Citation
Supporting undocumented students : MSU Denver's faculty and staff training program

Material Information

Title:
Supporting undocumented students : MSU Denver's faculty and staff training program
Creator:
Armendariz, Cynthia N.
Mora, Fabiola
Castillo, Carla
Heinrich, Kendra
Publication Date:
Physical Description:
Presentation

Record Information

Source Institution:
Auraria Library
Holding Location:
Auraria Library
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.

Downloads

This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Cynthia N. Armendariz Director of Excel Programs Fabiola Mora Assistant Director of Advising and Student Success Carla Castillo Colorado Challenge Counselor Kendra Heinrich Assistant to the Registrar Supporting Undocumented Staff Training Program

PAGE 2

Overview of Agenda 1. National and Local Legislation 2. Overview of Landscape 3. Student Voices Break 4. What it means to be an Ally 5. Departmental and Institutional Practices 6. Scenarios 7. Closing 8. Evaluation

PAGE 3

Learning Outcomes Challenge participants to identify and deconstruct their preconceptions of undocumented student populations state, local and institutional policies directly affecting undocumented students for undocumented students Provide participants the opportunity to engage in dialogue with undocumented students and practitioner allies Help participants develop competencies and skills crucial to working alongside undocumented immigrant students and their families

PAGE 4

Conditions for Success 1. Confidentiality 2. Active Listening (with your heart, mind, and body) 3. Respect and "I Statements 4. Share the lesson not the story 5. Be cognizant of your learning moments & triggers 6. Support each others growth (constructive feedback) 7. your position) 8. Challenge your understanding and that of others (learning/unlearning) 9. Participate, Ask questions and Have Fun!

PAGE 5

Who We Are (Gallery Walk)

PAGE 6

Who are undocumented immigrant students? 1. Part of the 11.2 11.7 million undocumented immigrants in the nation 2. 3/5 have been in the US for more than a decade 3. They account for roughly 1 in 20 workers Source: Pew Hispanic Center Undocumented Immigrants in the U.S.

PAGE 7

Who are undocumented immigrant students? 1. 4.5 million native born U.S. citizen children have at least one unauthorized parent (Pew Hispanic Center) 1. Undocumented immigrant students are NOT all Latinos 1. One in 7 Koreans in the U.S. are estimated to be undocumented Source: Pew Hispanic Center and Department of Homeland Security Undocumented Immigrants in the U.S.

PAGE 8

Barriers 1. Ineligible for specific degrees/professional liscenses that require state certificatation ( example:teaching) 2. Unable to study abroad/be part of certain class excursions 1. This could now be an opportunity with Advanced Parole through DACA 3. Not eligible for many paid internships (that are funded by or connected to state or federal funding) 4. Many come from low income communites Some of the many barriers faced by undocumented immigrant students

PAGE 9

Defending and Surviving instead of Living and Thriving Higher Education = Unaffordable /Limitted accessibility Barriers to many public benefits/ resources No path to residency or citizenship What do these barriers lead to?

PAGE 10

Blaming Alienation Substance Abuse Suicide Uncertain Future Pressure Deportation Family Separation Fear Anxiety Shame Depression Source: Penn for Immigrant Rights, Dream Activist PA, & Immigration Policy Center Barriers= Mental Health Issues

PAGE 11

1. Overcoming feelings of hopelessness 2. Financial stress and burden 3. Societal impact/internalized stereotypes 4. Fear of sharing status 5. Pressure of hiding or being perfect (could be dependent of culture) 6. Self hate or self blame for status 7. Anger at the privileges that other people have 8. Placing limitations on self based on those of society UndocuHealth : Serving the mental health needs of undocumented immigrants

PAGE 12

Education Where Are W e Now Nationally?

PAGE 13

Since Plyler v. Doe (June 15, 1982) Approx. 2.5 million total undocumented youth 80,000 become 18 years of age each year 65,000 graduate from HS each year 5 10% enroll in college each year 1 3% graduate from college each year Source: Dr. Angela Chuan Ru Chen, UCLA Department of Education The Plyler Dilemma

PAGE 15

Texas Protect In State Tuition and State Financial Aid Virginia Protect In State Tuition for DACA Kansas Protect In State Tuition Arizona Protect In State at Maricopa Community College & fight against the defunding/privatizing of education (Pima, Maricopa,1 3 million Northern A Z State University, ASU 37million, U of A 21 million ) Georgia Lift Ban and Win In State Tuition Missouri Fight against bill that would deny In State and State Financial Aid New York Win State Financial Aid Connecticut Win State Financial Aid Massachusetts Win In State Tuition and State Financial Aid Tennessee Win In State Tuition Wisconsin Win In State Tuition Indiana Win In State Tuition Illinois Win State Financial Aid Education Equity Campaigns

PAGE 16

Education: Where are we now locally?

PAGE 17

1. Potential DACA beneficiaries (October 2012) = 33,448 2. Accepted DACA applications (February 2014) = 13,555 3. Approved DACA applications (February 2014) = 11,219 4. Number of undocumented immigrants = ~140,000 325,000 Undocumented Immigrants in Colorado

PAGE 18

1. Advancing Students for a Stronger Economy Tomorrow (ASSET) 2. After a 10 year journey, SB13 0033 passed in the senate and house, Governor Hickenlooper signed the bill on April 29, 2013 3. ASSET Allows undocumented students to receive in state tuition at all Colorado public higher education institutions 4. MSU Denver has 315 students enrolled and receiving in state tuition under ASSET ASSET In State Tuition

PAGE 19

Students are eligible for asset if they: 1. Have attended a public or private high school in Colorado for at least three years immediately before graduation or completion of a general equivalency diploma (GED) in Colorado. 2. Graduated from a Colorado high school or received a Colorado GED. 3. Admitted to a Colorado college or university within 12 months of graduation from a Colorado high school or completion of a Colorado GED. 4. Complete an affidavit with the College Opportunity Fund indicating that you have applied for legal presence or will apply as soon as you are eligible to do so. Students that graduated from a Colorado high school/completed GED before September 1, 2013 1. If you were not accepted to Colorado college/university within 12 months of graduating/completion of GED, you must submit proof of 18 months of continuous physical presence in Colorado prior to the first day of classes. The documents must indicate a Colorado mailing address in order to determine continuous physical presence. ASSET Criteria

PAGE 20

ASSET Criteria

PAGE 21

1. ASSET, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients and Undocumented students are not eligible to receive federal aid or state aid 2. ASSET and DACA students are eligible to receive institutional aid (private scholarships) 3. ASSET and DACA students ar e eligible to apply for and receive the College Opportunity Fund, which pays $75.00 dollars per credit hour Financial Support

PAGE 22

National: Legislation, Policy & Programs

PAGE 23

Timeline Activity

PAGE 24

Educational Equity: An on going civil rights issue

PAGE 26

Local: Legislation, Policy & Programs

PAGE 27

Residency/Citizenship Currently takes at least 10 15 years to qualify all dependent of personal case and current immigration political context Current Policies and Practices

PAGE 28

Primary benefit high skilled professionals requiring high levels of education There is a 5,000 cap per year for Employment Green Cards to those from countries with low rates of immigration to the U.S. Diversity Visa U.S. Citizens can petition for spouses, parents, children and siblings Family Immigration Must Prove a well founded fear of persecution Not open to economic refugees Political Refugees Source: Penn for Immigrant Rights, Dream Activist PA, & Immigration Policy Center

PAGE 29

Source: Penn for Immigrant Rights & Dream Activist PA Requirements are usually very specific Every situation is different There is no clear or easy path

PAGE 30

Immigration enforcement is how the government and its agencies deport immigrants (undocumented & even with green cards!) 1984: Government deported 20,000 per year 2014: Government deported 400,000 per year What is enforcement?

PAGE 31

It does this with the help of agencies like: Who deports? Border Patrol ICE POLICE

PAGE 32

E Verify Electronic program that is to help verify employment eligibility of employees but a system to hold employers accountable for taking advantage of people 287 (g) program O ne of Immigration Customs that allows a state and local law enforcement entity (police) to enter into a partnership with ICE Current Policies and Practices

PAGE 33

1. 1,100 people are deported and separated from their families every day 1. Children are being put in foster care 2. Bed q ICE enforces 34,000 individuals daily costing tax payers 1.44 billion dollars each year (alternatives to detention are less expensive) 2. Raids ICE rof iling, inhumane treatment, deportation) Deportations #Not1More

PAGE 34

END Detention Hotline 1 844 363 1423 DAPA/DACA eligible people in detention or deportation proceedings To report any ICE Activity like a raid or a checkpoint

PAGE 35

Traveling & Commuting: Drivers Licenses

PAGE 36

Student Voices (Activity)

PAGE 37

Part Two: Skills and Action

PAGE 38

What it means to be an ally Finding/sharing resources Working through process of enrollment, scholarships, and applications Challenging people, current policies, or practices that hinder undocumented students success (Being an educator activist & scholar activist) Creating a welcoming space by changing practices and language used on a daily basis Creating and increasing resources available to undocumented students (and being public about it) Work with and for undocumented students students have led this fight for many years, we need your support Key support areas are:

PAGE 39

The Atmosphere On your door : Display Safe Space Symbol On your walls : Display posters from the immigrant youth led movement or post news articles in support of immigration efforts On your bookshelves : Include titles like Underground Undergrads and Undocumented and Unafraid On your face: Meet each student and their family with a smile. Never assume anything about their status. If they open up to you, be sensitive and understanding. Listen before you speak. Source: Erin Howard, BCTC Latino Outreach Director, 2014

PAGE 40

Educators UndocuKnowledge!

PAGE 41

Current Institutional Practices Admissions Financial Aid Institutional Scholarships Student Support Services First Year Success Immigrant Services RISE

PAGE 42

Action Planning

PAGE 43

Initiatives around the nation: What will we do to work alongside OUR Students ? 1. Dream Resource Centers 2. Institutional scholarship funding 3. Family Events Orientations including all information 4. Websites with information on resources available to undocumented students 5. Working committees (Admissions, Financial Aid, Campus Life, Community Outreach, Student Liaison) 6. Immigrant Community is coming out of the shadows Undocumented and Unafraid 7. National Educators Coming Out Day (Day of Action)

PAGE 44

Undocumented Students Practitioner Allies Community Partners Ally Network Collective Goals: 1) Educational Equality 2) Legislative Reform 3) Raise Consciousness & Awareness 4) Develop Resources Role of Community Partners Leverage community resources not under institutional guidelines Provide direct services and advising Role of Undocumented Students Hold institutions accountable Counter narratives & student representation Student activism and organizing Role of Practitioner Allies Leverage their social and professional roles to advocate educational resources for undocumented students Counsel/encourage student goals Source: Dr. Angela Chuan Ru Chen, UCLA Department of Education

PAGE 45

Institutional Analysis How could we organize our resources and relationships to give us enough leverage to get the change that we need within our institutions?

PAGE 46

How can you make change in these key areas? Financial Opportunities Clear statement on the access to resources Social Support (Wellbeing) Academic Support & Career Planning Legal Support

PAGE 47

Resources http://bit.ly/DEEPresources

PAGE 48

Organizations Immigrant Led Educators for Fair Consideration

PAGE 49

Organizations Resource guides Tips Research Educators for Fair Consideration

PAGE 50

Scholarships Oth er options to consider Explore payment plan options Alternative fundraising ideas: ChipIn Support Letters Compile personal stories for a book Create and sell j ewelry, music, poetry, art Be creative Have Fun!

PAGE 51

UndocuPeers : Liberating Campus Climate Educator Ally Agreement

PAGE 53

Thank You F or P articipating Laura Bohrquez : laura@unitedwedream.org Dream Educational Empowerment Program (DEEP) Coordinator United We Dream Webpage : http :// unitedwedream.org/deep FB: https:// www.facebook.com/DEEP Twitter: @ unitedwedream