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Asset Mapping in Ketchikan, Alaska
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Lynch, Aftan
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Denver, CO
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University of Colorado Denver
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Auraria Library
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Running head: ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 1 Asset Mapping in Ketchikan, Alaska Aftan Lynch University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs Author Note Send correspondence to: This client based project is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Public Administration in the School of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver Denver, Colorado Spring 2019

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 2 Capstone Project Disclosures This client based project was completed on behalf of t he Ketchikan Wellness Coalition (KWC) and supervised by PUAD 53 61 Capstone cou rse instructor Dr. William Swann and second f aculty reader Dr. Nuriel Heckler . This project does not necessarily reflect the views of the School o f Public Affairs or the faculty readers. Raw data were not included in this document, rather rele vant materials were provided directly to the client. Permissions to include this project in the Auraria Library Digital Repo sitory are found in the final Appendix . Questions about this caps tone project should be directed to the student author.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 6 Introduction ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 7 Literature Review ................................ ................................ ................................ ............................ 9 Shifting from Deficit Models to Asset Models ................................ ................................ ........... 10 Asset Based Advantages ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 11 Asset Mapping ................................ ................................ ................................ .......................... 12 Disadvantages ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................... 14 Statement of Purpose ................................ ................................ ................................ .................... 15 Methodology ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ . 16 Results ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ........... 18 Physical Environment ................................ ................................ ................................ ............... 19 Industry Influence ................................ ................................ ................................ ..................... 20 Perceived Value ................................ ................................ ................................ ........................ 21 Data Limitations ................................ ................................ ................................ ....................... 21 Discussion ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 22 Conclusion ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ .... 25 References ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ..... 26

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 4 Appendix A : Focus Group Email Invitation ................................ ................................ ................. 30 Appendix B : Focus Group Protocol ................................ ................................ .............................. 32 Appendix C : Focus Group Survey Questions ................................ ................................ ............... 34 Appendix D : Focus Group Session Notes ................................ ................................ .................... 35 Focus Group Session 1 ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 35 Focus Group Session 2 ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 38 Focus Group Session 3 ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 40 Focus Group Session 4 ................................ ................................ ................................ ............. 43 Appendix E : Coding Results for Focus Groups ................................ ................................ ............ 46 Appendix F : Comprehensive List of Assets and Physical Places in Ketchikan ........................... 48 Map 1: Assets in Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ................................ ....... 58 Map 1: List of Assets in Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ........................... 59 Map 2: Assets in Midtown Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ....................... 61 Map 3: Assets in Downtown Ketchikan ................................ ................................ .................... 66 Map 3: List of Assets in Downtown Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ......... 67 Map 4: Physical Assets in Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ........................ 69 Map 4: List of Physical Assets in Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ............. 70 Map 5: Physical Assets in Downtown Ketchikan ................................ ................................ ..... 72

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 5 Map 5: List of Physical Assets in Downtown Ketchikan ................................ .......................... 73 List of Assets with Multiple Locations, Out of Town Offices, or No Designated Location ...... 74 Appendix G : Focus Group Follow Up Survey Responses ................................ ........................... 76 Appendix H: Core Competencies Reflectio n ................................ ................................ ................ 79

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 6 Executive Summary This project created an asset map of Ketchikan while exploring the advantages of implementing an asset based approach in a rural, Southeast Alaskan community. In conducting this project, the research aimed to answer three questions: 1: What are the formal and informal assets existing in K etchikan? 2: What are the unique characteristics of Ketchikan residents that are perceived to be providing resiliency? 3: Do participants involved in the creation of an asset map perceive value in the process? Through secondary data collection, focus grou p sessions, and follow up surveys, the project produced a list of 434 assets in Ketchikan as well as five visual maps . The data also revealed that residents are heavily influenced by their physical environment and changing industries. F ocus group sessions created a common reflection on the geographic location, island boundaries, and harshness of the weather economy dominated by natural resource development (fishing, mining, logging, e tourism economy was likewise discovered to provide resiliency . F ollow u p survey responses, as well as generally positive perspective s expressed during the focus group sessions , indicated that participants viewed the process as an overall po sitive one. Because of this, a recommendation that the KWC complete a more in depth, individual level asset map was offered.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 7 Introduction Asset based approaches to community development are becoming a n exciting option for practitioners interested in capitalizing on their existing strengths and resources . These approaches seek to understand and enhance the characteristics of a population that are providing positive health outcomes. Unlike deficit driven models, which tend focus on community problems and needs, asset based approaches prioritize and build upon the mechanisms within a community that are providing resiliency . Asset mapping is one asset based method that helps communities identify these mechanisms. sidered the resources, organizations, individuals, associations, and qualities that are contributing to a healthier community. Asset mapping is a technique that pinpoints those assets through a process by which community members identify the various resources, characteristics, and opportunities contributing to a higher quality of life. Oftentimes, the result of this inventory is presented with a visual map. The aim of this capstone project is to produce an asset map of the identified strengths and resources currently available in Ketchikan. Ketchikan, Alaska is a small, island community on the southern tip of Southeast Alaska. A wa terfront town primarily built on piling s, it is known for its breathtaking beauty and is fond ly There are about 14,000 year round residents who live on 32 miles of road . The main economies are fishing, ship building, and tourism. Residents who live her e often praise the g ood natured people and the beautiful natural surroundings (United Way & McDowell Group, 2007). During the process of examine the characteristics of Ketchikan residents that are perceived to be contributing t o its resiliency one dimension of community health .

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 8 Client The Ketchikan Wellness Coalition (KWC) is an innovative organization working to . The founders of the KWC recognized that improving community health required a multifaceted approach , and that individual dimensions of health and organizations and developed several sub task forces. Together, the sub task forces co mbine to form the KWC. The KWC use s its collaborative power to identify overlapping risk and protective factors within multiple social issues and then concentrate s their resources on where those factors intersect . The result is a reduc ed duplication and a more effective and efficient response. One of the core values of the KWC is to respond to community issues with current and accurate data . They requested an asset map to gain more insight to the available resources and strengths in Ketchikan . There are benefits to asset mapping that extend beyond simply identifying available resources ( Goldman, K. & Schmalz, K , 2005) . The process of identifying and inventorying local assets creates a shared understanding among the participants of the process . By listing and focusing on the assets in the community, participants are reminded that there are great things occurring some of which they may not be aware (Morgan & Ziglio, 2007) . Participants come to understand that the resources needed to combat social inequities and health concerns are often already available within their reach (Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993) . This is a powerful realization that can jumpstart robust movements toward positive change. Taking this into consideration , this project will also investigate t he benefits of implementing an asset map in a rural, Alaskan community.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 9 A sset maps are typically used to identify and inventory individual expertise and skillset s the intent being to connect one another. This capstone project , however, will not focus on individual capacities, but will explore the organizational level assets and physical place s . This capstone will go one step further and look at the traits of Ketchikan residents that are contributing to its resiliency. F inally, it will discuss the perceived value in the process of conducting an asset map . The project aim ed to answer the following research questions: 1: What are the formal and informal assets existing in Ketchikan? 2: What are the unique characteristics of Ketchikan residents that are perceived to be providing resiliency? 3: Do participants involved in the creation of an asset map perceive value in the process ? The next section is a review of the literature relating to asset based models and the benefits and challenges of asset mapping . The methodology section outlines the process taken to perform several focus group sessions . A discussion of the findings as well as recommendations for the client based on the findings will follow. Literature Review A promi sing body of literature has emerged around the use of asset based approaches for community development and health promotion (Whiting et al, 2012; Glass, 2001; Morgan & Ziglio, 2007; Kreztmann & McKnight, 1993) . Researchers are enthusiastic about the applic ation of asset based models and some have begun shift ing from deficit based approac hes to those that highlight community strengths (South et al, 2017) . Asset maps are one asset based approach that have caught the attention of researchers , with an increasing number of articles commenting on the potential to improve health outcomes (Whiting et al, 2017; Kreztmann & McKnight, 1993) . D espite the promise of asset models, however, it appears there is less research connecting asset based approac hes with proven health advancements (South et al, 2017). Instead, a wealth of

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 10 research has been documented on the potential of this strategy for improving community health. The following literature review will outline the justification researchers have used to propose shifting from deficit based to asset based models; describe the best practices for implementing an asset map (one asset based approa ch); explore the gaps in the literature; and discuss areas for potential research. Shift ing from Deficit M odels to Asset Models Despite an abundance of data demonstrating the extent to which populations are impacted by inequalities and social issues, there is little data outlining the effectiveness of various strategies to effectively reduce inequalities (Whitehead & Dahlgren, 2006) and the evidence that suggest s that some of the current strategies seek ing to address health inequities are failing to do so (Whiting et al, 2012). Deficit based models are one approach that have been criticized because of their focus on the needs and problems within a community (Mor gan & Ziglio, 2006). Researchers propose this as a problem because it implies that aspects of the community , itself , are inherently t he problem and suggests that if things are to be repaired, solutions need to come from the outside (Goldman , 2005) . A consequence of this, suggested by Kretzmann & McKnight, is that a reliance T his has potential adverse impacts on communities as it cre ates incentives for disadvantaged populations to paint the mselves as worse off than other populations in order to lure funding from potential grantors (Morgan & Ziglio, 2006). Deficit based approaches , when used in isolation, miss an important step in the process McKnight, 1993; Goldman & Schmalz, 2005). By not providing a complete representation of a

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 11 community acknowledg ing that even when a host of maladies exist there are traits and assets that are contributin ). Despite these set of deficiencies, deficit approaches continue to be the dominant approach to health policies (Whiting et al 2012, Morgan & Ziglio 2007; South et al 2017, Rotegard et al 2009). There are many benefits to the deficit driven model indeed, t here is no other way to identify community problems and clarify what specifically is causing those proble ms . But a lone , t hey are insufficient in reducing health disparities (Whiting et al 2012). Combining deficit based approach with asset based models , however, helps color a complete picture of a community (Morgan and Ziglio, 2007). Using this reasoning , asset model proponents suggest that the deficit model is important and necessary but should be used as one strategy within a complete set of approaches ( Morgan, 2014) . Asset Based Advantages In contrast to t raditional deficit based models that seek to identify the problems and needs of a community , asset models look at what is going well in a population. Sometimes called empowerment models, asset based approaches give citizens control in their decisio ns (Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993) . These models attempt to identify strong relationships within the community and build confidence in capacity to improve their own circumstances (Foot & Hopkins, 2010). Kretzmann and McKnight (1993) assert that the effectiveness of asset mode ls lie s in their capacity to reshape the way communities view themselves . Further , they suggest that the process of implementing an asset based approach is itself one that contributes to positive outco mes . By creating a narrative around positive attributes, that communi ty engages in a social construction of itself that is more favorable and optimistic. This shift in reframing the approach is common in the literature with many authors articulating the

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 12 benefits of combining the two methods. Increasingly, the asset based model is becoming the preferred approach , with many countries around the world implementing these strategies (McLeary, 2011) . In fact , these approaches are becoming mainstream in European policies and frameworks (WHO 2017). The asset based approach began as an offshoot of (1979, 1996). Antonovsky was critical of the field of public health for not acknowledging the characteristics that facilitated a healthier life. Antonovsky believed that publ ic health providers could improve health outcomes not by decreasing disease and poor health conditions, but by promoting the factors that made people healthy. Under this reasoning, which he call ed salutogenisis, people possess coping mechanism s , and by ide ntifying what thos e are and promoting them practitioners could increase overall health outcomes and thus reduce diseases . This rationale funnels into current literature of asset based versus deficit based approaches. Asset Mapping At their core, asset based approaches are a methodology for recognizing and taking advantage of the assets in a community. Using this approach, practitioners gain access to valuable information , and community members begin to realize how others perceive and experie nce the same place (McLean, 2011). Asset maps are often used as a spring board for practitioners in their quest to understand what resources are available and can later be use d for strategic planning and community development strategies (Guy e t al, 2002). The process practitioners take to complete an asset map is significant. Morgan (2014) states a predetermined community vision or goal that allows the assets to be con nected for productive ughout the literature (Griffin & Farris, 2010; Kretzmann

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 13 & McKnight, 1993; Crane & Skinner, 2003; South et al., 2017). T he application of asset maps within specific health contexts such as nursing (Rotegard et al., 2009 ) or school counseling ( Rutten et al., 2007) has been explored, but guides for the mapping process for specific disciplines has not been presented (Whiting et al . , 2012). The re are, however, useful field maps for universal asset mapping processes (Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993; Office of Learning Technologies, 2002; Goldman et al., 2005). A ssets. What is cons idered an asset varies because the interpretation is contingent upon the perspective of who is generatin g the definition ( Crane & Skinner, 2003) . Most often , definitions of assets include any factor or resource that promotes or sustains health and well being (Morga n & Ziglio, 2007; Friedli, 2012; McLean, 2011) . Kretzmann and McKnight (1993 ) further specify that assets can be only those resources that are access ible and usable to a community; without accessibility, they claim, resourc es are unusable and therefore not effective. Rotegard et al (2010) narrow the definition of assets to those within the 4). Whiting et al (2012) note that this variance in defining health assets creates a challenge for practitioners hoping to im plement the asset model. A common definition , agreed upon by researchers, would advance the asset based literature . Asset levels. While there is no consensus on the definition of a health asset , there is concurrence in the literature regarding the classification of health assets into three levels: individual, community, and org anizational or institutional assets (Morgan & Ziglio, 2007; Foot & Hopkins 2010; Goldman et al 2005; Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993; McLean, 2011; Griffin & Farris 2010). At the individual level, assets include resiliency skills, social competence, protective factors, and the unique abilities people possess that contribute to a vibrant and healthy community. Community level assets consist of the associations and relationships that promote a

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 14 well connected and thriving social network system. And organizational or institutional level assets are the environmental systems and resources that support health and well being , safe environments, and enhance quality of life indicators (Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993) . Disadvantages A sset model s are promising to researchers because they have the ability to shift the balance of power back int o the hands of the communities but they are not without criticism. Friedli (2012) , for example, offers one of the more powerful criti ques of asset based models suggesting th at just as the deficit model offers a limited solution to health and well being, the asset model , unaccompanied with other approaches, do es not question the very structural factors which produce unequal communities. Others have likewise found inadequate li nks between asset based approaches and health outputs and call for more research to substantiate this connection (South et al, 2015; Rutten et al, 2007). Further, it is suggested t hat asset based approaches tend to be more time consuming make them a less d esirable option for practitioners (Whiting et al, 2012). While this is an encouraging field , more research is needed including an analysis of the health outcomes of asset based approaches (Friedli, 2012) . To fully capitalize on such a promisin g model, researchers should consider research which connect s the asset mapping p rocess with health improvement. M ost of the discussion falls within the needs based ver sus asset based dichotomy, pitting the two against one another, but the more meaningful c onversation lies in the linkage around the process of asset mapping and enhanced health outcomes (South, 2017) . Little research has been done on this linkage suggesting that this might be a n area of future research.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 15 Much of the literature touches on the in herent benefits of an asset based approach as opposed to the downsides of deficit model s , with deficit models painted as approaches that highlight community blemishes. It appears asset mapping help can fill this gap by providing a more complete picture of the community. However, t he literature lacks in its exploration of how the asset mapping process es itself offers advantages. A question remains as to whether or not the process of implementing an asset map add s value to a community. In addition to iden tifying the community assets in Ketchikan, this capstone will explore this gap in the literature by attempting to understand the perceived value of implementing an asset mapping project in a rural , Alaskan community . Statement of Purpose This capstone aims to explore three, distinct research questions during an attempt to create an asset map of Ketchikan, Alaska: 1: What are the formal and informal assets existing in Ketchikan? 2: What are the unique characteristics of Ketchikan residents that are perceive d to be providing resiliency? 3: Do participants involved in the creation of an asset map perceive value in the process? The most recent assessment measuring residents perception of their own capacities is the Compass II Survey done by United Way (2007). T he intention of that survey was to identify areas of strength in Ketchikan, as well as issues important to community members such as homelessness and substance abuse. Interestingly, the publishing of this survey was the impetus for the establishment of the Ketchikan Wellness Coalition (KWC Community Assessment, 2012). Several needs assessments have been implemented over the years including the United Way Compass II Survey (2007) the PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Needs Assessment (2016) and the bienni al Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2017). Additionally, there are resource

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 16 lists for particular populations such as for seniors (Senior Directory, 2019), youth (Ketchikan Youth Activity Booklet, 2010), and individuals seeking social services (Ketchikan Resourc e Guide, 2016). Yet despite these available assessments and inventories, there is no comprehensive list of resources organized through the lens of asset mapping, nor are any of these resource lists The asset map created during this process will use input from community stakeholders and the aforementioned guides and directories to create a comprehensive list of resources and assets . Further, the project will examine what it is about the residents who liv e in Ketchikan that makes a stronger community the non tangible assets that are believed to be yielding resiliency. T his project also aims to explore a gap in the literature regarding the potential value of the process . The following expectations are made 1) stakeholders will be knowledgeable and will be selected to participate in the project based on their perceived knowledge of the community; 2) their expert knowledge will produce a comprehensive list of assets; and 3) given that the data gathering proce ss asks participants to reflect on the positive qualities of their community, it is anticipated that the asset m apping project will be perceived to be valuable. Methodology Using a qualitative research approach , the author held a series of focus groups to gather information about the assets of Ketchikan . This data collection method was selected as it was one recommended method by the literature (Goldman & Schmalz, 2005; Kretzmann & McKnight, 1993). The author also used secondary data collection of existing resources guides and directories to assemble a preliminary list of assets to use as a spring board for participants during focus group sessions . Sample Selection

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 17 The author used nonprobability, purposive sampling to identify focus group participants. Ketc hikan Wellness Coalition staff selected an initial sample group who were believed to be knowledgeable about the various events and sectors in the community. Expert sampling is a recommended method for assem b ling asset maps (Kretzmann & McKnight,1993; Goldman & Schmalz, 2005). Following the suggestion of Goldman & Schmalz (2005), snowball sampling was implemented by way of the initial sample selection identifying future focus group participants. Thirty two people were identified and in vited to attend. The author contacted this sample group via the email shown in Appendix A. Of the invited sample participants, 16 people participated . For the purposes of this inventory, sample participants were residents of Ketchikan. The Ketchikan Gatew ay Borough encompasses the entire Revillagigedo Island, of which only a small portion is inhabited. The City of Ketchikan is located within the Borough; this is an important distinction because there are residents and resources outside Ketchikan city limit s but still within the scope of what is considered part of Ketchikan. Assets were included if they were identified as being available and accessible within the roaded or trailed areas of the Borough. Focus G roups A total of four focus groups were conducted with 16 total participants. Questions were asked in an open ended fashion and were pretested with KWC staff and during individual interviews prior to the first session . Focus groups were conducted until data saturation was obtained (Fusch & Ness, 2015). T o obtain the asset list, the author presented the unified list of existing resource guides to each focus group asking participants to identify missing items. to the open ended questions were written on a visible paper in front of th e

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 18 the subsequent sessions in order to save time listing similarly identified locations and to generate new information. After receiving permission from participa nts, focus groups were recorded for future analysis. The focus group protocol is listed in Appendix B. During the first focus group, it of Ketchikan resident s. These questions were modified for the following three sessions . Data received during the questions on community resiliency was analyzed and coded to determine themes. To measure the perceived value of the asset map process, the author sent out a follow up evaluation to participants upon completion of focus group sessions. The survey, available in Appendix C, was emailed and collected via Survey Monkey. Two key questions were asked to n anything new during the follow up survey was sent to all 16 attendees . Of the 16 focus group participants, 9 responded to the survey . Results The focus groups spu rred creative conversations and revealed valuable information about the community. Complete focus group session notes are available in Appendix D. Coded analysis of the themes around resiliency traits are available in Appendix E. After combining the existi ng resources and directories with focus group data, 316 resources and 118 physical places were identified as assets for a total of 434 assets . Complete a sset inventories and visual maps are listed in Appendix F. In addition to the asset data , the analysis of the focus groups revealed two themes with regard to the characteristics of Ketchikan that make it a more resilient community:

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 19 (1) the physical environment and (2) industry influence . The physical environment referred to boundaries d ue to it being an island, the remoteness of its location, the connectio n to nature and the sea, among other comments . The theme surrounding c hanging industries represented transient populace, its entrepreneurial spirit, the plentiful professional opportunit ies, and other opinions. These two themes were observed during every question and throughout every focus group. Moreover, questions about the characteristics of Ketchikan residents produced responses that were predominantly positive in perspective , even when describing characteristics that are typically viewed negatively (such as the isolation and rain). Finally, it was found that the follow up survey captured positive opinions about the asset map experience. Physical Environment One of the central themes to emerge was that Ketchikan residents are profoundly shaped by their physical environment. This subject was repeatedly articulated in various ways, reoccurring during every focus group session. Under this broader theme, two sub theme s environment shapes their tenacity and ability to cope with adversity. Participants repeatedly mentioned the physical boundaries of the island, noting that this created a population of people who are aware of their own isolation fostering a high sense of self efficacy as a result. One participant remarked that he believed residents were more reliant on one another than past communities he Another participant discussed how the isolation of livi ng on an island made residents more resourceful,

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 20 and suggested that living in a remote environment meant they had less access to abundant resources. As a result of this, they were more creative with the few resources they possessed . Weather. Participants discussed the impact the weather had on their behavioral health, noting that a rainy environment might be causing them to be more resilient. Ketchikan, located in the middle of a temperate rain forest, is one of the rainiest communities in the United State s averaging over 165 inches of rain each year (Alaska Public Lands Information, n.d.). This Ketchikan is self selecting. Those who are able to adapt stay , leave. And those who love it end up staying for a lifetime. The people who end up living here are pretty tough Another participant discussed that youth growing up in Ketchikan play outdoor sports rain or shine and this increased their tolerance level. H e said this fosters resiliency as a result ! Participants also considered the rain to be a trait that contributed to a strong arts community, t heorizing that the constant rain causes more people to stay indoors, creating art projects and resulting in the cultivation of a robust arts culture. Indeed, Ketchikan is listed as one of the top 100 small ar ts communities in the U.S. (Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce website, strong art s culture as unique from other communities , and as something that provides benefits for the mental health of residents. Industry Influence The other major th eme that emerged was that the shift in local industries had an impact on residents. One participant suggested the change in economies resul ted in a change in residents behavior . There was a shift in industries a few decades ago . After the pulp mill close d in the mid nineties, the tourism industry filled the gap. The result was that Ketchikan changed too.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 21 This brought a lot of people from the outside and the community changed its focus. Ketchikan [has become] a trans ient, but integrated population . Others mentioned that this shift travel to Ketchikan to work seasonally, but many people end up staying here. They bring diverse adds a lot of value to the community . Perceived Value Overall, the participants who responded to the follow up survey regarded the process as a positive one. Survey responses are listed in App endix G . All who responded reported learning something new dur ing the focus group. When asked if participants felt more excited about Ketchikan after the focus group sessions , six reported feeling more excited and three said they felt about the same. One person noted in the comments section that they had an overall positive view of Ketchikan that would be hard to change. None of the respondents reported feeling less excited about Ketchikan. Upon completion of each session, several participants verbally shared with the author that they believed this process to be valuable. One participant said this of the ned more about community resources and that it changed their perspective on Ketchikan: their history and background, and I gained a different perspective on the community through their vision . Many comment s afte r the focus group sessions suggested not only that it was a positive one, but that they were appreciative of the process itself. Data Limitations The extent to which the data is complete relies on the knowledge and perspective of sample participants. It i s likely some assets were not identified and the identified groups,

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 22 individuals, and associations will change over time. This asset map, then, will have likely left out several perceived resources and assets. While it is presumed data saturation was reache d for the themes , the small sample size may have indicated that some perspectives of individuals in the community were not included. Additionally, the author intentionally chose not to define terms during the focus group so as to stimulate creative the participant to interpret. This lack of a n agreed upon definition could have altered the perspectives of each participant. Discussion The focus group sessions identified a broad inventory of current assets and provided insight on the research questions raised in this study. Ketchikan residents report being a resourceful people who have designed a connected network of groups and resources to support their needs. They expressed that they are heavily influenced by their physical location an d by their economic industries two characteristics they perceived to be contribut ing to their resilien cy. F inally, their responses indicated that they believed the process to be valuable. The following section discusses the fi ndings raised by each question and provides recommendations for future research. What are the formal and informal assets existing in Ketchikan? A comprehensive asset list was obtained using secondary data collection and supplemental information from the focus groups . While it is acknowledged that the asset map may not be perfectly complete , its wide range suggests that Ketchikan has a diverse and rich array of resources available at its disposal. The list of physical places that are considered assets was extensive. Participants were able to name many physical places on the island that provide wellness. The places already named in

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 23 previous focus groups were presented during subsequent sessions. This created an exciting challenge for the last focus group pa rticipants, who remarked that the task caused them to think more creatively about where people gather. The accompanying map of these locations is a compelling one that captures the breadth of assets present in the community. What are the unique characteri stics of Ketchikan residents that are perceived to be providing resiliency? The focus group sessions highlighted the features in Ketchikan that are contribut ing to more resilient residents . The conversations around resiliency characteristics were insightful and illuminating . T environment of the community and the shifting industr ies . Each of these themes seemed to fit the narrative the community has of itself (Ketchikan Visitors Bureau, 20 19; Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce, 2019; Ketchikan Story Project, 2019) . Historically, Ketchikan has been propelled by four major industries: mining, fishing, timber and tourism (Kiffer, 2009). Since the closing of the pulp mill in the mid 1990s, timber ha s decreased and tourism has taken its place (Dudzak, 2017). This shift has brought seasonal workers into Ketchikan from all over the world (Kiffer, 2009). Based on the data from the focus groups, this shift in industries has had a profound impact on the co mmunity. Participants recognized that the evolution of their economic industry facilitated a community that has become more adaptable; thus making them a more resilient population in the process. Throughout the focus groups , individuals repeatedly referen ced a significant impact of the environment. Residents spoke to the durability it takes to endure the elements , but they also remarked on the appreciation gained from living in such beautiful surroundings. Participants acknowledged that the isolation from the road system made them resourceful, aiming to solve

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 24 problems on their own because they had no choice a survival technique. Naturally this would make for a more resilient population , one th at is accustomed to working out challenges on their positive way, rather than suggesting these hardships as disadvantages, they viewed them as strength buildi ng leading into the third research question. Do participants involved in the creation of an asset map perceive value in the process? The data from the focus groups and follow up survey suggest the asset map provided value to the participants. T he process of identifying their assets allow ed participants to examine some of the characteristics that are producing a resilient population. Discussions on the implications of living on an island in a temperate rainforest could very easily become cynical and negative . Indeed, it could be surmised that living on an island receiv ing over thirteen feet of rain annually creates its challenges . Yet , while identifying the characteristics of resiliency through the lens of asset mapping , participants created a na rrative that lent a more optimistic discussion of these factors . They viewed negative characteristics positively simply by reframing the characteristics through an Rather than implying that the isolation and intense weather patterns were an noyances , participants viewed them positively , and remarked that the rain and isolation shape d the community in beneficial ways . This suggests that the process of implementi ng an asset map might have altered t he participants . Further, w hen asked if the focus group session changed their excitement of Ketchikan, most participants said it had, further suggesting that an asset mapping process offered a valuable experien ce . Recommendations The process of conduc t ing focus groups to create an asset map resulted in a positive experience for participants but it did not assess assets at the individual level. Kretzmann &

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 25 McKnight (1993) suggest that the assessment of individual skills and capacities can be a valuable proc ess . Individuals within a community have skillsets that can be harnessed and used to form stronger resources . To access this data, researchers must collect primary data on a wide scale , a process that was be yond the scope of this project. Considering the v alue of this initial asset map, and the potential value of individual level asset maps, i t is recommended the KWC consider conducting an asset mapping exercise to inventory individual capacities. By doing so, they may uncover even more information about th e community , while fostering positive perspectives about the community in the process . Conclusion This project produce d an asset map that explored tangible assets, but also the unique traits that are shaping community members health and wellness . More over , this project aimed to look at the process of creating an asset map and shed a bit of light on the perceived value of an as set based approach . Very early on in the process the author anecdotally recognized that participants w ere happy during the exercise , indicating that it was perceived by them to be a meaningful activity . While the exact value of the asset map project was not comments that the process yielded some usefulness by shifting their perspective to a more optimistic view of their community. Through this unders tanding that asset maps are considered a beneficial process , one could justify their use in achieving positive community change and it was recommended the KWC consi der an individual level asset map . In summary, the asset map of Ketchikan provided value to the community particularly the KWC, and it added scholarly insight into the process of implementing asset based community development .

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 26 References AARP Ketchikan Chapter 1825(2019). Senior directory: Community information for the seniors of ketchikan. Retrieved March 8, 2019, from http://www.liaktn.org/SRDirectory.pdf About Ketchikan. (n.d.). Retrieved March 6, 2019, from https://www.visit ketchikan .com/en/About Ketchikan Alaska Public Lands Information Centers (n.d.). Retreived April 3 rd , 2019 from https://www.alaskacenters.gov/faqs people often ask/what average annual rainfall ketchikan Antonovsky, A. (1987). Unraveling the mystery of health: How p eople manage stress and stay well. Jossey bass, San Francisco. Antonovsky, A. (1996). The salutogenic model as a theory to guide health promotion. Health Promotion International(11) 1, 11 18. Crane, K. & Skinner, B. (2003). Community resource mapping: A st rategy for promoting successful transition for youth with disabilities. NCSET Information Brief(2) 1. Retrieved from http://www.ncset.hawaii.edu/institutes/feb2003/papers/pdf/COMMUNITY%20RESOUR CE%20MAPPING%20.pdf Dudzak, M. (2017). Ketchikan remains an att ractive cruise ship destination. KRBD September 27, 2017. Retrieved from https://www.krbd.org/2017/09/27/ketchikan remains attractive cruise ship destination/ Foot, J. & Hopkins, T. (2010). A glass half full: How an asset approach can improve community he alth and well being. Improvement and Development Agency Healthy Communities Team , London.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 27 Critical Public Health , DOI: 10.1080/09581596.2012.748882. Fusch P . I. & Ness, L. R. (2015). Are we there yet? Data saturation in qualitative research. The Qualitative Report (20) 9, 1408 1416. Glass, N. (2001). What works for children the political issues. Children & Society (15) 1, 14 20. Goldman, K. & Schmalz, K. (20 mapping tool as part of a community health needs assessment. Health Promotion Practice (6) 2, 125 128. Griffin, D. & Farris, A. (2010). School counselors and collaboration: Finding resources through community asset mapping. Professional School Counseling (13) 5, 248 256. Guy, T., Fuller, D., & Pletsch, C. (2002). Asset mapping: A handbook. Canadian Rural Partnership . Ottawa, Ontario. based? The Guardian. June 23, 2011. Retrieved from https://www.theguardian.com/voluntary sector network/2011/jun/23/community development comes age Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce (n.d.) Moving to ketchikan. Retrieved April 10 th , 2019 from https://www.ketchikanchamber.com/reloca tion info Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce Website (2019). Retrieved on April 10 th , 2019 from https://www.ketchikanchamber.com Ketchikan Story Project (2019). Retrieved on April 10 th , 2019 from http://www.ketchikanstories.com Ketchikan Wellness Coalition. ( n.d.). Ketchilinks. Retrieved March 8, 2019, from http://ktnwc.org/ketchilinks

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 28 Ketchikan Wellness Coalition & Love in Action (2016). Ketchikan resource guide: Solutions for success in our community. Retrieved March 8, 2019, from http://www.liaktn.org/KWC_ Resource_Guide_16.pdf th , 2019 from https://visit ketchikan.com Kiffer, D. (2009). Four major industries built Ketchikan. Sitnews, May 6, 2009. Retrieved from http://www.sitnews.us/Kiffer/Indu stries/050609_ketchikanindustries.html Kretzmann, J. & McKnight, J (1993). Building communities from the inside out: A path toward McLean, J. (2011). Asset based approaches for health improvement: Redressing the balance. Glasgow Centre for Population Health , Glasgow. Morgan, A. (2014). Editorial. Revisiting the asset model: A clarification of ideas and terms. Global Health Promotion (21) 2, 3 6. Morgan, A., & Ziglio, E. (2006). Foreword. In: Capability and resilience: Beating the odds. Department of Epidemiology & Public Health: Social Context and Action. Open University Press. London. Morgan, A. & Ziglio, E. (2007). Revitalising the evidence base for public health: An assets mod el. Promotion & Education Supplement , Supplement (2) , 17 22. Morgan, D. (1995). Why things (sometimes) go wrong in focus groups. Qualitative Health Research(5) 4, 516 523. Nishishiba, M., Jones, M., & Kraner , M. (2014). Research methods and statistics for public and nonprofit administrators: A practical guide. Thousand Oaks, CA: Safe Publications, Inc.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 29 PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center (2016). Community health needs assessment and implementation plan. Ret rieved March 8, 2019, from https://www.peacehealth.org/sites/default/files/ketchikan_chna_11.14.16_final_ with_.pdf Rotegard, A. M., Moore, S. M., Fagermoen, M. S., & Ruland, C. M., (2009). Health assets: A concept analysis. International Journal of Nursin g Studies (47) 2010, 513 525. Rutten, A., Abu Omar, K., Levin, L., Morgan, A., Groce, N., & Stuart, J. (2007). Research note: social catalysts in health promotion implementation. Community Health (62) 2008. 560 565. South, J., Giuntoli, G., & Kinsella, K. (2017). Getting past the dual logic: Findings from a pilot asset mapping exercise in sheffield, UK. Health and Social Care in the Community (25) 1, 105 113. United Way & McDowell Group (2007). Ketchikan Compass II community building assessment: Report to th e community. Whitehead, M. & Dahlgre, G. (2006) Levelling up (part 1): A discussion paper on concepts and principles for tackling social inequalities in health. World Health Organisation. Copenhagen. Whiting, L., Kendall, S., & Wills, W. (2012). An asset based approach: An alternative health promotion strategy? Community Practitioner (85) 1), 25 28.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 30 Appendix A Focus Group Email Invitation Dear Community Champion: participation in a focus group for a community asset mapping project. This project is part of my University of Colorado School of Public Affairs capstone project and is being completed in conjunction with the Ketchikan Wellness Coalition . What is an Asset Map? An asset map is an inventory of all the resource s and characteristics within a community that provide resilience against negative health and well being outcomes. Asset maps are an asset based approach to solving community issues. Asset based models, unlike deficit based models, go beyond identifying the deficiencies and gaps in a community. They shed light on the positive characteristics which are helping a community sustain favorable outcomes. instead th Ketchikan? right? ignoring the problems, but are instead recognizing we already have some of the tools available to confront those problems. The end result will be a comprehensive inventory of the resources available at our disposal. What is Considered an Asset? parks, the Monthly Grind, Ward Lake shelters, outdoor campsites, the police department, or it sector can all be considered positive assets that are contributing to this is why your participation is so valuable. You've already been identified as a valua ble asset to the community and very likely, you're aware of other valuable assets. I highly encourage you to contribute your expertise to this inventory by participating in this focus group. Why You? Your name came up during the data gathering process a s someone who is well connected in the community and has information to share. You have a wealth of knowledge about the resources available in Ketchikan. When? 1:30 3:00 pm on Monday, March 25th at the Ketchikan Public Library in the small conference room . The second will be on Friday, March 29th at the Ketchikan Wellness Coalition (602 Dock St. #108) from 3:30 to 5:00 pm . What is a Capstone Project? A capstone project is a culminating project for a graduate school program. The primary goal of a cap stone is for a graduate student (like myself) to demonstrate the collective learning gained

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 31 throughout the program. This asset map was a project selected by the Ketchikan Wellness Coalition (a wonderful choice!) and will be used as my capstone for the Mast er in Public Administration program. Please RSVP with your availability and/or interest Further Questions or Ideas? Contact me at (907) 254 8282 or aftanlynch@gmail.com .

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 32 Appendix B Focus Group Protocol Intro: (5 minutes) Thank you all for coming. My name is Aftan Lynch. I am a student with the University of Colorado Denver. I have lived in This session is part of a capstone project I am working on for my Masters of Public Administration with an emphasis in nonprofit organizations. The purpose of this focus group is to gather information for a community asset map for the Ketchikan Wellness Coalition. An asset map ping is an listing of all the resources and attributes in a community which provide resiliency against negative health and well being outcomes. The basis for asset mapping is that available to respond to community issues. They shed light on the positive characteristics which are helping a inventories like the Ketchikan Resource Guide, the Ketchikan Senior Directory, and the Ketchikan Youth Activity Booklet. I created this initial list to shed some time off our focus group session. These are some obvious resources that are keeping Ketchikan healthy. As we ncourage you to think creatively about what qualities make our community great. We will be trying to understand what makes Ketchikan so wonderful, specifically with regard to our behavioral health. If everyone approves, I will be recording this session s o I can listen to again as I code the information gathered during the session. h a few general organizations, institutions. professional role is in the co mmunity, and name one of your favorite things about Ketchikan. (10 minutes) (Begin focus group session by 3:45) General Questions Individual Capacities

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 33 Community Associations Write down the associations/ groups are you a part of on sticky notes (Both formal and informal) (5 minutes) (4:15) Local Organizations and Institutions Share list of resources ahead of time, ask folks to review for a few moments (3 minutes) physical place s Write down three names of people who are champions in the community, and put them on the wall (2 minutes) Questions to ask if there is time remaining: Future Sample Participants Thank you. an 5 minutes. The survey will ask you about this focus group and get your opinion on the process and how it can be improved.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 34 Appendix C Follow Up Survey Questions 1. Did you learn anything new during the focus group? a. Yes b. No c. If yes, what was it? 2. Did you feel more excited about Ketchikan after the focus group? a. More excited b. Less excited c. About the same d. Other 3. Did you have additional thoughts after the focus group? 4. What went well during the focus group? 5. What could the facilitator have done differe ntly? 6. Do you have anything else to add?

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 35 Appendix D Focus Group Session Notes Focus Group Session 1 Date: March 13 th , 2019 Time: 3:30 pm 5:05 pm Location: Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Participants: Tundra G., Bett J., JoBeth S., Romanda S., Reed H., Terrence R., Joy D. Caring people People are willing to help one another Ac cepting people everyone is typically accepting of others People are tolerant of others/lifestyles everyone can explore their passion, Leadersh ip within Ketchikan is usually from Ketchikan leaders who are in positions of influence are typically from here The professional opportunities are unlike other communities Personal connections help people advance n Barriers are beginning to break down People work together and share resources Lot of collaboration help each other Strong native population is integrated throughout the community (this is a more modern characteristic) Industry evolution shifted from timber, mining, and fishing to tourism. This brought in a lot of people from outside the community who had a different focus. The result is a community that is transient but integrated. prepared for anything and are ready for becau High transient population coming in, teaching the community in the process. People help each other community Names hidden for confidentiality.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 36 They are involved Care about the community Lift other people up No ego/humble Finger on the pulse of the community See when/where there is a need for something Go above and beyond what is asked They are available and open to others They do something when/where they need They have strong integrity Are vocal and passionate They are connectors Are resourceful Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce Behavioral Health Task Force Building a Healthy Community Task Force Friday Night Insight Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Service First City Players Behavioral Health Advisory Group Domestic Violence Task Force Breastfeeding Support Group Infant Rest Stop Library Group Elks Lodge Ketchikan Reentry Coalition Philanthropic Educational Organization Coast Guard Auxiliary AARP Boomball Dance H all Creek Street Cabaret Community Action Planning Ketchikan Youth Initiatives WISH Sofia Libre Book Club Community Connections Board Substance Abuse Task Force Building a Healthy Community Strengthening Cultural Unity Ketchikan Community Foundation Rendez vous Adult Day Center Community Choir Compassionate Friends Revilla Island Resiliency Initiative Ketchikan Area Arts and Humanities Council Ketchikan High School Ketchikan Wellness Coalition PeaceHealth Community Collaboration Committee Salvation Army Soup Kitchen Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder Task Force Local Emergency Planning Committee Love in Action Peach Health Hospice Healthy Minds Knitting Group First City Council on Cancer Mentoring a Youth Rainy Day Quil ters Holy Name Church Community Collaboration Committee: KIC, Southeast Prevention Services, RYC RYC and SPS Success comes from leadership investme nt First City Players and Akeela (plays)

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 37 KAAHC and KTN Pioneer Home (art with elders) Pioneer Home and Headstart and KGBSD (senior prom) Chamber of Commerce and KWC BHC Task Force and KGBSD SPS and KGBSD WISH and KGBSD (Girls on the Run) Revilla Island Resilience and THRIVE and Public Library and PeaceHealth and RYC Public Library and rest of community KYI and RYC (space usage) KGBSD and Public Health and WIC Akeela/Gateway and KTN Reentry TBI Group and KWC and Strengthening Nonprofit group KTN Fire Dep artment and Mental Health First Aide Community Action Planning: Peace Health, KIC, Akeela, RYC, Community Connections Tongass Substance Screeni ng Health Fair KRBD (community calendar, PSAs for nonprofits, Youth Podcast) Local Emergency Planning Committee Love in Action, faith sector Homeless collaboration: WISH, Day Shelter, PATH Presbyterian Church food program (donations) Ketchikan local jail (heavily involved in the community and partner with many groups) North Tongass Community Club Settlers Cove cabin and Ward Lake shelters Schools, ballfields, pl aygrounds (though, Ketchikan Public Library Ketchikan Gateway Borough Recreation Center Coffee House (Kooteeyaa Koffee House) in Saxman Mainstay Gallery Saxman Community Club Ted Ferry Civic Center Creek Street Cabaret Plaza Ma ll Knutson Cove Marina Various docks and berth spaces Great Alaska Lumberjack Show Promenade Bike trails Various beaches around the community Trails Grocery stores Restaurants McDonalds The Landing counter Sourdough Bar and other bars around town (hosting celebration of life events and birthdays, fundraisers) Clubs and fraternal organizations Yacht Club First City Players Kayhi Commons and Auditorium Redman Hall Names hidden for confidentiality.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 38 Focus Group Session 2 Date: March 18 th , 2019 Time: 3:30 pm 4:45 pm Location: Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Participants: Austin, O. and Debrah H. Less money available prompts resource sharing. an island and there are limited resources. People donate and contribute more than other places. There is a high amount of philanthropy because they know the money is going to stay here. There is a culture of generosity. There is an overlapping of people participating on different groups/boards so it leads to more collaboration. We pride history of Ketchikan. Care about historic preservation and our buildings reflect that. We put up with more. The rain is challenging, but we deal with it better than other places. All the people who get depressed with bad weathe r leave. All that is left are the cheery people. Entrepreneurial spirit exists here. People start their own businesses more than other places. Strong sense of community. Adults provide youth programs more (after school, sports, etc.). They care about yout h. People are more involved. There is a strong arts community. There is so much to do here and it fosters a lot of talent. We have globally renown artists and musicians who live here. Rain keeps people inside so they become more creative. to the ocean: we eat it and make money off it. We spend a lot of time outdoors and are connected to nature. Creek Street Historic District Ketchikan Community Concert Band Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Substance Abuse Task Force Ketchikan Youth Court Ktown Youth Podcast KRBD Grow Ketchikan Rainbird Solutions Misty Thistle Pipes and Drums Ketchikan Garden Club KAAHC Council Member

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 39 KRBD Member Historic Ketchikan Ketchikan Community Foundation Grant Committee Ketchikan Youth Court and local/state court system SEAPA and KPU (keeping costs low) KRBD and all the local nonprofits Substance Abuse Task Force and RYC and PH and KTN Correctional Center and Gateway/Akeela and Tongass Substance Screening and KTN Police Department and KIC Ketchikan Concert Band and Plaza Mall and KGBSD First City Pla yers and SAIL and Community Connections KGBSD and local nonprofits and organizations and community connections, etc. Ketchikan Gateway Borough and (grants) and Recreation City of Ketchikan and Historic Ketchikan KYI and Youth Community Center and Fist Bank and RYC KTN Community Foundation and Chamber of Commerce PeaceHealth and SPS and City of Ketchikan KYI Building NY Café Fish House Bawden Street Brewery Fawn Mountain Field PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center KRBD Saxman Clan House Potter Road Community Center Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Public Health Bus Shelters PATH First City Homeless Day Services Ketchikan Job Center Asylum Bar Discovery Center Visitors Bureau Sweet Mermaids Ward Cove area Green Bean Coffee City Park Whale Park Alder Park Grant St. Playground 2 nd street playground Water Street playground Names hidden for confidentiality.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 40 Focus Group Session 3 Date: March 22 nd , 2019 Time: 3:30 pm 5:00 pm Location: Ketchikan Public Health Center Participants: Diane G., Chelsea G., and Felix W. We work through our problems, we have to. We have less access to resources so we become more resourceful. s available. There is a strong sense of community here. We depend on each other. There is a lot of intergenerational knowledge here, elders teach us not to experienced. There are deep roots here. People have lived here for a while. solve their own problems and have the makes us tough. We believe in ourselves. High self efficacy. assets in people and welcome their skillsets into the community. There is an int erdependency in Ketchikan residents have a broader perspective of life in general. There is are perceived by others. more authentic and ourselves. We are a diverse community for our size. People travel to Ketchikan to work seasonally, but many people end up ives and skillsets add a lot of value to the community. There is a high level of entrepreneurialism in Ketchikan. The evolving [tourism] industry opens the door for new businesses. experienced it over the years with our changing industries. forces us to connect with one another. Ketchikan has defined boundaries. We all feel that and connect with ea ch other. You have to learn to deal with your them again and it forces you to move on from your past issues and learn to work with one another.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 41 Families are more connected because we are a part of a small community. FASD Community Partnership Substance Abuse Prevention Task Force Strengthening Non Profits group Ketchikan Area Arts and Humanities Council Greater Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce First City Players Rotary 2000 Enchanted Forest Steering Committee Ketchikan Visitors Bureau Rotary Ketchikan Youth Soc cer League Ketchikan Running Club Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Ketchikan Gateway Borough School Board Strengthening Cultural Unity Task Force Women in Safe Homes Revilla Island Resilience Initiative Ketchikan Gateway Borough Assembly PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Foundation Ketchikan Arts and Humanities Council Ketchikan CHARR Southeast Conference UAS Ketchikan Campus Advisory Council Ketchikan Youth Court and local/state court system SEAPA and KPU (keeping costs low) KRBD and all the local nonprofits Substance Abuse Task Force and RYC and PH and K TN Correctional Center and Gateway/Akeela and Tongass Substance Screening and KTN Police Department and KIC Ketchikan Concert Band and Plaza Mall and KGBSD First City Players and SAIL and Community Connections KGBSD and local nonprofits and organizations a nd community connections, etc. Ketchikan Gateway Borough and (grants) and Recreation City of Ketchikan and Historic Ketchikan KYI and Youth Community Center and Fist Bank and RYC KTN Community Foundation and Chamber of Commerce PeaceHealth and SPS and City of Ketchikan KYI Building NY Café Fish House Bawden Street Brewery Fawn Mountain Field PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 42 KRBD Saxman Clan House Potter Road Community Center Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Public Health Bus Shelters PATH First City Homeless Day Services Ketchikan Job Center Asylum Bar Discovery Center Visitors Bureau Sweet Mermaids Ward Cove area Green Bean Coff ee City Park Whale Park Alder Park Grant St. Playground 2 nd street playground Water Street playground Names hidden for confidentiality.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 43 Focus Group Session 4 Date: March 29 th , 2019 Time: 3:30 pm 5:00 pm Location: Ketchikan Wellness Coalition Participants: Jessica M., Sheryl Y., Glenn B., Stephen B. Passionate people live here thing There are a lot of dooms day preppers contingency planners live off the land if we need The weather is harsh here. Those who selecting. The kids will play in anything. Really harsh environments People step up and help each other, we do what we need to do to get things done We take advantage of what we have Th ere is a spirit of adventure here. The wilderness is right there, people take advantage and go out. island. People are very friendly here. We say hi welcoming of others. in other places. Inclusion is important. Even the inebriates are a part of the community. People with problems and issues do end u coming back after incarceration. There is a strong artistic community here and there are many opportunities to engage in the arts. There are a lot of opportunities to be multidisciplinary array o f people. Stephen gets to wear a kilt and nobody the road out north was damaged, they skiffed out lunches to people. The community says goodbye to people when they leave. Many have retired and left, and we throw huge goodbye parties for them. People listen to the radio and use the phone book here. We house students from other communities when they trave l for sports. fosters a connection with other Southeast communities too and makes our kids well travelled Various sporting events Arts events Cultural events Faith community

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 44 Many organizations rely on volunteers and are able to run on less resources High volunteerism, many people are involved Residents serve their community cultural value for us People are a lways listed in the on in the community. of us accountable small community, this keeps people in line But, Ketchikan will let you rede em yourself Initially, we tend to be judgmental, but over time we forgive one another There is an interdependence here There are more givers than takers Last week the boys won the state basketball championship. Within 12 hours there was an entire parade s et up for them, Alaska Air was involved and had a past resident fly the students back to Ketchikan. The airport had a water cannon welcome as the plane arrived. The whole town was connected. Kanayama Program Chamber of Commerce CWMA Weed Management Control Group Trapping Association Ketchikan Visitors Bureau First City Players Kayhi Love Letters 2 Strangers Reentry Coalition Gatekeeper Program Justice Reading Group Girl Scouts of Alaska Department of Corrections Ketchikan Correction Center South Tongass Alliance Church Geocaching KIC Advisory Health Board UAS WISH Board Southeast Conference Ketchikan Gateway Borough Ketchikan Wellness Coal ition Ketchikan Youth Court Misty Thistles Pipe Band Ketchikan Family Addiction and Recovery Support Group Law Enforcement Torch Run for Special Olympics Ketchikan Gymnastics Club Ketchikan Bar Fishing Derby Animal Shelter Naranon Behavio ral Health Action Group Kayhi Track and Field VFW Mental Health First Aide Ketchikan Homeless First City Council on Homeless KRBD Mt. Point Neighborhood Kayhi Cross Country KAAHC Alaska Chapter Recycling Group Rain City Riders Historic Ketchikan Kayhi Basketball Oilean Well Being LLC Matthews Family

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 45 Thursday Sewing Night Department of Corrections and KTN Police Dept. and KTN Cour t System KIC and Gateway and OCS and Community Connections KTN Youth Court and nonprofits and First City Players and Rendezvous and Animal Shelter Rendezvous and Community Connections and Southeast Senior Services and SAIL and Peace Health and Gateway and KIC Love Letters 2 Strangers and South Tongass Alliance Church First City Players and KAAHC First City Players and Ketchikan Theater Ballet Monthly Grind and Everyone! Love in Action and Southeast Senior Services Rotary and Chamber and Lions Club and Rotary 2000 Revilla Island Reentry Coalition and Public Health and Southeast Prevention Services and Love Letters 2 Strangers Peace Health and Akeela and KTN Court system and RYC and LL2S (BHAG Group) Salvation Army and Warming Center and PATH and First Ci ty Homeless Day Shelter Ketchikan Ministerial Association and local churches Coast Guard and Fawn Mountain CHARR KGBSD Friday Night Insights and Discovery Center First City Forum Shoe Solstice and PeaceHealth aces that are providing resiliency? Crows Nest Pioneer Hall Stoney Moose Fire Department Mt. Point boat launch Pioneer Café Wee Man Din Asian Garden AJs Narrows Rain Country Nutrition Coast Guard Buggies Beach Herring Cove Hole in the Wall Mt. Point (Surprise) Beach Knudson Cove Refuge Cove South Point Higgins Beach Coast Guard Beach Walmart Brown Mt. Harriet Hunt Carlanna Lake Carving Shed in Saxman Totem Bight

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 46 Appendix E Coding Results for Focus Groups Table 1 What about Ketchikan makes it resilient? Coded Analysis # Instances People are generous/caring 5 Harsh environment makes us tough 5 We solve problems ourselves 5 Available opportunities 5 Lack of resources prompts resourcefulness 5 People are welcoming 4 Collaboration is present 4 Adventurous (Alaska spirit) 3 Leadership is from Ketchikan 1 Forward looking 1 Table 2 What sets Ketchikan residents apart? Coded Analysis # Instances Island mentality 5 Culturally diverse 5 People are helpful 4 Transient but integrated population 4 People are accepting 3 Physically tough 3 Entrepreneurial 3 Volunteer a lot / involved 2 Strong arts community 2 Oriented to the outdoors 2 Open to change 1 Authentic 1

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 47 Table 3 What characteristics encourage connection? Coded Analysis # Instances Isolation fosters connection 4 Highly involved people 4 Small community fosters connection 4 Many events around town 3 People are accepting 3 Rely on each other 2 Respect for elders 1 Generous people 1 Strong faith community 1

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 48 Appendix F Comprehensive List of Assets and Physical Places in Ketchikan 1. 49er Apartments 2. A&P 3. AARP TaxAide 4. AARP Ketchikan Chapter 1825 5. Adult Protective Services State of Alaska 6. AJs 7. Akeela Pregnant Women and Women with Children 8. Alaska 211 9. Alaska and Proud Market 10. Alaska Cab 11. Alaska Careline 12. Alaska Housing Finance Corporation Public Housing Division 13. Alaska Job Service/Department of Labor 14. Alaska Legal Services 15. Alaska Marine Highway Service 16. Alaska Native Brotherhood and Sisterhood 17. Alaska Public Assistance 18. Alaska State Troopers 19. Alaska Temporary Assistance Program 20. Alaska USA Federal Credit Union 21. Alcohol Safety Action and Juvenile Alcohol Safety Action Programs 22. Alcoholics Anonymous 23. Alder Park 24. 25. Arctic Bar 26. Arctic Chiropractic Center 27. Arne Pihl Dentistry 28. Asian Garden 29. Asylum Bar 30. AVG Day Care 31. 32. Bawden Street Brewery 33. Be Well Counseling 34. Bear Valley Apartments 35. Behavioral Health Advisory Group 36. Behavioral Health Task Force 37. Bereavement Support Group 38. Big Dawg Realty 39. Body Mechanics 40. Boomball Dance Hall 41. Boy Scouts: Great Alaska Council 42. Boys and Girls Club of Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 49 43. Brain Injury Support Group 44. Breastfeeding Support Group 45. Brent Tingey Dentistry 46. Brown Mt. 47. Buggies Beach 48. Building a Healthy Community Task Force 49. Calvary Bible Church 50. Cape Fox 51. Carlanna Lake 52. Carving Shed in Saxman 53. Center for Community 54. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska FASD Counseling 55. Central Council Tl ingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Child Care 56. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Child Welfare 57. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Elderly Services 58. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Preserving native families 59. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Tribal Child Support Unit 60. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Tribal Support Unit 61. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Youth emp loyment 62. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Vocational Rehabilitation 63. Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Saxman Tribal House) 64. Charles Reed Dentistry 65. Charles Schultz Dentistry 66. Charter/TSAS 67. Child Care Assistance Program (State of Alaska) 68. Child Support Services Division (State of Alaska) 69. Childbirth Education 70. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 71. City of Ketchikan 72. City Park 73. Clover Pass Christian School Day care facility 74. Coast Guard 75. Coast Guard Auxiliary 76. Coast Guard Beach 77. Coast Guard Trail 78. Coastal Realty 79. Community Action Planning 80. Community Connections 81. Community Connections Early Learning Program 82. Community Connections Older Alaskan Resource Services (OARS) 83. C ommunity Connections Services for Individual with Developmental Disabilities 84. Community Connections Vocational Resources 85. Compassionate Friends Group

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 50 86. Connell Lake Trail 87. Consumer Direct 88. Cornerstone Home Care 89. Credit Union 1 90. Creek Street Cabaret 91. Creek Stree t Historic District 92. Creekside Family Health Clinic 93. Crows Nest 94. David Albertson Dentistry 95. Deer Mountain 96. Denali Kid Care State of Alaska 97. Department of Corrections Ketchikan Correctional Center 98. Destiny Coaching Services 99. Diabetes Education Support Group 100. Disability Law Center 101. Disc Golf 102. Discovery Center 103. Division of Public Assistance (State of Alaska) 104. Division of Senior and Disability Services (State of Alaska) 105. Docks and Berth spaces 106. Dog Park 107. Domestic Violence Task Force 108. Downtown Bus Shelter 109. Dru Kindred Acupuncture 110. Dudley Field 111. Elks Lodge 112. Family Care Counseling 113. Family Chiropractic Center 114. FASD Community Partnership 115. Fawn Mountain Elementary School 116. Fawn Mountain Field 117. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder Task Force 118. Filipino Community Center 119. Fire Department 120. First Assembly Church of God 121. First Bank 122. First Baptist Church 123. First City Council on Cancer 124. First City Homeless Day Services 125. First City Homeless Services Day Shelter 126. First City Kid Care Day care facility 127. First City Players 128. First City Players ActOut 129. First City Players ArtsCool 130. First Lutheran Child Care Center 131. First Lutheran Church

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 51 132. First United Methodist Church 133. Fish House 134. Friday Night Insight 135. Gatekeeper Program 136. Gateway Baptist Church 137. Gateway Christian Schools 138. Gateway City Realty 139. Gateway Mental Health Services 140. G ateway Psychiatric Emergency Services 141. Geocaching 142. George Inlet Lodge 143. George Shaffer Dentistry 144. Girl Scouts of Alaska 145. Girls on the Run (WISH) 146. Good News Fellowship 147. Grant St. Playground 148. Great Alaska Lumberjack Show 149. Great Alaska Lumberjack Show Ketchikan Cohos Log Rolling Team 150. Green Bean Coffee 151. Grow Ketchikan 152. Hansen's Home care & Specialty Services 153. Harmony Health Clinic 154. Harriet Hunt 155. Head Start 156. Healthy Minds 157. Herring Cove 158. Historic Ketchikan 159. Hole in the Wall 160. Holy Name Catholic Church 161. Hope Community Resources, Inc. 162. Horizon House 163. Houghtaling Elementary School 164. Infant Rest Stop 165. Island Pharmacy 166. Jason Evison Dentistry 167. Jay Hochberg Attorney 168. Day care facility 169. Joseph C. Williams, Sr. Coastal Trail 170. Justice Reading Group 171. Kanayama Program 172. KAR House Residential Program 173. Karla Gelhar Counseling 174. Kayhi Commons and Auditorium 175. Faith Youth Group 176. Kelly Chick Comstock 177. Ketchikan Animal Shelter

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 52 178. Ketchikan Area Arts and Humanities Council 179. Ketchikan Big Brothers Big Sisters 180. Ketchikan Car Seat Program 181. Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce 182. Ketchikan CHARR 183. Ketchikan Charter School 184. 185. Ketchikan Chiropractic Center 186. Ketchikan Church of Christ 187. Ketchikan Church of the Nazarene 188. Ketchikan Coast Guard 189. Ketchik an Community Choir 190. Ketchikan Community Concert Band 191. Ketchikan Community Foundation 192. Ketchikan Court House 193. Ketchikan Dribblers League 194. Ketchikan Eye Care 195. Ketchikan Family Addiction and Recovery Support Group 196. Ketchikan Garden Club 197. Ketchikan Gateway Borough 198. Ket chikan Gateway Borough Recreation Center 199. Ketchikan Gateway Borough School District 200. Ketchikan Gateway Borough Transit System 201. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Babysitting clinic 202. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Activity Room 203. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Martial Arts 204. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Preschool crafts 205. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Roller Skating 206. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Swimm ing Lessons 207. Ketchikan Gymnastics Club 208. Ketchikan High School 209. Ketchikan Indian Community After school club 210. Ketchikan Indian Community Batterers intervention 211. Ketchikan Indian Community Classroom Training 212. Ketchikan Indian Community Clinical social serv ices 213. Ketchikan Indian Community Domestic violence program 214. Ketchikan Indian Community Elder services 215. Ketchikan Indian Community Employment Services 216. Ketchikan Indian Community Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Diagnostic and Prevention 217. Ketchikan Indian Communi ty General assistance 218. Ketchikan Indian Community Health clinic 219. Ketchikan Indian Community Indian Child Welfare act 220. Ketchikan Indian Community Job readiness 221. Ketchikan Indian Community On the job training 222. Ketchikan Indian Community Tribal alcohol program 223. Ketchikan Indian Community Tribal Health Dental Clinic

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 53 224. Ketchikan Indian Community Youth activities scholarships 225. Ketchikan Indian Community Youth services 226. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Elder rehabilitation 227. Ketchikan Indian C ommunity Housing Authority Emergency rehabilitation grant 228. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Home buy down assistance 229. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Weatherization program 230. Ketchikan Job Center 231. Ketchikan Killer Whales 232. Ketchikan Little League 233. Ketchikan Pediatric Occupational Therapy 234. Ketchikan Police Department 235. Ketchikan Presbyterian Church 236. Ketchikan Probation Office 237. Ketchikan Public Health Center 238. Ketchikan Public Library 239. Ketchikan Public Library Family Night 240. Ketchikan Public Li brary Storytime 241. Ketchikan Public Library Teen Advisory Group 242. Ketchikan Realty 243. Ketchikan Reentry Coalition 244. Ketchikan Rod and Gun Club 245. Ketchikan Running Club 246. Ketchikan Theater Ballet 247. Ketchikan Visitors Bureau 248. Ketchikan Volunteer Rescue Squad 249. Ketchikan We llness Coalition 250. Ketchikan Youth Court 251. Ketchikan Youth Initiatives 252. Ketchikan Youth Shotgun League 253. Ketchikan Youth Soccer League 254. Key Bank 255. Knudson Cove 256. Knutson Cove Marina 257. Kooteeyaa Koffee House 258. KRBD 259. KRBD Radio Station 260. Ktown Youth Podcast 261. KYI Building 262. Legacy Health Clinic 263. Piano and singing lessons 264. Lighthouse Church of God 265. Lighthouse Grocery 266. Lions Club 267. Lit Chicks Book Club 268. Day care facility 269.

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 54 270. Love in Action 271. Love Letters 2 Strangers 272. Lunch Creek Trail 273. Lunch Falls 274. M ainstay Gallery 275. 276. McDonalds 277. Michael Heiser Attorney 278. Minerva Mountain Trail 279. Misty Thistle Pipes and Drums 280. Mt. Point (Surprise) Beach 281. Mt. Point boat launch 282. Narcotics Anonymous 283. Narrows 284. New York Café 285. North Tongass Community Club 286. North Tongass Fire Department 287. North Tongass Roadside 288. Northland Audiology Clinic 289. Northrim Bank 290. Northway Family Healthcare Clinic 291. 292. Office of Public Advocacy (State of Alaska) 293. Office of the Long Term Care Ombudsman 294. Outpatient Substance Use Treatment 295. PACE Statewide Correspondence School 296. Palmer Daycare Day care facility 297. Parents as Teachers program 298. Park Avenue Temporary Housing (PATH) 299. PATH 300. Patricia Houser Counseling 301. PeaceHealth Community Collaboration Committee 302. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Med ical Center 303. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Nutrition 304. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Prenatal care 305. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Rehabilitation services 306. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Child Development Center 307. PeaceHealth Ketch ikan Medical Center Foundation 308. PeaceHealth Social Worker Caitlin Andrews 309. PeachHealth Ketchikan Medical Home health and volunteer hospice 310. Perseverance 311. Philanthropic Educational Organization 312. Physical Therapy Services 313. Pioneer Café 314. Pioneer Home 315. Pipeline Trail

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 55 316. Plaza Mall 317. Point Higgins 318. Point Higgins Elementary School 319. Point Higgins Playground 320. Post Office 321. Potter Road Community Center 322. Pregnant Women and Women with Children 323. Presbyterian Church Food pantry with fresh produce 324. Providence Properties 325. Public Health 326. Rain Country Nutrition 327. Rainbird Solutions 328. Rainbird Trail 329. Rainforest Family Healthcare Clinic 330. Rainwood Counseling 331. Rainy Day Quilters 332. Re/Max of Ketchikan 333. Redman Hall 334. Refuge Cove 335. Rendezvous Senior Day Services 336. Residential Youth Care 337. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Inpatient residential treatment services 338. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Outpatient residential treatment services 339. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Recovery groups 340. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Tobacco cessation groups 341. Revilla High School 342. Revilla Isl and Resiliency Initiative 343. Rotary 344. Rotary 2000 345. Rotary 2000 Youth Scholarships 346. Round Table Counseling & Meditation Services 347. Safeway 348. Safeway Pharmacy 349. Salvage Trail 350. Salvation Army 351. Salvation Army Soup kitchen 352. Salvation Army, Gateway Corp 353. Saxman Clan House 354. Sax man Community Club 355. Saxman Social Service 356. Saxman Totem Park 357. Saxman VPSO 358. Saxman Ketchikan Senior Services Center 359. Schoenbar Middle School 360. Schoenbar Trail 361. SEAK Professional Services

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 56 362. Second Street playground 363. Serenity Health & Wellness 364. 365. Settlers Cove Cabin 366. Seventh Day Adventist Church 367. Silvis Trail 368. Social Security Administration 369. Sofia Libre Book Club 370. Sourdough Bar 371. Sourdough Cab 372. South Point Higgins Beach 373. South Tongass Alliance Church 374. South Tongass Fire Department 375. South Tongass Service 376. Sou theast Alaska Independent Living Low vision and Blindess Support 377. Southeast Alaska Independent Living Mental Health Support Group 378. Southeast Alaska Independent Living Traumatic Brain Injury support 379. Southeast Alaska Independent Living (SAIL) 380. Southeast A laska Prosthetics and Orthotics, LLC 381. Southeast Conference 382. Southeast Dental Group PC Dentistry 383. Southeast Pediatric Dentistry 384. Southeast Sea Kayaks Kayaking for Kids/Adventure Kayaker Clubs 385. Southeast Senior Services 386. St. John's Episocopal Church 387. Stoney Moo se 388. Strengthening Cultural Unity Task Force 389. Strengthening Nonprofits 390. StudioMax 391. Substance Abuse Task Force 392. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program 393. Sweet Mermaids 394. 395. Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) Option 396. Taylor Made Child Care Day care facility 397. Ted Ferry Civic Center 398. The Addicts Mom Ketchikan Chapter 399. The Landing 400. The Manor 401. Tingey Orthodontics 402. Tongass Federal Credit Union 403. Tongass School of Arts and Sciences 404. Torch Run for Special Olympics 405. Totem Bight 406. Tribal HUD VASH Case Manage r 407. True North Health & Wellness A Family Clinic

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 57 408. University of Alaska Southeast Ketchikan Campus 409. VFW 410. Vibrance A Creative Space 411. Visitors Bureau 412. Walker Field 413. Walmart 414. Walmart Pharmacy 415. Ward Cove area 416. Ward Creek Trail 417. Ward Lake shelters 418. Water Street playground 419. Waterfront Playground 420. Weatherization Program State of Alaska 421. Wee Blessings 422. Wee Man Din 423. Wee Ones Daycare Day care facility 424. Weekend Social Club 425. Wells Fargo 426. Whale Park 427. Women In Safe Homes (WISH) 428. Women Infants & Children (WIC) 429. roup 430. Woodside Village Apartments 431. Yacht Club 432. Yellow Taxi 433. Young Life Faith Youth Group 434. Your Space Counseling

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 58 Map 1: Assets in Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 59 Map 1: List of Assets in Ketchikan 1. Clover Pass Christian School Day care facility 1. Clover Pass Christian School Day care facility 2. Point Higgins Elementary School 3. Destiny Coaching Services 4. Ketchikan Rod and Gun Club 4. Lighthouse Grocery 5. Hansen's Home care & Specialty Services 6. Alaska State Troopers 6. Ketchikan Volunteer Rescu e Squad 6. North Tongass Fire Department 9. Ketchikan Pediatric Occupational Therapy 9. Taylor Made Child Care Day care facility 9. Walmart 9. Walmart Pharmacy 10. Patricia Houser Counseling 10. Sourdough Cab 11. Arne Pihl Dentistry 11. Boys and Girl s Club of Ketchikan 11. Cornerstone Home Care 11. First City Council on Cancer 11. First Lutheran Child Care Center 11. First Lutheran Church 11. Gatekeeper Program 11. Jason Evison Dentistry 11. Rainwood Counseling 11. Southeast Senior Services 11. Southeast Sea Kayaks Kayaking for Kids/Adventure Kayaker Clubs 11. Your Space Counseling 12. Community Connections Early Learning Program 12. Community Connections 12. Community Connections Services for Individual w ith Developmental Disabilities 12. Community Connections Older Alaskan Resource Services (OARS) 12. Community Connections Vocational Resources 12. Ketchikan Animal Shelter 13. Coast Guard Auxiliary 13. Ketchikan Coast Guard 14. Wee Ones Daycare Day c are facility 15. Saxman Ketchikan Senior Services Center 15. Saxman Social Service 15. Saxman VPSO 16. South Tongass Service 17. Fawn Mountain Elementary School Faith Youth Group

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 60 17. South Tongass Allian ce Church 18. South Tongass Fire Department

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 61 Map 2: Assets in Midtown Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 62 Map 2: List of Assets in Midtown Ketchikan 1. Ketchikan Gymnastics Club Piano and singing lessons 3. Alaska and Proud Market 4. Gateway Baptist Church 4. Gateway Christian Schools 5. First Assembly Church of God 6. Palmer Daycare Day care facility 7. The Manor 8. Island Pharmacy 8. Kelly Chick Comstock 8. Legacy Health Clinic 8. True North Health & Wellness A Family Clinic 9. Alaska Marine Highw ay Service 10. Alaska Housing Finance Corporation Public Housing Division Day care facility 12. Lighthouse Church of God 13. Ketchikan Eye Care 13. Residential Youth Care 13. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Inpatient residential trea tment services 13. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Outpatient residential treatment services 13. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Recovery groups 13. Residential Youth Care, Inc. Tobacco cessation groups 14. Calvary Bible Church 15. Breastfeeding Support G roup 15. Brent Tingey Dentistry 15. Charles Schultz Dentistry 15. David Albertson Dentistry 15. Northway Family Healthcare Clinic 15. Serenity Health & Wellness 15. Tingey Orthodontics 16. Ketchikan Church of Christ 16. Rainforest Family Healthcare Clinic 17. Behavioral Health Advisory Group 17. Bereavement Support Group 17. Childbirth Education 17. Compassionate Friends Group 17. Diabetes Education Support Group 17. KAR House Residential Program 17. Ketchikan Car Seat Program 17. PeaceHealth Communi ty Collaboration Committee 17. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Nutrition 17. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Prenatal care 17. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Rehabilitation services 17. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Child Devel opment Center

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 63 17. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center Foundation 17. PeaceHealth Social Worker Caitlin Andrews 17. PeachHealth Ketchikan Medical Home health and volunteer hospice 17. Philanthropic Educational Organization 17. Physical Therapy Services 17. Pregnant Women and Women with Children 18. Alcohol Safety Action and Juvenile Alcohol Safety Action Programs 18. Akeela Pregnant Women and Women with Children 18. Gateway Mental Health Services 18. Gateway Psychiatric Emergency Services 18. Horizon Ho use 18. Ketchikan Family Addiction and Recovery Support Group 18. Ketchikan Reentry Coalition 18. Outpatient Substance Use Treatment 19. Houghtaling Elementary School 20. Revilla Alternative School 21. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 21. Ketchikan Public Health Center 21. Women Infants & Children (WIC) 22. Family Chiropractic Center 22. VFW 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Batterers intervention 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Classroom Training 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Clinical s ocial services 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Elder services 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Employment Services 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Diagnostic and Prevention 23. Ketchikan Indian Community General assistance 23. K etchikan Indian Community Health clinic 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Indian Child Welfare act 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Job readiness 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Tribal alcohol program 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Tribal Health Dental Clinic 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Youth activities scholarships 23. Ketchikan Indian Community Youth services 23. Ketchikan Youth Soccer League 24. University of Alaska Southeast Ketchikan Campus 25. Holy Name Catholic Church 26. Charles Reed Dentistry 26. Dru Kindred Acupuncture 27. Ketchikan Gateway Borough School District 28. Ketchikan Church of the Nazarene 28. Ketchikan Presbyterian Church 28. Presbyterian Church Food pantry with fresh produce 29. Ketchikan High School 30. Re/Max of Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 64 31. Rendezvous Senior Day Services 31. StudioMax 32. Gateway City Realty 32. Credit Union 1 33. Key Bank 34. Harmony Health Clinic 34. Southeast Alaska Prosthetics and Orthotics, LLC 34. Southeast Pediatric Dentistry 35. Northrim Bank 36. Filipin o Community Center 36. SEAK Professional Services 37. Alaska USA Federal Credit Union 37. Safeway 37. Safeway Pharmacy 38. Ketchikan Chamber of Commerce 38. Ketchikan Community Foundation 38. Ketchikan Youth Court 38. PACE Statewide Correspondence School 3 8. Southeast Alaska Independent Living Low vision and Blindess Support 38. Southeast Alaska Independent Living Mental Health Support Group 38. Southeast Alaska Independent Living Traumatic Brain Injury support 38. Southeast Alaska Independent Living (SAIL) 38. Young Life Faith Youth Group 39. Alaska Job Service/Department of Labor 39. Alaska Public Assistance 39. Alaska Temporary Assistance Program 39. Child Care Assistance Program (State of Alaska) 39. Child Support Services Division (State of Alaska) 39. Denali Kid Care State of Alaska 39. Division of Public Assistance (State of Alaska) 39. Division of Senior and Disability Services (State of Alaska) 39. First Bank 39. Ketchikan Job Center 39. Providence Properties 39. Supplemental Nutritio n Assistance Program 39. Weatherization Program State of Alaska 40. Arctic Chiropractic Center 40. Big Dawg Realty 40. Hope Community Resources, Inc. 41. Girls on the Run (WISH) 41. Revilla Island Resiliency Initiative 41. Tongass Federal Credit Union 42. Seventh Day Adventist Church 42. Women In Safe Homes (WISH) 43. AVG Day Care 44. First Baptist Church

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 65 44. Love in Action 44. Wee Blessings 44. Elks Lodge 45. Ketchikan Gateway Borough

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 66 Map 3: Assets in Downtown Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 67 Map 3: List of Assets in Downtown Ketchikan 1. Ketchikan Gateway Borough Transit System 2. KRBD Radio Station 2. Ktown Youth Podcast 3. Ketchikan Public Library 3. Ketchikan Public Library Family Night 3. Ketchikan Public Library Teen Advisory Group 3. Ketchikan Public Libr ary Storytime 4. Department of Corrections Ketchikan Correctional Center 5. Bear Valley Apartments 6. First City Kid Care Day care facility 6. Head Start 6. Parents as Teachers program 7. Woodside Village Apartments 8. Tongass School of Arts and Scie nces 9. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Preschool crafts 9. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Babysitting clinic 9. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Martial Arts 9. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation 9. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Roller Skating 9. Ketchikan Gateway Center Parks and Recreation Swimming Lessons 10. Ketchikan Charter School 11. Ketchikan Killer Whales 12. Be Well Counseling 12. Karla Gelhar Counseling 12. Michael Heiser Attorney 13. Adult Protective Services State of Alaska 13. Jay Hochberg Attorney 13. Ketchikan Court House 13. Ketchikan Probation Office 13. Office of Public Advocacy (State of Alaska) 14. 49er Apartments 15. Alcoholics Anonymous 15. First City Homeless Services Day Shelter 15. First United Methodist Church 15. St. John's Episocopal Church 16. Ketchikan Youth Initiatives 16. Park Avenue Temporary Housing (PATH) 17. Boomball Dance Hall 17. Ketchikan Area Arts and Humanities Council 18. Consumer Direct 18. Ketchikan Police Department 19. City of Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 68 19. Coastal Realty 19. First City Players 19. First City Players ActOut 19. First City Players ArtsCool 20. Schoenbar Middle School 21. Creekside Family Health Clinic 21. Ketchikan Chiropractic Center 21. Northland Audiology Clinic 22. George Shaffer Dentistry 22. Ketchikan Big Brothers Big Sisters 22. Round Table Counseling & Meditation Services 22. Wells Fargo 23. Creek Street Historic District 24. Historic Ketchikan 25. Behavioral Health Task Force 25. Building a Healthy Community Task Force 25. Domestic Violence Task Force 25. Ketchikan Wellness Coalition 25. Strengthening Cultural Unity Task Force 25. S ubstance Abuse Task Force 26. Ketchikan Visitors Bureau 27. Ketchikan Realty 27. Social Security Administration 28. Creek Street Cabaret 29. Good News Fellowship 29. Ketchikan Theater Ballet 30. Friday Night Insight 31. Great Alaska Lumberjack Show Ketch ikan Cohos Log Rolling Team 32. Yellow Taxi 33. Salvation Army 34. Salvation Army, Gateway Corp 34. Salvation Army Soup kitchen 35. Ketchikan Indian Community After school club 35. Ketchikan Indian Community On the job training 35. Ketchikan Indian Community Domestic violence program 35. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Home buy down assistance 35. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Emergency rehabilitation grant 35. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Elder rehabilitation 35. Ketchikan Indian Community Housing Authority Weatherization program

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 69 Map 4: Physical Assets in Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 70 Map 4: List of Physical Assets in Ketchikan 1. Lunch Creek Trail 1. Lunch Falls 2. Settlers Cove Cabin 3. Knudson Cove 3. Knutson Cove Marina 3. Potter Road Community Center 4. Disc Golf 4. Point Higgins 4. Point Higgins Playground 5. Coast Guard Beach 5. Coast Guard Trail 6. Harriet Hunt 7. Connell Lake Trail 8. Dog Park 8. Salvage Trail 9. Brown Mt. 10. Ward Creek Trail 11. Pipeline Trail 12. Ward Lake shelters 13. Green Bean Coffee 13. Ward Cove area 14. North Tongass Community Club 14. Refuge Cove 15. Totem Bight 16. South Point Higgins Beach 17. North Tongass Roadside 18. Perseverance 19. Minerva Mountain Trail 20. Body Mechanics 20. Walmart 21. Carlanna Lake 22. AJs 22. Narrows 23. A&P 23. Alder Park 23. Dudley Field 23. Houghtaling Elementary 23. Kayhi 23. Kayhi Commons and Auditorium 23. PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medica l Center 23. Pioneer Hall 23. Pioneer Home 23. Plaza Mall

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 71 23. Post Office 23. Public Health 23. Revilla High School 23. Safeway 23. Second Street playground 23. Studio Max 23. The Landing 23. Vibrance A Creative Space 24. Ketchikan Job Center 24. McDonalds 24. Wee Man Din 25. Rainbird Trail 25. Water Street playground 27. Deer Mountain 28. Coast Guard 28. Crows Nest 29. Carving Shed in Saxman 29. Joseph C. Williams, Sr. Coastal Trail 29. Kooteeyaa Koffee House 29. Saxman Clan House 29. Saxman Comm unity Club 29. Saxman Totem Park 30. Buggies Beach 31. Fawn Mountain 31. Fawn Mountain Field 32. Mt. Point (Surprise) Beach 32. Mt. Point boat launch 33. Herring Cove 33. Hole in the Wall 34. George Inlet Lodge 34. Silvis Trail

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 72 Map 5: Physical Assets in Downtown Ketchikan

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 73 Map 5: List of Physical Assets in Downtown Ketchikan 1. KRBD 2. Ketchikan Public Library 3. Ketchikan Gateway Borough Recreation Center 4. Charter/TSAS 5. Waterfront Playground 6. Asylum Bar 6. Arctic Bar 7. First City Homeless Da y Services 7. Grant St. Playground 8. Sweet Mermaids 9. First City Players 9. Mainstay Gallery 9. Redman Hall 10. KYI Building 10. PATH 11. Schoenbar Trail 12. Sourdough Bar 13. Rain Country Nutrition 14. Visitors Bureau 15. Bawden Street Brewery 16. 17. Cape Fox 18. Ted Ferry Civic Center 19. Schoenbar Middle School 20. Ketchikan Wellness Coalition 21. Fire Department 21. Asian Garden 22. Creek Street Cabaret 22. Pioneer Café 22. Stoney Moose 22. Whale Park 23. Discovery Center 24. Fish House 24. Great Alaska Lumberjack Show 25. Walker Field 26. City Park 27. New York Café 28. Rendezvous 29. Yacht Club 29. Downtown Bus Shelter 30. Docks and Berth spaces

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 74 List of Assets with Multiple Locations, Out of Town Offices, or No Designated Location AARP Ketchikan Chapter 1825 AARP TaxAide Alaska 211 Alaska Cab Alaska Careline Alaska Legal Services Alaska Native Brotherhood and Sisterhood Brain Injury Support Group Boy Scouts: Great Alaska Council Center for Community Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska (Saxman Tribal House) Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Tribal Child Support Unit Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Ala ska Child Welfare Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Child Care Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Tribal Support Unit Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska FASD Counseling Central Counci l Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Preserving native families Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Vocational Rehabilitation Central Council Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska Elderly Services Central Council Tlingit & H aida Indian Tribes of Alaska Youth employment Community Action Planning Disability Law Center Family Care Counseling Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder Task Force FASD Community Partnership Geocaching Girl Scouts of Alaska Grow Ketchikan Healthy Minds Infant Rest Stop Justice Reading Group Lions Club Love Letters 2 Strangers Kanayama Program Ketchikan CHARR Ketchikan Community Choir Ketchikan Community Concert Band Ketchikan Dribblers League Ketchikan Garden Club Ketchikan Lit tle League

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 75 Ketchikan Running Club Ketchikan Youth Shotgun League Lions Club Ketchikan Lit Chicks Book Club Misty Thistle Pipes and Drums Narcotics Anonymous Office of the Long Term Care Ombudsman Rainbird Solutions Rainy Day Quilters Rotary Rotary 2000 Rot ary 2000 Youth Scholarships Sofia Libre Book Club Southeast Conference Strengthening Nonprofits Southeast Dental Group PC Dentistry Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) Option The Addicts Mom Ketchikan Chapter Torch Run for Special Olympics Tribal HUD VASH Case Manager Weekend Social Club

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 76 Appendix G Focus Group Follow Up Survey Responses 1. Did you learn anything new during the focus group? Yes: 100% No: 0% If yes, what was it? some key groups I hadn't considered, how inclusive we can be IF you get involved, there is something for everyone, that this mapping could be used in rn about the responses and priorities of the others who community resources outside of my specific area of volunteerism/interest and also learned what the perspective of those working in time residen ts' perspectives on how Ketchikan culture and 2. Did you feel more excited about Ketchikan after the focus group? More excited: 66.7% Less excited: 0% About the same: 33.3% Other 3. Did you have additional thoughts after the focus group? Perhaps only the people who are involved in fishing who can produce a volume of seafood on very little notice. In short, no one will go hungry unless they're S Campus get mentioned much? It's an often over looked part of the

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 77 with Ketchik Schools, WISH, KWC, Public Health for the parent education night. Community Connections s haring KWC Healthy Minds mail with those but I thought of more, ha ha rainforest sanctuary, Ketchikan Harvesters, Ketchikan Garden Society, Diving shop, all the real estate 4. What went well during the focus group? excellent in directing the discuss and eliciting information. Her manner put us at ease and encouraged thoughtful consideration nd I gained a different perspective on the community through their vision. Also, I was very impressed with the amount of work accomplished in a short time which questions invited broad answers, names of communi ty's "connectors" shared, Participants were invested and I especially loved seeing ideas spark and flow 5. What could the facilitator have done differently? was very well structured for our task and care was given to avo id duplication of information or effort which was very valuable. Perhaps just a little more

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 78 sweet and kind, considerate of our time, we were her last group so she said this might be hard for you --not sure that was accurate as we did still have things to add but I can see how surely there couldn't be more, so she was being graceful if we couldn' t come up with more stuff...it actually challenged us 6. Do you have anything else to add? Thank you! will benefit many organizations and groups to not only be more effective but also is project which

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 79 Appendix H Core Competencies Reflection There were three areas of core competencies that best suppor ted the work of this capstone: 1) to participate in and contribute to the public policy process 2 ) to analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve problems and make decisions; and 3 ) to communicate and interact productively wit h a diverse and changing workforce . To participate in and contribute to the public policy process I had intended to pursue this degree so that I would learn to govern and manage lead , but there are processes which allow for more complete and democratic solutions. I n the course of the responsibility facing the public administrator of a democratic society : there is an ever present managing of tensio ns that, by design, ensures no one body ever acquires too much power. when the public administrator involves all stakeholders. This capstone project allowed me an opportunity to administer a meaningful project in my community that required I mimic a public policy process. This asset map project was the first of its kind to source data from residents regarding perceptions of assets in the community. Focus groups produced several rich and valuable discussions, leavi ng participants delighted to have participated. This was a valuable lesson in the advantage to citizen participation. Including residents in this process will provide thoughtful information for the KWC to create policies and make decisions around best prac tices policy analysis at its finest. By gathering an abundance of information so as to select the most prudent approach, administrators make informed

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 80 decisions about the problems they face. This creation of an asset map modeled the procedure for proper pol icy development as it required I study the data for themes . To analyze, synthesize, think critically, solve problems and make decisions Without a doubt, the most impactful understanding of this competency came with during my introduction to adaptive lead ership. Understanding the role of a leader in solving adaptive problems highly impactful . Under this reasoning, p roblems are best solved if all the information is gathered before making a decision , and, the information gathered is looked at though an unbia sed lens . This project mimicked this competency by requir ing a significant amount of information gathering, including literature on asset based approaches and best practices, and a significant synthesizing of data after the focus group sessions. One of create an asset map with expectations from the School of Public Affairs to produce a research project. Blending an academic study into a tangible deliverable presented an interesti ng challenge. I resolved this quandary through the exploration of the none tangible assets of Ketchikan residents. Rather than simply listing the resources providing value to the community, this project sought to understand exactly what it was about the co mmunity that made it a resilient place to live. The intersection of these two ventures was a more in depth analysis of the community and a richer exploration of the process of asset mapping. To communicate and interact productively with a diverse and chan ging workforce and citizenry

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 81 Throughout this project, I relied heavily on the components related to this competency. In the d ata limitations section I acknowledged that the extent to which the asset map is complete is reliant on the diversity of the persp ectives of the participants. Facilitating focus group sessions with participants who had different values and ideas about what made Ketchikan a great place to live created a multi layered understanding of the community. Participants handled conflicting vie wpoints with respect and consideration. Navigating these conversations presented an fascination challenge. I opinion was valuable and contributed to a greater understa The diversity of the participants made the final result that much more complete. Another challenge I faced was to articulate the value of participation in an asset mapping process to stakeholders who were unfamiliar with the project. Often I reached out to individuals I had never met before, and who were not aware of the work we were t rying to accomplish. The request to participate had to be succinct enough the invitee would continue reading , but detailed enough to communicate the importance of the project. The resulting email invitation was one that drew in at least half of those who w ere invited. In order to answer the second research question, I was also required to articulate main themes that emerged during the data gathering process, sifting through diverse perspectives and finding commonality. This challenging activity resulted i n a perspective that integrated many ideas into a common concept. In conclusion, I would not have been able to complete this project without the aforementioned competencies that I obtained throughout the course of this public

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ASSET MAPPING IN KETCHIKAN 82 administration program. I have gained valuable insight into appropriate management of the public and nonprofit sector s and I have learned to be a more responsible public servant. These skills will no doubt guide me in my future endeavors as they are applicable irrespective to the profe ssional field I choose. I am grateful to the School of Public Affairs faculty and staff for the guidance and support I received throughout this journey.

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Form Name: capstone repository permission Submission Time: November 15, 2019 2:42 pm Browser: Chrome 78.0.3904.97 / Windows IP Address: 50.92.138.18 Unique ID: 556181096 Location: 49.278800964355, -123.11389923096 Description Area SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS ELECTRONIC CAPSTONE REPOSITORY Description Area Dear Capstone Author and Capstone Client:The Auraria Library Digital Library Program is a nonprofit center responsible for the collection and preservation of digital resources for education.The capstone project, protected by your copyright, and/or created under the supervision of the client has been identified as important to the educational mission of the University of Colorado Denver and Auraria Library.The University of Colorado Denver and Auraria Library respectfully requests non-exclusive rights to digitize the capstone project for Internet distribution in image and text formats for an unlimited term. Digitized versions will be made available via the Internet, for onand off-line educational use, with a statement identifying your rights as copyright holder and the terms of the grant of permissions.Please review, sign and return the follow Grant of Permissions. Please do not hesitate to call me or email your questions.Sincerely,Matthew C. MarinerAuraria LibraryDigital Collections ManagerMatthew.mariner@ucdenver.edu303.556.5817 Grant of Permissions Description Area In reference to the following title(s): Author (Student Name) Aftan Lynch Title (Capstone Project Title) Asset Mapping in Ketchikan Publication Date 10/15/2019 I am the: Client Description Area As client of the copyright holder affirm that the content submitted is identical to that which was originally supervised and that the content is suitable for publication in the Auraria Library Digital Collections.

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Description Area This is a non-exclusive grant of permissions for on-line and off-line use for an indefinite term. Off-line uses shall be consistent either for educational uses, with the terms of U.S. copyright legislation's "fair use" provisions or, by the University of Colorado Denver and/or Auraria Library, with the maintenance and preservation of an archival copy. Digitization allows the University of Colorado Denver and/or Auraria Library to generate imageand text-based versions as appropriate and to provide and enhance access using search software. This grant of permissions prohibits use of the digitized versions for commercial use or profit. Signature Your Name Romanda Simpson Date 11/15/19 Email Address romanda@ktnkwc.org ATTENTION Description Area Grant of Permissions is provided to: Auraria Digital Library Program / Matthew C. MarinerAuraria Library1100 Lawrence | Denver, CO 80204matthew.mariner@ucdenver.edu303-556-5817

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Form Name: capstone repository permission Submission Time: July 10, 2019 8:18 pm Browser: Safari 12.1.1 / OS X IP Address: 206.223.201.126 Unique ID: 519350485 Location: 55.615299224854, -131.58479309082 Description Area SCHOOL OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS ELECTRONIC CAPSTONE REPOSITORY Description Area Dear Capstone Author and Capstone Client:The Auraria Library Digital Library Program is a nonprofit center responsible for the collection and preservation of digital resources for education.The capstone project, protected by your copyright, and/or created under the supervision of the client has been identified as important to the educational mission of the University of Colorado Denver and Auraria Library.The University of Colorado Denver and Auraria Library respectfully requests non-exclusive rights to digitize the capstone project for Internet distribution in image and text formats for an unlimited term. Digitized versions will be made available via the Internet, for onand off-line educational use, with a statement identifying your rights as copyright holder and the terms of the grant of permissions.Please review, sign and return the follow Grant of Permissions. Please do not hesitate to call me or email your questions.Sincerely,Matthew C. MarinerAuraria LibraryDigital Collections ManagerMatthew.mariner@ucdenver.edu303.556.5817 Grant of Permissions Description Area In reference to the following title(s): Author (Student Name) Aftan Lynch Title (Capstone Project Title) Asset Mapping in Ketchikan, Alaska Publication Date Spring 2019 I am the: Author (student) Description Area As copyright holder or licensee with the authority to grant copyright permissions for the aforementioned title(s), I hereby authorize Auraria Library and University of Colorado Denver to digitize, distribute, and archive the title(s) for nonprofit, educational purposes via the Internet or successive technologies.

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Description Area This is a non-exclusive grant of permissions for on-line and off-line use for an indefinite term. Off-line uses shall be consistent either for educational uses, with the terms of U.S. copyright legislation's "fair use" provisions or, by the University of Colorado Denver and/or Auraria Library, with the maintenance and preservation of an archival copy. Digitization allows the University of Colorado Denver and/or Auraria Library to generate imageand text-based versions as appropriate and to provide and enhance access using search software. This grant of permissions prohibits use of the digitized versions for commercial use or profit. Signature Your Name Aftan Lynch Date 7/10/19 Email Address aftanlynch@gmail.com ATTENTION Description Area Grant of Permissions is provided to: Auraria Digital Library Program / Matthew C. MarinerAuraria Library1100 Lawrence | Denver, CO 80204matthew.mariner@ucdenver.edu303-556-5817