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People's News Service, June 10, 1971

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People's News Service, June 10, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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Full Text
Peop!e’s News Service
VOLUME 2 ISSUEII JUNE 10,1971 cop for justadime lOt

/TC
I6th at gaylord I0am-7pm


HW"W
PNS
saeaks
TABLF OF CONTENTS: Boulder riots - 3
shorts -------- 5
Colorado vets - 6
WPAX------ j.O
baggie---------1.2
Erie concert — 12
calendar-------15
16
Here it is summer and things are getting heavier.
Keeping all of our individual hangups, everyday hassles. neighborhood incidents, community events, nationwide actions, and worldwide struggles in a proper perspective will be as difficult as ever. Last month PNS paid particular attention to the news of the U.S., since the antiwar actions throughout this country were so intense. But now people everywhere are turning their attentions to their own comraunities, where a very real, hard struggle continues. There are so many tensions to bear in Denver now -- its growing too fast, there are too many cars, more pigs that ever (even dogcatchers), less jobs, everyone has landlord problems or household breakdowns in one way or another, not to mention the crazy way our rock concerts come off and the vay we get vanrped or. whenever we get together to have some fun.
The only way we can deal with the heat this summer is to get tight with each other, support each othersf programs, share difficulties and corcbat them together. I hope I don*t see any more dumbfounded freaks getting dragged off to jail just because the mayor decides its time for a cleanup. It only takes getting to know our areas, our people, defending our places in the community, and moving on projects as a force rather than as individuals....like food coops, daycare centers, rent strikes, Street patrols, defense funds, to gain control over what happens to us. One e we can handle our own neighborhoods, we can strengthen our positions on greater issues, destroy this whole stinking, cold hearted, noisy machine of a country and all the bastards that thrive in it — and let each other live right on th5s Xovely earth.
Carol F,


OH OOOO KkHtfck \S MOHH 'IHHH k STMt Ot HAHO
oi spontaneous violence erupted
in the Hili area of Bonlder and lasted tvro nights. The
background to the incidents on
Saturday and Sunday nights follovs an obscure thread back. through several months.
Especially noticable in the sumraer of 1970 vas an attitude by tovnspeople and city officials alike that vas overtly negative tovard the Street people on the Hili.
In the fail, regular footpatrols hy Boulder police vere instituted nightly in the area, andhy early this spring, a "copshop" had been located on the Hili itself by BPD. The foot patrols and sub-station vere the resuit of pressure applied by Bili capitalists in trying to stop the increasing "loitering" and Street scene vhich had been developing over the last tevi
sfAOtAn ir 4-Vam- VnA o


Finally, on Saturday the 22nd, Street people reacted to a recent series of busts for spitting, loitering, jay-waiking and other similar heinous crimes« After an individua! vas clubbed by the pigs, a patrol car was nearly overturned and set afire, the occupsints themselves fleeing and not returning for another l\ hours, and at that time with reinforcements. During that short period, Windows in many Hili businesses vere trashed.
The next evening, on Sunday, police called in a helicopter and with sheriffs reinforcemerrts barricaaed and isolated the en-tire Hili business district, hoping to prevent recurrences of Saturday night's rout. Tear gas, niacc--, and clubs were used to disperse the crcwds that gathered and a new level of activity was initiated. Whero Sat. night was a reaction to specific busts,
Sunday night was enacted on a broader scale by the people par-ticipating. Some banks and realty offices around Boulder became targets for well-aimed rccks and the crowd itself disperse! to form into .'.malier : urban guerilla type bands ., Cop cars became a target for these 4aq:|s and an effective strategy evolved of buil-ding fires in the streets and then ambushing the police as they came to investigate.
With a minor disturbance over busts on Friday night. a loct-ing on Saturday night, and overreactive tendencies displayed on Sunday night, the police in Boulder not only failed to prevent dis-turbances but actually initiated them. Even more important, a generally apathetic Hili community was turned from a reactive mass into a self-defense consciousness through action—the beginnings of a political orientation for an apolitical Boulder.
Through the use of a massive propaganda and pacifying cam-paign using newpapers, radios, and TV, a liberal co-optation has been effected for the present. The demands of the week, i.e. the removal of the police sub-station on the Hili, the use of the facilities for a communication center, and an end to police/ community harrasment have obviously been ignored in the wake of "returning law and o.rder". Both liberal Hili peop] nd town officials have sacrificed a community's rights to the law and order stigma. Political awareness of power structures on a communi ty level comes through self-defense of ones fnterests. The Street people's interests on the Hili haven't been recognized and the conditions for militant action stili remain.
4
PNS corresnondent in Boulder


SHORTSHORTSHOStTSHORTSHORTS
i LNS- John Wayne on Indians, ”Our so-called stealing of this country from therri vas just a matter of survival. We needed land and the Indians vere selfishly trying to keep it for themselves. We’ll ali be on a reservation if the socialists keep subsidizing groups (the Indians) vith our tax money.M
LNS- Arrests, hit- and run police raids into the black cormnunity and major fires have marked the kth veek of the Huntsville^Ala. sanitation vorkers strike. The men have been locked out of their jobs for trying to organize a union since April 9*
| LNS- On the day folloving his unprecedented fifth-term election as I Mayor of Chicago, Richard Daley received messages of congratulations from George McGovern, Ed Muskie, Hubert Humphrey. Ed Kennedy and | others as if he had never ordered to shoot-to-kill looters and i, alloved his cops to kill Fred Hampton and Mark Clark and as if | Chicago '68 had never happened.
I LNS- China, has eradicated VD according to English Surgeon Dr. Joshua Horn vho has returned from a 15 year stay in China. "In my last 8 } or 9 years in China, I did not see a single case of infectious syphilis
SUN- The U.S.Customs Dept. has seized more than 6 tons of marijuana since the beginning of fiscal year 1971» Six tons makes 2,200,000 lids vhich makes.. .?for more speed freaks, smack freaks. dead freaksl
Ericka Huggins and Bobby Seale were set free after the jury in the L longest and most expensive trial in Conn. history could not agree on a verdict. The judge finally realized that it would take i "superhuman powers" to select an impartial jury.
ar\d guesfc M pel -Wul mM. qMjls resident
CuHural (mkr onZWl ^1017
courses in
5


“Over the border they send us to kill and Sight
for a cause they have long ago forgotten”
These lines of Paul Simon's recall to
Vietnam Veterans the causes for which we went to fight in Vietnam and the outrages we were part of because the men who sent us v *cl long ago forgotten the meaning of the words.
We went to preserve the peace and our testimony will show that we have set all of Indochina aflame. We went to defend the Viet-namese people and the testimony will show that we are committing genocide against thenw We went to fight for freedom and our testimony will show that we have turned Vietnam into a series of con-centration caraps. We went to guarantee the right of self-deter-mination to the people of South Vietnam and our testimony will show that we are forcing a corrupt and dictatorial government upon them. We went to work toward brotherhood of man and our test*' mcny will show that our strategy and tactics are permeated with raclf’*».
We went to protect America and our testimony will show why our country is being torn apart by what we are doing in Vietnam.
Vietnam Veterais Against the War in 1967« like the winter soldier of 1776, recognized that America was in grave danger and that the* danger was from within. We understand only too well that what threatens America this time is not the Redcoats or even the Reds. Rather, it is the crimes that America is carrying out against her people at home and her brothers * and sisters abroad that thrf en to destroy her. It is the separating of those of our count* men who deplore these acts from those of our countrymen who r to examine what is being done in the name of America, which ti ens to destroy America.
It has often been remarked. but seldom remembered, that war itself is a crime. Yet a war crime is more, and other than war.
It is an atrocity beyond the usual barbarie bounds of war. It is legal definit ion growing out of custom and tradi zioa supported by every civili zed nat ion in the world, including our own. It is an 6act beyond the pale of acceptable actions even In war. Deliberate


destruction without military purpose of civilian corainunities is a war crime* The use of certain arms and armaments and of gas is a war crime*
The forcible removal or relocation of population for any purpose is a war crime* Ali of fchese crimes have been committed by the United States Government over the past ten years in Indochina*
An estimated one million South Vietnamese civilians have been killed as a resuit of these war crimes*
A good portion of the reported 700,000 National Liberation Front and Nortb Vietnamese soldiers killed have died as a direct resuit of these war crimes. And no one knows how many North Vietnamese civilians, Cambodian civilians and Laotian civilians have died as a resuit of these war crimes
Indochina has suffei * 1mmeasurably as a resuit of American war c 'xio^s, but America suffers too. The first casualty America suffered as a resuit of her war crimes was that of TRUTH.
The Colorado Vietnam Veterans Against the War requests your presence at the Winter Soldier Investigation -- an inquiry into U.S. war crimes in Indochina* Formal testimony will be taken from over 30 honorably discharged Colorado veterans, giving conclusive evidence that such horrors as My Lai stem from what is, in fact, Official United States Military Policy..• not from isolated misconduct of G*I*fs Other panels will discuss related topics of racism, treatment of P0W’ s, "Vietnamization”, and black market activities* We urgently request that all concerned citizens at,tena this public investigation*
Hearings will he held Saturday and Sunday, June 19 &nd ?0, 10:00 am to 7*00 pm at the Denver Indian Center, 26th Ave. and Gaylord St., Denver. For Information contact: WAW, 1^60 Penn., rra 7, 255-1006.
7


WAV£1MCAN*1
Summertime and the living is easy. Really? Well in some ways the chance to spend more time outside your cubicle does make it easier, however, the usual tenant-landlord problems are sti-11- with us, which brings us, naturally enough, to Solutions to the problems.
The best answer is to organ-ize your buildings. It is the most difficult answer but it is the best for the following rea-sons.
There are no regulations gov-erning rent raises, harrasment, discrimination on the basis of lifestyle or sex and no really effective protection against sub Standard buildings and slum-lords. In short there is no real protection for tenants within the legal system as it is presently structured.
Obviously that leaves us with three choices: change the system--1*11 wait for the laugh ter to die down...., develop ways of dealing with the landlord outside the system. accept it as bad karma and pray for the landlords enlightenment (no a bad idea, but it takes all the fun out of the Te nant s Union),


Organizing is also an effective way of creating the eom-munity that we all wairt but never seem to get. Any group action requires both trust and communication between the people involved and these acts break down the ego glaze that all of us have been packaged in by our competitive society and our own fears.
Acting as a group or union allows us to do three basic things that individua! action does not: it gives us the bar-gaining club of cutting off the bulk of any landlord* s income instead of a fraction of it, it multiplies the lega! costs of a landlord* s action against tenants and it opens up a collective bargaining situation which allows tenants to dea! with a broad range of prob-lems instead of a limited, specific complaint.
Organi zing is difficult because it requires hammering out a common set of goa!s and agreeing on tactics. It a!so requires some work on the part of the tenants in doing research on the landlordfs other proper-ties and organizing those tenants to strengthen the tenants* economic hold on the landlord.
In most cases It also boils down to a war of nerves between the tenants and the landlord, to see who will get tired of trotting in and out of court
first. In this situation tenants have a natural advantage over the landlord since they can share the tension and sup-port each other while the "Man" has to go it alone.
In any case and no matter what means we use to deal with the problem it will be a long hard struggle as the histc v of the labor union movement teaches us. That particular history also teaches us that united action is successful in the long run in iraproving the conditions of the people.
It would be naive, however, to assume that there will be any permanent solution to hous ing problems until the basic system of landlord-tenant is demolished and replaced by a collective control and use of the land that permits no one to control more land than he or she needs to thrive as a human being.
It is a long way from here to there however, and there*s no good reason why we can*t ha some fun along the way, so if you*ve got a feeling that it*s a good day to start a new way, give us a call at the T.U. anc we*ll conspire together. Have a nice day and remember, **the landlord ain*t evil, just ignorant".
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
Capitol Hili
Tenants Union


froia Hanoi....Jft WPAXM
V/PAX, the new progressive rc peace and love station, brought to you by the broadcast facilities of....Radio Hanoi. WPAX is a non-profit foundation, perfectly ■ r.opefully) legal within all fed-eral. state and FCC standards. in the business of inaking radio tapes oriented towards the feelings and problems of American GI*s. It expects its first show to go on the air from North Vietnam shortiy, opening with Jimi Hendrix playing "The Star Spangled Banner.’’
Three of the M s tat ion *s!! DJ*s and apparent leaders, Abbie Iioffman, poet Jchn Giorno and former Guardian writer John Gabree claim that the government of North Vietnam has already agreed to all this. Although WPAX*s Services were also offered to the Voice of America. Radio Free Europe, the Armed Forces NetWork and the Thieu-Ky regirae, they all tu mea the idea down. MThis is a chance for groups and
well-knovn personalities to speak ings on the war," explained Giorno isn’t about to go on the Bob Hope groups have already submitted tape are directea to P.O. Box 1+10, Coop proceeIs from Abbie Hoffman*s book directly to Gl’s about their feel-. "After all; the Grateful Dead tour.M Several diverse antiws,r d programs. Fnquiries ar.d tapes er Station, N.Y., Axa the , Steal This Book. go to WPAXo
PAFK HliiL BICYCLF SHOP U6?6 East 23**d Avenue 333-^8 Lowest Prices on 10 speed bikes: Am Fagle..$72*95 Atala..$8^.95 Used Bikes. .$10.00 & uj) Radica}. Information Project 737 F. 17th Ave. 825-7U13 book & pamphlet store books 20$ off, pamphlets at cost coffee, soft chairs
BRASS PLUM £25-3960 A cooperative gallery and store at 17th & Park. jewelry, furn-iture, weaving, batiks, sewing, graphics, leather, macram^, etc. NON-ALIENATING LABORII help your people & yourself sell the People*s News Service 1 for a dime, keep a nickel pick up au RIP, 737 E. 17th
IO


seeds.
Man this is dark.
Must be good.
Smells damp...
Yeh, must be good. Son-of-a-bitch!
Sure a lotta fuckin Once it’s clean, maybe 5 boxes.
Lets see-------,
Shoebox...lid.
Bastards!
Ripped off the strainer. Where’s that deck of cards? Yehi Alright!
Goddamn!
Better lock the door,
Getting a little forgetful. Card...lid...
OoK.
Man those little seeds...
are really a rolling down the Save the black shiny ones. Theyfre the best.
Flant them...
in Mrs. Cook5 s Ea Ha Ha Ha Ha.
Thatfs enough.
Where?s the papers?
Fapers. Papers, Papers.
There!
Goddamn memories really short Man this stuffs sticky.
(lick)
Light. Light?
Geez, right in front of me. (scratch)
OOOoooooosssssssssssssss.
Anonymous Colorado State Penitentiary


A mass of a couple thousand freaks gathered in the middle of a field at the Frie Speedways last Thursday for what they thought would be a rock concert. Delaney and Bonney, Big Brother, The Allman Brothers and several other groups were supposed to play. Big Brother and several local groups played first—the evening seemed to be building up to something big, and everyone was waiting for Delaney and Bonney to come on next. We waited and waited, listening to records over the loud speaker and waited. Finally, the promoter frc n Crazy Horse Productions, who put on the concert, announced that the show would continue soon, that the reason they hadn’t gone on was because there were too many freaks too close to the stage, too much "violence". Well, this was jive, since the reason the group hadn*t gone on was that they were bickering backstage over money - over our money - Bonney didn’t even show up, the Allman Brothers wouldnTt go on without Delaney and Bonney. Meanwhile, we suckers say in a damp, chilly field listening to some dude sing folk songs, waiting for the
Meanwhile, the Businessman who owns the Raceways land had hired a security force, quote, consisting of farmhands to keep an ^eye on gate-crashers and field runners. Crazy Horse also hired a long-haired "security force" from Barry Fey, some of whom were on horseback, patrolling the boundaries, running off renegade freaks. Several hundred of these maniacal music lovers managed to charge through a fenee and across a field to join us waiting. Some people got beaten by one security force or another, the security forces fought each other at some points, and the music lovers threw stones at them all, recognizing them as cops - short and long-haired.
By midnight we were tired of waiting, bummed out by the Altamont-type atmosphere, and decided to split. People who stayed said the Allman Brothers finally came on and played for several hours. The promoters lost money because of the poor turnout---but the "stars” walked away with plenty of dough, the culture vultures of the peoples' music.
by Ultra Violet


Flvis Presley killed Ike Fisenhower, and rock and roll music brought the change in attitude that created our revolu-tionary culture. Rock music is a cultural institution, built by us, § the people. So it is us s that it should serve, g not the few promoters •3 who try to make money w from it by exploiting us and our culture.
At Frie Speedway, May 26, Free People - freaks, chicanos, blacks, and kids showed up without tickets or money, hoping to get in anyway and dig on some good live music. They parked on the road and some hung around and grooved while others walked to the gate. There they vere shoved and chasea back by big hulking hippy types wearing white T shirts with "Big Brown Rainbow" printed on
the back. Some even held on to harmless looking German Shepard pups, for intimidation more that anything else. One of the more arrogant cultural scabs who had hair down to his neck and parted in the middle was called a ”long haired pigi” by a freak. His


reply was "least I ain!t no fuckin* queer". Later on he was hit in the head with a rock after a truck load of hippy-pigs was rushed to another side of the racetrack where several hundred real hippies swarmed through the fenee threatening to overwhelm several long haired pigs on horse back. But with their bigger individual sizes and by ganging up on some of our people and making blood run with blackjacks and broken beer bottles, these pigs were able to intimidate the much larger groups of people into dispersing. They couldn*t have done it to the Vietnamese, and this should make even more apparent the need to puli together and create a new free society.
When we live in a dying capitalistic world that only takes and doesnft give, we need the free institutions of a new society to find ourselves and others and maintain a collective sanity, and live. Anyone who tries to make money off our music is trying to use the ways of the old society to destroy an institution in our new society. This is exploitation, and when people try to exploit our culture they are ripoffs.
Fvery group of people that promotes a rockfest areams of making another Woodstock, and piles of money along with it. No promoter made Woodstock, they had nothing c3ose to it in raind.
We made Woodstock, and if we ever another one it will be free.
Free music, an institution in our revolutionary culture, made Woodstock. This is something that promoters with capitalistic instincts don’t understand, along with.the fact that most people got into Woodstock for free. Music is meant to be free. Crazy Horse Productions, producers of the Frie Insuit, tried to make money off of something that should have been free. They tried to insure their profit with gestapo-hellTs angeli like Big Brown Rainbow, and that*s why Erie ended up a lot closer to Altamont than anything eise.
BJ
E$N3UaSB


Wednesday, June 9
8:00 pm, movie night at Deriver Polklore Center (movies every Wed. starting this Wed.) admission 75^
Thursday, June 10
7:00 pm, channel 6, Vision of Photography. "Na-.n.al Light"
8:00 pm, Jethro Tuli at Red Rocks
8:30 pm, channel 6, NET Playhouse, ,!Black and White"
10:00 pm, channel 6, Soul, Richie Havens and the cast
from the all-black musical "Sambo,! will perform
Friday, June 11
8:30 pm, channel 6, The Toy that Grew Up, ?,My Boyn, 1921 movie s.;arring Jackie Coogan
Saturday June 12
Folklcr*- Center Vohn Travers, contemporary guitar -«.ni sir^inr, $1.50
Sunday , June 13
8:00 pm, Cat *c*’ /ens at . i Rocks
Smokey /obinson a 'toliseum 10:00 pm, char.'~ l " IJY-L fe. -,ival, Casals
Saturday, June 19
Folklore Center, Robbie Basho, guitarist, $1.50 Sunday*, June 20
7:00 pm, channel 6, .\dvocates, "Should Capital Gains be taxed as Qr.>inary Inc< ne?,?
Tuesday, June 22
8:00 pm, Sammv Davis at Red Rocks 10:00 pm, channel 6, San Franci*. Mix, "Loving"


â– hUMfeT IMGSHKt
The Peasants of North Vietnam, by Gerard Chaliand $1.32
In the summer of I96U, Lyndon Johnson and his advisors faked a North Vietnamese attack on 2 U.S. destroyers in order to justify the first American air attacks on North Vietnam. This resulted in the famous Tonkin Gulf Hesolution and helped LBJ beat poor Barry Goldwater in November. During this time there was much civil unrest in South Vietnam, and several Saigon governments feli. It was beginning to look like LBJ and his military advisors might not have any Saigon puppets to fight for. In the same months U Thant, Charles de Gaulle and Premier Kosygin had ali called for a reconvening of the Geneva Conference, which the United States had violated con-tinuously sinee 195^• The desertion rate in the Saigon Army had reached 30$ in January, 1965* It was time for some dras-tic LBJ action, and so, on February 7; 1965, American planes began attacking North Vietnam in force. Three weeks later the U.S. State Department produced its famous White Paper which tried unsuccessfully to prove that: "In Vietnam a Communist government has set out deliberately to conquer a sovereign people in a neighboring state." Thus began an in-credibly destructive campaign of strategic bombing of North Vietnam which obliterated factories, hospitals, schools, government buildings and in some cases entire towns. It failed to stop the people*s war in the South, and when the bombing was finally halted on November 1, 1968, LBJ had al-ready given up and it was too late to save Hubert Humphrey. North Vietnam had not only survived over one million tons of high explosive bombings since 1965* but it had actually in-creased its support of the guerrilla stru^gle.in the South.



Chaliand* s book is the product of a visit to North Vietnam during October and November of 1967, during the peak of the bombing. He spent his time in four of the provinces around Hanoi, and much of the book is composed of personal state-ments by the peasants in those provinces.
The book opens with a short historica! sketch of the Viet-nainese nation. A paragraph from this section demonstrat es the importance of Vietnamese history both to the building of socialism and to the ability to resist American attack.
f,The distinctive qualities of the Vietnamese nation-al character had been moulded by the way of life pre-vailing in the viUages, with their entirely communal basis, their relative independence and their peculiar solidarity. The continua! need to build dikes and

m


overdose I won!t feel.
The other more cruel and slowly used walls and fcfars of Steel.
So you see these scars upon my arms are trying hard to say;
It really doesnft matter PHS denver
I'm the victim either way.
333-7875
-Homer Brown, the State Pen


Full Text

PAGE 1

People's News Service VOLUME 2 ISSUE II JUNE 10, 1971 for just a dime The Colorado Winter Soldier Investigation vietnam veterans against the war pageS

PAGE 2

wP.AX --------. L V baggie -------1 1 PNS TABLE OF CONTENTS: Boulder riots -3 shorts -----5 CoJ.orado vets 6 Erie -12 calendar ------15 speaks 16 Here it is summer and things are getting heavier. Keeping all of our individual hangups, everyday hassles, neighborhood incidents, community events, nationwide actions, and worldwide struggles in a proper perspective will be as difficult as ever. Last month PNS paid particular attention to the news of the U.S., since the antiwar actions throughout this country were so intense. But now people everywhere are turning their attentions to their own communities, where a very real, hard struggle continues. There are so many tennions to bear in Den-rer novr --its growing too fast, there are too many cars, more pigs that ever (even dogcatchers), less jobs, everyone has landlord problems or household breakdowns in one way or another, not to mention the crazy way our rock concerts come off and the way we get vamped or. whenever we get together to have some fun. The only way we can deal with the heat this summer is to get tight with each other, support each others' prograrr.s, share difficulties and combat them together. I hop e I don't see any more dumbfounded freaks getting dragged off to jail just because the mayor decides its for a cleanup. It only takes getting to knovl our areas, our people, defending our places in the community, and moving on projects as a force rather than as individuals •••• :ilte food coops, daycare centers, rent strikes, street patrols, defense funds, to gain control over what happens to us. Once we can handle our ovm neighborhoods, we can strengthen our :positions on greater issues, destroy this v1hole stinking, cold hearted, noisy machine of a country and all the b a s t a r ds that thrive in it --and let each other live right o n tl1:l 13 "Lovely earth. 2._ _____________

PAGE 3

CITY Jn May 22nd, an outbreak C > . spontaneous violence erupted in the Hill area of Boulder and lastedtwo nights. The background to the incidents on Saturday and Sunday nights follows an obscure thread back through several months . Especially noticable in the sQmrner of 1970 was an attitude by townspeople and city officials alike that was overtly r.Ecgative toward the street people on the Hill. In the fall, regular footpatrols by Boulder police were instituted nightly in the area, and by earl y this spring, a "copshop" had been located on the Hill itself by BPD. Tne foot patrols and sub-station were the result of pressure applied by Hill capitalists in trying to stop the increasing "loitering" and street scene which had b-een developing over the last few years. Evidently, they had a bad image of the people since most of the street freaks h a d little or Ti" ) money to purchase t heir overpriced goods . Police harrasment during the last year increased in proportion to the amount of pressure applied by Hill businessmen. over OR GOOD KARMA IS MORE THAN A STATIE OF MIND 3

PAGE 4

4 Finally, on Saturday the 22nd, street people reacted to a recent series of busts for spitting, loitering, jay-walking and other similar heinous crimes. After an indiVidUal was c.Lubbed by the pigs, a patrol car was nearly overturned and set afire, the occupants themselves fleeing and not returning for another l! hours, and at that time with reinforcements. During that short peri-od, windows in many Hill-businesses were trashed. The next evening, on Sunday, police called in a helicopter and with sheriff's reinforcements barricaded and isolated the entire Hill business district, hoping to prevent of Saturday night's TE>ar gas, ne.c"', o .nd clubs ere used to d:Lsperse the crcvHls that gathered and a new level of activity was ini t.iated. Wher e 3at. :-,ight '"as c;, reaction to specifi c busts 1 Sunday nj_ght was o n a broad e r scale b y the people participating. Some: b ar..ks and r e a lty offices a.roun d Boulder became targP.ts for well-,,. ime d rocks and u,e crowd j_tself dispersel to for:n into . ;maller . urban guerilla type bands, CoiJ cars became a target for the so:: . "' ' i J and a n effective strategy evolved o:' b-v.il ding fires in the s treets aP.d then ;,.mbushing the police as cam e t o invesU.g ate. Witb a minor ::.isturbance ove r b u s'.;s on F-"iday nigL';, " lcc:: ing on Satu rd. a.y night , and overreactive tendenci e s displa.reti on Sunday night, the police i n Boulder not only failed to prevent disturbances b u t act u ally initiated t hem. Eve n mor e important, a generally apathetic Hill community wa, s turned from a reactiv e m ass into a self-defense consciousness throug h action--the beginnings o:r a political orientation for an apolitical Bou lder. Through the use of a massive propaganda and pacifying cam paign using newpapers, radios, and TV, a liberal co-optation has been effected for the present. The demands of the week, i.e. the removal of the police sub-station on the Hill, the use of the facilities for a communication center, and an end to police/ community harrasment have obviously been ignored in the wake of "returning law and o,rder". Both liberal Hill peopJ nd town officials have sacrificed a community's rights to the law and order stigma. Political awareness of power structures on a community level comes through self-defense of ones The street people's interests on the Hill haven't been recogni_zed and the conditions for militant action still remain. PNS correspondent Boulder

PAGE 5

! I LNSJohn Hayn e on Indians, "Our so-called stealing of this country . from them was just a matter of survival. We needed land and the Indian s wer' e selfishly trying to keep i t for themselves. We 111 all be on reservation if the socialists keep subsidizing sroups (the Indians ) vli th our tax money. " LNSArrests, hit and run police raids into the black community and major fires have marked the 4th week of the Huntsville, Ala. sanitation workers strike. The men have been locked out of their jobs for trying t o organize a union since April 9. LNSOn the day following his unprecedente d fifth-term election as 1 Mayor of Chicago, Richard Daley received rr.essages of congratulations from George McGovern, Ed Muskie , Hubert Humphrey , Ed Kennedy and others a s if he had never ordered t o shoot-to-kill looters and allo wed his cops to kill Fred Hampton and Mark Clark and as if had never happened. LNSChina. has eradicated VD according to English Surgeon Dr. Joshua Horn who has returned from a 1 5 year stay in China. "In my last 8 or 9 years in China, I did not see a single case o f infectious syph:ilh SUNThe U.S • . Cus toms Dep t . has seized more than 6 ton s of marijuan a s ince the beginning of fiscal year 1971. Six tons makes 2,200,000 lids which makes ••• ?for more S'\)eed freaks, smack freaks, dead freaks i Fricka Huggins and Bobby Seale were set free a fter t h e jury in the r longest and most expensive trial in Conn. history couJ.d n :)t agree on a verdiet . The judge finally realized that it w ould take ' 'superhuman powers" to se.iect an impartia l jury. pru M*&&4 ma •&a 'itttiflihlii.& finO goeeb wna\ Q\\a.s [fStdtnt CM\tr Ol\ t..W2.. St., 1J{Z IOl7 1n T.V., ... 5

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"Over the border they send us to kill and light for a eause they have long ago forgotten" These lines of Paul Simon's recall to Vietnam Veterans the causes for which we went to fight in and the outrages we were part of because the men who sent us ''" .u long ago forgotten the meaning of the words. We went to preserve the peace and our testimon y will show that we have set all of Indochina aflame. We went to defend the Viet namese people and the testimony will show that we are committing genocide against them. We went to fight for freedom and our testimony will show that we have turned Vietnam into a series of con centration camps. VIe went to guarantee the right of self-determination to the people of South Vietnam and our testimony will show that we are forcing a corrupt and dictatorial government upon them. VIe went to work toward brotherhood of man and our test mr'1Y will show that our strategy and tactics are permeated with rae tf We went to protect America and our testimony will show why our country is being torn apart whc.:t. we are doing in Vietnam. Vietnam Against the War in l967 , like the winter soldier of 1776 . . recognized that America was in grave danger and that the' danger was from within. VIe understand OEly too well that what threatens America this time is not the Redcoats or even the Reds. Rather, it is the crimes that America is carrying out against her people at home and her brothers-and sisters abroad that thrf -en to destroy her. It is the separating of those of our count• men who deplore these acts from those of our countrymen who r to examine what is being done in the name of America, which t • . ens to destroy America. It has often been remarked, but seldom remembered, that war itself is a crime. Yet a war crime is more, and other than war. It is an atrocity beyond the usual barbaric bounds of war. It is legal definition growing out of custom and tradi ':.ion supported by every civilized nation in the world, including our It is an 6act beyond the pale of acceptable actions even i n war . Deliberate

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destruction without purpose of civilian cornlliUnities is a war crime. The use of certain arms and armaments and of gas is a war crime. The forcible removal or relocation of population for any purpose is a war crime. All of these crime s have been committed by the Uni te
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B C.H.T.U. Summertime and the living is easy. Really? Well in some ways the chance to spend mor e time outside your cubicle does make it easier, however, the usual tenant-landlord problems are with us, which brings us, naturally enough. to solu-tions to the problems. The best answer is to organize your buildings. It is the most diffi.cult answer but it i s the best for t h e follow:i. ng rea-sons. There are no regulations governing rent raises, harrasment . discrimination on the basis of lifestyle or sex and no really effective protection a gainst substandard buildings and slum lords. In s hort there is no real protect1 on for tenar•ts w ithin the legal system as it is presently structured. Obviously that leaves u s with three choices: change the system--I'll wait for the laughter to die down •.•• , develop ways of dealing with the landlord outside the system. accept it as ba.d k arme a n d 1Jr y f", the l a.r:rnmd.:.:; t n --::. a bad i ".•?'"t b u t i • ; takes ar. the f :c.:. 0ut. c f t ht• 'l'-::;na.nts Un i on).

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Organizing is also an effective way of creating the community that -.,e all but never seem to get. Any group action requires both trust and communication between the people involved and these acts break the e g o glaze that all of us have been packaged in by our competitive society and our own fears. Acting as a group or union allows us to do three basic things that individual action does not: it gives us the bargaining club of cutting off the bulk of any landlord' s income instead of a fraction of it, it multiplies the legal costs of a landlord's action against tenants and it opens up a collective bargaining situation which allows tenants to deal with a broad range of problems instead of a limited , specific complaint. Organizing is difficult because it requires hammering out a common set of goals and agreeing on tactics. It also requires some work on the part of the tenants in doing research on the landlord's other properties and organizing those ten to strengthen the tenants' economic hold on the landlord. In most cases i t a lso boils down to a war of nerves between the tenants and the landlord, to see who will get tired of trotting in and out of court first. In this situation ten ants have a natural advantage over the landlord since they can share the tension and support each other while the "Man" has to go it alone. In any case and no matter what means we use to deal witb the p.:oblem it will be a long hard struggle as the histc v of the labor union movement ' : eaches us. That particular history also teaches us that united action is successful in the long run in improving the conditions of the people. It would be naive: however, to assume that there will be any permanent solution to hous ing problems until the basic system of landlord-tenant is demolished and replaced by a collective control and use of the land that permits no one to control more land thar! he or she needs to thrive as a human being. It is a long way from here to there however , and there's no good reason why we can' t h a some fun along the way , so if you've go t a feeling that it's a good day to start a new way , give us a call at the T.U. anc w e ' l l conspire together. Hav E a nice day and r e member, "the landlord ain' t evil, just ignorant''. QUOTE OF THE WEEK Capitol Hill Tenants Union

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from Hanoi. ...... ra IPAX ! ! WPAX, the new prog:ess:: -.'!:; r : : peace and l ove station, brought to you by the of ••.• Radio Hanoi. WPAX is a non-profit foundation, perft-:-:l y . :.CJpefully) legal within all fed eral, state and FCC standards, in :he business of making rad. i o tapes towards the feelings and problems of American GI's. It expects its first show to gc on ti:"iE air from North Vietnam short1y. opening with Jimi Hendrix playing "l'he Star Spangled Banner., . Tr.rc e c f the "station's' ' DJ's and apparent leaders, Abbie Hoffman, poet J .:.r..n Giorno and former Guardian writer J ohn Gabree c l a i m that the governllln-: of North Vietnam has already agreed to all this. Although WPAX's services were also offered to the Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, the Armed Forces Network and the 'I'h i eu-Ky regj _ne, they =-.:..:.. the idea down. "This is a chance f o r g roups and. t o speak directly to Gl's abou t their feelings on the war, " explained Giorno. "After a ll, :.h e G:a teful D ead isn't about to g o on the Bob Hope tour.'' Severa}. ;;.r:-::.iwar groups ho.v e submitted taped programs. Fncu:i.ries ar.d. tapes are dire::t-('i to P.O. Iio x 410, Coop e r Stat i o n , N . Y., : ; _ y , All the procee :.s from Abbi: Hoffman 1 s book , Ste a l This Book, .;• _ g o to \iPAX , J -t-J-E Hl!L BICY C L E SHOP !;f..-;>b 1-:ast 23rd Ave nue 333 -44 4 8 LO\lest. Prices o n 10 s peed bikes: Am Eagle. *7295 Atal a •• $84.95 Used Bikes ••. 00 & u p BRASS PLUM e25-396o A cooperati':c gallery and store at 17th & :->ark. jewelry, furn iture, weaving, batiks, sewing, graphics, leather, etc. P.adical Information Froject 737 F . l71: h Ave . 8?5-7i-
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Man this is dark. Must be good. Smells damp . . . Yeh, must be good. Son of-a-bitch! Sure a lotta fuckin' seeds. Once it's clean, maybe 5 boxes. Lets see-------, S h oebox ••. lid. Bastards! Ripped off the strainer. Where's that deck of cards? Yeh ! A l right! Goddamn! B etter lock the door, Getting a little f orgetful. Card ..• 1.id • • • Man those l i t tle s eeds ... are :-ealJ.._;,r a rolling down t h e Save sb.iny O:lE"S. '.!.'tey're -:he b e st. Plant them •.. i. n Mrs. Ha Ha Ha E a H a . That's e n ough. w nere's papers? Papers, Papers, Papers. T'nere! Goddamn memories really Man this stuffs sticky. (lick) Light. L i ght? Gee z , r i gh t in f ront of me. (scratch) OOOoooooosssssssssssssss. Anonymous Colorado State Peniten tiary

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12 culture vultures produce • • • • • • • A mass of a couple thousand freaks gathered in the middle of a field at the Frie Speedways last Thursday for what they thought would be a rock concert. Delaney and Bonney, Big Brother, The Allman Brothers and several other groups were supposed to play. Big Bro+her and several local groups played first--the evening seemed to be building up to something big, and everyone was waiting for and Bonney to come on next. We waited and waited, listening to records over the loud speaker and waited. Finally, the. promoter frc1 Crazy Horse Productions, who put on the concert, announced that the show would continue soon, that the reason they hadn't gone on was because there were too many freaks too close to the too much "violence". Well, this was jive, since the reason the grOU)' hadn't gone on was that they were bickering backstage over money over our money Bonney didn't even show up, the Allman Brothers wouldn't go on without Delaney and Bonne y . Meanwhile, we suckers say in a damp, chilly field listening to some dude sing f olk songs, waiting for the big sounds. Meanwhile, the Businessman who o•Nns the Raceways land had hired a security force, consisting of farmhands t o keep an on gate-crashers and field runners. Crazy Horse also hired a long-haired "security force" from Barry Fey, some of whom were on horseback, patrolling the boundaries, running off renegade freaks. Several hundred of these maniacal music lovers managed t o charge through a fence and across a field to join us waiting. Some people got beaten by one security force or another, the security forces fought each other at some point s , and the music lovers threw stones at them all, recognizing them as cops -short and long-haired. By midnight we were tired of waiting, bummed out by the A ltamont-type atmosphere, and decided to split. People who stayed s aid the Allma n B r other s finally came on and played f o r several hours. promoters lost money because o f the poor turnout--but the "stars" walked away w:J.th plenty o f :iou gh , the culture vultures of thQ _peoples 1 mus i:: . b y UJ.. Violet

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•• .the • er1e insun Elvis Presley killed Ike Eisenhower, and rock and roll music brought the change in attitude that created our revolutionary culture. Rock music is a cultural institution, built b y us, the people. So it is us that it should serve, no t the promoters l{ho try to make money from lt b y exploiting us and our culture. At Erie Speedway, May 26, Free People -freaks, chicanos. blacks, and kids showed up without tickets or money , hoping to get i n a n y way and dig on s ome go o d live musi c . They parked on the road and sorne hung aroun d and grooved. vihile others walked to the gate, There the y were s hoved a n d chaseu back by big hulking hippy types wearing >vhi te T shirts w i t h "Big Brown Rainbow" printed on the back. Some even held on to harmless looking German Shepard pups , for j_ntimidation more that anything else. One of the more arrogant cultural scabs who had hair down to his neck and parted J r , the middle was called a "long haired pig!" by a f reak. His

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reply was "least I ain't no fuckin' queer". later o n h e was h:i. t in the head with a rock after a truck load of hippy-pigs was rushed to another side of the r ncet.rack whe r e several hundred real hippies swarmed through the fence threatening to o v erwhelm several long haire d pigs or. horse back. But wi t h their bigger individual sizes and b y ganging up o n some of o u r peopl e and making blood run with blackjacks and broken b e e r bot tles, these pigs wer e able to intimidate the much larger groups of peopl e into dispersing. They couldn' t have d ne i t t o t-he Viet namese, and this should make even more apparen t the need to p ulJ. together and create a new free societ y . When we Jiv e in a dying capitall.stic w o r l d t.hat only takes and . doesn't give, we need t h e free institutions of a n e w society t o find ourselves and others and . main tain a c:olJ.ec t i v e sani t ,y, a n d live. Anyone who tries to make money off ou r is t.r ying t o use t h e i{ays of the old society to destroy an inst.itution in our n e w society. This is expJ.oitation , ::tnn when try -:o exploit our culture they are ripoffs. Fvery grou p o f people that. p romo"tes a r ockfes1. c i-:-earr. s or m aking another Woo d s tock, and piles of money along • .. ;j_ t h i t . No promoter made Woodstock, they had nothing c J ose t c i.e in m:inci . • We made Woodstock, a n d if we ever another one it will be .free. Free music, an inst i tution in our r e vo l u tion a r y cult-u r e , made Woodstock. This is something that promoters cap i taJ.is tic instincts don't understand, along wi t h .. the fact that most p eop l e got into Woodstock for free. Musi c is mean t t o b e free. Crazy Horse Productions, producers of the Frie Insult, tried to make money off of somethi ng that should have been free. The y tried t o insure their profit with gestapo-hell's angeJs like Big Brown and that ' s why Frie ended up a lot closer to A l t amon t than anything else. DJ

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calendar june 10-23 Hednesday, June 9 8:00 pm, movie night at Denver Folklore Center (movies every Wed. starting this Hed.) admission 75 June 10 7:00pm, channel 6, Vision of Photography. "Na . n .al Light" 8:00 pro, Jethro Tull at Red Rocks 8:30 pm, channel 6, NET Playhouse, ''Black and 10:00 pm, channel 6 , Soul, Richie Havens and the casL from the all-black musical " Sambo " will perform Friday, June ll 8 : 30 pm, channel 6 , The Toy that Grew Up, "My Boy", 1921 movie & .;arring Jackie Coogan Saturday June 1 2 Folklc ,., C. enter Vohn Travers ' contemporary guitar .... n 'i sir _,ir:,-, $1.50 June 13 8:00 pm, Cat rens a t i Focks . " 1 :inen"1 a '!oliseum 1 0 : 00 pm, char: .i..), " fe. ,i val, Casal s Saturday, June 1 9 Folklore Center, Robbie Basho, guitarist, $1.50 Sunday , June 20 7:00 pm, channel 6, . , !J.voca t.es. ., Should Capital Gains be taxed as Or-.inary Inc• 1e ?'' Tuesday, June 22 8:00pm, Sammy Davi-:; 'lt RF.ri 10:00 pm, channel 6, .:.an Franch. : o Mix, "Loving" ..

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........................................................ . radical inflirmatlun oroiact book review The Peasants o f North Vietn am, by Gerard Chaliand $1.32 In the summe r of 1 9 64, Lyndon Johnson and his advisors faked a North Vietnamese attack o n 2 U.S. destroyers in order to justify the first American air a ttacks on North Vietnam. This resulted in the famous Tonkin Gulf Resolution and h elped LBJ beat poor Barry Goldwater in November. During this t ime t here was much civil unrest in South Vietnam , and several Saigon g overnments fell. It was beginning to look like LBJ and his military advisors might no t have a ny Saigon puppets to fight for. In t h e same months U Thant, Charles de Gaulle and Premier Kosygin had all called for a r econvening of the Gene v a C on ference, '"hich t h e Uni ted States had violated continuously since 1954. The deserti on rate in '.:.he Saigo n Army had reached 30% i n January, 1965. I t was time for some drastic LBJ action, and so, o n February 7 , 1965, American plane s began attacking North Vietnam in force. Thre e weeks later the U.S. State Department produced its fam ous Paper which tried unsuccessfully to prove that.: ''In Vietnam a Communist government has set out deliberately to conquer a sovereign people in a neighboring state." Thus began an incredibly destructive campaign o f strategic bombing o f North Vietnam which obliterated factories, h cf.i) i tals, schools, government buildings and in s ome cases e n t ire towns. I t failed to stop the people's war in the South, and whe n bombing was finall y halted on November l, 1968, LBJ had alread y given u p and it was too late to save Hubert North Vietnam had not only survived over on e million tons o f high explosive bombings since 1965, but i"; had actually i n creased its support of the guerrilla the South . ) .......................................... .-.. .. .. a

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Chaliand's book is the product o:f a visit to North Vietnam during Octobe r and November o:f 1967, during the peak o:f the bombing. He spent his time in :four o:f the provinces around Hanoi, and 1111ch o:f the book is composed o:f personal statements by the peasants in those provinces. The book opens with a short historical sketch of the Vietnamese nation. A paragraph from this section demonstrates the importance of Vietnamese history both to the building of social.ism an. d to the ability t o resist American attack. "The distinctive qualities of the Vietnamese n a tional character had been moulded by the way of life prevailing in the villages, with their entirely communal basis , their relative independence and their peculiar solidari-:-,y. T'ne continual need to build dikes and i-----------------------... ( i

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You see the scars upon my arms, but you don't know what they mean. Twin tatooes of misery, and the troubles I have seen. Exploited by profiteers from sun to morning sun; Hounded by detectives and always on the run. Dealers and detective strange allies it would seem; United in their effort to destroy a happy dream. One seeks to destroy me with the overdose I won't feel. The other more cruel and slowly used walls and of steel. So you see these scars upon my arms are trying hard to say; It really doesn't matter I'm the victim either way. Homer Brown, the State Pen PNS denver 333