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People's News Service, June 24, 1971

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People's News Service, June 24, 1971
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People's news service
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People's News Service
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Denver, CO
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People's News Service
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Auraria Library
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In thls issue; People’s Music-3, Dogcatcher-4, Tenanfs Uhion-5, Urban Renewal-6,
Herman Davis-8, Taxi Strike-9, Shorts-12, Community Services-middle, Calendar-13, Movement-14, Wine Boycatt-l6, Winter Soldiers-17, Ho Chi Minh Trail-18, A Song of Peace-23j Sitting Bull-24»
Never has it been more important for us to understand what is happening to us in Denver. Whether we understand or nat, ve are being affected by decisions ve have not made. Our music has been cut off, our dogs are being stolen by the city, our homes are in the fateful hands of Urban Renewal, and ve stand a good chance of being searched illegally on the Street.
If you have spent rauch time on the hili in Boulder, valked along East Colfax, or gone-to one of the "rock concerts" you are probably very avare of some bad vibes and some outright pig repression. It is not hard to pick up on some feelings.
One evening on Cblfax vas enough. The first irapression is that there are pig cars almos t end to end in a fi ve block area. Both the managers at McDonald’s and Taco Bell stood outside vatchlng to see if people vere eating food or Just talking. The Taco Bell manager explained to me that thelr sign by the sidevalk vas not for leaning on. Later a guy on a bike vas busted in the Taco Bell parking lot as helpless freaks stood around not knoving hov to help.
As if that vasn’t enough, ve got into a rap vith a "freak" salesman in Budget Tapes and Records about the Jethro Tuli, concert. He vas rapping down things like "If the kids are going to act like that they don’t deserve any more music" and " What vould you have done if you vere a policeman there" • The concert as veli as the store itself is part of the "Culture Vulture" plan to make us pay through the nose for the very music and culture that ve have created. He vent on to expiain that he didn’t like ali the freaks standing around. Just that very day he had got ter» together vith some of the other "merchants" on Colfax and they had asked the police to keep the freaks moving on the sidevalk. Can you imagine a pig telling a business-raan standing in front of May D&F to move along? No. It only could happen in our communlty.
What started at Erie vas finished at Red Rocks vith the Jethro Tuli concert. After 10,000 contained people (incluaing babies and kids) had been gas^ed the first time, I vent up to the back to see vhat vas happening. As I valked up to the railing I vas yelled at by a pig. He said to get back or he'd throv me out. A little later I sav a guy being choked by three pigs. His toes vere barely touching the ground and his face vas bright red. He had come up fremi his seat to find out vko had throvn the second tear gas bomb. Three girls vere screaming that he Just vanted to knov vhat vas happening, as they dragged him avay vith blood dripping from his ear.
I tried to find out from some Feyllne long hairs vhy they vere standing around vith clubs. They said they vere hired as buffers. But I never sav them stand up for the freaks. In fact, they vere the pig front line.
In the end, the promoters and other pigs lost an other vay to rip off large groups of freaks (10,000 freaks at $4.00 a head equals $40,000.00), Mayor McWichols proved that kids couldn’t be peaceful and vas re-elected in the process, and ve lost the music that is rightfully ours.
The lesson to be leamed from all the things I sav in the last couple of veeks is that vherever ve gather ve are going to be harrassed. As individuals ve vili be picked off one by one as the rest of us stand by and vateh. We must become individ-ually and collectively avare of vhat is happening to us, vhy it is happening (profit— eering, uptightness, and dovnright pignishness), and vhat our rights are.


PENUS' MISIC PUPUS' WAI ?
Keii, rigfct nov it iooks as if outdoor i summer-ccncerts in Demrer are a lost cause. [ Ey feelings are that, if they must te i conducted as at Srie and Red Rocks, who cares? I have never objected to tfce haze >}of grass smoke that often hangs over such «an affair, but tear gas is another matter.
[ 11 have been gassed before and it just doesn't make for a good stonel Also a )lconcert swarming with pigs of whatever /j vari et y resembles a concentration camp st more than anything eis e, They seem to ?! produce a sort of nausea gas generated by jj their very presence. Neither could I .sit jjplacidly listening to a band while my d brothers and sisters were having their heads cracked in a minor guerilla var being conducted all around me.
IjPeople^ News Service June 2*f, 1971
1, wfiwj>"s ito Thfllaimp and 2, are there amy altemaatives? Tfftte amswer ito #1 is A, the ciity administratiani, tine cops, ifcSne panaronters, B, tine bands, E, the peopie vino pay ridiculcus parices to see thom, and. F, the gate crashers» Stow let nae eapdLalm that» The mayor and his lackejs Am*t freaks and love to represent
themselves as chawpioaas of law and arder, as defemders of civilizaticn against the barbarous hordes of the great unwashed»
The cops, with few excepticiis, don*t lite us either and vhen given the opportunity vili often deligfat in doing their thing, clubbing, gassing and jailing freaks.
Rock promoters don*t give a shit about servi ng the commmity, but only how rnuch money they can make selltng our culture back to us» The bands must share sosne guilt for offering their music at cutrageous prices and c ooperati ng with tfce capital i st prcnoten . Ideally. people should boycott ccncerts where prices and security measures are totaily fcreign to wnat a concert should te- fete cr^ Thing is hard to condemn for ne as 1 iiave dene it and given the circumstances may very well have joined in the guerilla warfare out of the sheer excitement a riot can generate» However,
I wculd then also have to share responsi-bility for people being hurt who vere in no vay responsible sucfc as the babies who suffered from gas, or kids who have no political consciousness and just wanted to hear scms music • A riot in this context does little to raise such consciousness and "^rtainly doesn’t provide for a. good tim<_w
Now as I see it there are two alternatives. One depends on how much the promoters can control their greed and better stili on the community1s ability to create a counter-cultural music scene for its own benefit.
over-
3


Por you violenee freaks (something for everyone) flash on this scene; a people’s band is playing on liber-ated territory, peqple are aware of the need to defend their culture and'their turf. The pigs move in, tac squad and helipigSo The band breaks into "Street Fighting Man"0 Trained cadre are ready and move to protect the band and deploy themselves strategically. Non-combatants move to safety. Helmets, gas masks and gloves appear, barricades go up. Peqple’s medical teams are on hando Guerillas move out to encircle the pigs and create diversionary attackso Helipigs are dealt with by people*s antiaircrafto Well, perhaps I*m getting carried away, the point is, don*t play the pigs' game on his terms..
Jim Do
If the promoters really want to provide music and make a reasonable (?) profit, let them pick a large outdoor area, charge no more than $2.00 for space near the bands and say $1.00 further back.
Then have speakers set up around the area so peqple who are really broke can stili at least hear the music o Avoid bringing pigs around and I believe if people are treated fairly and the situation is run down to them, there would be no gate cra3hing.
Another altemative would be to arrange free concerts or benefits, put on by a coalition of youth comraunity groups who are respected by everyone o This works well in other dities such as Ann Arbor.
Of course we probably wouldn*t have big name bands, but I would rather listen to a local group who really just dug on playing their music and serving the comraunity.
Once before we suggested that bands or people able to help contact us. Perhaps now we may have more success as there seems to be no alternative.
Jim D.
............................ i... â– â– â– hi
power fo fhe pupples
If you are quietly sitting in your front yard playing with your brand new pup-py, or even you not-so-brand new dog and you see a white van with a yellow light on the top pull up in front of you and stop with screeching tires, runl IT’ S THE DOG CATCHERJ
This, however, so not how it will probably happen—more likely, at five or five-thirty in the morning, he will creep stealthily up onto your front porch and STEAL your dog. If caught in the act, the motherfucker will explaine his duty is to enforce the leash law.
If you have a flre-escape that leads to a window that your dogs use as a door at night, and I am sure I am not the only one with this situation, then it is best to either sleep with your clothes on, keep a loaded water-balloon, or get an Army-trained killer dog that will attack on command, or ali of the above, for those early-morning marauders will even sneak up theses fix-tures to startle you out of you dreams of dogs barking by yelling, "Whose dog is that?" "Butbutbut Sir....."
No use. Irregardless, if you have
4
a four-footed canine friend, be ready for a ticket or getting you dog busted.
Also these dog-pigs are harassing more and more in the parks, and unfortunately, the verbal leash does not hold up in Denver County as it does in Arapahoe and Adams Counties. If you have any feasible Solutions to this problem, please write PNS(^>


Today $ Spocial!: 2 bdrm. sewer for rerrt, $95.
ChHdren, pets OK. Call for appmt. Moore Realty.
Now that most bf our artlcles have dealt vith organi zati on and baslc knowledge of rights, ve thought maybe you'ld like to have some of the types of cases that come lnto our office.
Most cases fall lnto general categorles such as evictions, lockout, wlthholdlng damage deposit, ; pet problems, etc., however we flnd that often there wlll be a definite surface problem, as : veli as an underlylng problem, usually dis criminat ion. Some circumstances are very blatant-ly dis criminat lng. One day a lady— correction—a female person called our office and pro-ceeded like thls: "I have a 12-unit bullding, and I live in eme unit and the manager1 s in i one other. Thls leaves 10. Do I have to rent to niggers?"
Another big problem Is finding emergency housing for some people in crisis type llvlng conditions. Recently I got a call from Sue Keltch at East Side Aetion Center asklng me to come help picket a red tag (condemned) house. Thls is a drastic move that sometimes needs to be taken vhen nothing eis e has vorked. When I arrlved at the house, I found the detalls | of the case vere that eleven chlldren and tvo pregnant women vere llvlng in a two-bedroom house. The plumbing had failed to such an extent that neither the tollet, bathtub, or kitehen sink vere operable. If one of the chlldren had to shit, then it ended up in the kitehen sink i or bathtub via the broken plumbing. Some of the sevage had filled the b as ement, vas rottlng I the floorboards of the flrst floor, and coming up in the backyard. EVery morning the tvo ) women and the older chlldren vould vork together in trying to sveep the sevage out of the â–  house. The conditions of the house led to infestatlon by rats and cockroaches. The owners of the house, Moore Realty Conrpany, vere stili collectlng $95 a month. One of the vomen said 1 that tvo of her chlldren vere slck and she feared the posslbility of typhoid. Both famllles i vere on Welfare and had gone to both the Welfare Department and Public Housing only to be 1 told they must vait their tum to be placed in liveable housing.
We decided that if thls vas the resuit from the normal source, then ve'd go to a "super" i source, the Mayor. We knev if ve vent to the Mayor, something vould get done, and possibly | there vould be publldty letting people knov of thls not uncommon situatlon. AS"We vere | gathering in front of the City and County Bullding, a suited man came dovn the stalrs , and ! after giving us a cold stare, asked, "Don't you ever vork?" When ve arrlved at the .Mayor's I suite and confronted his five not-so-lusdous secretarles, ve vere told that they vere very r sorry but Mr. McNlchols had lefb for the day, "about five mlnutes ago." I personally feel i that he vas probably hidlng In the can or under his desk, not vanting to acknovledge that I such conditions exist in his Mile-Hi City. Hovever, ve dld get to talk to Mr. Roger Olsen,
! assistant to the Mayor. It took 2^ hours and a lot of bullshit, but ve dld succeed in housing ali thirteen people at the Oxford Hotel until permanent housing came up. We vere trying to get Olsen to say that there vili be temporary housing for all people in crisis housing,
and he told us to take only one at a time. So.......We'll see you at Uncle Bill's.
Capitol Hili Tenanfs Union
{
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P0TTIR'S BICYCLES STRAIGHT JOHNSON'S (restaurant)
4628 East 23rd Avenue food, vibes, music
333-4U48 I had pizza,
Lovest Prices on 10 speed bikes: but the rest.of the food is good. fi
American Eagle...$72*95 Atala...$8^.95 659 South Pearl at Exposition
Used Bikes 0. .$10.00 & up call 777-5627
People'8 Nevs Service June 2^, 1971 5


As eome of you know, Urban Renewal1s next project (the last one vas Auraria) is tentatively going to be the area bounded roaghly by 13th and 22nd Avenues, and Grant St. and Colorado Blvd. The City would very much like to "irnprove this area, or, inore accurately, raise the value of the property so that more property taxes can be collected. While this may be the most obvious motive, it is not the most significant.
There are several approaches that Urban Renewal uses to "improve" areas, ranging from the Total Bulldozer tactic to giving money to property ovners to improve their property, to widening streets and building freeways. (Incidentally, one idea currently being considered is to make Colfax a one-way Street* in combination with l6th Ave. similar to the Broadway-Lincoln
combination). Less than 10$ of the people who live in the proposed area own their ovn houses. Given this fact, any project which raises the value of the property in the area will mean that the absentee landlords will raise the rental rates, in other words destroy some more of Denver’ s "underdeveloped" communities. Although Urban Renewal is required by law to provide all people displaced with equivilant housing at the same price, this has hardly ever happened. Denver now has a housing crisis. There is a l/l0$ vacancy rate in
6
low and moderately priced apartments.
This means that there are less than enough for people now and the only low cost housing that any government agency is considering building would be high-rises near the Valley Highway and the football stadium, a truly clean, relaxing and beautiful place to live. (For one example of what Denver*s housing crisis does, see the CHTU article in this issue).
Mayor McNichols has often demonstrated his hostility towards the blacks, chicanos, Xndians and freaks who inhabit the area.
The other significant group who live in the area are old people, more of whom own their own houses. At this point many of these people would be glad to sell their property at a good price to the government and move out of the "blighted" neighborhood to Windsor Gardens or some such place.
The other property owners, who live some-where else, have no stake in the community except money. These are also the people who are represented on the Urban Renewal board and by the city administration.
The project was originally to be sponsored by a coalition of the hospitals in the area, The Midtown Hospital Assoc. and was referred to as The Hospital Park Plan. But the hospitals were not able to see the "larger plan" and submerge their capitalist urge to compete with each other instead of cooperating. So the cover and the name was dropped. In any case, vague pians during the Hospital Park Plan period referred to large landscaped park areas. Any such development in the project area would serve as a (military) buffer zone or a demilitarized zone separating Denver's black community from the white parts of the city except in middle-class, "happily integrat.ed" Park Hili. The idea that parks could be planned or used for such insidious purposes may bring charges of paranoia. Maybe. Just keep in mind that parts of other redevelop-ment pians pro^ected by various government


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| agemcies Include a freevay with narrow i parks ora. eaeh side alcog 3^^ Ave* from [tine aiipoart ito dowinrtowm (part of pians for
ItSue Olympica), vialcto Ibiappezas to run through ■ * ithe rnidrille ©f tine Tblack ec8»mity. 'This ;/ voraldL mott oraly' mate iit easier ito keep a I rorate ito tfine strategicaULy important I aixjtiOrt ©pom in case ©f a black uprising, tat also msakea movomemt of police and ■ Hational Oiaard thorcragSi the "black e Genauni ty easier to maintain. Ancther plan vould ' Tblodk mamy sitreets in a large area around -1 Manual Highi School and cbange the grid Ipattern of streets into a series of circle drives and dead ends. This not only makes j it more difficult for fire equipanert and I other eoergency vehicles to re&pond quickly, Itat n&akes it posslble to isolate several-block areas with only 2 or 3 strategic
A ccuple of months ago, THK Assoc., i l6th and Bnerson, vas given money to do a jfeasability study, to see if it is feasible |j (sometimes read as "profitable") to renew fthe area and to make recommendations as to fjwhat kind of reneval would be best. Part >|of the Urban Reneval Act calls for the [tparticipation of the residents in the area* 2|So 3BK gave Bernie Jones money to find out vhat the residents vant. He must tura in i (his report hy September lst and he feels that it vili take a morrth to compile and jjwrite the report, vhich means he has ane (l) month to find out vhat ve vant* To do this he is planning a series of community c meetings during July. He understands that tjthere is little time and that thousands of people stand to get ripped off. Denver Urban Reneval' s last project, Auraria,
> vas already planned out before the residents ijfound out vhat vas going to happen at vhich :jpoint they vere told that they vere tbo i late. No matter hov good a report Bernie eland his staffvrite, ve vili almost ijcertainly get ripped off* Unless Bernie )(& staff are able to mobilize the community J into a uuified, independerit forfee, they’ twill only have been used by Ultima Reneval :jto fulfill the lcgai requireaaBte and to Rtry to saaka people bslieve that they have
ipe-opler1 Revu Service Sune 2%, V&IX
i
had a voice* If ve, the residents, seize on this opportunity ve can unify around a together plan for our community, a plan ve , have developed. If this happens, Urban Reneval may find it increasingly hard to run over a community of people for a fast buck.
In following issues ve vili publish some far-out ideas different comnunities across the country have thought out and acted on for making a livable city environment* So far, ideas from the PNS collective are; using block parties to complement the community meetings vhich may tend to be boring, attended by fev and dominated by even fever, Absentee Landlords seem to be the major contributing factor to the physical-mental deterioration of the community. It just doesn*t make sense to spend a lot of energy-time-money improving your environment vhen you can and do get evicted at the vhim of your land-lord and any improvements you do make can be used as an excuse by the landlord to raise your rent« One suggestion to Urban Reneval then, is to make long term, no- > interest loans available to people to buy houses in the area, on the condition that thev !■*■«¥» b^jses. This vili
axau allov people vho vant to move to do so even they vili probably change their minds vhen they see a righteous people*s community. Beyond this, smaller neighborhoods within the area should be given the information and materials and then the money so they can figure out the best vay to use the land. To fix up houses vhich are valuable as far as aesthetics and structure, to use the rest of the land, like irretrevable houses, vacant lots, ugly Stores, etc., to make parks, maybe a bandshell, bicycle paths space for vegetable gardening, or
If you are interested in rapping to Bernie and his staff and finding out more or helping him, go to the southvest corner of l8th and Clarkson.
Steve W.
7


JffiRMtt MMK.JT MHHi?
On May 31» 1971, Herman Davls, 25 vas shot to death In the Uve Polnts Area after allegedly confronting pollce and after belng disarmed by police, Herman vas shot vhlle he vas runnlng from offlcers. Many questione have been raised about the Incident* Peatured eure statements about the shooting, by the vldov and eous in of the deceased originally published in the June lOth issue of The Denver Weekly News.
(Part of statement made by FTankie Churchill Jr», cousin of Herman Davls vho vas with hiro the nigbt of the kllllng* Dominguez and Prince eure the police offlcers»)
"Herman had left the 715 Bar» I looked around and didn't see Herman so I vent out the door on the 26th Ave side and I sav Hermem talking to tvo vhlte men in the alley»
"This is vhen I walked up and It seemed everythlng vas okay. They vere laughing and talking. As I walked up, Dominguez said, nHey, that's cool, man. Fverything's edi right." Dominguez seild, "Lefs go." This is vhen 1 heard Hermem say, "You oughta see hov they kill cops in Chlcago." Then Prince said, "I am a cop." This is vhere Herman reached dovn in his pants and Prince grabbed his vrlst» Prince begem to pull his hand (Herman's) out of his pants» Then they had the gun out emd it vas polnted to the ground» During that time this other officer (Dominguez) fired into the alr» * Hermem's gun vent off stili polnted toward the ground. Herman had dropped his gun slnce he couldn't do any-thlng. Then me emd Hermem broke out and began to run. When ve had our backs turned, they (Dominguez and Prince) started shooting» We vere in the car wash emd they started shooting. Ibis is vhen I seen Herman stagger» I vas stili runnlng emd turned around to see if they vere stili chemlng us. This is vhen I seen smoke and I turned my head rlght quick emd I heard that bullet vhen it passed my ear. We ran out of the vaaher. Herman vent rlght up Weltom. Z atopped beeause 1 figured they «m fodat to keep on flring* 1 sav Bumm vhen he ooaiet the Street and Z gUht see hdn aayneeo» After that». there van no noro sheda fired» hmhpithd \: iitisd hin pa at ma«
8
(Statement of Mrs. Margaret Davls, vife of Hermem Davls»)
"The Police came into my horne about 1:00 am. They asked me did Hermem Davls live here» I said "Yes." They said he shot at a policeman emd that they vanted to search through my horne. Then I said, "Could you give me time to put some clothes on?" They seild, "No," They came in.
Slx or elght policemen came in» They vere ali vhite» Tvo vere in plaln clothes»
They vent ali through my house, turning or the llghts and looking everyvhere» They . stayed about 5 minutes in the house and about 15 minutes around it» I asked them hov did they knov vhere we llved and they said one of the policemen ldentlfled Hermem.
"I didn't flnd out my husband vas dead untll around 6:00 am vhen my cousin came»**


The following letter is written to Allan Haifley who is currently incarcerated in a federal prison in Stafford, Arizona for refusing inductione Xt was written by Nell Sale, a taxi cab driver and active meniber of the Independent Drivers Associatione As ve go to press the strike has been settled. The strikers vili receive a 6$ across the board vage increase plus a 15^ an hour equity increase. The company vili probably petition the Public Utilities Commission sometime in July for a fare increase to make up the increased costs of vages.
6-17-71
Dear Allan,
I suppose that you have been waiting with an anxious lump in your throat to hear about the most exciting event in labor his-tory in Denver, the great taxi cab strikei Steve and I have just begun trying to anal-yze what has happened, now that a vote was taken last night that brought the situation to an end, most probably. I assume that you have been reading the Denver Post, so I'll spend just a little time on the facts of the actual strike.
There are four unions at Yellow Cab. (Zone and Ritz cab have not been involved at ali up to this point.) The dispatchers are members of Teamsters Local 775> the telephone operators are members of Profes-sional and Office Workers, and the mechan-ics are in the MachinistSo Then of course the drivers are members of the Independent Drivers Association, known fondly as IDA. Ali of the jobs are held by a union shop, so in order to dispatch, one would have to join the Teamsters, etc. The contracts of
People's News Service June
the three smaller unions at the company came up for vage negotiations on June 1.
The contract with the drivers does not of-ficially come up again until Jan. 31 > 197i so on the face of it, we were not involved at ali in this recent dispute. However, wt are the largest group of workers, so our sheer size means that we are always somehov involved. And, the company has put dovn the line that unies s the cab drivers agree to pay the company more money when we rent the cabs, that they will be unable to raise
the other workers' salaries.....a good tac~
tic, no? Add to that potentially divis ive strategy, the fact that the drivers are ex-Teamsters, and are targets for ali the wrath that the Teamster International can mus ter, and you find an almost conspira-torial relationship between the company and the Teamsters against the drivers. We were in a weak position in a strike because we have no strike fund, being an independent local, and the Teamsters really wanted to exploit that too. So there really were two factors in this strike from the drivers point of view. • .how to beat the company, . and how to beat the Teamsters. Now, some history.......
In March or so, the company applied with the PUC for a fare increase for the meters. The terms of our contract with the company say that the drivers have to con-cur on any fare increase that the company wants. So, rauch to Steve and my surprise, the drivers voted down the fare increase. That was our first hint at what was to come. Then, in Apri1 news began to circulate that the’ other three unions were de-manding a 15$ increase in wages for their new contract in June. Then the company began filling the drivers full of hard' luck storles about their losses, their sad
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finaneial dilemma, and hov Mike Emerich wanted to sell the corapany anyway0 When negotiation actually began in May, the drivers1 negotiators were involved even thought we were not actually involved in a contract renewalo Our negotiators, at the first session, offered to buy the corapany i Ali of a sudden, Emerich wasn't so eager to sell» The union voted unanimous-ly NOT to ralse our payoff on whatever terms, in the middle of May..*We were be-ginning to flex our muscleso••«0 While the other unions and the corapany bargained, al-ways keeplng in mind that the drivers had to bend, and could be forced to bend once a strike was called because we could not survive for more than four days with no
Kaiser are the union's lawyers, for better or worse.
The idea that we came up with was the courtesy car. We would install phones, publici ze a new phone number for Yellow cab Service, drive our own cars, and maintain Service to the public, as well as provide ourselves with subsistence. With that threat, June 1 came and went, and a four day exbension of the contract was granted until a federal mediator was able to meet with the disputing parties. At thls point it became ciear that we were to recelve no support from the other three unions, es-pecially the Teamsters. I also learned then that the whole Teamster union is in
trusteeship, which means that the leader-ship of ali locals is appolnted by the International, and the local membership has no power over any decisione that their negotiators make.......so we were really
struggling with a guy naraed Harry Bath, who had a number of bitter personal enemies in our union, from old Teamster days. So we had a meetlng on Tues day, June 1, when we stili didn't know whether or not the other unions were even going to strike* The lead-ership of the union, and Kaiser, proposed that we offer to the corapany that we would eros s the picket lines of the other unions, and run the corapany. This really rubbed wrong with a lot of people, and we were really angry at such an idea. The leadershlp
and honestly was that if we offered to run the corapany, that Yellow could not accept because of their contiracts with the other unions. Only wages were under negotiation. There were stili union shops, and we were not Teamsters, so we could not dispateh. If Yellow allowed us to, they would be sued for breach of contract by the Teamsters. Of course we weren't sure that the Teamsters would do that, and that made the scene a bit unsure» The strategy was that Yellow would refuse to let us, a lockout. This strategy was not really explalned very well at all, and the lssue at the meetlng was talked about in terms of scab or not scab. At the end of the vote, the union voted to respect
strike fund, our union began to try to fig- though really raessed up in presenting the i-
ure out how to survive. Gerash, Gerash and
dea. What they failed to explain clearly


any picket lines that may be set up and to not scabo This put the courtesy cars back into our pians. We had also found out that our liability Insurance had been blocked by Yellow cab, so we would be operating our Service in cars not fully insured....sort of tlcklish. But that was our only out now.
So, at ^:00 am on Saturday morning, the dis-patchers went off the air, drivers retumed their cabs to the pot, and the flrst IDA Courtesy Car was on the Street by 5*00 am.
It took a while to catch on, but as of yes-terday we were handling close to the sanie amount of business that Yellow cabs usually handle.oo.we have no radios and have to call in by telephone to receive orders for trips, and we are definitely xnaking less money than usual.....of course we have no pay off ex-cept for a three dollar levee to pay our own operators and dispatchers, so it1s not ali that bad. Some interesting things have hap-pened* Por instance, at Yellow cab they av-erage three accidents per day. We have had one, which was not the driver fault. Ali enat ed labori The rapport among the drivers has been fantastic...we have set up our own regulatory body which handles disputes, un-fair practices, cheating, etc., replacing the need for the Yellow Cab personal pigs.
The public has really been behlnd us, which has really exposed Yellow Cab's real inter-ests.
The major drawback is that we have never articulated ciear goals, thus " dw-ing for a debate over what our goals should be. There has been a lot of rhetoric a-bout ccntrol of the company, and how we run it now anyway, why shouldn’t we own it, etc. I foolishly latched on to that rhetoric as more widespread and significant than it actually has been. Last night we voted on whether to settle or face an injunction. We have been expect-ing an injunction any day, and I honestly feel that the leadership was prepared to buck it if there were no significant bud-ges by Yellow Cab. But in the last few days Mike Emerich himself has offered the lowest pay off increase that he can, and a dime increase in the flag drop. This seemed to the leadership to be the juiciest carrot they could get, and so they pushed for us to "get back to work" and work for a better contract deal next January. Of course Kaiser was also saying that he did-n’t think we could beat the stick, the injuction. Another factor was that McNich-ols was reelected, and we had been aware that the City had not moared against the
Peoplels News Service June 24, 1971
courtesy cars because of the impending eleC' â– Kon. So, the goal really was for most of ^e drivers, the best pay off deal we could get, and back to work as soon as pos-sible. So that won, 4-1. Those of us idealistic radicals who wanted to hold out for some concrete concessions in textos of control, hopefully will begin trying to stimulate that consciousness among the menbers for the next six months. I really felt that we should have held out for more right now, since the drivers were more conscious of their real power now than ever before. We should also have challenged the companies logic that the only increase in wages would have to corae from the public through a fare increase, and from the drivers through a pay off increase. We also failed to challenge explicitly that the drivers owe Yellow Cab anything.... .mahy of the drivers believe that it is their end of the bargain to work for Yellow Cab as long as Yellow provides them with the means to work, i .e., a cab. That fundamental attitude and relationship was in fact challenged by the courtesy cars, but not really brought explicitly to consciousness. And that really was our fault as radicals.
I have really been learning a lot from the other drivers, as well a learning how to relate to them. Steve and I have really done nothing in that union before now, and I think we will stick aroiund now and try to organize some consciousness so that more peqple will feel clearer about the real is-sues. I have to admit that I found more right on workers control folk that I thought
were there......although now as I look
back on it, they may have been just riding the rhetoric, and I don't really know where they really stand. My dreams of the first soviet of Denver will have to be carefully shelved. smirk. \
The vote we took last night is contingent upon the company settling with the other three unions, and also contingent upon a fare increase which will have to be
granted by the PUC.....and possibly by the
other two cab companies, I don’t know how they fit in. So it may not be over yetl If the other unions stili refuse to settle it could start all over again, maybe.
I’ll write again. Stay alive as rauch as you can.
much love,
nell
11


MslirlsMoits
LNS, Cupertino, Calif. - All nares, IBI agents and CIA. will get a cash discount on admission to student activities at Deanza Jr. College. The eollege's student council approved unanimously a 20$ discount for agents who show proper ID, lover prices for pork.
Los Siete de la Raza have gone underground because of, the stoleh car charge that has beeh hanging on them from the May 1, 1969 incident when they were put on trial for murder and found not guilty. Also because of the harras sinent they have gotten from the San Francispo police after the trial was over, and because two of them were busted in a liquor store hold-up, they felt that they couldn't get a fair trial* They have a letter published in the S.F* Good Times explaining why they went underground*
"The fallacy is that we want to be nice to the prisoners or that we want to give them greater opportunity and develqpment* That is not the main purpose of rehabilitation programs* These programs are to give added protection to the public* We want to protect the public from criminality*"
Commissioner G* F* McGarth of N*Y*C* Jail System ^JJewYorJ^Times., 10-23-70
A national anti-war convention has been called by National Peace Aetion Coalition for July 2-h at Hunter College in New York City* The purpose is to plan mass demonstrations for the fall offensive*
12
A bili that would extend democratic rights for homo-sexuals by banning discrimina-tion because of "sexual orientation" in public employ-ment and housing was defeated May 26 in the New York State Assembly. The bili was the first of its kind and would have provided a legal basis for hornosexuals to fight firings in public employment and discrimination in housing.
A federal parole board voted to transfer Chicano nationalist Reies Lopez Tijerina from federal custody to New Mexico state prison authorities on July 26 where he will serve a state sentence stemming from his 1967 county courthouse raid* During the raid Tijerina attempted to make a Citizen's arrest of police officials in connection with their harass-ment against his attempst to reclaim land taken from Chicanos by U*S. government* * I
Dear Rosa,
My name is Lorraine.
I live with Jack* He just came back from Cuba* He is telling us about you and your country* He would like our country to be like yours. You have a pretty name* Does sugar cane grow slow or fast? Did your school get out yet? Mine did. Do you like school?
I like art, math, reading, painting and recess* Please write back.
P.S* Send a picture of yourself.
â–  â– 
LNS, The Peoples Coalition for Peace and Justice, a cqalitiqn that sponsored the Mayday disruptions in Washington last month, pians a national confer-ence in Milwaukee on June 25-27 at St* Michael's Church and School.
Thirteen Black Panther Party members went oh trial in Los Angeles in connection with the police raid that took place k days after Chicago police murdered Fred Hampton and Mark Clark. The 13 defendants, including former deputy defense minister "Geronimo" entered pleas of not guilty. They are charged with conspiracy to murder, assault with intent to murder and possession of deadly weapons. On Dec 8, 1969 L.A. police kept the Panther office under a constant hail of gun-fire and dynamite charges until early moming when the Panthers were able to rally .the press and people in the community to witness the attack ^and guarantee their safety.
have you noticed
the gutless wonders
sitting in air-conditioned
Street comer s?
have you noticed the
people everywhere?
ah, yes
a businessman
(beer belly hunter)
and a hippie
(pot belly hunted)
it is easy to laugh
when you are not part
of a viscious square.
Mass Marvel
Lorraine, USA


inmity
genandA
overiapplng
Boulder Communications Center 999Alpine 2*44.4443, 24 hours
St* Andrew‘s Church 2015 Glenarm Place 825-5517
-crashing, free meal daily except Thurs* Opens at 1 pm*
Hip Help Center
1002 B. 17th Ave. #2 222-33^> 24 hours -open evenings from 7 Pm -emergency food and clothlng, run-away and other counseling, legal and medical help, etc.
EI K II XS
ifcsr in a 1 PUBUCPIACE- 1
FBR.MJL
you HMU>-
C6RET
TfcANSIENTS
ANDCaHEfc.
N6HDPOL
peoPUc:..
The Connection (Youth Coalition)
125 E* l8th Ave* (for now)
892-1^12, 24 hours
-legal^medical, housing, J0b*.«
ACHJ (American Civil lihertles Union] Contact: Oorothy Davidson 1711 Pennsylvania St* Room 108 825-5176
Colo* Public Defender County Office 1445 Cleveland 297-2681
DoUp Help Line 753-3178
-open daily 6pm-2am
Bicycles Now - Environmental Aetion 534-3621
Legal Educatlon and Information Centex 2420 Welton St*
222-1573
D*U* Lav School 200 W. l4th Ave*
753-2646, 753-2643
East Side Aetion Center 23rd and Welton 222-18o6, 534-6228
North Side Oomsunlty Center 3551 Pecoe 433-8349
West Side Aetion Center 1312 Santa Fe Dr* 534-5141
pwohe YB#, m cokhectvoH? V OOST Gcft\vnoTW*)N-*’»"yB>ssav 6 Jit «ffljT CJPF Trte StSETT By h
, m Jott, w 1
1M( umkt todo . m§. pBfeiiS&... NO AftKh), l MEMvl, FlBST i| I WfcNT TO StNOu) WHERE Cf\N VoO gei. 0*"* ronD in -trtu, -roi«IN?T
Legal Aid Soclety 1375 Delaware 623-8251
Peoples Defense Commlttee 333-7875
GHTU (Capital Hili Tenants Union) 1460 Pennsylvania, Room 4 825-2329
-fTee advice and help on ali hous-ing, tenant/ landlord problems•
Lavyers Gulld Walter Gcrash 1700 Broedway 222-85"v
Jails
Denver City—297-2968 Denver County—297-2564 Boulder—442-3434
People‘8 News Servio» June 24, I971


entertainment
boc- 13V&T i nlftf 1 lU 1 irYflV
m 1 1 LfREE CUNicj i 1
Nboor AS»/ iwacmj
MJU
!W53N'J^
toar VT>. ^EAiwtannr?'
Health Services
A media
Signs of the Zodiac Coffeehouse 311 B. 20th Ave.
-open evenings freta B:00pm
DFU Gay Coffeehouse 125 E* l8th Ave.
-open 7-H pm Monday-Thursday and Tpm-lam Friday and Saturday
Chinook
1452 Pennsylvania, Suite 21 892-1709
-$3 for 20 issues
Boulder Free Medical Clinic 999 Alpine, Boulder
303-1^9-6050
-open daily from noon till midnight, open forum each Wednesday
Planned Parenthood 2020 York St.
388-1*777
-Birth control Information, sex educati on center for under 18, teen clinic sessions Wed. after school, VD treatment, pregnancy tests, speakers available, library.
Women’s Liberation
1458 Pennsylvania St.
534-0069
-abortion counseling
The Open Clinic 2030*S. Gaylord 753-3245
-drug counseling, birth control Information, medical referals
NOUS (high school action) contact Barb Nevlon 722-3102
Boulder Express
1030 13th St., Boulder Ed.-Bob Wells
447-8033
-$4 per year
KCFR-PM 90.1
2056 S. York St.
753-2667
-non-profit, educational, free forum format
-Ken Hofftnan, Bili Fieriberg
KEML 5M-98.5 AM-I39.O 290 Fillmore St.
-stereo, FM 24 hours daily,
AM between 6am and sunset.
Peoples News Service P.O. Box 377-7875
Denver Free Clinic (william Millett Free Clinic)
828 E. 22nd Ave.
244-2162
-open 7-9:00 pm, Monday-Saturday
Neighborhood Health Centers
1. 5110 W. 38th Ave.
443-8678
2. 990 Federal 292-9690
3. 529 29th St.
244-4611
Underground Cinema Twelve Vogue Theatre 1465 Pearl St.
-films on midnight Saturdays
The Changing Scene 1527^ Champa St.
244-5777
-experimental theatre
The Hiird Eye Theatre 380 Broadway


:8bave gpruiinnurt pagrer— c/o Tomi Kdtoeartts actt same addiress T
634-9225
AFSC (American. Friemus Service CommrHtt.ee. 1%60 Pennsylvanla Sit*
-draft cocmnseligig
Samen's IntermsfclcmaX Leagme for Peace (and KreedoB
1880 Klmg ifcre, BociMer
V*3-32Bl oar
P.O. Bqz 20053 Beznrer
Crusade for Justice
1567 Bcwning St.
222-0625 or 2221-0848
The ^eakers Baream
lit60 Pennsylvamia St.
534-6285
-speakers on C.O., ccocerned cJLergy, nan-coqperatGrs, cornuseiars, soldi ers.
Colorado Conmnist Farty Bob Tru jiilo 4030 Tejon St..
American Indian Rec. and Educational ikrtivities Ime.
1580 Gaylord
399-6450
flall of tine Comncil Drunss
Calvary Tndiian Gburcb
Benver Tmidiaini Bance Society
Besmet TiMHaani Center
Indians fer BBational Liberation
Hative American Student Organizatien
White Buffalo Council
Demrer Metropolitan Commitj Gburch Rev. ALLen E. Hafoerkcrn 3501 M. Ist at KLng 388-%920
-hcnerphile coranmity velcome -Cay Liberation rap sessions every Ued. nigjrt, at 1^10 Colvudbine, aptA, 7:30 pn.
cuHural
Model City Resident Cultural Center 118 E. 20th Ave.
892-1017
Sundiata-booikstare 2878 Colorado Blvd.
333-1055
Centro Cultural 935 W. Uth Ave.
892-1421
Prana Works
723 B. 17th Ave. 255-0819
Vietnam Veterans Against the War 1460 Pennsylvania St. Room 7 255-1006
Folklore Center 608 E. 17tt Ave. 623-4869
Brass Pium
1112 E. 17th Ave. 825-3960
Institute/Mountain West Lookout Mountain 277-0762
-study of non-vi olenc e -alternative lifestyle and political Information
Box 570, Golden Colo. 80401
Radical Information Project 737 E. 17th Ave.
825-7413
-bookstore, ali books at 20$ dis-count, coffee, conversation
Militant Bookstore 607 E. 13th Ave.
623-9505
People's News Service Jurie 24, 1971


edueallon & etaUdren
Upland School
Iris Green, Box 1038, Boulder,80302 443*2976
-klndergarten through 2nd grade
Together Bodks 636 E. 17th Ave,
892-1172
Breakfast Program Community Residente for Aetion 2950 Gilpin St.
Strawberry Fields, free school 9927 MiHer (Arvada)
424-6261 or call Bonna Gripe at 892-5606
Denver Free Uhiversity 125 E. l8th Ave.
825*1297
-as of July l, DFU is movlng to .E. l8th and Emerson, in the Association far the Bllnd building.
The Lucy Stone Foundation Day Care Center 1467 Birch 355-8910
-eollectively run hy parents, qpen 7 : 30-5:30 Monday - Friday, ages 2-5«
Community Free School 1030 13th St., Boulder Wr-8733
Spring School, Boulder
Len Barron, 1204 Pleasant St.
442-6149 or
Karen Hodge at 444-0363
The Jkbm Plung»
EUjr Bmnaan
2423 W. 4lst Ave.
455*0619
Opportunity School 1250 Welton
244-8899
-cheap classes Do It
Jack Rickards 1921 21st St.
422-8938
People United to Reclalm the Environ-nent
P.O. Box 731> Boulder 80302
Sierra Club, Rocky Mountain Chapter 2225 Buchtel Ave.
Denver, 80222
Rocky Mountain Center for the Ehvi-ronment
5850 E. Jevell 757-54:9
Denver Food Conspiracy Co-op 83O E. l8th St.
277-0762
-wholesome, cheap food
Denver's Organic Kitchen 1509 Welton 825-9343
The Grainery
1043 E. 17th Ave.
Whole Earth Natur al Foods 2019 S. Broadway • 733-5353
i OP COtfW t«5 ^ A\ht ytus>*i wcbs..
cdWfcscntMS
"1 . 50
ft \ NOiBcDY OETS


Thursday, june 24
7:00 pm, Channel 6, Vision of Fhotography: Creative illustration - Rbt« 7:30 pm, Channel 6, Insight: program of Denver's cultural interests 8:30 pm, Channel 6, NET Playhouse: The Wright Brothers
Korop
Priday, June 25
7:00 pm, Channel 6, Blues Everyday: John Lee Ganderson and Carey Bell's Blues Harps, country soloist/city blues
8:30 pm, Channel 6, The Toy That Grew Up: The Covered Wagon, one of the few big pietures of screen history
9:30 pm, Channel 6, Your Week in Perspective: world news as it affects Denverites and Denver news as it affects the world
'Saturday, June 26
8:00 pm, Red Rocks Amphitheatre: Poco«0••*CANCELLED
8:30 pm, DU Observatory, 2930 E* Warren Ave*, Star Gazing, lecture and films, free, every Saturday
8:30 pm, Denver Folklore Center: Steve Nardella and John Nicholas, country blues, ragtime playing and singing
Sunday, June 27
6:00 pm, Channel 6, Get On Board: Jazz Pianist Art Hodes
7:00 pm, Channel 6, The Advocat es: Should Congress force withdrawal of ali U*S* troops in Indochina by Dec* 31 , 1971?
8:30 pm, Channel 6, Vanishing Wilderness: offshore oil leak near Santa Barbara, '68 10:00 pm, Channel 6, Fanfare: Filimore East, Byrds, Van Morrison, Albert King
Monday, June 28
9:00 pm, Channel 6, Black Journal: philosophy of Black Art Tuesday, June 29
7*30 pm, Channel 6, Making Things Grow: easy bulbs
8:00 pm, Channel 6, A Child Went Farth: an exploration into schools as they are now 8:30 pm, du Chanberlain Observatory: - Star. Gazing, lecture and films, free,
2930 E* Warren, every Tuesday*
9:00 pm, Channel 6, Hard Times in the Country: study of the American Economy through the perspective of food we grow and eat 10:00 pm, Channel 6, San Francisco Mix: Searching
10:30 pm, Channel 6, Elizabeth Drew—Thirty Mi nutes With*.* Wash* DC pollce chlef Wednesday, June 30
8:00 pm, DU Lindsay Lecture Hali, rm* 244, Comnunication Aesthetics, Dr* Campbell 8:30 pm, Channel 6, Just Jazz: coronetist Bobby Hackett
Thursday, July 1
7:00 pm, Channel 6, Vision of Fhotography: photography as an art medium 8:30 pm, Channel 6, NET Playhouse: Rembrandt
Friday, July 2
7:30 pm, Channel 6, Chicago Festival: Uziiv* of Illinois4 Jazz Band 8:30 pm, Channel 6, The Toy That Grew .Up: an hour with Mack Sennett
Pe' le's News Service June 24, 1971
13


Now, after the Spring anti-war offensi ve, it is a good time for questioning ourselves and our comrades as to the best method of achieving radlcal social change. Where is the movement heading and how do we reach the yet uncommited. I shall not discuss the actual seizlng of state pover as we simply are not ready for that. Of course we should all be atterapting both to leam and be more effective in the struggle continuously. Life is for learn-ing and a closed mind is a dead mind.
I do not question the need for a socialist revolution however, but only the means and methods to be used. There is no alternative, if we are to achieve a society free of exploi tat ion, war and racism. People become radical by many paths, their own oppression and the recognition of it, alienation from present society, or simply a love of your fellow men and women. A person rarely becomes radical from study alone. It is necessary to leam the mechan-ics of imperialism and exploitation to act effectively, but personal experience and observation are usually the triggers. I have not seen a napalmed village or been a witness to my own children's starvation, but I have seen the resuits of the capital-Istic greed in amerika and I know the vil-lian is the same. I only have to look at the ru’.ned landscape, polluted air and water, the rotten core of our cities and the cancerous growth of the soulless sub-urbs, to know that a fast buck is amerika's only national ethic. I will try to present some personal opinions concerning the movement's tactics and possibilities in the sight of my own experiences. I think we can group amerikans in one of three broad categories•
Group I would consist of those who are now radical (including all leftist groups) and those who because of their own oppression (women, minority groups and poor whites) can easily radicalized.
Group II consistes of working c3.ass middle America. I mean not only indus-trial workers, but all who must sell their labor to survive; small businessmen, white collar workers, G.I.'s, farmer s and even a few members of the present governmental system. No realisitic revolutionary can
14
afford to ignore this group or imagine a revolution without at least a large number of supporters from it. Reaching G.I.'s,
I believe, is a priority for obvious rea-sons.
Group III consists of the ruling class, the big money people, corporate heads and their lackeys in the govera-ment and the military. These people know their power and do not intend to surrender it. They will never accept a socialist system, so we can fOrget trying to radical-ize them or worry about alienating them by out actions. Their power must be taken from them. Notice I do not consider the question of anti-war sentiment as a basis for group division. Both Bobby Seale and the Bank of Amerika aure against the war— what does that teli you?
Some lefbist groups believe that since Group H is in the majority, the sole priority is to build a working class movement. This to me is folly. We may have to make some accomodations but very certain-ly we cannot fail to use or betray the only present revolutionary groups now existing. We are going to alienate people Just by our very existence, should we change our life styles, lose our cultural identity?
N01 Neither can we deny our support for the Cubans, Vietnamese and others who are fighting the monster from without.
Okay, so how do we bring the mass of 'amerikan people to a revolutionary con-sciousness, how do we be true to our ideals and stili not drive middle amerika into Fascism? My own experience may have some use in showing where these people are at. During my childhood I was oppressed directlyo I lived with my mother (my par-ents were separated), she was sick most of the time and worked when she could. We would up on A.D.C. and eventually after years of poverty she died for lack of prop-er medical care. Later I got ajob, married had kids and entered the amerikan "keep up with the Jones" rat-race — new car, fum-iture, debts up the ass, and almost, but not quite, a house in suburbia. After near ly becoming an alcholic from sheer frustra-tion, a change of cities caused me to on-counter the hip culture. This in tura led to drop-M ng acid and seeing with full clar-


fdo)
D
What is thepoint of Progress I! the food is tasteless, the housing absurd, the clothing uncomfortable, the religron just talk, the air poisoned (by Cadillac,s, the wr* horing, the sex up-tight
and mechanical the earth clobbered with concrete, and the water so chemlcalized that even the fish are abandoning existence?
People's News Service June 2b, 1971
ity Just where I and this society was at*
Of course, there were many radical seeds in my being Just waiting* So there is in all people who are exploited, in whatever degree, a radical potential* Our purpose is then to bring about a flowering of this potential, we must work up the social lad-der, maintaining and developing radical consclousness among the most allenated, while reaching upward to those who are un-aware of their pppression* Working class consclousness will develop as the unavoid-able contradictions of monopoly-capitalism manifest themselves* I do not believe the majority of the so-called proletariate be-come revolutionary until the economic con-ditions approach that of the 30*s. Our Job then is to be able to offer a revolutionary analysis and altematives to the system as these contradictions develop* We must build a real counter-culture with institu-tions, such as day-care centers, food con-spiracies, clinics, etc*, serving all. We must always contrast radical humani sm to corporate indifference* City wide organ-izations such as the Seattle Liberation Front sould always be ready to respond tc mass layoffs, or other crisis situations with definite analysis and programs. In certain communities, sudi as Berkeley, where real radical changes are por. ••b}*» should endeavor to produ -r a ttCu- '*i SliOVi— case of what kind of society is possible*
Above all, we must observe certain guidelines and recognize that most Americans are brainwashed and freaked out by the very word communi sm* I maintain we can offer support to third world people and work for a socialist society without alienation of people terrified of communism* We must stress that conditions here are vastly differant than in other socialist countries. We can show how a post-scarcity economy is possible and that a communitarian system voiil d benefit all, making for a real political and economic democracy instead of the present facade* This poses a question that I have no immediate answer for, but is of primary importance, that of methods for spreading radical information without having control of the media. Educating and communicating with each other is necessary, but how many middj.e Americans read our papers, see our films or seek out books that would lead them to a greater understanding? We can refer them to, but not dwell upon, current Marxist heroes, using American examples whenever possible. If they call us unAmer-ican, talk of Tom Paine, Franklin. Thoreau,
15


Whitman, etc. Use examples oi’ the first Americans, the Indians, who had a working communist society with a real reverence for life. We can avoid old leftist dogma and sterility and produce a Vision of a genuine American socialism with true liberty, equal-ity and racial hrotherhood for ali its cit-izens and those of the worldo
Jim D.
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A glass of ciear sparkling wine...and an evening of enjoyment with frlends?
Por farmworkers that glass of wine may be a symbol of long hot hours in the fields, substandard wages, exposure to the indiscriminate use of dangerous pesticides, and an accident rate 300$ higher than the national average»
Sinee 1965 vineyard workers in California have been seeking to improve these conditions through collective bargainingo The United Farm Workers Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO has wo*. 'ntract with the majority of the table grape industry and raueh ~ the wine industry®
The one large conrpany who has refused to negotiate with the workers is United Vintners, better known as Italian Swiss Colony. United Vintners is a subsidiary of Heublein, Inc® which also produces Smimoff Vodka and many other liquors®
A nationwide boycott of Italian Swiss Co3ony wines and Smirnoff Vodka has been called in support of the workers at United Vintners®
BACK THEM IN THEIR STRUGGLE TO ACHIEVE JUST AND SAPE WORKING CONDITIONS.
REFUSE TO BUY ITALIAN SWISS COLONY WINES AND SMIRNOFF VODKAl
jmg
For more Information contact:
United Farm Workers Organizing Committee Denver Boycott 3138 Humbolt Street 53^-8351 or 222-1*371
vwwwvwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwvwvx
>
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m f PNS! OGDEN B00KST0RE
ifi 919 East Colfax Ave.
M jgl 1 825-9815
HsraSlil 11? 1 Out-of-Print Headquarters
£ FK1 ^get. 10 for 5 each, With Out-of-Sight Prices Boss-Tony Scibella Shylock-Steve Wilson
WKSm sell 10 for 10 and
l iSa ■ afleome out with 5 e^cch® ■j(see back cover) \ ■■


THE WAR
It sulks betveen lovers at the dinner table; it is in the soup« No one speaks of it anymore — vhat is there to speak of anymore?- — it has settled on the land; the unspoken news, the not news, the news no one hears on the radio anymore, it has been with us as long as life, longer than the seasons, longer than the vind«
The weight — the body adjusts, the frame bends -has settled on the eye, it is behind the glasses, it is on the retina, it is before everything, it is no longer seen, we do not live it, it lives us«
— Todd Gitlln
The var in Indochlna has been vith us far too long; it ©ppresses us every day, ln every vay lmaginable* Thact we, as a people, have learsed te live vith lt, is a tragedy. That ve have allcwed it to live us, has mina leas tban we vere, Hat this wur has. tem uojp* *» theasn» ef f'
iNfle1» tat .
freedom, for the sake of peace, makes a constant mockery of the American ideals, The American reality in 1971 is an ugly distortion of those ideals•
These are times that try men*s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot vili, in this crisis, shrink from the Service of his country; but he that stands now, deserves the love and thanks of man and voman.
— Thomas Paine, 1776
This past veekend, June 19th and 20th, the Colorado chapter of the Vi et nam Veterans Against the Var conducted an investigati on into the ttdted States Involvement in lndochina, the tth Wlittr Soli!» Iniestigdiau Dm testi fle*, reecMiitiajg thedb» perSenee» in Senfcheas* hsSn «ore
w


men, who, because of their experiences in Vietnam, r.,f£bl the contradictions between what America says ahd what America does most concretely. They spoke from the need to retell,; the-contradictions as they lived them. They^.spoke to relieve in some way the burden 'of their disillusionment, confusion, ifirustration, and rage.
They spoke, in alarming detail, of American and1 Vietnamese atrocities in common practice, of corruption and ineffec-tiveness in the military, both American and South Vietnamese, and in the Saigon government. They contrasted this with the benefits the Vietnamese peasant receive from the Vietcong, such as smallpox vaccinatione Several military war corres-pondents described the raulti-layered news censoring network within the military bureaucracy> the magazine and news Service correspondents who rarely leave the Saigon bars and hotels, and who, when they do, endanger the lives of American soldiers through recklessnesso
Veterans testified to the farcity of the advisor system - even as early as 1963 U.So "advisors" were actively involved in combat maneuverso They testified to the falsity of the pacification program, in reality it involved the forced relocation of large segments of the indigenous peasant population into "strategic" hamlets, divorcing them from the land, the means of their survival, ‘ and the basis of their culture. They testified to the deception surrounding the Vietnamization program -in fact the South Vietnamese military rely exclusively oh U.S. air support, unwilling to fight without it. In fact, both soldiers and civilians have little faith in the Thieu-Ky regime and are more sympathetic to the Vietcong. They feel that as soon as the U.S. pulls out of Indochina the war will end and the Saigon regime will crumble. Many veterans recounted the racism they encountered within the U.S. military machine itself, and as exemplified in the evolution of U.S. policy in Indochina from the advisor system, through pacification and "freefire1' zones, to Vietnamization, saturation bombing and the use of defoliants and anti-personnel weapons.
Confronted daily with these many contradictions/ the American soldier in Vietnam is forded to seek some f orm of escape• Drugs, being readily available in large quantities at low cost, often serve as such an escape. The use of drugs, from marljuana to speed and smack, is growing
rapidly among American troops, leading to widesji^ead heroih addiction and increased psychological disturbances. Projeet Amnesty, the arny's attempt to cope with the growing drug problem through rehabili-tation and psychological .counseling, in reality, more often throws the addict in jail or dishcmorabiy discharges bim. Returning addict-veterans are cast into American society with no official channels to turn to for real help» Biany veterans attempt to support their habit in this country, a far more expensive proposition. Others re-enlist to stay in Vietnam and continue their habit vhere they can afford it.
The list gces on and on, stunning you and taking away your breath by its sheer volume. Though no conclusions were drawn by the veterans, they became obvious as the investigation progressed. That the U.S. must totally and immediately withdraw from Southeast Asia was the most urgently felt one, and underlied ali of the testimony this past weekend.
The war is indeed appalling, that these polides have heen carried on for so long without our knowledge but in our name is even more so. But what strikes you most is that they are presented so matter-of-factly; that is what makes them sensational. The war, with ali its contradictions, does live us.
In this light, it is important that the constitution of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam embodies the spirlt and reflects even the wording pf our own Declaration of Independence. It is significant that we are waging an untfeclared war, defying International law and every artide of the Geneva conventions, to destroy the government based on that constitution. The war is but the fruition of the incessant contradictions between the American ideal and the American reality. For far too long returning Vietnam veterans have been silent. Many were too shaken to even want to remember. Now as they speak out, it would be tragic if we, the American pepple, did not listeno Yet only 300 persons attended the Colorado Winter Soldier Investigation. Most of the press had left half way through the first session. To paraphrase a famous quote, we have made a desert of Indochina, shall we now call it peace? Uniess we listen and act on this testimony, I'm afraid we will he told it is so.
Rick B.


Probably no single road network in history has been subjected to such intensive aerial | bombardment as the series of trails running from North Vietnam through Laos and into.South I Vietnam and Cauibodia known as the Ho Chi Minh Trail.
American B-52s, fighter-borabers and helicopters have attacked the trail. They haye dropped !]| sensors along it for monitoring truck traffic; tons of bonibs which act like mines, blowing up |;.from either contact or prosimity, and defoliants for peeling the jungle cover off the roadways.
C-130 transports, converted for the mission, orbit over the trail at night, looking for |j trucks carrying war supplies south to the figvte of the National Liberation Front of South |j Vietnam, the Khmer Rouge of Cambodia and |h5g North Vietnamese Army. The C-130s have been fitted ||with special weapons for their mission, including night Vision devices and Gatling type guns.
Khanh Van, a North Vietnamese correspondent, has written a serias of articles about the jj trail. The series was monitored by Foreign Broadcast Information Service, a U.S. agency, and I published in condensed form in +he Washington Post, "without vouching for the accuracy of this ; Information".
"A truck convoy which the brothers referred to as Wife Group One was (wheeled) into :the offensive departure posi-tion. This means that Wife iGroup Two should be at another milestone along the road.
!,The artillery gun trailers were veering toward the side paths so that the cargo trucks could fall into formation. The order given by the armed branch .station was that ali the artillery gun trailers were to fol-p.ow Wife Group One.
People's News Service June 24,
"The armed branch station cadres came to every truck to . visit and motivate the driving combatants...
"An assault unit, which con-sisted mostly of girls, passed by...The girls were carrying heavy packs and, in particular, each carried a small pillow in her pack. The blue and red trimmings on the pillow could be seen....
"No sooner had our comrade driver started the engine than members of the assault youth unit blocked the road. Although our comrade driver sounded the horn, they did not budge be-cause they were absorbed in talk about the folks back home.
"At the outset, I thought that the trucks would run continu-cusly through the jungles and would be shielded by the fo-liage. However, when the convoy erossed over Summit 301, I began to see the bomb craters. The trucks began to run along an open, devastated road sec-tion where the smoke emanating from, the craters could be smelled everywhere.
"The first night, then the second night went by. I grad-ually realized that almost no / part of this road section was well concealed..«Along the road-side, various kinds of trees had been stripped of their
1971
leaves and branches. There re< mained only bare trunks with pointed tops. If we contemplat ed this scene through the early morning mist, we would have the impression that a flotilla of big sailboats, the masts of which were close to one another, was resting along the river.... i
"I was told that on certain days aggressor aircraft, in â– three formations, sprayed tox-ic Chemicals over this road.
19


The trees along the roadside had been stripped of their green leaves.
"I was also told of the.aays when a fire had been burning continuously. The fire, con-suming the dry leaves,. burned endlessly for more than one montho- The fire burned the branches and sornetimes a fire-engulfed branch feli down. The fire started by the timed Steel pellet bombs was roaring on the hili slopes<. The flames from the plastic substance in the bombs spattered the surface of the road and even stuck to the rolling tires of the truckso
«Comrade Bang, a driver com-bambatant, also told me that previously on every night for a wholejweek the trucks had to run through ares of fire all along the section from Milestone 16 to Milestone 4l, Route A.
It was oppressively hot in the driving cabin. The comrade drivers were deeply concerned about the possibility that their gasoline might catch fire*.."
Khanh Yan wrote that. North Vietnamese monitoring the traf-fie kept track of his progress all along the route, with some of th? North Vietnamese watch-ing from underground shelters alongsL le the road. He stopped at one s fcation to receive a' military briefing about the Ho
'"The briefing place was a tali, big house cuilt against a raountain and surrounded by wide verandas. It looked very.spacious. Two hundred-watt electric bulbs shed light on a map six meters high out-lining the transportation lines, thus making the briefing room brighter and more solemn.•.
«The comrade head of the propaganda and training organ told me that the present trail is several thousand kilometers long. Truck con-voys do not go in only one directidn. In each direction there is not just one axis or one fozmi of transportation.
Each aocis has not only a main traly, but many auxiliary ones..
'VAircraft roared continuously ov^rhead (during the briefing). Sometimes fragment bombs exploded to the south.. Sometimes bombs from B-52's exploded for a while to the north. Occasionally, the house was shaken as if there were an earthquake. I found that these explosions did not affect the briefings. It seemed that everyone was too familiar with these explosions.
«The on-duty combat cadre . gave a briefing on the enemy situation, ranging from the ienemy1s tactical tricks to the-tonnage of bombs dropped at each milestone, road or mili-
tary station.
"He described fairly clear-ly a battle fought by the anti-aircraffc unit of Military Sta-tion M yesterday (March 3)> which downed five aircraft and which was encircling the pilots in order to capture them; a battle fought by the infantry troops of Military Station N who annihilated a large group of enemy rangers and seized all the weapons and radio communi-cation sets; and particularly a battle fought by an anti-aircraft artillery unit in charge of protecting Bunker B, which downed a C-130 aircraft that chased and straffed our vehicles at night. Ei ve pilots were burned to death in that battle.
"The details which the on-duty cadre of the road and bridge staff presented were even more complete. He was conversant with everything, from weather conditions to the level of water in the tunnels along the over all route...He knew how many bombs were dropped on which key points, how many bombs hit the surface of the road, how many cubic meters of earth and stone were required to repair damaged road sections, how many squads were required to do the repair job, how the command post directed the work and at what time the repair of this road section was finished.
"After a signal cadre briefed me on the maintenance of signal and liaison operations on a chart - showing the entire signal network throughout the trail - I understood that the skillful command was due partly to the signal operations. I could not imagine how the radio Communications combatahts, after one day ond one night, received and dispatehed nearly '600 messages, of which only two were not transmitted.
"Two hundred eighty-six cuts in telephone wires were repaired by telephone cbmbatants., The
Chi Minh Trail.
2C)



jtelephone wires were cut by enemy bonibing or by falling trees caused by the northeast jwinds. The comrade head of the propaganda and training told I ne, ’Without the signal opera-fcions, a commander becomes jleaf and dumb • • •1"
I He went on to say that the jjbruck convoys had exceeded jtheir set goals for the movement bf tonnage to the point that 1*208$ of the daily norm has been achieved." i He said that at heavily, |bombed points, engineers had Iput bypasses off to both sides ;of the main road. He quoted ithe briefer as telling the jpersonnel assigned to the Ho iChi Minh Trail that "in one
direction, there must be many spearheads of attacks. It is necessary to force the enemy to disperse his attacks not only along the full length of the road, but also laterally against the auxiliary roads.
"In a month, the U.S. aggressors' aircraft make as many as 16,871 sorties to drop bombs on key points. This does not include the bombing by B-52s, which make more than 700 sorties a month."
(Van left the briefing center and resumed his trip down the trail - this time at night. He said the road was passable despite "more than 300 magnetic and time bombs" dropped at two main intersec-tions at 3 o'clock in the after-noon. He wrote that antiair-craft units along the road were put on alert before the truck convoy began rolling down the trail.)
"The convoy continued to
hurriedly move past Milestone 63* Suddenly, the wind swirled overhead. Antiaircraft fire and the explosion of steel pelLefc borribs thundered amid the truck formation,•,A truck stopped abruptly. Ahead of it was a column of bla (It is Standard practice for American planes bombing the trail to try to hit the lead truck so the convoy behind it is blocked, making an easier target.)
"Battalion Commander Quang, standing on the running board of the truck, said loudly:
1Comrades, may I have your attention please. Firmly maintain the same speed and move forward. Move on, buddy, I'll be standing on this runninj board for a while.1
"The trucks again roared ahead. At Milestone 6k, Quang
People's News Service June 2^, 1971


stepped down, entered a communi-; cations shelter and telephoned a control point “in order to '* keep himself informed of the status of the preceding trucks* The control point told him that a total of kh trucks had been handed over*
"Occaisionally, the convoy stopped for a few minutes so the engineer unit could probe the road ahead, and then continued to move on* Quang said: 'Once the truck formation has entered a strategic zone, it cannot stop but rather raust move rapidly no matter how intensive the enemy’s raids may be*••*
"When the convoy vas nearing three-way intersection 82, the enemy attacked Tunnel 86* Antiaircraft fire burst intermittently* The vehicle carrying armed branch chief N stopped at Intersection 82«
The comrade commander of the engineer eompany there let it be kriown that as a resuit of effective antiaircraft fire, all enemy bombs were dropped in the jungle, and Tunnel 86 remained open*
"There is an enemy trick to
use bombs of many different types to drop against a key point* Accarding to enemy calculations, if ve vant to flll in the boni> craters ve must first of ali destroy enemy time boBbs. If ve vant to destroy the time bcnfcs, ve must destroy the magnetic bonfcs first in order to ciear the vay to move focrward. Sometimes, the enemy fits talis of magnetic bombs to the time bombs in order to deceive us*
"To move forward to destroy the magnetic and time bonibs, it is necessary to sveep avay the barrier formed by the trigger mines that the enemy drops on both ends of the control point in order to keep our troops from moving up to repe • .he damaged road sect. • • •
"*••we vere standing near the bcmibs that the brothers usually cali the 'highly sensitive firepower* of the enemy* When a vehicle or a person carrying metallic substances passes by these bombs, they immediately explode».o"
(Van wrote that his friend
Hi en vas bloun to bits as the tvo vere destroying the kobs on the road. & continued disaming the bcmbs hecaose they *vere stili lying on the surface of the rcad*m)
"Affcer destroying all the bombs, I vent to a. telepiaDme booth to repor IL on the manfoer of bombs destroyed* Bwwar, no sooner had I passed the Dat do curve than enemy aircraft reappeared and dropped bodts on the road secticn near the Dat do and Tayao turns* ilgain, magnetic bombs - thelr talis extended to slov dovn their descent - vere plunging to the ground, emitting a buzzing sound like that of heavy rain*. • •All the bcmibs - ab aut 30 of them - feli into the ravine because of our intense antiaircraft fire*
" • • «No sooner had I leaned against the side of the hili (alongside the road) than I heard the sound of *trigger* mines landing on the hlgh-level ground over my head*
The mother bcmb explod^d, sending smaller mines shovering to the ground like swarms of flies o The mines vere falling on the Dat do tura* Some of them expicded vhen hitting stone at the control point*
(He vrote that mines are dropped arcund an American pilot by another plane vhen he is shot dovn over the trail* This is to keep North Viet-namese from reaching him before the rescuing helicopter can land* By daylight, the corres-pondent said, he and others removed trigger mines from the roadway and used dynamite to fili in the bomb craters obstructing truck traffic*) "That night, the convoy passed through the control point without waiting even a minute*"
pVio\o tecAH *.


Perhaps once
at the foot of the orange trees of pink California, robbed by your grandfather from other grandfathers, you dreamt of becoming president of your nation, or only of becoming an honest Citizen»
Perhaps that was the dream with which your greatgrandfather ran awav from far-off Italy
and thus established family and house and new hopes in the new land of promise of the North American»
(I am only guessing, I am only turning the pages of your possible hlstory, only inventing, approximately, what you will never be because the land of promise dug your tomb far, very far from the orange groves»)
Perhaps you never knew of that place in the world that is called Vietnam, where now you are dying daily, where your interrupted infancy loses every logical sense, where —I know why and you don’t— you grip a rifle that is no longer a toy, and against you are fighting the shaaows and the trees and the winds and the roads and the stones and the smoke from your own blazes and the silence
of a forest that is not yours nor will it be and the water and the heat and the rain and — of course — the bullets that you yourself brought, now turned against you.

Perhaps ycu never thought it could happen this that is not a dream, this that breaks
something inside you, this that devastates the orange trees that grandfather planted far away, there where perhaps you would want to be with friends in the shade of a song of peace,
because this is already too rauch for you who know why this song of peace was interrupted here,
by the passing of others iike you, who came
to destroy the houses, the families, the new hopes of this nation that is called Vietnam,
of which perhaps you never heard until that sad day
when they sent you, together with your friends,
without telling you why,
to these lands where now,
under the sarae weapons that you brought,
you die, you die, daily, irrevocable, you die»
a song of peace
David Fernandez, a young Cuban poet
reprinted from Monthly Review.
23
Pecple’s News Service June 24, 1971


"Behold, my brothers, the Spring has come; the earth has received the embraces of the sun and we jdiall soon see the results of that loveS
"Every seed is awakened and so has all animal life. It is through this mysterious power that we too have our being and we therefore yield to our neighbors, even our animal neighbors, the same right as oiirselves, to inhabit this land«
"Yet, hear me, people, we have now to deal with another race — small and feeble when our fathers first met them but now great and overbearing. Strangely enough they have a mind to till the soil and the love of possession is a disease with them. These people have made many rules that the rich may break but the poor may not. They take tithes from the poor and weak to support the rich and those who rule. They claim this mother of ours, the earth, for their own and fenee their neighbors awayj they deface her with their buildings and their refuse. That riation is like a spring freshet that overruns its banks and destroys all who are in its path.
"We cannot dwell side by side. Only seven years ago we made a treaty by which we were assured that the buffalo country should be left to us forever. Now they threaten to take that away from us. My brothers, shall we submit or shall we say to them: 'First kill me before you take possession of my Fatherland....1"
Sitting Bull at the Powder River Council, 1877
Well, this is absolutely the last thing I'm going to type, I hppei : : Only two of us typed this whole thing, and we both work, too. Oh well. A few hours ago, when I could think, I thought it was worth it. I probably will again after a few hours or days of sleep. This is just to let you know a few things• We'll start from the bottom. If you want to buy a copy of PNS (don*t remember that you already have one in your hands) you can get them at; Together Books, RIP, Folklore Center, DFU, Youth Coalition, Book Mart, Fantasy Trip, Hobbit, General Store, lst Creation, Jerrie's News, Straight Johnson's, Sun Books, Saint Andrew's Church, Planned Parent-hood?, and on the streets. If you want to sell PNS you can buy them (10 or more) for a nickel and sell them for a dime. Pick them up at RIP, 737 E. 17th Ave. If you want to write us, we now have a Post Office Box, If you want to ccaie to
some meetings -and see about joining the collective in putting it together call 333-7875* And, if you want to type, heh heh heh, just drop by anytimel


Full Text

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service VOI.2111ie12 June 24.1971 Denver.Colo.10C cheapl summer in the Mila High

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2 In this issue; People's Music-3, Dogcatcher-4, Tenant's Union-5, Urban Renewal-6, Herman Davis-8, :J:axi Strike-9, Shorts-12, Community Servicesmiddle, Calendar-13, Movement-14, Wine Boycott-16, Winter Soldiers-17, Ho Chi Minh Trail-18, A Song of Peace-23, Sitting Bull-24. Never has it been more important for us to understand what is happening to us in Denver. Whether we understand or not, we are being affected by decisions we have not made. Our music has been cut off, our dogs are being stolen by the city, our homes are in the fateful hands of Urban Renewal, and we stand a good chance of being searched illegally on the street. If you have spent much time on the hill in Boulder, walked along East Colfax, or gone to one of the "rock concerts" you are probably very aware of some bad vibes and some outright pig repression. It is not hard to pick up on some feelings. One evening on Ciolfax was enough. The first impression is that there are pig cars almost end to end in a five block area. Both the managers at McDonald's and Taco Bell stood outside watching to see if people were eating food or just talking. The Taco Bell manager explained to me that their sign by the sidewalk was not for leaning on. Later a guy on a bike was busted in the Taco Dell parking lot as helpless freaks stood around not knowing how to help. As if that wasn't enough, we got into a rap with a "freak" salesman in Budget Tapes and Records about the Jethro Tull concert. He was rapping down things like "If the kids are going to act like that they don't deserve any more music" and 11\-t'hat would you have done if you were a policeman there".. The concert as well as the store itself is part of the "Culture Vulture" plan to m?J.;nd and his face was bright red. He had come up from his seat to f ind out ... -ho ho.d. thrown the second tear gas bombo Three girls were screaming that he just wa1teQ to know what was happening, as they dragged him away with blood dripping from ear. I tried to find out from some Feyline long hairs why they were standi:>g around with clubs. They said they were hired as buffers. But I never saw them stand up for the freaks. In fact, they were the pig front line. In the end, the promoters and other pigs lost another way to off large groups of freaks (10,000 freaks at $4.00 a head equals $40,0COoOO), Mayor McNichols proved that kids couldn't be peaceful and was re-elected in the process, and we lost the music that is rightfully ours. The lesson to be learned frow all the things I saw in the last couple of weeks is that wherever we gather we are going to be harrassed. As individuals we will be picked off one by one as the rest of us stand by and watch. We must become individually and collectively aware of what is happening to us, why it is happening (profiteering, uptightness, and downright pignishness), and what our rights are.

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, PEIPLEs MUSIC PEDrLES.IAI? \ i cll, right. n ow it looks as i:f" outdoor summr ccncerts in Denver are a lost l-1y :fe<:lings arc t P..at , if' they must. te ccnd.u .:!ted as at Erie and Red Hocks, ;.;ho cares? I h ave never Objected to the haze of grass smoke that often hangs over such an affair, but tear gas is another matter. I have been gassed before and it just t make for a good stone! Also a swarming with pigs of whatever resembles a concentration camp anything else. They seem to sort of nausea gas generated by presence. Neither could ! .sit listening to a band while my and sisters were having their S<>, ]., wiln<>' s it<> 1D]moe #/ill. is Jli., tl!De city 3/llbWm:ii.s11:.Jratiamla)s , E, tl!De :p.el1ho were in n o uay responsi\lle suet as the babies '-tho suffered from gas, o1 kids vrho have no political consciousness and just wanted to hear some A riot in this context does little to raise such consciousness doesn't provide for a .good as I see i t there are two alternatives. One depends on how much the p romoters can control their greed and better still on the community's ability to create a counter-cultural music scene for its own benefit, in a minor guerilla war being around me. overService June 24, 1971. 3

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If the promoters really want to provide music and make a reasonable ( 1) profit, let them pick a large outdoor area, charge no illore> than $2.00 for space near the bands and say $1.00 further back, Then have speakers set up around the area so people who are really broke can still at least bear the music . Avoid bringing pigs around and I believe if people are treated fairly and the situation is run down to them, there would be no gate craahing. Another alternative would be to arrange free concerts or benefits, put on by a coalition of youth community groups wboare respected b y everyone. This works well in other dities such as Ann Arbor. Of course we probably wouldn't hav e big name. ba:'lds, but I would rather listen to a local group who really just dug on playing their music and serving the community. Once before we suggested that bands or people able to help contact us. Perhaps now we may have more success as there seems to be no a lternative. Jim D. power to the If yo u are quietly s itting in your front yard playing with your brand new puppy, or even you not-so-brand new dog and you see a white van with a yellow light on the top pull u p in front of you and stop with screeching tires, runl rr•s THE DOG CATCIIERI This, however, so not how i t will probably happen--more likely, at five or five-thirty i n the morning, he will creep stealthily up onto your front porch and STEAL your dog. I f caught in the act, the motherfucker will explaine his duty i s to enforce the leash law. If you have a fire-escape that leads to a window that your dogs use as a door at night, and I am sure I am not the only one with this situation, t hen it is best to either sleep with your clothes on, keep a loaded water-balloon, or get an Army-trained killer dog that will attack on command, or all of the above, for those early-morning marauders will even sneak up theses fixtures to startle you out of you dreams of dogs bs.rking by yelling, i•Whose dog is that?" 11Butbutbut Sir •••• •" 4 No use. Irregardless, if you have For you violence freaks (something for everyone) flash on this scene; a people 1 s band is playing on liberated territory, people are aware of the need to defend their culture and 'their turf. The pigs move in, tac squad and helipigs. The band breaks into "Street Fighting Man". Trained cadre are ready and move to protect the band and deploy themselves strategically. Non-c ombatants move to safety. Helmets, masks and gloves appear, barricades go up . People's m edical teams are on hand. Guerillas m ove out to encircle the pigs and create diversionary attacks, Helipigs are dealt with by people's antiaircraft. /ell, perhaps I'm getting carried away, the point is, don ' t play the pigs 1 game on his terms . • Jim D. a four-footed canine friend, be ready for a ticket or getting you dog busted. Also these d og-pigs are harassing more and more in the parks, and unfortunately the verbal leash does hold up in County as it does in Arapahoe and Adams Counties. If you have any feasible solu-tions to this problem, please write PNS rP.o. ;/tr'!l

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Today's Special!: 2 bdrm. sewer for rent, $95. Chldren, pets OK. Call for appmt. Moore Realty. Now that most or our articles have deSlt with organization and basic knowledge of rights, we thought maybe you'ld like to have some of the types of cases that come into our office. Most cases fall into general categories such as evictions, lockout, withholding damage deposit, pet problems, etc., however we find that often there will be a definite surface problem, as well as an underlying problem, usually discrimination. Some circumstances are very blatant-ly discriminating. One day a lady--correction--a female person called our office and proceeded like this: "I have a 12-unit building, and I live in one unit and the manager's in one other. This leaves 10. Do I have to rent to niggers?" Another big problem is finding emergency housing for some people in crisis 'type living conditions. Recently I got a call from Sue Keltch at Fast Side Action Center asking me to come help picket a red tag (condemned) house. This is a drastic move that sometimes needs to be taken when nothing else has worked. When I arrived at the house, I found the details of the case were that eleven children and two pregnant women were living in a two-bedroom house. The plumbing had failed to such an extent that neither the toilet, bathtub, or kitchen sink were operable. If one o f the children had to shit, then it ended up in the kitchen sink or bathtub via the broken plumbing. Some of the sewage had filled the basement, was rotting the floorboards of the first floor, and coming up in the backyard. Every morning. the two women and the older children would work together in trying to sweep the sewage out of the house. The conditions of the house led to infestation by rats and cockroaches. The owners of the house, Moore Realty Company, were still collecting $95 a month. One of the women said that two of her children were sick and she feared the possibility of typhoid. Both families were on Welfare and had gone to both the Welfare Department and Public Housing only to be told they must wait their turn to be placed in liveable housing. We decided that if thi s was the result from the normal source, then we'd go to a "super" source, the Mayor . We knew if we went to the Mayor, something would get done, and possibly there would be publicity letting people know of this not uncommon situation. AB)we were gatherbg in front of the C ity and County Building, a suited man came down the stairs , and afte r giving uo a cold stare, asked, unon't you e ver work?" When we arrived at the. Mayor's suite and confronted his five not-so-luscious secretaries, we were told that they were very sorry but Mr. McNichols had left for the day, "about five minutes ago." I personally feel that h e was probably hiding in the can or under his desk, not wanting t o acknowledge that such conditions exist in his Mile-Hi City. However, we did get to talk to Mr. Roger Olsen, assistant to the Mayor . It took hours and a lot of bullshit, but we did succeed in housing all thirteen people at the OXford Hote l imtil permanent housing came up. We were trying to get Olsen to say that there wi l l be temporary housing for all people in crisis housing, and he told us to take only one at a time. So ••••• We'll see you at Uncle Bill's. Capitol Hill Tenant 1 s Union POTTER'S BICYCLES 4628 East 23rd Avenue 333 -4448 Lowest Prices on 10 speed bikes: American Eagle ••• $72.95 Atala ••• $84.95 Used Bikes ••• $10.00 & up People's News Servtce June 24, 1971 STRAIGHT JOHNSON'S (restaurant) food, vibes, music I had p izza, but the rest .of the food is good. 659 South Pearl at Exposition call 777-5627 5

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Bill 91111Elf. .IEIE COmES ... As E ome of you know, U rban Renewal ' s next projec t ( t h e last one was Auraria} is tentatively going to be the area bounded r o 1ghly by 13th and 22nd Avenues, and Grant St. and Colorado Blvd. ' The city would very much like to "improve this area, or, accurately, raise the value of the property so that more property taxes can be collected. While this may be the most obvious motive, it is not the most significant. There are several approaches that Urban Renewal uses to "improve11 areas, ranging from the Total Bulldozer tactic to giving money to property owners to improve their property, to widening streets and building freeways. (Incidentally, one idea currently being is to make Colfax a one-way street in combination with 16th Ave. similar to the Broadway-Lincoln Less than lo% of the people who live in. the proposed area own their own houses. Given this fact, any project which raises t h e value of the property in the area will mean that the absente' e landlords will raise the rental rates, in other words destroy some more of Denver's "underdeveloped" communities. Although Urban Renewal is required by law to provide all people displaced with equivilant housing at the same price, this has hardly ever happened. Denver now has a housing criSis. There is a 1/lo% vacancy rate in 6 DRill BEDEll II! low and moderately priced apartments. This means t hat there are less than enough for peopl e now and the only low cosi; housing that any government agency is considering building would be high-rises near the Valley Highway and the football stadium, a truly clean, relaxing and beautiful place to live. ( For one example of what Denver ' s housing crisis does, see the CHTU article in this issue). Mayor McNichols has often demonstrated his hostility towards the blacks, chicanes, Indians and freaks who inhabit the area. The other significant group who live in the area are old people, more of whom own their own houses. At this point many of these people would be glad to sell their property at a good price to the government and move out o f the "blighted" neighborhood to Vlindsor Gardens o r some such place. The other property owners, w h o live some where else, have no stake in the community except money. These are also the people who are represented on the Urban Renewal board and by the city administration, The project was originally to be sponsored by a coalition of the hospitals in the area, The Midtown Hospital Ass oc. and was referred to as The Hospital Park Plan. But the hospitals were not able to see the "larger plan11 and submerge their capitalist urge to compete with each other instead of cooperating. So the cover and the name was dropped. In any case, vague plans during the Hospital Park Plan period referred to large landscaped park areas. Any such development in the project area would serve as a (military} buffer zone or a demilitarized zone separating Denver's black community from the white parts of the city except in middle-class, "happily integrated" Park Hill. The idea that parks could be planned or used for such insidious purposes may bring charges of paranoia. Maybe. Just keep in mind that parts of other redevelop-. ment plans projected by various government

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I i ag"""ies incl.ude a f'reevay vith narrow ! am each side al.rt t.o doomtovri (:P.trt• . of plans for !Une 01Jll!l!Dics), vhicb I the lllliaille or the bleck ctill block it out think the day is done, i t >Till be. MAP>IF" ! ...... ! A couple of months a ge, TliK Assoc., :ll6th and l2nerson, wa s give n money to d o a l,feasability study, to see i f i t is feasible H (sometimes read as "profitable" ) to r enew the area and to make reconunendations as to l what kind of rene wal. would be best. Part l! of the Urban Renewal Act calls for the yparticipation of the residents in the area. ll•So gave Bernie Jones money to find out 1 what the residents want. H e must turn in l his report by September lst and he feels t1that it vill take a month to compile and '!write the report, which means he has one (l) 1 month to find out . what • e want. To do this l he is planning a series of community 1lmeetings during July. He understands that l lthere is littl.e time and that thousands of lfpeople stand to get ripped Denver '! Urban Renewal's last project, Auraria, •rwas already pfan"ed the residents lifound out what vas going to happen at whicb they were. told tlBt they were tdo !late. No matter how good a report Berni!! 'land his staff.write, -viil ... ' . ' certainly get ' ripped orr. Unl.c!sa Bernie . _ " . 1!&: s tsff are able t o tile CCIIIIIIUDit7.,,. '!into. a unified, they '!rlll only have been Uf!:eil Ren ewal. .. :Ito fuJ.fill the lepl tmd to 'Fr.'l t.o tlak• :peopl.e l: olieve tmt a..,y have Ne><::s SerJier, :-,,,.. l :run over a colllnUllity of peopie fer a: faSt buck. In following issues we will publish some far-out i deas different communities across the country have thought out and acted on for making a livable city environment. So far, ideas f'rom the PNS collective are; using block parties to complement the COOI!IIUlli t y meetings which may tend to b e boring, attended by few a n d domin a t e d b y even fewer, Absentee :..ancUords s e e m to be the major contributing factor to the physical-mental deterioration cf the I t just doesn't make s ense to spend a lot of energy-time-money improving environment when you can and do get evicted at the whim o f your landlord and any improvements you do make can be used as an excuse by the landlord to raise your r e n t.. One suggestion to Urban Renewal then, i s to make long term, nointerest available to people to buy hous e s in th.e area, o n t h e conditioD. :.ha+. t-.hPv .: .... : :-1-."''..!.SeS. This will o....o:>u ailmT people who want to move to do so even t hey will proba b l y change their minds whe n they see a righteous people's community. Beyond -this, smaller neig.'oborhoods within the area should be given the information and materials and then the money so they can figure out the best way to use the land. To rix up houses vrhich are valuable as far as aesthetics and structure, to use the rest of the land, like irretrevable houses, vacant lots, ugly stores, etc., to make parks, maybe a bandshell, bicycle paths. , . space for vegetable gardening, or whatever. If you are tnterested in rapping to . -Bernie and his stsff and finding out more or helping him, go to the southwest corner or 18th and Clarkson. Steve w. 7

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_diSIIFIABlE ... IP MIRIER? OD May 311 1971, Jlerman Davia, vas ah
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WOl?D=ll IDA T h e following l e t ter is writt en to Allan Haifley who is cu rrently incarcerated in a federal prison i n S tafford) Arizona for refusin g induction6 It was writ t e n b y Nell Sale, a taxi c ab di-i ver and active member o f the Independent Driver s Association. As w e go to press the strike has been settl ed. The strikers will receive a 6% acro s s t he b oard wage increase p l us a 15 a n hour equity increase. The company >Till probably petition the Public U tilities Conunissi o n somet ime i n July for a fare increas e to make up the increased costs o f wages. 6-17-71 Dear Allan, I suppose that you have been wai ting with an anxious lump in your throat to he a r about the most exciting event in labor history in Denver, the great taxi c a b strike ! Steve and I have just begun trying to analyze what has happened, now that a vote was take n last night that brought the situation to an end, most probably. I assume that you have been reading the Denver Post, so I ' l l spend just a little time on the facts of the actual strike, There are four unions a t Yellow Cab. ( Z one and Ritz cab have not bee n involved a t all up to this point.) The dispatche r s are members of Teamsters Local 775, the telep hone operators are members of Professional and Office Workers, and the mechan ics are in the Machinists, Then of course the drivers are members of the Independent Drivers Association, known fondly as IDA. All of the jobs are held by a union shop, so in order to dispatch, one would have to join the Teamsters, etc. The contracts of the three smaller unions at the company came up for wage negotiations o n June 1. The contract with the drivers does not officially come up agai n until Jan. 3 1 , so on the face of it, we were not involved at all in this recent dispute. However, W < are the largest group of workers, s o our shee r size means that we are always someho > involved. And , the company has put down the line that unless the c ab drivers agree t o pay the co mpany m ore money when we rent the cabs, that they will be unable to raise the other workers' salarie s ••••• a good tac tic, no? Add t o that potentially divisiv e strategy, the fact that the drivers are exTeamsters, and are targets for all the wrath that the Teamster International can muster, and you find an almost conspiratorial relationship between the and the Teamsters against the drivers. We wer e in a weak position in a strike because we have no strike fund , being an independent local, and the Teamsters really wanted to exploit that too. So there really were two factors in this strike from the drivers point of view ••• how to beat the company, and how to beat the T eamsters. Now, some history ••••••• In March or so, the company applied with the PUC for a fare increase for the meters. The terms of our contract with the company say that the drivers h a v e to c oncur o n a n y fare i n crease that the company wants G So 1 much t o Steve and my surprise, t he drivers voted down the fare increase. Ths. t was our first h int a t wha t was t o come. Then, in Apri l news began to circu late that the other three unions were demanding a 15% increase in w a ge s for their ne w co ntract i n J une. The n the company began filling the drivers full o f hard ' l uck stories about 'their losses, their sad (

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financial dilemma, and how Mike Emerich wanted to sell the company anyway, When negotiation actually began in May, the drivers' negotiators were involved even thought we were not actually involved in a contract renewal. Our negotiators' at the first session, offered to buy the com pany! All of a sudden, Emerich wasn't so eager to sell. The union voted unanimously NOT to raise our payoff on whatever terms, in t he middle of May ••• We were beginning to flex our muscles ••••• While the other unions and the company bargained, always keeping in mind that the drivers had to bend, and could be forced to bend once a strike was called because we could not for m ore than four days with no our union began to try to fig-or worse. The idea that we came up with was the courtesy car, We would install phones, publicize a new phone number for Yellow cab service, drive our own cars, and maintain service to the public, as well as provide ourselves with subsistence, With that threat, June 1 came and went, and a four day extension of the contract was granted until a federal mediator was able to meet with the disputing part1es. At this point it became clear that we were to receive no support from the other three unions, especially the Teamsters. I also learned then that the whole Teamster union is in trusteeship, which means that the leader ship of all locals is appointed by the . international, and the local membership has no power over any decisions that their negotiators makeoooooooSO We Were really struggling with a guy named Harry Bath, who had a number of bitter personal enemies in our union, from old days, So we had a meeting on Tuesday, June 1 , when we still didn't know whether or not the other unions were even going to strike. The leadership of the union, and Kaiser, proposed that we offer to the company that we would cross the picket lines of the other unions, and run the company. This really rubbed wrong with a lot of p eople, and we were real ly angry at suc h an idea. The leadership though . really messed up in the i-dea, What they failed to explain clearly and honestly was that if we offered to run t he company, that Yellow could not accept because of their contracts with the other unions. Only wages were under negotiation. There were still union shops, and we were not Teamsters , so we could not dispatch. If Yellow allowed us to, they would be sued for breach of contract by the Teamsters . Of course we weren't sure thatthe would do that, and that mad e the s c ene a b i t unsure, The strategy was that Yellow would refuse to let us, a lockout. This strategy was not really explained very well at all, and the issue at the meeting was talked about in terms of scab or not scab. At the end o f the vote, the union voted to respect

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picket lines that may be set up and to not scab. This put the courtesy cars back into our plans. We had also found out that our liability insurance had been blocked by Yellow c ab , so we would be operatin6 our service in cars not fully insured •••• sort of ticklish. But that was our only out now. So, at 4:00 am on Saturday morning, the dispatchers went off the air, drivers returned their cabs to the pot, and the first IDA Courtesy Car was on the street by 5:00 am. It took a while to catch on, but as of yesterday we were handling close to the same amount of business that Yellow cabs usually handle •••• we have no radios and have to call in by telephone to receive orders for trips, and we are definitely making less money than usual ••••• of course we have no pay off except for a three dollar levee to pay our own operators and dispatchers, so it's.not all that bad. Some interesting things have happened. For instance, at Yellow cab they average three accidents per day. We have had one, which was not the driver fault. Alien ated labor! The rapport among the drivers has b ee n fantastic ••• w e .have set up our own regulatory body which handles disputes, un fair practices, cheating, etc., replacing the need for the Y ellow Cab personal pigs. The public has really been behind us, which has .really expos e d Yellow Cab's rea l interests. The msjor drawback is that w e have never articulated clear goals, ow-ing for a debate ove r what our goals should be. There has been a lot of rhetoric a bout central of the company, and how we run it now anyway, why shouldn 1 t we own it, etc. I foolishly latched on to that rhetoric a s more widespread and significant than it actually has been. Last night we voted on whether to settle or an injunction. We have been expecting an any day, and I honestly feel that the leadership was to buck it if there were no significant budges by Yellow Cab. B u t i n the l ast few days Mike Emerich himself has offered the low est pay off increase that he can, and a dime i ncrease in the flag drop. This seemed to the leadership t o be the juiciest carrot they could get, and so they pushed for us to "get back to work" and wor k for a better contract deal next January. Of course Kaiser-was also saying that he didn't think we could beat the stick, the injuction. Another factor that McNichols was reelected, and we had been aware that the city had not against the People • s Ne1s Service June 24, 1971 courtesy cars because of the impending elec+
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shortshorlshortshorls ... LNS, Cupertino, Calif. -All narcs, FBI agents and CIA will get a cash discount on admission to student activities at Deanza ................ ... Jr. College, The eollege's student council approved unanimously a 2o% discount ror agents who show proper ID, lower prices ror pork. Los Siete de :.a Raza have gone underground because or the stolen car charge that has been hanging on them rrom the May l, 1969 incident when they were put on trial ror murder and round not guilty. Also because or the harrassment they have gotten rrom the San Francisro . police arter the trial was over, and because two of them were busted in a liquor store hold-up, they relt that they couldn't get a rair trial. They have a letter published in the S.F. Good Times explaining why they went under ound. "The rallacy is that we want to be nice to the prisoners or that we want to give them greater opportunity and development. That is not the main purpose or rehabilitation programs. These programs are to give added protection to the public. We wru1t to protect the public rrom criminality." Commissioner G. F. McGarth or N.Y.C. Jail System New York Times , 10-23-70 A national anti-war convention has been called by National Peace Action Coalition ror July 2-4 at Hunter College in New York City. The purpose is to plan mass demonstrations ror the fall orfensive. 12 A bill that would extend democratic rights ror homosexuals by banning discrimination because of "sexual orientation" in public employment and housing was dereated May 26 in the New York State Assembly. The bill was the rirst or its kind and would have provided a legal basis ror homosexuals to right rirings in public employment and discrimination in housing. A rederal parole board voted to trru1srer Chicano nationalist Reies Lopez Tijerina rrom rederal custody to New Mexico state prison authorities on July 26 where he will serve a state sentence stemming rrom his 1967 county courthouse raid. During the raid Tijerina attempted to make a citizen's arrest or police orficials in connection with their harassment against his attempst to reclaim land taken rrom Chicanos by u.s. government. Dear Rosa, My name is Lorraine. I .live with Jack. He just came back rrom Cuba, He is telling us about you and your country. He would like our country to be .like yours. You have a pretty name. Does sugar cane grow slow or fast? Did your school get out yet? Mine did. Do you like school? I like art, math, reading, painting and recess. Please write back. P.S. Send a picture or yourselr. ' Lorraine, USA LNS, The Peoples Coalition ror Peace and Justice, a cqalitiqn that sponsored the Mayday disruptions in Washington last nionth, plans a national conrer ence in Milwaukee on June 25-27 at St. Michael's Church and School. Thirteen Black Panther Party members went on trial in Los Ange les tn connection with the police raid that took place 4 days arter Chicago police murdered Fred Hampton and Mark Clark. The 13 derendants, including rormer deputy derense minister 11 Geronimo'' entered pleas or not guilty. They are charged with conspiracy to murder, assault with intent to murder and possession or deadly weapons. On Dec 8, 1969. L.A. police kept the Pru1ther orrice under a constWlt hail or gunfire and dynamite charges until early morning when the Panthers were able to rally press and people in the :'community to witness the attack 'Wld guarantee their sarety. have you noticed the gutless wonders sitting in air-conditioned street corners? have you noticed the people everywhere? ah, yes a businessman {beer belly hunter) Wld a hippie {pot belly hunted) it is easy to laugh when you are not part of a viscious square. Mass Marvel

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CUI general& averl .......... Boulder Communications Center 999Alp1ne 444-4443, 24 hours st. Andrew's Church 2015 Glenarm Place 825-5517 -crashing, tree meal daily except Thurs. O pens at 1 pm. Hip Help Cent,er 1002 E. 17th Ave. /12 222-3344, 24 hours -open evenings tran T pm -emergency :food and clotbing, runaway and other counseling, legal and medical help, etc. D.U. Help Line 753-3178 -open daily 6pm-2am Bicycles Now Environmental Action 534-3621 Fast Side Action Center 23rd and Welton 222-18o6, 534-6226 .North Side :)OIIIIIWiity Center 3551 433-8349 West Side Action Center 1312 Santa Fe Dr. 534-5141 People's Service June 24, 1971 Services . ...... aiel RR. ... i..L y(C)J C6RE ")ID on!Elt. I'U:et>f\>L The (Youth Coalition) 125 E. 18th Ave. (:for now) 24 hours . housing, job. •• ACLU (American Civil Liberties. Union; Contact: Dorothy Davidson 1711 Pennsylvania st. Room 108 825-5176 Colo. Public De:fender County Of'fice 1445 Cleveland 2!11'-2681 Legal Bducation and In:formation Centel 2420 Welton St. 222-1573 D.U. Law School 200 w. 14th Ave. 753-2643 Legal Aid Society 1375 Delaware 623-8251 Peoples De:fense Committee 333-7875 Cll'l'U (Capitol Bill Tenants Union) 1460 Pennsylvania, Room 4 825-2329 . -tree advice and help on all housing, tenant/landlord problema. Lawyers Guild Walter Gc-ash 1700 Bro?.dway Jails Denver Denve r County--297 2564 Boulder--442-3434

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health services Boulder Free Medical Clinic 999 Alpine, Boulder 303-449-6050 -open daily from noon till midnight, open forum each Wednesday Planned Parenthood 2020 York St. 388-4777 -Birth c 'ontrol information, sex education center for under 18, teen clinic sessions Wed. after school, VD treatment, pregnancy tests, speakers available, library. Homen 1 s Liberation 1458 Pennsylvania St. 534-0069 -abortion counseling The Open Clinic 2030 S. Gaylord 753-3245 -drug counseling, birth control information, medical referals Denver Free Clinic (william Millett Free Clinic) 828 E. 22nd Ave. 244-2162 -open 7-9:00 pm, Neighborhood Health Centers 1. 5110 w. 38th Ave. 443-8678 2. 990 Federal 292-9690 3. 529 29th St. 244-4611 entertainment a media Signs of the Zodiac Coffeehouse 311 E • . 20th Ave. -open evenings frcm 8:00pm DFU Gay Coffeehouse 125 E. 18th Ave. -open 7-11 pm Monday-Thursday and 7pm-lam Friday and Saturday Chinook 1452 Pennsylvania, Suite 21 892-1709 -$3 for 20 issues NOUS (high school action) contact Barb Newlon 722-3102 Boulder Express 1030 13th St., Boulder Ed.-Bob ;Jells 447-8033 -$4 per year KCFR-FM 90.1 2056 s. York St. 753-2667 -non-profit, educational, free forum format -Ken Hoffman, Bill Fienberg KFML FM-98.5 AM-139.0 290 Fillmore St. -stereo, FM 24 hours daily, AM between Gam and sunset. Peoples News Service P.O. Box 377-7875 Underground Cinema Twelve Vogue Theatre 1465 Pearl St. -films on midnight Saturdays The Changing Scene Champa St. 244-5777 -experimental theatre The Third Eye Theatre 380 Broadway

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I jrncnetnenl i!b<>we klt.li. I C'<>llo. 1!03m -a :reeder """""' s:er;ullce [ -H<1111e1'l!:'n"eeb Pennsylvania St. Room 1 255-loo6 !Institute/Mountain West I Lookout Mountain Z77-CJ762 ! -study of' non -violence -alternative lifestyle and political information Box 570, Golden Colo. 8o40l ! Radical Information Project . 737 E. 17th Ave. 825-7413 -bookstore, all books at discount, corfee, c onversation Militant Bookstore 6ar E . 13th Ave. 623 9 505 People's News Service June 2'4-, l 9 7 l Indian Re<:. and Fdneat.ional ktivities Inc. 1580 Gayli:mrd 39'}-(ik)O Ca:ll o:r the Cmmcil :ilrums Cal.vary Indian Cilm'cl> :ileJNer In Cameil Del!I9er Ketropolltan CoOIIDmity Clrurch Rev. Allen E. Baberkcrn 3501 'lll. lst at King 388-4920 -hine, apt.!,., po. cultural Moael City Resident CUltural Center ll8 E . 20th Ave . 892-1017 2678 Colorado Blvd. 333-1055 Centro Cultural. 935 W . lith Ave. 892-lk2l Folklore Center 6o8 E. 17th A
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"j} c . . .. ... { / education &children Upland School Iris Green, Box 10)8, Boulder,80302 4-43-!2976 . -kindergarten 2nd grade .Toe:ether Books 636 E. 17th Ave, 892-ll72 Breakftst Program Community Residents for,Action Gilpin St. Strawberry Fields 1 f'ree school 59::!7 Miller (Arvada) 424-6261 or call Domla Gripe at 892-5606 Denver Free Uliversity 125 E. 18th Ave. 825 . -as of July l, DPU is JDOYing to . :z. 18th and EIDers on 1 in the Association for the Blind building. The Lucy Stone Foundation Day care Center 1467 Birch 355-8910 -collectively run by parents, open 7:30-5 :30 Monday Friday, ages 2 COmmunity Free School 103o 13th St., Boulder 4-47 Spring School, Boul_der . Len Barron, 1204 Pleasant St. 442-6149 or . jCaren Hodge at _ 444-0363 Opport)lllity School 1250 Welton 244-8899 -cheap classes Do It Jack Rickards l92i 21st St. 422-8938 People United to Reclaim the Environ ment P,O, Box 731, Boulder 80302 Sierra Club, Rocky Mountain Chapter 2225 Buchtel Ave. Denvt:-1 80222 Rocky Mountain Center for the Envi ronment 5850 E. Jewell 757-54;9 services Denver Food Conspiracy Co-op 830 E. 18th St. ::!77-C1T62 -wholesane 1 cJleap food Denver's Organic Kitchen 1509 Welton 825-9343 The Orainery 1043 E, 17th Ave, Whole Esrth Natural Foods ro"l9 s. Broadwsy 733 "•ItT 'Ill> 9Ki5 .. 11\H lblt.OI.Jf al'ilbr:n\'11'43 (,S

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. calendar :.P : Thursday, June 24 7:00 pm, Channel 6, Vision of Photography: creative illustration -Rbt. Korop 7:30 pm, Channel 6, Insight: program of Denver's cultural interests 8:30pm, Channel 6, NET Playhouse: The Wright Brothers Friday, June 25 7:00pm, Channel 6, Blues Everyday: John Lee Ganderson and Carey Bell's Blues Harps, country soloist/city blues 8:30 pm, Channel 6, The Toy That Grew Up: The Covered Wagon, one of the few big pictures of screen history 9:30 pm, Channel 6, Your Week in Perspective: world news as it affects Denverites and Denver news as it affects the world saturday, June 26 8:00pm, Red Rocks Amphitheatre: Poco,,,,,CANCELLED 8:30pm, DU Observatory, 2930 E. Warren, Ave., Star Gazing, lecture and films, free, every Saturday 8:30pm, Denver Folklore Center: Steve Nardella and John Nicholas, country blues, ragtime playing and singing Sunday, June 27 6:00 pm, Channel 6, Get On Board: Jazz Pianist Art Hodes 7:00 pm, Channel 6, The Advocates: Should Congress force withdrawal of all U.S, troops in Indochina by Dec. 31, 1971? 8:30 pm, Channel 6, Vanishing Wilderness: offshore oil leak near Santa Barbara, 10:00 pm, Channel 6, Fanfare: Fillmore East, Byrds, Van Morrison, Albert King Monday, June 28 9:00 pm, Channel 6, Black Journal: philosophy of Black Art Tuesday, June 29 7:30pm, Channel 6, Making Things Grow: easy bulbs 8:00pm, Channel 6, A Child Went Forth: an exploration into schools as they are now 8:30 pm;nu ChaiDberlain Observatory:. Star. Gazing, lecture and films, .free, 2930 E. Warren, every Tuesday. 9:00 pm, Channel 6, Hard Times in the Country: study of the American Economy through the perspective of food we grow and eat 10:00 pm, Channel 6, San Francisco Mix: Searching 10:30 pm, Channel 6, Elizabeth Drew--Thirty Minutes With ••• Wash. DC police chief Wednesday, June 30 8:00pm, DU Lindsay Lecture Hall, rm. 244, Communication Aesthetics, Dr. Campbell 8:30pm, Channel 6, Just Jazz: coronetist Bobby Hackett Thursday, July 1 7:00pm, Channel 6, Vision of Photography: photography as an art medium 8:30pm, Channel .6, NET Playhouse: Rembrandt Friday' July 2 7:30pm, channel 6, Chicago Festival: Uniy, Jazz Band 8:30pm, Channel 6, Tile Toy That Grl!w .Up: an hour with Mack Sennett Pe e i.e's News Service June 24, i971 13

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AFTER SPRING? SUMMER Now, after the Spring offensive, it is a good time for questioning ourselves and our comrades as to the pest method of achieving radical social change. Where is the movement heading and how do we reach the yet un commited. I shall not discuss the actual seizing of state power as we simply are not ready for that. Of course we should all be attempting bot h to learn and be more effective in the strrggle continuously. Life is for learning and a closed mind is a dead mind. , I do not question .the need for a socialist revolut i o n however , but only the means and meth ods to b e used. There is no alternative, if we are to achieve a society free of exploitation, war and racism. People become radical by many paths, their own oppression and the recognition of it, alienation from present society, or simply a love of your fellow men and women. A person rarely becomes radical from study alone. It is necessary to learn the mechanics of imperialism and exploitation to act effectively, but personal experience and observation are.usually the triggers. I hav e not seen a nap alme d village or been a witness to my own children ' s starvation , but I have seen the results of the capitalistic greed in amerika and I know the vil lian is the same. I only have to look at the ru .. led landscape, polluted air and water, the rotten core of our cities and the cancer ous growth of the soulless suburbs, to know that a fast buck is amerika's only national ethic. I will try to pre-sent some personal opinions concerning the movement's tactics and possibilit ies in the sight of my own experiences. I think we can group amerikans in one of three broad categories. Group I would consist of those who are now radical (including all leftist groups) and those who beca use of own oppression (women, minority groups a n a poor whites) can easily radicalized. Group II consistes of working class middle America. I mean not only industrial workers, but all who must sell their labor to survive; small businessmen, white collar workers, G.Io1s, farmers and even a few members of the present governmental system. No realisitic revolutionary can 14 afford to ignore this group or imag:l,ne a revolution without at least a large number of supporters from it. Reaching G .I.1s, I believe, is a priority for obvious reasons. . . . . . Group III consists of the ruling class, the big money people, corporate heads and their lackeys in the govern-ment and the military. These people know their power and do not intend to surrender it. They will never accept a socialist system, so we can forget trying to radicalize them or worry about alienating them by out actions. Their power must be taken from them. Notice I do not consider the question of anti-war sentiment as a basis for group division. Both Bobby Seale and the Bank o f Amerika are against t h e war-what does that tell you? Some leftist groups believe that since Grou p II is in the majority, the sole priority is to build a working class movement. Thi s to me is folly. Vie may have to make some accomodat i ons but very certainly we cannot fail to use or betray the only present revolutionary groups now existing. Vie are going to alienate people just by our very existence, should we c hange our life styles, lose our cultural identity? NO! Nei ther can we den y our support for the Cubans, Vietnamese and others who are fighting the monster from without. Okay, so how do we bring the mass of amerikan people to a revolutionary consciousness, how do we be true to our ideals and stil l not drive middle amerika into Fascism? My own experience may hav e some use in showing where these people are at, During my childhood I was oppressed directly. I lived with my mother (my parents were separated), she was sick most of the time and worked when she could. Vie would up on A.D.C. and eventually after years of poverty she died for lack of proper medic a l care. Later I got a job, married, had kids and entered the amerikan "keep up with the Jones11 rat-race new car, furniture, debts up the ass, and almost, "but not quite, a house in suburbia. After nearly becoming an alcholic from sheer frustration, a change of cities caused me tn ::n counter the hip culture. This in turn led to acid and seeing with full clar-

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What is the point F---:::1 of Progress if the food is tasteless. the housing absurd, the clothing untomfortable, the religion just talk. the air poisoned byCadillacs. th !"M h . w-' e wo, . . mg, the sex up-tight and mechanical, the earth clobbered with concrete, and the water so chemicalized that even the fish are abandoning existence? People's News Service June ' 1 971 ity just where I and this society was at. Of course, there were many radical seeds . in my being just waiting. So there is in all people who are exploited, in whatever degree, a radical potential. Our purpose is then to bring about a flowering of this potential, we must work up the social ladder, maintaining and developing radical consciousness among the most alienated, while reaching upward to those who are unaware o f their oppressio n : Working c lass consciousness will develop as the unavoidable con tradictions of monopoly-capitalis m manifest themselves. I do not believe the majority of the so-called proletariate b e come revolutionary until the economic conditions approach that of the 30's. Our job then is to be able to o ffer a revolutionary analysis and alternatives to the system as these contradictions de velop. We must build a real counter-culture with institutions, such as day-care food con spiracies, clinics, etc. , serving all. \ole must always c o ntrast radica l htil n an ism to corporate indifference. City organizations such as the Seattle Liberation Fron t sould always be ready to respond to mass layoffs, or other crisis situation::; with definite analysi s and programs. In certain communi ties, suc:ll as Be:rkele,'/. real radical changes are p'ibJ"' sbould endeavor to produ . •: a I! ..... u ..:. ::;lJ:Jv: case of wha t kind of i s yossible. Abov-e all, we must 'lin guidelines and recognize that most are brainwashed and :!'reaked out by t h e v el' ! • .. mrd communism . I maintain we can support to third world people and work for a socialist society without alienation o f people terrified of c(Imnunism. HP. mut. s t r ess that conditions h e r e are vastly than in other socialist countrief:'. ?:e can show how a post-scarcity economy i s possible and t hat a conmruni tarian
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Whitman, etc, Use examples or the first A mericans, the Indians, had a working communist society with a real reverence for life. He can avoid old leftist dogma and sterility and produce a vision of a genuine American socialism with true liberty, equal i ty and racial brotherhood for all its eit izens and those m" the world. Jim D. XIA IAIAIA!AIAIAIAIA!AIAIA!AIAIAIAIAIAIAIAIAIA.IAIAIAIAIAAIAIAIAAIAIAIA,fAIAIA IAIAIAIAIA!AIA)( A glass of clear sparkling wine ••• and an evening of enjoyment with friends? For farmworkers that g lass o f wine may be a symbol of long hot hours in the fields, s ubstandard wages, exposure to the indiscriminate use of dangerous pesticides, and an accident rate 30af> higher than t h e A (\1 f.C.<:. c{ national average. t7li\-.>J Since 1965 vineyard wor kers in California have been seeking to improve these conditions through Clr t.. iR cnllecti v e bargaining, The United Farm \olorkers t....r\ Organizing Commit-cee, AFL-CIO has '"0'" ""\tract with the majority of the table grape industr y and w.uch -f the wine industry. The one large company who has refused "to negotiate with the workers i s Unite d Vintners, better known as Italian Swiss Colony. United Vintners is a subsidiary of Heublein, Inc. which also produces Smirnoff Vodka and many other liquors, A nationwide boycott of Italian Swiss Col a n y 1 wines and Smirnoff Vodka has been called in support of the workers at United Vintners, B ACK THEM IN THE IR STRUGGLE T O ACHIEVE JU S T AND SAFE WORKING CONDITIONS. REFUS E TO BUY ITALIAN SHISS COLONY For m o r e inform!l.tj o n contact: -h WINES AND SMIRNOFF VODKA! Unite d Farm Workers Organizing Commi t tee .._,. Den v e r Boycott. 3 138 Humbolt . Street :::,... . 5348351 or 222 -4371 16 sell PNS! OGDEN BOOKSTORE 9 19 East Colfax Ave. 825981 5 Out-of-Print Headquarters With Out-of-Sight Prices Boss-Tony Scibella Shylock-Steve Hilson

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I 1•t11EI IIIIIEI IIIEIIIIIIIII THE WAR It sulks between lovers at the dinner table; it is in the soup. No one speaks of it anymore -what is there to speak of anymore? ---it has settled on the lan
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men, who, -because of their experiences in Vietnam, •. ,fe'ef thl' contradictions bet .i'een what Ame!'ica :says. and what " Ame!"ica . does most conc retelyo They spoke from the need to as they lived themo to relieve in some way the burden ()f their disillusionment; . :' confusion, and rage9 They spoke, in alarming detail, C>f American and .. Vietnamese atrocities i n common practice, of corruption ru1d ineffectiveness inthe military, both American and Sout. h Vietnamese, and in the Saigo n go v ernme n t " They .contrasted this with the benefits the Vietnamese peasant receive from the Vietcong, such as smallpox vaccinationo Several military war corresponden t s the multi-layered news censoring network within the military bureaucracy,. the magazine a n d news service correspondents who rarely leave the Saigon bars and hotels, and who, when they do, endan ge r the lives of American soldiers through recklessness" Veterans testified to the farcity of the advisor system e v en as early as 1963 UoSo 11advisors11 were actively involved in combat maneuverso They testified to the falsity of the pacification program, in reality it involved the forced relocation of large segments of the indigenous peasant population into "strategic;1 hamlets, divorcin g them from the land, the means of their survival,and the basis of their cultureo They testifi ed to the deception surrounding the Vietnamizati o n program -in fact the South Vietnamese military rely exclusively on UoSo air support, unwilling to fight without ito In fact, both soldiers and civilians have little faith i n the . Thieu-Ky regime and are more sympathetic to the Vietcongo They feel that as soon as the UoSo pulls out of Indochina the war will end and the Saigon regime will crumble" Many veterans recounted the racism they encountered within the U oSo military machine itself, and as exemplified in the evolution of UoSo policy in Indochina from the advisor system, through pacification and ":freefire" zones, to Vietnamization, saturation bombing and the use of defoliants and anti-personnel weaponso Confronte d daily with these many contradictions; the American soldier in Vietnam i's forcedto seek some form of escapeo Drugs, being readily -available in large quantities at . low cost, often serve as such an escape o ' The use of drugs, from marijuana to speed and smack, is growing rapidly among Anierican troops, leading to widespread. heroiii a:ddfc tiol). and '!.nerT and every article of the Geneva co nven t i ons, to destroy the government based on that constituti'ono The war is but the fruition of the incessant contradictions between the American ideal and the American realityo For far too long returning Vietnam veterans have been silent. Many were too shaken to even want to remember o Now as they speak out, it would be tragic if we, the American people, did not listen. Yet only 300 persons attended the Colorado Winter Soldier Investigation" Most of the press had left half way through the first session" To paraphrase a fam ous quo te, we have made a desert of Indochina, shall we now call it peace? Unless we listen andact o n this testimony, I'm afraid we. will be told i'trs BOo Rfck Bo ; .

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i . . l ViewFrom Ho's Trail ll Probably no single road network in history has been subjected to such intensive aerial bombardmen t as the serie s of trails running from N orth Vietnam through Laos and into South Vietnam and Cambodi a kn own as the H o Chi Minh Trail. American B-52s , fighter-bombers and helicopters have attacked the trail. They have dropped sensors along i t f o r monitoring truck traffic; tons of bombs which act like mines , blowing up (.from either c ontact or prosimity, and defoliants for peeling the jungle cover off the roadways. C-130 transports, converted for the mission, orbit over the trail at night, looking for trucks carrying war supplies south t o the o f the National Liberatio n Front o f S ou t h Vietnam , the Khmer Rouge of Cambodi a and •• a North Vie tnam ese Army. The C-l3 0 s h ave been fitted with special wea p o n s for their missio n , including night vision devices and Gatling type guns. Khanh Van, a North Vietnamese c orrespo n de nt, has written a serie s o f arti c les a b ou t t h e trail. The series w a s monitored by F oreign Br oadc ast Informatio n Service, a U.S . a genc y , and publishe d in condensed form in +l}e Washington Post, "witho u t vouching f o r the accuracy o f this informatio n " . "A truc k convoy whic h the brot he r s referred to a s Wife Group One w a s ( w heeled) i nto the offensive departure position. This means t hat Wife Group Two should be at anothe r milestone alon g the road. "The artillery gun traile r s were veering towar d t h e side paths so that t h e car go trucks could fall i nto formation. The order given by t he armed branch station was that all the artillery gun trailers were to fol low Wife Group One. ' 1The armed branch stati on cadres came to ever y truck i.,o . visit and motivate the drivin g combatants ••• 11An assaul t unit, which con s isted mostly of girls, passed by ••• The g irls were carrying heavy packs and, in particular, each carried a small pillow in her pack. The blue and red t rimmings on the pillow could be seenoooo 11No sooner had our comrade driver started the engine than members of the assault youth unit blocked the road. Although our comrade driver sounded the horn, they did not budge because they were absorbed in talk about the folks back home. "At the outset, I thought that the trucks would run continu ously through the jungles and would be shielded by the foliageo However, when the con v oy crossed over Summit 301, I began to see the bomb craters. The trucks began to run along an open, devastated road section where the smoke emanating from the craters could be smelled everY'vhere " "The first night, then the second night went by. I gradually realized that almost no part of this road section was well concealed ••• Along t h e r oad side) various kinds of trees had been stripped of their People's Ne"s Service June 24, 1 971 -Tb• Wa•b ln a ton Pol\ leaves and brancheso There mained only bare trunks 'd'i th pointed tops. If " e contem plated this scene through the early morn ing mist) 1-1e would have the impression t hat a flotilla of big sailboats, the masts of which were close to one another, was resting alon g the river ••• , : " I was told t hat on c ertain days aggressor aircraft, i n .three f ormat i ons, sprayed toxi c c h emicals o v e r thi s road. 19

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tt .. The trees alon g l h e i..dc had bE>e n stripJOed or thei r green leaves. " I was also tol d of t h e . days whe n a fire h a d ":Jet:n burnJ.ng continuousl y . r .rhe f ire' (;(Jn suming t h e dry l e a v es,. burne d endles s l y for m o r e t han one month . The f i r e burn e d the bra n c hes and sor. letimes a fire e ngulf erl. bran c h iell dovm. Th e .fire s tart e d by the timed stee l pell e t bombs vraa coaring un t h e h ill s l op es. 1he flames from t h e p Jast.ic substance in the b ombs spattered the surface of thr: road. a n d e1ren stuck to the-tires of the trucks. Bang, a driver com bambal.ant, ulso told me that pre v i ously o n every night for a ,,reek the tru cks bad to run through arcs o1' fire all alo ng the oection from Milestone J.6 to Milestone 4 1 , Route A. It; was oppressively hot in the driving cabin. The comrade driver s were deeply concerned about t he possibility that their gasoline might catch f i r e ••• 11 Kha nh Van wrote t hat. North Vie t n ames e monJ.toring the traf fi• : kE-pt trac k of his progress all. a l ,)ng +.he route, with some o f' t II? fkn t h Vietnamese watch inG underground shelters alo : • t!' i ,. the road. He stopped nt c•nc s t:n.tion to receive a briefing about the Ho l;h;. linh Trail. "'l'he brief ing place v . .'a.-; a tal l , big houze tuil t against a and surrounded. b y wide verandas. It looked very. spacious. T>1o hundredwatt e lectric bulbs shed light on a map six met ers high outlining the transportation lines, thus making the briefing room brighter and more solemn ••• "The comra de head of the propaganda and training organ told me that the present trail is several thousand kilometers long. Truck convoys do not go in only one directi In each direction not just one axis or o f transportation. i s has not only a main tr , but many auxiliary ones . • rcraft roared continuously ov head (during the briefing). Sometimes fragment exploded to the south •• So metimes bombs from B-52's exploded for a while to the north. Occasionally, the house was shaken as if there 'were an earthquake. I found that these explosions did not affect the briefings. It seemed that everyone was too. familiar with these explosions. "The on-duty combat cadre gave a briefing on the enemy situation, ranging from the enemy's tactical tricks to th& tonnage of bombs dropped at each milestone, road or military sta tion. ''He described fairly clearly a battle fought by the antiaircraft unit of Military Sta tion M yesterday (March 3), which downed five aircraft and which was encircling-the pilots in order to capture them; a bat tle fought by the infantry troops of Military Station N who annihilated a large group of enemy rangers and seized all the weapons and radio communication sets; and particularly a battle fought by an antiaircraft artillery unit in charge of protecting Bunker B, which downed a C-130 aircraft that chased and straffed our vehicles at night. Five pilots were burned to death in that battle. "The details which th!' onduty cadre of the road and bridge staff presented were even more complete. He was conversant with everything, from weather conditions to the level of water in the tunnels along the overall route ••• He knew how many bombs were dropped on which key points, how many bombs hit the surface of the road, how many cubic meters of earth and stone were required to repair damaged road : sections, how many squads were required to do the repair job, how the command post directed the work and at what time the repair of this road section was finished. "After a signal cadre briefed me on the maintenance of signal and liaison operations on a chart -showing the entire signal network throughout the trail -I understood that the skillful command was due partly to the signal operations. I could not imagine how the radio communications combatants, after one day ond o n e night, received and dispatched nearly '600 messages, of which only two were not transmitted. "Two hundred eighty-six cuts in telephone .wires were repaired combatants • . The

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teleph one wires were c u t by enemy bombing or b y falli ng trees caused b y the northeast winds, The co mrade head of propaganda and training told ' Without the signal opera-' a commander b ecome s and dumb ...... ' 11 went on to say that the conv oys had exceeded set goals for the movemen t to the point that of the daily norm has achieve d." He said that at heavily, embe d points, engineers had bypasses off to both sides the main road. He quoted jthe briefer as telling the jpersOimel assigned to the Ho [ Chi Minh Trail that "in one ) People's News Service June 24, direction, there must be many spearheads of attacks, It is necessary to force the enemy to disperse his attacks not only along the full length of the road, but also laterally against t h e auxiliary roads, "In a month, the U.S. aggressors' aircraft make as many a s 16,871 sort ies t o drop bombs o n key points. This does not include the bombins b y B-52s, which make more t h an 700 sorties a mon t h." (Van left the briefing center and resumed his trip down the trai l -this time at night. He said the r oad was passable despite "mor e than 300 magnetic and time bombs" droppe d at tw o main intersec tions at 3 o'clock in the after-He wrote that antiairunits along the road were put on alert before the truck convoy besan rolling down the trail.) hurriedly move past Milestone 63. Suddenly, the wind swirled overhead. Antiaircraft fire and the explosion of steel pell.el; bombs thundered amid the truck formation ••• A truck stopped abruptly. Ahead of it was a column of black smoke that engulfed the surface of the road. The trucks in the rear halted, bumper-to-bumper.'' (It is standard practice for American planes bombing the trail to try to hit the lead truck s o the convoy behind it is blocked, making an easier target.) "Battalion Commander Quang, . standing on the running board of t he truck, said l oudly: . ' C o mrades, may I have your attention please. Firmly maintain the same speed and move f orward.. Move on, buddy, I'l l be standing on this runnin f boar d for a while.•

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use bOIIibs many different types to drop against a key • point. According to enemy stepped down, . . entere craters ve must all destroy: eneso;y time bOIIibs. If ve vant to -destroy the time bo.ils, ve DllSt destroy the magnetic bc.i>s in order to clear the way to move Sometimes, the enemy fits tails magnetic bombs to the time bad>s 1n orier to deceive us. "To move to destroy . the magnetic and time bombs, it is necessary to sweep awa y the barrier by the trigger mines that the enemy drops on both ends the control point in order to keep our troops moving up to repE c.he damaged road sect. 11 ••• vie were standing near the bombs that the brothers usually cali the 'highly sensitive the enemy. When a vehicle or a person carrying metallic substances passes by these bombs, they immediately explode ••• " (Van '-Tote tha t his :ir:l.en vas bl01111 to bits as tile tvo vere destroying the baabs on the road. Be Cer b;ro t e that mines are dropped around pilot by ar. other plane when he is shot dow-n over the trail. This is to keep liorth Vietnamese :f'rom reaching hirr: before the rescuing helicopter can land. By d'lyligt.t, the correspondent said, he and others removed trigger mines the roadway and used dynamite t o in the bomb craters obstructing truck "That night, the convoy passed through the control point without waiting even a minut.e.11

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Perhaps once at the foot of the orange t r ees of pink Calii ' ornia, robbed by your grandfather from other grandfathers, you dreamt o f b ecomi ng president of your natio n , or only of becoming an honest citizen. Perhaps that was the dream with whi c h your greatgrandfather ran !'rom f ar-off Italy and thus established family and house and new hopes in the new land of promise of the North American. (I am only guessing, I am only turning the pages of your possible only inventing, approximately, what you will never be because the of promise dug your tomb fllr, very far from the orange groves. ) Perhaps you never knew of that p lace in the world that is called Vietnam, where now you are dying daily, history, land where your interrupted infancy loses every l ogical s ense, where --I know why ':Uld you don't--you gdp a rifJ.e that is no longer a toy, and against you are fighting the shaciows and the trees and ':.he wind s an d the roads and the stones and the smoke from you r o,.-r:; blazes and the silence cf e. forest I::; not yours nor 1-rill it b e and the water enci t h e i1eat and the rain and -o-r course -the bullets tba;; you yoursd f brought, nm< turned against you. Perha;.s Jrcu r.ever thought it could happen this that is not a dream , this th.3.t sorr.et.h:i:r.g inside you, this that devastates the o range trees that granifather planted f a r av:a.y, there a song ol peaee vhe. r e perhaps you would want to be with friends i n the shad e D avid Fernande Z , a youn g Cuban poet of a son g ot' -peace , beea.use this is already too much for you who k."'lov.. why this song of peace rE'printed frorr. rqonthly was interrupted here, b y the passing of others like you, who came t o destroy the houses, the f amilies, the new h opes of this nation that is called Vietnam, of which perhaps you never heard that sad day when they sent you, toget!1er with your friends, without telling you why, to these lands where now, under the same that you brought, you die, you die, daily, irrevocable, y(m die .. Pec;:le 's I'ie>!'S ::=e:!'vice 197l 23

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"Behold, my brothers, the Spring has come; the earth has received the embraces of the sun and we soon see the results of that love! "Every seed is awakened and so has all animal life . It is through this mysterious power that we too have our being and we therefore yield to our neighbors, even our animal neighbors, the sam e right as ourselves, to inhabit this land. "Yet, hear me, . people, we have now :;o deal another race--small and feeble when our fathers first met them but now great and overbearing. Strangely enough they have a mind to till the soil and the love of possession is a disease with them. These people have made many rules that the rich may break but the poor may not. They take tithes from the poor and weak to support the rich and those who rule. They claim this mother of ours, the earth, for their own and fence their neighbors away; they deface her with their buildings and their refuse. That nation is like a spring freshet that overruns its banks and destr oys all who are in its path. "We cannot dwell side by side. Only seven years ago we made a treaty by which ' we were assured that the buffalo country should be left to us forever. Now they threaten to t ake that away from us. My brothers, shall we submit or shall we say to them: 'First kill me before you take possession of my Fatherland •••• "' Sitting Bull at the Powder River C ouncil, .. Well,. this is absolutely the last thinS' I'm going to. type, I hope. Only two of us typed this whole thing, and we both work, too. Oh well. A few hours ago, when I could think, I thought it was worth it. I probably will again after a few hours or days of sleep. This is just to let you know a few things. We'll start from the bottom. If you want to buy a copy of PNS {don't remember that you already have one in your hands) you can get them at; Together Books, RIP, Folklore Center, DFU, Youth Coalition, Book Mart, Fantasy Trip, Hobbit, General Store, 1st Creation, Jerrie's News, Straight Johnson's, Sun Books, Saint Andrew's Church, Planned Parenthood? and on the streets. If you want to sell PNS you can buy them (10 or more) for a' nickel and sell them for a dime. Pick them up at RIP, 7Jr E. 17th Ave. u you want to write us, we now have a Post Office Box, #!f671 If you want to come to some meetings see about joining the collective in putting it together c all 333-7815 And, if you want to type, heh heh heh, just drop by anytime!