but the words never leave my mouth , Thing s look bad, but I think I'm clean so I shrugo 11YOu can go..,11 Just as I thought, A set-up, But why me and who put them up to it? • •• ,in bold relief against illusion/ /sated truth,,,, enigmatic c ubes . a pervert a perversion watching listening waiting waiting .... Goodbye s are briefo 11Well, see'ya 'round, man." Sure. He bends to pick up his belongings. When he straightens, I am gone, mOvinF down the stairs, ou t of the cell house. I a. on my job, working at my typewriter when he walks out to catch his bus. Until someo ne reminds me, I won't think of him. He was a friend. We may be friends again. But I don • like the feeling his being gone. And ever less I don't like thinking of the day •••• .... waiting cubed roots/ /geometric genetics for the sculpting of my life. Jerry Nemnich #392C'h Colorado State Penitentiary

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Anonymous Colorado State Pen! tentiary ,,.,'t..n . . : l if. it: .. .. e o n .. ., .. f'!..! i vve;, wnat a h. Ji.t:.J.p wfitt-r .... ., i! .i..:Jf: : 'i., ...:u r .ei'ul nu ... , shaking.,.,., Caref 'u J n o w 'l'EF.HE \ Now a jJ.ttje t'irP,..., ., Nausea .• Bubbles\ C o tton .,., ,Cott,on? Shoe.,.,., Yeh Draw 1 t u p .... ., nice and eas y .... " get a.J.:._ o i ' i . t , nuw .... " Knock on the l .iekPd. rloo!"'., ... , It's dar!< .. .,, .:lhhh, v ibi G
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At thts point, Jo.id. way in what Is coUJ.WonJy the .it. is t.:i.we ror n eci.ive anfl.lysis of' what has happ e ned . so far--es tile AfJr-Ll JTt.h ant.iw:-tr nUJ y in Denver , Th ree q uest.:ions need to b e asked .in this eont. t:..xt.::-f.i r s t., \o/hat. a r e tht:-J...IO.I.i t f cs and lae t.I cs o/' a ra.l.l y , second. , what went down on the l'(th, to bf' done, the or that strives to de pr i ve t . he go vernment. of the resources , physiea l and intel. 1 'lnd emotional, 1 t needs to wage war--i. e , its popular s up port and human resources, the and. counterinsurgency conducted by the uni versities and private corporatl ons, and the production of armaments <.md other war-rela ted. good s by industry, Rallies are no substitute for thP. ongoi.ng work, but only a secondary lnst.rument. of this work, albel.t an irnport.ant. sec nnd.ary instrument .. To be "" effective tool gi ven th:Ls a rally fi rs f. of all JJllJ. s t involve large masses of people and dis play a hig h degree of mass iliscip1.!ne . This indicates a strength both in number s and in comm.Htment. of indi vi
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masses of people. It is not a debate platform. Briefly a rally is a highly. organized and disciplined display of committment and strength, both physical end intellectual. It can only be strong, well organized and disciplined if the people are familiar with and have faith in the organizers of the rally. This is accomplished through the everyday efforts of the With this in mind we can now go on to analyze the April 17th rally, where it measured up and where it was deficient. First of all, and perhaps most important, the April 17tl. rally showed an increased level of organization and discipline over previous rallies. This was evident from the beginning when, even before the march began, John Hilson rapped to the people about the reasons for the march and suggested the direction that the slogans of the march should take. The slogans, especially the original ones such as "Big business gets rich--GI' s dieL" and "1-2-3-4, Vietnam's a racial war , 5-6-7-8, nothing to negotiateL" reflected a degree of political awareness higher than the more traditional anti-war epithets, The march route was, whether accidently or purposely, well chosen. Marching down E. Colfax Ave. and through the down town area maintained the spirit of the people at fever pitch by enabling the participants to relate to a large number of on-lookers, by the participants s .eeing their ranks swell as the march progressed, and by making the connection between business and the war evident. Organizers dispersed throughout the crowd who constantly kept the slogan-shouting alive also contributed to the high spirited nature of the march . , a s wellas helpi ng to maintain a reasonable discipline. The march was orderly, and stuck to the agreed-upon route. Very few tttunts and obscenities were hurled and no incidents of individual trashings or terrorisms were reported. Ai; for the rally itself, the speakers were well chosen to reflect the existing widespread opposition to the war,many women, workers, and the third vorldo The speeches were kept short to maintain crowd interest, and a policy of a closed microphone was in effect--all of whi ch indicates an unprecedented level o f organization. There were unfortunately, many negative aspects to the rally. Most important among these was that the rally did not develop from any well defined and effective ongoing effor:t on the part of the organizers, the Colorado Peace Coalition. The rally stood alone. This has traditionally been a defect of antiwar rallies and was no less so on the 17th. As we see it, this has long been the primary reason for popular dis-illusionment with mass demonstations, for the poor attendance at rallies, and the low level of interest in the speeches. The anti-war move ment has not been effective precisely because it concentrates all of its time and energy in the staging of rallies and demonstrations, rather than in a constant effort to deprive the government of the necessary resources t o wage war through leading the everyday struggle in concert with the people. Only in this way can we develop the trust and respect of the peo ple. Political awareness, organization, interest, and discipline cannot be imposed from above; they can only be developed by working everyday with the people, by coming to grips with where the people are at and movin g from there. The people are not going 1 ; o to us, we must go to them n Apart from this, the only other major defect was the spe eches, whi ch , with perhaps a few notable exceptions, uninteresting, and no t log icalJ y present.ed .. They did little tc raise t.he political awareness o . f the people, did not presen c a coherent p1cture of the Indochinese situation, and, as such, were ineffective .. Thi.s is primarily due to the fact that topics were not assigned beforehand and speakers were not chosen for either their ability to speak well or their knowledge of the war and its background. There is, undoubtedly, muc h more that could be said. We have just tried to present the major points as we see them Q Overall, because of the trends toward increased organization and discipline, we are opt.lmistic, though cautiously so, about the development of the organized opposition to the government .. MASS MFDIA WORKSHOP --Free instruction is being offerred in radio production, television production, and film making. For information, contact Rick Pontaza, 2142 Weyton, 892-1017. Free films and miscelaneous media production will b . e show every Friday evening at 7:00. Contact Terry Gould at 892-1017 for information. CLOSE THE SCHOV.LS --May 3,4,&5 to commemorate the killings of the Kent State 4 ana the Jackson state 6, killed in 1970. CLOSE THE SCHOOLS in Sorrow, in Solidarity, in Anger.

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".r(l:l ved i n ant,i-:unPr.i_cs..n ::-.1.cti "J:i i.n !:e!" .left i1ef" _perrnHn ent.ly dr,r.l<:if?:Cd .-"i.nO. fta:U.... .\f'te: !.i.he wtts &rresten. "in ::.he uri son she .'e!1t to :.ortured he,; .for in.forma."t:i on ::>he did.n' t. ; ... :i her whie h t .qvped \..:itb a st.i.ck... T'ne y apyJi.ed. el.ect;odes to eurs, ftnge.r-s, nipples ar1d geni. t.:t.J s untiJ . . -:he fe. L fer-w 1 en.:.irf' a :f: ... ern o on . t.imes she made to drink a mi:xt.1 n p W':li.er, ::;a.l t , and. .J . . unt"i..: pasaeo. O\.;t, hm st,omach tr:JJJi_t.ded. to force ODt. the: td'te.r-w:=-J.l'ri.::>: ;;.h e would vorr.i t a h1H.ck onze o . r b ..... eod... Her ce.l . l was m e t .ers .l(Jng a.rd l.j: J:;jf.'ter-s. w.i.tif;': w:i th men i:ll1d w omen wi. tnout a. U .• i .,_,. i.np, "ln t.he s::'irr:r.• c.: • 'J"'hP Y h a d . t o :""el:iev( on -:-.he .fleer a:Hi f t n.J J owed . to t.a.ke baths... h'i:!.r ;.rcr:y .!.or.,q ::.U!d ruati..ed l..'i+.h h.;ooi.l, tnrt >V:' ce. U an!l with :>ticks ur1! i.1 :, _ ht:' '...ra;:; a ron slJt! in there were six te(.':-: r.:hLlct.re n were v ery diseased.. .lUl ..:ere betwee n the J.'l.ges o.f one a n d d e sc:: il)eri. by he-:; a!.> nothing but skin and bones .. Many of them d.1 P.d during the fifteen months s_pent there.. During two of the months she was left naked. in her cell "With .her hand...c:; an.J feet shaci<.J.ed . t.ogether and an i.ron bi. t "in her mouth.. '.rhe pri.son was surrounded by 3 Jayers o.i' barhed wire,. a . !':leld of mi nes, and ten watchtowers wit h machine guns, with 5 bat.taLi.ions of puppe t troops to watch them .. If nrisoners tried to. escape, they we.remade to dri nk gas, thrown into the sea with the i:r hands and feet tied, put in a bag of sand in the hot sun until they died. In 1969 a lone, 6.3C p!'isoner-s diedo \{hen she was finally released in April of l96l, she was so sick that she contin uously vomitted blood" She has been i . n and out of hospitals ever since. Her friends People's News Service in her vil .lap:e have taken care of her in a cons tant struggle to regain her health. , ,; ,en we •,;er e speaking with the women from , ;outh Vietnam in small groups after they h:tJ :.o.l d their personal stories, I couldn't .Look at Thi without fee lint.: tbe ;:-:in of being part of the system which put her through such outrageous cruelty. She was so frail but I felt frail beside her endurance. she spoke of the struggle for liberation in her, country, her eyes were bright, but when she sat quietly, her eyes were. full of exhaustion, of a quiet, permanent pain, a scar of suffering that has left a dark shadow there. She fought to control her tears when she spoke of'how her friends kept her alive with a smile that gave each of us a sense of the tremendous

PAGE 16

inner strength she possesed. in each of the women was . a spirit or committment to the struggle and a feeling of. solidarity be . tween their Indochinese countries. Their dignity, confidence and sisterhood served to show us where we should be trying to go, where we would like to go, Un fortunately, it was equally clear to every one how far we must go. The Women's Liberation part of the conference provided some of the most obnoxious, hostile meetings I've every had to sit through. Divisions between different factions of the women•. movement dissolved a lot of the solidarity we had originally felt as women against the war. The important issues were neglec1ed and replaced by smaller ones such as NonDelegates against Delegates, Canadians a gainst Americans, non-Trotskyists against Trotskyists, Trotskyists against the conference, and so on until everyone was alien ated somewhere along the line. At one point some non-delegates or Trotskyists (it was never clear which) disrupted a reception given by the Indochinese women. Every one apologized to them profusely until fin ally they stood up and said, "Don't apologize to us, you should feel sorry for yourselves. We had thought you were organized, but it is clear that we were wrong. We are sorry for you." The response was to plan a follow-up conference to work through some of the prob lems, For myself, I hav e lost most . of "'Y desire to st.ruggle with the women's movement for the sake of a women' s movernent . n I would much rather see women work with women within groups which are I thJ .(;.!: it is necessary for women to strug gle aeainst thei.r-oppressj _on, but. to strug gle outside of the other issues means just. that much more energy d:iffusr--d, I ;; dnk at this point, t.hat women worki.ng a.ga.i r:s.t thC i r oppression can do it bes:. by gett1ng t..vgehter with women .in groups they're invol v e d with. As ,for worklng agai.r:s t the war., right no\<.' Nixo n ls bui ld.ing prison s hold the patr.i.ots he i s arresting in South Vietnam to s e cure his 11Vi.etnamizat.ion11 plar.o In Olll" pri son Dinh Th::i. tol d us abo;.:t. h e w tn Lhere were 2 sector.s and c>,oc..e N ew, i.r ; that pri5on a lone} JO 2i 3 JOOO pri.sonerso NJxon mu5t be s tC':l)r-f:.V'nL it. from happening again. \,1e w i.Ll r;Ped strength and e n d urance a nd spi r.i.t. o: .. 1.Le J n dochinese to maintain out -'.'lmost.Jon the destruction o f people f o r i.he. n !' profit, Dedra I \ day care center The Lucy Stone Foundation, Inc., a c01lect1 ve J of about 20 p<-..Lrents opened a Day Care Center at 1467 Birch, There are openings for more childrenages 2-5. The Center is opi!Il f'rom 7:30-5:30, Monday thru Friday, Donations pe r chlld are $3.00 a day. For information stop by o r call 355-&910, during the d"Y•

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Open letter from Berkeley Marsha, April 14, 1 971 Hig.hb f . ttappening7 B crke te.v i s really far-out, there are lots of good films and laJk; ; , happening a lmost. every night ... Th e guy we are crashing with did a lot of cam !-.:H.igHing for t-n t four rad.icals w b o w ere e.lected, and he 1 s gonna write something about it .. We a n • gnnna g(J t.o the nex.t. ''shitty m eeting and s e e .1 f' we can arrange to talk to Warren W i c l e nC>r , who got t.>lected Mayor, and thP ot.h e r three rad.icaJs who Wt:"re eJectedo On the 12th, tht: .) ... F' ... orfic ' e s 1 > f tt:e-N.d , :'turf ;u1d oYfic e mF.tchlneryo 'l"he door and file J o c kf' were broken, equipment was over t.urnt:.d. u.nd t.h( : rooms sprayed. with watero 'I'hf' WPst.. Coa:;t Cuord.lnator, Daniel Rosenshine, called 1l a n •net. of Po.l it.ir:al VanriRUs m o ' ' A.lso on the llth was a roe k :.it 1 !"'::'.. ip ! . During festival an und.ercover p i g t r !f!d t o bust s cmeo n c f c ) r dupe.. Several f"l:>l .rlghts sl.a.rt<>d. when the pig trleL i (:ks, m, ;torc ycJt:s } cutd other a.t>so:rted _ pig paraphaneJia, to try and clear the crowd of 5000o A pfg who wa::; cUrtct..ing traffic , started t o rec.:eJve ''Peoples Justice11 from several kids with clubs . He was . knocked down and a brother was about to t..hump on hls head, when another pig :;h<>t t.h e brot.h•r in the .leg. The pig then shot another brother who was generously going to t)vP him a bott.. le,c-.vt-r t..ht h e ad o Hoth brothers grabbed a hat, but one of them, Ronald Bar b er, was buste d late r at the of Southern California Medical Center when he tried t.o have his gunshot wound.s treated .. He was booked. on suspici.on of assault with intent to rt>urrt, r., But. the p.!g who ""'S trashed got a fracture d jaw, f:rac1.ured skull, twisted left ankle :md and muJt.Jple c:-ul.r. and bru.lses, so 1 guess that's one pig who knows who not to fuck with, ..... llliVe to go to r'ri6C O t o talk to 1.he at Newsreel Filllls about possibly getting thr 'lll sent. to Denver at a .!'al:rly che a p price, and we talked to the Panthers and they said that if' the Lumpen are on tour they might be able to com e to Denver for a benefi1. ,and. they will keep in touch wHh us. l hope tht> paper is coming out OK. We may s1.art working with the 'Prtbe or a pape r caLl "d New Morning that has recently started in Berkeley, so maybe I can learn a l.ittle more. !' m not pos1 Uve but l may stay out here until June, and ride back with John. On Easter Sunday w e went out to Wheeler's Ranch, a 500 a cre ranch that some rich guy owns . Anyone can move on to the ranch for f:ree and stay as long as they want. Right now there are abou t 300 freaks out ther Hvi ng .In t .. nts or shanties that they built themselves. I may g o out ther for about "month, if I don' t come back with Jim. The ranch was so far-out, you have to park your car on the road and walk in, there are no cars allowed on the ranch. And the pigs don't come there at all. Can you a beautiful li tlle nation of countryfreaks witout even one pig I While we was there, they had a big pot-luck dj,nner, with about J)O running around, stoned and naked, Beautiful people gave me one of the best days I've had for God knows how long. I hope you realize how proud you should be, I've never written a fuckin' e page letter before in my life (think about thatt) SP.e you soon {maybe) People's News Service Love;, Rick PNS Fuck-up On the Move

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s EfKTW AT BERKEJ.E Our victory in the recent Berkeley election was a dream of long ago but began t o materialize after our victory i . n November when we e.lected radical Ron Dellums to Congress. The Berkeley Coalitlon, l.n which I am a member, had a meeting in December to discuss the April city elections in Berke.ley. Out o f that meeting we planned and had our workshop and nominating convention the last week or . ranuary. The establi.shment did everythin g possible to mess up our plans but failed. And ex.amp.le of thls was when Berkeley CHy Attorney Robert Anderson announced on January 24 t hat a new state law in the ., _lectlon c ode had chang<>d the city council filing date from February JJ to January 28. Wt> all knew why h e ct!d this. However our convention was successful and we nominated Rick B rown and Ilona Aancock, whil<' the Black Caucus had endorsed D' Army Bailey and Ira Simmons . So we endorsed each other,; candidates along with the PoHce Control Propostton and formed the Super Coa.l :!Uon S.lat" for city council. In the meantime city councl.lman Warren Widener, candidate for Mayor refused to end cJrse the Police Control Propo8iton but remal.ned for the concept of pollee control. We refused to officially endorse him but.most of u s voted for him anyway . During February and March we did much campaigning on a small budget but with muc h dedication including precient walks with a bandwag o n which included a groovy rock. band. We also received. the endorsement of v.lrtually a.ll various radical groups. As April 6 approached our chances of victory were looking good but we kept cool. Even Gov. Reagan out .ln his 2 worth against us, but hl.s l .nfluence !.n BerJ(.eley i s very small . On the night of Aprl.l 6, over 2,000 of" u s -watche d the returns and vote processing on the stage or the Berkeley Communtt.v Theatre and were jubi.liant when we had won 3 out o r 4 counc. U seats and had elected Warren Wide n e r Mayor . We were d!.sappointed .in the failure n.f the Pol i '''" Control amendment but we plan to draft up a better proposal in the future A recount is pending but w e are not. worried because all group& il.l. watch the o.nctorULl Good Luck . ALL POWER TO THE PEOPLE . ..fohn Combs

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flZ par t of the PN3 g.1 abel network of arw .. ;ysi.s!.s, two of us y, . ent to 0an Fra.nsisco to i!CVF:?r rm:l 1-'a.t•t,j,(:ipJ;tte in th. raJ Jy on t,hE' ?.f"'th .. !>u I ;ci:._:: :'!:":.)•. F.( / Z Pl.:', w h ! :.t r.lid I accomplish? JJ.. ! a nt:'.,... char:ts 1 rr.et :.;orr: e in . . , . . . .ir :;: :r got s-::>rr.e new books a n d 'tutt.rJn& 1.nC. '":u<..k :;orne W"nat I lack ; ; .";! sens•.' of i si'ur.ent at having effec:.1v,_.O.:y h.;..lpf,;. ; . o cnd .. ;..ar.. ( i"t.c!'eLrarades Tr1d .. , ... :: m ore about '['! .. f !'OU t E •..,::-i.s . L hA.d ever ;.:ff'9 1 r.:i.1$ i"rou: i.ile " . ...:: Gcld"?r• Gate ? ark.., 11. ':." v::m<;: ;r:. i.i . t h:> t , ;;, h:..;me vitt , !.r t."i to .. :l'. iitu=-.L i..(n };':\!':• a l ong., ' r":i'f r ' ! P.:.,.r "1.g .. ; fJ.yJ r.:r--I:.U.•"'_ • .UH.v:y, Pr:tthe t ' ; , ... • t'\IPL'-:.1 : f:• .... :t:: Ot' . r e:ou:,.. It. '.:::. • :1 .Jf,.' .:.f 1..he m.:.;;; (:•::..i.cd"ul.. W e .:'.;'""t!. • c ... . • . •.'>iti t :; '.!P : •.• kr:o .. .';,':), ; l , (.fil e j : . : : . . y..-::.1 t..:s:: rUg it)_. " .:u,,tf, l-':lo, ! lt: C': i ; m =u; if! i .. r.Lie . . Ol'"!t:' 6:i.dt<• .:e' t 'f' .):: -;.L•.: .:.i . !' th, :l;CS!, 0!' :,h.:• 1,.ht=: ;r. -::: ! ;.. .: \o."'!S t.hP ;-:ji.y r .. 1,.l ";t:; ples J<..e:t:":_ . .-!'1.5':!., :._:;::":i::W:.H: ,}'oe ; _ :." T d.• i:J: t-t'.' !""\:i' \',hat tho=S'.::_j, -:r: ! Vf' nl.i. bP.fm e .. do . .tt: 1 IP ..;'.!y t.C:e .. ; ... .. P . ; l : P lr,r;i l.f'lH. i:1 ..;:-;-,;_,.tJ a (::-.::rt.:ler ..r1. bei n g by :1 o.f ;;.r:,s .. A 1!.!,...f<.' f::!"'(1u; t.'hout .• to ! 1im t:.:. ! . h e m :\:-::Lt.i.:.s dii evt::"rything t..hey cou.Jd to keep peopJe mov in.g on ar.d thf> hell with th. b rout.herc We lef t n n.:':..y a fter he w 1. 5 released.. During the ralJ.y , they would n.llo w o:1ly selected speak ers on stage, except for some chicanes and IndianE-•..tho the mike and said what's all this marching bullshit? They were very detenninE'd also to colJ ect money from the c:--cwd, holding UJ: the rally .fo r a half hour Yihile their collectors repeatedly harrased the :people i'or m oney., As I was leaving after a lready donating, I stopped to buy a Yippie !-.1anifesto Poster 3.nd SOI!le buttons. A collec tor r.ame u p and said,"W!1 y not give your money to I said, 11Fuck offtrl It was a long v1aJ.s back to the car, all transportation, buses ani cars, were fullo With scat tered all along Geary Blvd, som e with flags stiE :flyingo It looked like Napcleon' s re ::r-ea.t from Moscow . It was my last long march. A s to wha t. effect the whole month long affair ( : f rom early April to 5) had, here are a few of my own opinions o l"-1archin g and peace rallies have not ended the war, although they undoubtedly raised consciousness among large mur.bers of Americans o The ruling class is itself divided on the war issue, by a desire t . o end American economic domination of ':.he non-socialist world, but only as to pri odlie;. Different interests h ave differing opini cns as to whe-ther the effort in Viet Nam is essential 't..O J or a liability to the ccn tinuance of the American Empire., Some are concerned about inflation and. rising anger a mong t .he American public against the war--i' ."ffo say the polls.. The military chiefs rear

PAGE 20

PARK HILL BICYCLF 4628 Fast 23rd Avenue 333-4448 Lowest Prices o n 10 speed bikes: American Fagle ••• $ 72.95 Atala ••• $84.95 Used Bikes ••• $ 1 0 .00 & up Of ccvrse. J ... i i . :r. : : 1.it'r .1y in Vit:t ::c.:.;, V' :. : ; r..-..;, : . :.f . < ui.!.. are ir. : _ .r. d t:;t i : r • i s o hsng c:n u t ail : ;x ; , s .. "Erir.,:.in' 1hf' rrtcp.; r.vr. : f now'' . .-ill not r ;;-,(-ir•t: ,!r:-no-:: ... ur. t i l '7r rJ •:-c , i c.ns 't Eve-r:t G: i:LYld Viet..nB.:r:d :!.::; a '.J'l:;'l"d _ , i f., I tf,e Vct.s lo;d and '"i J.;,. .. t. :-:f' . . .. r (:I.:'Jd. vaJue 1;<'ss:.b.le ; s o I :>r:r-:-:: c rer1son f!..1 : .. a::-ee Jc. cc:!1 i rn.or 1<\a,yr.iay \>la.::. a tr:.ctical df'feat 1 hut I te-:i.icV!.' their . ., ,,'p C'!:i.-'10l. bu.t limit. f'f!'ectivt:-rt":!SSo =nora::. stat.emnt perhaps} as in the Fed eral CP.nt er. dr->;n <.:nstr at.ion, no rE'al interference with as usualo An action should contain as w uch as possible, limited only by the necessity of educating and prepari.ng th05e !nvo.Lvedo WRS only e. beginningo Since the NPAC refused to cooperatE;>-with the Mayday ';lCtion ( . r even support the Peoples Peace 'I-reaty) a great. was lost . by not having t.he act ion:;; togethero Peopl e could have . m arched pUCe . :'u.1J r, comrni tted civi l disobedience o r wha tever a t the same time and the d.isruptlve effec1 Ytould haVE' been greatley magnifiedo 'tlel.l, He can go i t alone if necessary, but. J.P t 1s :lo Jim r: CGD'E!'I BOO:
PAGE 21

VietNam Veterans: Most effective anti-war group in washington ,.::,:;_!ITY0N r J .r., -:-!:P VP.te r a r: I s .Limited i :v;ursion i.n i.Jashi neton D .. C .. made i t obvi ous the vets ; lrP. g oing t o b e the mos t impc:-tant ( e ffective) group for s t opping the war-.. L jke no o tf',er group ce.n , they cut through the im3.ge of -+.he peuce rr:ovem e:1t h eld h;.' w a n y Am.f:•rir: m s ; t h at. o!' r i c h , lazy . . :ho smo k e dope . • love fre-e, :1r*" ,j;;st ehick en.. Ano t.her m ajor PXCU SE' us e d for not l isten i n g "to the p e ace i:; • our b oys".. Obvioto.s l y t.h'iz. :.s tJ, e -:ut t:ing 1'o ssessed b y 1.h e vt.;., v e .... s had i n .. will gr0\1' C:lS t}, e 0':";.-.;:U:iZR.'t.iOfi g:C:.)W"::> and local mn.Kr-:i. •J f o r A..'ller1c a1 s g riJ..tis to :l '..s ::n ... y, boys 1 .> t.J"!.!" 0 b 5C"!'" V'd and C Orrl"'...:it.tedo n . " d . : . h to .l !til.tior. pF.O_T•lP i n D .. C . a..;d near tha-t. . i n San F!"-ancisco was less m i.li md rr:or' .fest . . iv., .,,it.h mnny liberal f:=.:::ili'3 '!no.l o t h e r s obviously at th•:h . firr;:. Th.ts if' :;ignificant b e.c:au s e ::;h m.rs that ')J"J.'OS:i.tion t . o : .!:? H .:tl"' is grm ... tng in .:t.:.X 2-eg raer..t.s c:' t hf' popul.::i":..:i. o n.. Thr: impa ct. o f :. b v•ts ::.os ! OVt"!"G h.st(lm .. t . y .. !..c i :n:z.•act o f t.I:"O .i.e • ... . . ;(l t t ;--f"d 1 •. :.f"rr " l.':"l.i . !.:..; .. ' LA:' D .\Y J . .n.s : ! :: L:;l:iq-::...:m ii.C. r:).l ice cbit:>f saLl if t.h at. thf' Day o n . ..: t:.ccn h:df : \ s Ol"f?.'-':lni:<.E'd t:; :_.:;, ... ro.: cc. : o f :jt • :iTinc 1 r : t i'f"ic into 'i:C' C' .\" "'OlL .I i; :!vt• l wC'n If CVC':" d.rivC'n in ru$h hour t raffic. y.:-, u kllO"-' it d oe.:m' t . r:nn:h to st..op 1'he Day Tribe 110r(' i.n t.crestPd in E;E't.ting :1 1lif, numbPr o f stOO}.--:int; 1.o t:J•.:Li c s ts s;.LyiEG • .. he !{o.i..Ling :.>tones '..;ouJ d be t..ho=:-r(;>, a Ji,:. , a nd not thr .. way to g<: t people : o an ant .i-w'l.r action invcl vi:lf: con fro n !..n.tions ...,, ,.i + . h Vurinp; .iJe v;eek l:;c!\)rc iay i.ln. Y a party atm:)3phete r rcva.i1cd.. Thousands of t h e purtygoer s .left before the schedl.!led con f ront.at 0o:ne of t h i s t im e could have b een spen t t3.lking out t.he urob.le:ns and si t t 1a.tions t o b' faced, pooline; tr., ? of experience fro.11 a cross count.rv in discussion s that ;ver yo n e1 s poli t . ical a w a r eness and heightened thP. effective n e s s of Ma.y Dayso Peo;:>lf>s 1 democracy works o The vet.s m a d e it apparent that press coverage o f a n t i -war acti o n s does not hav e be hostj l, but i t definl h a s to be taken into account o As i t was, M a y D a y s u nnecessarily reaffir med attitudes al;ou t t h e peace movemtmt w h i c h the v e t.s had started to tear down o But, just like in the movies, t h e m e n in blue saved t h e day b y illegally arresting m ore than 7 , 000 people, m a n y who were not e ven involve d in the demons tratio n s o An impo:-tant decision mad e by the veterans was, for a time , to direct their a t t enti o n and t h e nation' s a tten t i on at This is an important realiza t i o n for all anti-war forces t o make o Ending the war by any means necessary mea m 3 just t hat o It does not nec e ssaril y mean getti n g arreste d o r t r affi c o I t m eans being realisti c and stopping the war o W e have a l o n g way to g o b e fore the forces of rev olut i o nary s o c i a l , econ o mic, and c ultural c hange can seize state power o would b e very arrogant (racist) for us t o demand that the V i e t n9.1Dese peopl e postpone their f'reedom and independence until w e h a w: our revolutio n . I f W' nurture and build t h e broad opposition to the war which exists n n w and direct th9.t pressure at t h e war m e y eni thi s year.. If it does, that in itself wil l b e a s tep towards own freedom and the people w ill h a v e f e l t the i r power in victory., I f not we w i l l have m ili.ions mo;-e p eople in this country who und ersta.."ld the c o r::-upt n9.ture of the government. Steve w .

PAGE 22

On this land where each blade of grass is human hair each foot of soil is human flesh where it rains blood hails bones life must flower Ngo Vinh Long The first week of April r at.tendPd u C::.i:1-ference for !uoerica.n and Cana(iian women cal.leri by Indochinese women to talk end.ing t.h e war.. Jeven hundred deJ ogates, white and Third World spent six days sharing build. it, Ch.Lldcare i n :;l)rt . t . Vif't:"le ... -:1 hfG dividPd ;nA.ny families, because in order to p rcte:-:. :.he J d!Nt 1 they' V(;' been ! <:U ! " ferent parts of !<1crt.h Vif"trw.mo "rhP ten the g;e:.!:. ; ; _ give:--t r.:.chtld.re.-n., They ::;ai:-! U-:c-d:i.ld.!" e n a.r r r •.ing educated. 'c..hJ.' 1 .h•.1:.. _ , ll!UY !:ave t o carry on tnc st.r-uggle .. In ::Jouth Vietnwn, the chiJ d.r-er1
PAGE 23

The Myth of the Vagi n a. l \ .. Jig<.t.::>l.il b y Ann Koc-d t 10 Ann talks c f w oman':::> need lo r edef. i.n e h e r :.>exuatit:t" In t h e p a s t i t has b een determin('d Uy wtH l t. i5 Gexua..Lly p l easing t o tlic lt was out h a.ng -Uj l j f w e didn't have i:lfl orgasm. M e n have orgasms t-:::>sentia. U y b y frictio n with t-ht: vag.ina.. For the woman, the vaghw is not phys i o Joy,.icatly constructed to achieve o q ;asm; t.h0. clitoris "I::>. lt is a s ma..ll eq\dvalent of the m<-.LlE:: _l;( :nls and has no fun.;tlon o thf! r than sex-uaJ ple a oure,. u.re made to l< ..... r e u-J, h . i s promulgation uf the vagina...! orgasm myth and df.'e.taration of' the vag"ina.l o r g aom as fJ. of the mature woman.. Jubse quently m,Yr1 ads of wome n huve snttf.hl j JSychi care for r 11 .rr.igldi ty•" Others talk o f actual.ly exppriPnc:ing :::.>eparate and distinct vagina.l orgasms {see othe r book revie w),. Others, the s ociS..l inferiority of b(-:iog a woman, are s iro.pJ.y afraid to estabJis h thP"lr r i ght to equal enjoyment" An1thPr1 goe s inlo an int.< resting d.isr: u ssio n o f why men want to maintajn this myth and g.ives zt-: v e r a...l Interpretatio n ::;" 0rw hru:; to d o with mascul.i.ni.ty and how jt is c u .LturaLly define d as wbatP.v e r i s n u n -f'f:.m aJe ... In conc.lusion, she ta.lks o f what mus t. d o to redefine sexuality .. Tn esse nr:. e , c:r Patp ri P"-' guide.l ine;. thal take into ac:count nrutual sexua.l !' ff a st.•XlJa..l pus : i 1.1on now d efinf: d a.s 'standard' :is not mutuaJ.ly conducive t.o o rgasm, thf_-r l . it. s h ould n o .longer U e d efim: d as stw 1 d ard ... N P w t echniques must b e •.>!"'" wtli c h our curre nt. sexual expJoitat..i o n ... " T h f' Hadica) Information Projec t Collective The R.IoP. Ii o o lt Revie w in each issu e ot' P N G i . s a rcguJ.ar service to aquain t l 'eop.l e wj t h sornl':' of t h e b etter i terns in H,..l,..P .. ' s Gtocf.,, Th e H adical Information i s a. coll e cttve o f 20 people workin;: t.ogether t o spread informed rad jc:l:l t.h i nking c u1d aetio n in Denve:r. '1 .. l.. P o1s . fl.rs t. projec t i s a b o o k s tore/ cc.:. 'eshop at 17t h and Clarkson. All books d iscoun t e d a t 1P.as t 2Cfl-; all oth e r i tem s a r e so.i..d close to cost .. The b ookctor e h..:>t..i.r s are Mon .. Sat .. 1 2 noon9 pm; S u n .. l -5pw ..

PAGE 24

the night befun : . n l!P: WPll people, fin a ..... L.Y, i r.; the nt=.:xt i S S\.:P or J>NS., I t 'fi been a month now.. A.'1d right here before your P.yes you see tl-:e reason why.. 1\' e bought a printing press (cheap) and it has taken this much t im e s.nd the agon y of many fli.lsc star :.s , w e think it 1 s w o r t h it.. Something else has changed too, PNS now casts lC (cheap) instPS.d of just whoc you wanted t o give.. The main reason for this is so that anyone (vendors) can sell PNS on the streets and keep halt' of the money for themselves.. Also, our donati on can s i n hea d shops "''ere getting ripped off and new arra ngements with the shops may prevent You will also notice some smaJ.l ads.. ',.,'e accept only ads from places we feel serve the community and we will limit the number of ads in eac h issue. Our rate is $2.00 for a 2"x2'' ad. We will be starting a ''Letters to the Editor" column. If you have anything to say we will have a P .. O .. Box soon, and until then send letters to 1607 Race St.. If you are interested in vending PNS or helping in any way, call 333-7875. VENDORS CAN GET PNS AT R . I .P. (73 7 E.l7th AVF.) AT 5 A COPY WITH A MINIMUM OF 10 COPIES AND SFLL THEM AT 10 QUICKOt PHS Denver 333-7875